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#1
Old 09-28-2011, 09:18 AM
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Why get upset if someone parks in front of your house?

When I was a kid in the suburbs in northern Viginia, my parents would get upset if one of the neighbors parked on the street in front of our house. I've also seen it mentioned on these boards that some people get upset when a neighbor legally parks on the street in front of their house. One time in Virginia, my car broke down on a Friday and I was able to park it in front of a house until it could be towed on a Monday. When I came to get it, the homeowner was upset and said he was going to call the police, but I wasn't parked illegally and the car was properly tagged and registered, so I'm not sure what the police would have done.

I'm just wondering if there is a reason to get upset about this situation that I'm just not seeing.
#2
Old 09-28-2011, 09:23 AM
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Suburbanites are so adorable.
#3
Old 09-28-2011, 09:23 AM
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I think it depends on the street. I live on a very narrow street and our driveway can only fit one car in it (we have two). Apparently, it's legal to park travel trailers on my street and the neighbor across from us has not just one but TWO RVs parked on their side which takes up any extra spots that are near my house. I don't mind walking a little but sometimes I have groceries or something and I get a little annoyed when someone takes the one spot that is directly in front of my driveway. I recognize they have a right to park there and in most cases it's temporary but I probably would leave a polite note if the car was there every day and I never got to use the spot.
#4
Old 09-28-2011, 09:24 AM
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Some people feel that the road near their curb is an extension of their property and take a proprietary interest.
#5
Old 09-28-2011, 09:26 AM
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Temporarily? I don't see a problem with it. I think people in the suburbs can get skittish about dumb things, like a strange car parked on the street for a couple days must surely belong to a child molester or something.

Long term it can get annoying. I have a 1 car garage, so 1 of my cars is almost always parked on the street in front of my house. It's my eyesore to deal with essentially, and if I were to move it down the street in front of someone else's house that'd be considered a dick thing.
#6
Old 09-28-2011, 09:30 AM
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My next-door neighbors regularly park in front of my house instead of in front of theirs. I have no idea why parking in front of my house is more attractive to them. It vaguely bothers me, not enough to say anything, mostly because they've worn out the grass in that spot. We don't have curbs in the neighborhood, so they are actually parking on my property, well two wheels are on my property.
#7
Old 09-28-2011, 09:31 AM
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Related to this - I have seen neighborhoods near sports or entertainment venues post paper signs stating it is illegal to park on their streets. These streets do not have regular signs stating any restrictions on parking. A police officer explained to me that it is not in fact illegal to park on those streets. The residents are simply trying to prevent people from parking there. I can understand their motivation, however I believe they are misguided in their actions.

Fundamentally, like it or not, public streets are just that - public.
#8
Old 09-28-2011, 09:31 AM
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I assume this is where no driveway is blocked?

Two of my neighbours almost came to blows last month over just this issue (this is in the UK). I have called the police in the past to move cars which were blocking my driveway and preventing me driving my car in or out, but they would not do anything if the car was parked legally outside someone else's house.

There is a certain social pressure to park only outside your own house, but the reason I paid slightly over-the-odds for my house is that I wanted off-road parking without the hassle of finding a space nearby.
#9
Old 09-28-2011, 09:31 AM
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Mostly because it's considered rude. It prevents the house occupants from using the area and inconveniences people who live in the home or wish to visit. Plus there is a certain chance that the neighbors will associate person parked out front with the house occupant when they are in fact total strangers.

It also seems like an intrusion to many. A strange car so near one's property can be unsettling to some, especially if it's there for any considerable length of time.

Depending on local laws, police can tow abandoned cars after suprisingly short amounts of time. Usually they will drop a citation on it and come back in 72 hours. If it hasn't been moved after that, it gets impounded.
#10
Old 09-28-2011, 09:33 AM
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I don't mind, but it does creep me out ever so slightly. Why, out of all of the houses, my house? And I actually have a fairly long stretch of shoulder, so if people park at one end, I really don't care...but sometimes they park right behind my car. Why? It's weird.

But I don't make a fuss about it or anything. It's not like things don't happen to cars, but I'm sure the parkers aren't the ones doing it. For example, I'm sure the people who egged my car a month or so ago were just driving through.
#11
Old 09-28-2011, 09:36 AM
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My family had four cars and one single car garage. Sometimes when my brothers moved back in temporarily there would be five cars. Plus, it really was a theoretical garage - in practice, it was a storage shed for my dad's tools.

