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#1
Old 08-25-2011, 07:13 PM
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Can I use regular waffle batter in Belgian waffle iron? NEED ANSWER FAST

Seems like a dumb question, but I don't have time for waffle polemics: yes or no?
#2
Old 08-25-2011, 07:30 PM
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Short answer: Yes


Long answer: There's no real difference between "regular" waffle batter and the stuff you put in a Belgian maker. The primary difference is in the shape, not the recipe.
#3
Old 08-25-2011, 07:35 PM
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Thanks! I thought the Belgians put yeast in, so it might require larger holes.

Last edited by guizot; 08-25-2011 at 07:36 PM.
#4
Old 08-25-2011, 07:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labrador Deceiver View Post
There's no real difference between "regular" waffle batter and the stuff you put in a Belgian maker. The primary difference is in the shape, not the recipe.
Belgian waffles are yeast-leavened and other sorts are not.
#5
Old 08-25-2011, 07:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Peremensoe View Post
Belgian waffles are yeast-leavened and other sorts are not.
No, some Belgian waffles are yeast-leavened.
#6
Old 08-25-2011, 08:22 PM
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I've used Belgian waffle mix in my regular waffle iron. I see no reason you couldn't do the opposite. The iron just heats the batter. About the only thing that can go wrong is that you either over- or undercook it. You'll figure this out with the first waffle and be able to compensate if you have to.
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#7
Old 08-25-2011, 08:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labrador Deceiver View Post
No, some Belgian waffles are yeast-leavened.
The distinction of "Belgian" (that is, Brussels--there are other kinds in Belgium) waffles is their cooked structure and consistency, not just their shape. You can tell the difference between a Belgian and a "classic" or buttermilk waffle from just a forkful. Yeast leavening is what creates that. A non-yeasted batter in a Belgian iron will either not fill the spaces, or with more batter and more baking powder will be too heavy. Either way it won't be a Belgian waffle.
#8
Old 08-25-2011, 08:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peremensoe View Post
The distinction of "Belgian" (that is, Brussels--there are other kinds in Belgium) waffles is their cooked structure and consistency, not just their shape. You can tell the difference between a Belgian and a "classic" or buttermilk waffle from just a forkful. Yeast leavening is what creates that. A non-yeasted batter in a Belgian iron will either not fill the spaces, or with more batter and more baking powder will be too heavy. Either way it won't be a Belgian waffle.
This distinction has ceased to be a requirement for Belgian waffles in common cooking terms for quite some time. You can find hundreds upon hundreds of Belgian waffle recipes in the US that don't include yeast. On top of that, there are at least 2 types of waffles made in Belgium that don't include yeast.

We can get as technical or as broad as you want, but the various batters work just fine in the various waffle irons. We can debate why one may or may not be better suited for a particular recipe, but it just didn't matter for the purposes of the OP. The answer to his question was "yes".

Last edited by Labrador Deceiver; 08-25-2011 at 08:47 PM.
#9
Old 08-25-2011, 08:55 PM
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I noted as well that there are waffles in Belgium other than the Brussels style. But outside of Belgium, to my knowledge "Belgian" has always meant Brussels.

Until now, apparently, when it no longer means anything. You're saying that in "common cooking terms" the term has been drained of its most useful and distinctive meaning--that "Belgian waffle" is now to be understood as any waffle in a "Belgian" shape, regardless of its consistency?

If true, this is deplorable.
#10
Old 08-25-2011, 09:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peremensoe View Post
I noted as well that there are waffles in Belgium other than the Brussels style. But outside of Belgium, to my knowledge "Belgian" has always meant Brussels.

Until now, apparently, when it no longer means anything. You're saying that in "common cooking terms" the term has been drained of its most useful and distinctive meaning--that "Belgian waffle" is now to be understood as any waffle in a "Belgian" shape, regardless of its consistency?

If true, this is deplorable.
It's true, and it's a common theme in cuisine. You just have to be specific. If you want a real omelette, you have to ask for a French Omelette. People make barbecue in crock pots. Etc, etc. Just make sure you include yeast in your internet search for Belgian waffles.
#11
Old 08-25-2011, 09:45 PM
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All right.

I encourage guizot and any other readers who have not experienced authentic yeast-leavened Belgian (Brussels) waffles to try them (and not from mix, either--get some fresh active dry yeast).
#12
Old 08-25-2011, 11:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peremensoe View Post
All right.

I encourage guizot and any other readers who have not experienced authentic yeast-leavened Belgian (Brussels) waffles to try them (and not from mix, either--get some fresh active dry yeast).
Seconded. Yeast-leavened waffles are fantastic and rather easy to make. The only hassle is preparing the dough ahead of time, but, well, a little planning will do ya.
#13
Old 08-26-2011, 05:08 AM
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The OP asked if s/he could use regular batter in a Belgian waffle iron, not if the result would be termed a Belgian waffle.
#14
Old 08-26-2011, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by gatorslap View Post
The OP asked if s/he could use regular batter in a Belgian waffle iron, not if the result would be termed a Belgian waffle.
Right... and the first part of the first answer was "yes." It won't break his waffle iron, and the result will be edible. You can.

Even if you, or the OP, want your questions answered in the most minimal, least interesting and least educational possible ways, I don't think most readers are looking for that. I sure as hell wouldn't bother with this site if that's all that was here.
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