My dad would get absolutely furious at this one guy. He owned a shop down the street, but wanted his customers to park there, so he parked right in front of our house when we had all gone to school/work. When we made it back home, his big blue van was right there, and we all had to shuffle around or park in the municipal parking lot. That may not have been so bad, but it was right behind several dive bars and our cars had been damaged or broken into on numerous occasions, so we tried to avoid it.

My dad had words with him on numerous occasions, but of course it was a public parking area, so he did have the right to park there. It was just a dick move. The municipal parking lot was closer to his store, but he knew the dangers of parking there, so he would make us park there instead.

Mom and dad now have an empty nest and a two car garage-cum-storage-shed and are much more relaxed these days.
#12
Old 09-28-2011, 09:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Icarus View Post
Related to this - I have seen neighborhoods near sports or entertainment venues post paper signs stating it is illegal to park on their streets. These streets do not have regular signs stating any restrictions on parking. A police officer explained to me that it is not in fact illegal to park on those streets. The residents are simply trying to prevent people from parking there. I can understand their motivation, however I believe they are misguided in their actions.

Fundamentally, like it or not, public streets are just that - public.
There's a street near the hospital my wife works at with a "no hospital parking" sign, but I have no idea whether it's a legal sign or not. It's not backed up with any permit restrictions or other parking control, and I sometimes wonder whether the residents just put it up themselves.
#13
Old 09-28-2011, 09:42 AM
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In high school, circa 1975, a classmate got rude notes on his windshield when he parked in front of a woman's house. But, she had no car and it was usually the only open spot. And the notes were hilarious.

One day four of us skipped class and went to where his car was parked (in front of angry woman's house). We picked up the VW Bug and moved it from the curb onto the woman's lawn. Dead center.

Later in the day, a town cop appeared during Pre-Calculus to speak with the owner of the car, who took forever to put together 2+2.
#14
Old 09-28-2011, 09:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Anaamika View Post
I don't mind, but it does creep me out ever so slightly. Why, out of all of the houses, my house? And I actually have a fairly long stretch of shoulder, so if people park at one end, I really don't care...but sometimes they park right behind my car. Why? It's weird.....
I can offer a possible explanation for this one; since I moved to the city years ago, I kind of automatically park directly behind the other car on the block with room for that car to still be able to get out. I don't really think about it, but it's so that the block can most efficiently fill up with cars and you don't have any needless gaps. It could be the person parking behind you lives in a neighborhood where parking is more of a premium and is parking that way to be more efficient.
#15
Old 09-28-2011, 09:46 AM
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I live in Northern VA. It is perfectly legal to park on most streets but it is not always polite. I live on a cul-de-sac and my neighbors and I long ago worked out the parking arrangements so that none of us has to park down the street. I expect the space in front of my house to be open when I get home. If my neighbor's friends park there, I expect him to tell them to park down the street. I extend him the same courtesy.

When I lived in DC, my house was the 17 feet wide so the road frontage just over one car length, unless the preacher a few doors down parked his huge Caddy there. It was very common to find my space open when I arrived home because the neighborhood tried to be courteous to each other. Sometimes during big events we would have strangers parking all over the place which was very inconvenient for all the residents. Yes, those people were parking legally, and they were jerks too.
#16
Old 09-28-2011, 09:50 AM
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I think it's the same psychology that goes into the feelings of ownership of a particular desk in a classroom or a chair in a boardroom. When someone sits at YOUR desk or YOUR chair, you get crabby.
#17
Old 09-28-2011, 10:01 AM
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I find it baffling too, I have to say.

People who feel so entitled, always say, 'It's rude!' No it's not. It's public space. Period.

What you read into it being used, is on you. And if it's that important to you, then buy where there is no street parking and let people who understand the meaning of 'public' and sharing, live in peace.

If you're adult enough to purchase a home, you're adult enough to understand you have say only over that which lies inside your property lines. Because you can see it out the window, or it abuts your property line, give you no special entitlement.

You should be adult enough to accept that if there is a public parking spot available in front of your property, you could be looking at parked cars. Sometimes or all the time. Your neighbours, friends of your neighbours, even strangers! Accept it.

If you think it's rude, that's on you and your sense of entitlement, in my opinion.
#18
Old 09-28-2011, 10:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Icarus View Post
Related to this - I have seen neighborhoods near sports or entertainment venues post paper signs stating it is illegal to park on their streets. These streets do not have regular signs stating any restrictions on parking. A police officer explained to me that it is not in fact illegal to park on those streets. The residents are simply trying to prevent people from parking there. I can understand their motivation, however I believe they are misguided in their actions.

Fundamentally, like it or not, public streets are just that - public.
A couple anecdotes about this. I currently live on such a street - I'm relatively close to a major college stadium, and on football saturdays, my street will fill up with cars. It's a standard residential street, such that if cars are parked on both sides, it ends up being a de facto single lane 10mph street on game days. It never bothered me, but I'm young and generally don't freak out driving in tight spaces, but there's a lot of old folks in the neighborhood and I guess some of them complained. Last year they started restricting parking to one side of the street via the temporary signs you're talking about. I have no problem with this -- like it or not, I pay property taxes for a police department that has every right to shut down streets to make the taxpayers happy. It's not like anyone parking here actually lives in the neighborhood, after all.

The second one is from when I lived on Bolling AFB in DC, home of the DIA headquarters. Parking for DIA is terrible; there's a couple of small 2-story garages, but mostly people have to park far away and hoof it. My neighborhood (gov't quarters) was actually closer than some of the parking lots, and it didn't take long for people to realize this and start filling up all of the street parking. Bad idea with all the busy-body stay at home moms who considered it a safety hazard. Up went the signs, and the problem mostly went away, but every once in a while you'd see some schmuck try his luck. Bored moms + bored cops = tickets galore. I found the whole thing mildly amusing.
#19
Old 09-28-2011, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by elbows View Post
I find it baffling too, I have to say.

People who feel so entitled, always say, 'It's rude!' No it's not. It's public space. Period.

What you read into it being used, is on you. And if it's that important to you, then buy where there is no street parking and let people who understand the meaning of 'public' and sharing, live in peace.

If you're adult enough to purchase a home, you're adult enough to understand you have say only over that which lies inside your property lines. Because you can see it out the window, or it abuts your property line, give you no special entitlement.

You should be adult enough to accept that if there is a public parking spot available in front of your property, you could be looking at parked cars. Sometimes or all the time. Your neighbours, friends of your neighbours, even strangers! Accept it.

If you think it's rude, that's on you and your sense of entitlement, in my opinion.
Like I said, just creepy. Although sometimes I have people park in front of my house, and...just sit there. And they can see inside my living room from that angle, and that really creeps me out!

ETA: Oh yes, i forgot the real reason. There's no reason to park in front of anyone's house in my neighborhood. There's lots of open street parking and lots of room...not crowded at all. So why don't they park in front of the house where they are going? NO ONE KNOWS.

Last edited by Anaamika; 09-28-2011 at 10:26 AM.
#20
Old 09-28-2011, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Anaamika View Post
Like I said, just creepy. Although sometimes I have people park in front of my house, and...just sit there. And they can see inside my living room from that angle, and that really creeps me out!
Oh I have two possible explainations for this!
1. I'm kind of anal about being on time. When traffic is light that means I can be pretty early. If it's a friends house I'm going to, np but if it's someone I'm less familiar with I will stop a couple of blocks away, park and read until it's time for me to arrive.
2. I sometimes pull over and park to take phone calls depending on how much attention I need to give them and how much background noise driving is creating.
#21
Old 09-28-2011, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Wallenstein View Post
There's a street near the hospital my wife works at with a "no hospital parking" sign, but I have no idea whether it's a legal sign or not. It's not backed up with any permit restrictions or other parking control, and I sometimes wonder whether the residents just put it up themselves.
In the spirit of the Dope I just called the local countil and they said it wasn't one of their signs. I'd never park there because I'd end up with rude messages scraped into my paintwork, but it's interesting to know!
#22
Old 09-28-2011, 10:42 AM
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Originally Posted by steronz View Post
A couple anecdotes about this. I currently live on such a street - I'm relatively close to a major college stadium, and on football saturdays, my street will fill up with cars. It's a standard residential street, such that if cars are parked on both sides, it ends up being a de facto single lane 10mph street on game days. It never bothered me, but I'm young and generally don't freak out driving in tight spaces, but there's a lot of old folks in the neighborhood and I guess some of them complained. Last year they started restricting parking to one side of the street via the temporary signs you're talking about. I have no problem with this -- like it or not, I pay property taxes for a police department that has every right to shut down streets to make the taxpayers happy. It's not like anyone parking here actually lives in the neighborhood, after all.
I live in such a neighborhood too. Just this year people started parking on both sides of the street. The way our neighborhood is set up, there's only one entrance/exit so it's pretty annoying that EVERYONE has to go through that gauntlet of cars to get in or out on game night.

I had to drive it and I did call the cops. I knew there was nothing they could do at the moment (way too many to tow) but the next week they had cops keeping people from doing it and the next week they had erected permanent signs.

I mostly worried about emergency vehicles not being able to get through. There isn't enough shoulder for people to park very far out of the street so the area left in the middle was quite slim. Hard enough to navigate my mini SUV through, can't imagine a fire truck.

Anyway, I've lived in this neighborhood 32 years. First time I called the cops on game night. We've got a new stadium so people are getting weird about parking.

The worst thing about cars in the street is the fact that there's no sidewalks here and walking the dog around parked cars is scary - on a night like game night when there's a lot of traffic.

I had a friend from "the city" over the other day and she mindlessly passed up my driveway and parked on the street 2 doors down. Because that's how she parks at home. I made her retrieve her car and come park in my 80' driveway :P
#23
Old 09-28-2011, 10:44 AM
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It must be frightening to live in a world where a random car, parked on a public street, creeps you out, but it takes all kinds to make a world.

If it does creep you out, why would you choose to buy at that location?

As for seeing in your windows, can't you just close your curtains?

Do people truly believe the whole world should bend, to accommodate their individual issues?
#24
Old 09-28-2011, 10:47 AM
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I totally understand people's issues with local street parking being displaced, by event parking, near venues. But isn't that really a municipal issue? Isn't the number of required parking spaces, per venue capacity, set by the municipality, pre development? It seems to me, the displaced citizen's should take it up with city hall.
#25
Old 09-28-2011, 10:47 AM
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In Pittsburgh it is common for people to shovel the snow from the parking spot in front of their home, then to place lawn chairs to "save" the space. It is also common for others to move the lawn furniture and park there anyway.
#26
Old 09-28-2011, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by elbows View Post
It must be frightening to live in a world where a random car, parked on a public street, creeps you out, but it takes all kinds to make a world.

If it does creep you out, why would you choose to buy at that location?

As for seeing in your windows, can't you just close your curtains?

Do people truly believe the whole world should bend, to accommodate their individual issues?
? I just said it was a minor creepy feeling. You really do like to exaggerate your case, I've noticed.
Really, where did I say I expected the whole world should bend? Or even a small part of it?
#27
Old 09-28-2011, 10:53 AM
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My landlord goes Yosemite Sam-insane when anyone parks in front of our house.

Me, I get ticked-off when people park half-in and half-out of their driveway, forcing me to walk into the street or on the wet grass (or snow) to get by. I started leaving "please do not block the sidewalk" Post-Its on their windshield, but then realized, "Oh, god, I am turning into my father" and stopped doing that.
#28
Old 09-28-2011, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by elbows View Post
I totally understand people's issues with local street parking being displaced, by event parking, near venues. But isn't that really a municipal issue? Isn't the number of required parking spaces, per venue capacity, set by the municipality, pre development? It seems to me, the displaced citizen's should take it up with city hall.
In my case, the stadium is on campus property, which is in the Big City limits, whereas my neighborhood is technically One Small Town Over, if that makes any sense. Two different municipal governments. Furthermore, the university runs a shuttle from some of their larger parking lots, but people prefer to park closer and not have to deal with waiting for a bus.

I really don't see the problem with the solution my city came up with.
#29
Old 09-28-2011, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
In Pittsburgh it is common for people to shovel the snow from the parking spot in front of their home, then to place lawn chairs to "save" the space. It is also common for others to move the lawn furniture and park there anyway.
Do that (the second sentence) in Chicago and you're likely to end up with a broken window or several.

Last edited by Tom Scud; 09-28-2011 at 10:56 AM. Reason: clarified what "do that" means.
#30
Old 09-28-2011, 11:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Tom Scud View Post
Do that (the second sentence) in Chicago and you're likely to end up with a broken window or several.
Pittsburgh as well. There are also yearly news stories of fist fights, etc over lawn chairs/parking.
#31
Old 09-28-2011, 11:09 AM
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Do that (the second sentence) in Chicago and you're likely to end up with a broken window or several.
Frankly, it depends on the neighborhood. We don't all act like people in Bridgeport or Beverly.
#32
Old 09-28-2011, 11:12 AM
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The only time it bothers me is when someone does it in such a way that it keeps me from being able to get out of my driveway easily. As I live on a narrow street that isn't super densely populated, this is rarely an issue.


I also think it's odd when someone chooses to park in front of their neighbor's house rather than their own, like their own view of the street is too precious to clog up with cars but their neighbor's is not. Luckily, none of our neighbors do this, but I know of several people down the street from us do it to their neighbors. It's kind of bizarre.
#33
Old 09-28-2011, 11:17 AM
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I certainly can understand getting upset if event parking takes over your neighborhood, or if someone parks in such a way that it blocks your driveway, but I've seen people get upset about someone parking in front of their house when the homeowner didn't need the space, I just don't get that.
#34
Old 09-28-2011, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by elbows View Post
People who feel so entitled, always say, 'It's rude!' No it's not. It's public space. Period.
Legal/illegal and polite/rude are essentially orthogonal concepts.
Quote:
If you think it's rude, that's on you and your sense of entitlement, in my opinion.
What's rude and what's not is a matter of social convention. It's always more or less a matter of one's sense of entitlement. If I go to a restaurant (and I'm including fast food, cafeteria, diner as well as white-tablecloth places) I think it's rude if the guy at the next table is picking his nose. I think I'm entitled not to see that while I'm eating there. But legally, I have no such entitlement. Does that mean the other guy's not being rude?
#35
Old 09-28-2011, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by RTFirefly View Post
Legal/illegal and polite/rude are essentially orthogonal concepts.
What's rude and what's not is a matter of social convention. It's always more or less a matter of one's sense of entitlement. If I go to a restaurant (and I'm including fast food, cafeteria, diner as well as white-tablecloth places) I think it's rude if the guy at the next table is picking his nose. I think I'm entitled not to see that while I'm eating there. But legally, I have no such entitlement. Does that mean the other guy's not being rude?
Unless you can point to some well-known and specific taboo, like the ingestion of bodily products, our laws are taken to express the boundaries of social convention (after all, that's what laws and regulations are: certain formalized social conventions).

We are particularly disinclined to take the instinctual sense of rudeness from someone who has a vested interest in the classification.

Last edited by Kimmy_Gibbler; 09-28-2011 at 11:32 AM.
#36
Old 09-28-2011, 11:30 AM
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This thread surprises me. I never thought grown adults would have so much trouble with sharing a public space.

And the lawn chair thing... that's just weird and terribly inappropriate. I'd get my friend with a pickup to drive around the neighbourhood collecting all the free lawn chairs until people stopped putting them out.
#37
Old 09-28-2011, 11:35 AM
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Originally Posted by elbows View Post
I totally understand people's issues with local street parking being displaced, by event parking, near venues. But isn't that really a municipal issue? Isn't the number of required parking spaces, per venue capacity, set by the municipality, pre development? It seems to me, the displaced citizen's should take it up with city hall.
Bingo! This is my point. Take it up with city hall, get official posting up, write tickets. I can live with that.

Otherwise, telling me something is illegal, when it isn't - sounds illegal to me.
#38
Old 09-28-2011, 11:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Borzo View Post
And the lawn chair thing... that's just weird and terribly inappropriate. I'd get my friend with a pickup to drive around the neighbourhood collecting all the free lawn chairs until people stopped putting them out.
I grew up in an area where this was common, and thought it a worldwide behavior.
#39
Old 09-28-2011, 11:36 AM
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And the lawn chair thing... that's just weird and terribly inappropriate. I'd get my friend with a pickup to drive around the neighbourhood collecting all the free lawn chairs until people stopped putting them out.
The first time you spent an hour shoveling a spot clear on the street and some jackass took it before you could get your car into it, you'd put a lawn chair out as well. There's a lot of these local customs that exist for a reason.
#40
Old 09-28-2011, 11:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Borzo View Post
This thread surprises me. I never thought grown adults would have so much trouble with sharing a public space.

And the lawn chair thing... that's just weird and terribly inappropriate. I'd get my friend with a pickup to drive around the neighbourhood collecting all the free lawn chairs until people stopped putting them out.
We don't do that where I live, because there's plenty of parking for everyone, but it's cultural in a good many places. Shoveling is hard frickin work, and sometimes it does take an hour or two, especially when it's your fourth time this week and the plow has made it all frozen and heavy.
#41
Old 09-28-2011, 11:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Icarus View Post
Related to this - I have seen neighborhoods near sports or entertainment venues post paper signs stating it is illegal to park on their streets. These streets do not have regular signs stating any restrictions on parking. A police officer explained to me that it is not in fact illegal to park on those streets. The residents are simply trying to prevent people from parking there. I can understand their motivation, however I believe they are misguided in their actions.

Fundamentally, like it or not, public streets are just that - public.
You can arrange for Residents Only street parking in most cities, but there's an initial evaluation and set-up cost and then everyone needs to buy permit stickers. The folks that had their own sign made were doing a cheaper version.

In our neighborhood, parking your car in front means that you can keep an eye on it.
#42
Old 09-28-2011, 11:40 AM
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I grew up in a neighborhood of row houses in suburban Baltimore in the 50s and 60s. Back in those olden days, most women were stay-at-home moms and most families just had one car. People were mostly pretty good about parking in front of their own houses, with the overflow going to the side road. We lived in a corner unit, so even if someone parked right in front of our house, there was still plenty of curb going down the side street.

Then people started getting multiple cars. And one family got a pop-up camper. Sometimes you had to park a block and a half away in front of the animal cemetery. Yep, pretty annoying. That, among other things, led my folks to sell their house and move to the boonies where they had a quarter mile long driveway.

We live in the boonies also, on a corner lot, and everyone has driveways. About the only time you see street parking is if someone is having a big party. But every once in a while, I see cars parked on the side street either next to our yard or across the street. Judging by the beer bottles and cans I find when I mow, I'm guessing it's kids drinking in the dark (no street lights) - I bet they get spooked when I turn on the floodlights in my yard to let the dog out...
#43
Old 09-28-2011, 11:40 AM
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I occasionally park in front of the house across the street from mine when I come home on my lunch break. Why?

- there's a big ol' tree there and I live in Texas where it was until very recently a bazillion degrees out, so even if I'm just parking for fifteen stinkin' minutes my car - or any other - will broil over, hence: shade = OMGrainbowsandkittens

- my area has strict "park the same way as traffic" laws (meaning, no parking facing the "wrong" way) and parking across the street means my car is now facing the way I'll leave after my break, which I like

- why the fuck not?


I used to live in a college town close to campus, and the Other Shoe and I got used to the idea that some random car would inevitably be parked in front of our house. 'S okay. They're allowed to do that.
#44
Old 09-28-2011, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Borzo View Post
And the lawn chair thing... that's just weird and terribly inappropriate.
It's most common in places where shoveling out your parking space in winter is a major task. Your friend with the pick up truck wouldn't make it half a block before he was spoken to by the well behaved citizens of the neighborhood.
#45
Old 09-28-2011, 11:48 AM
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I think part of the underlying ethos, out here in suburbia at least, is that you really don't know when someone else is going to need the space in front of their house for guest parking, or for the yard man to park his truck and trailer, or whatever. So you try to park in your driveway or in front of your own house whenever possible.

If I'm giving a party, my guests might have to park in front of my neighbors' houses once they've taken up all the room in front of mine - but I'm damned sure going to give my neighbors a heads-up (and invite them to the party if it's not strictly family).

But I think the larger part is simply the usual stuff about how you give relative strangers their space. If the bus is mostly empty, you sit down in an empty seat, rather than sitting down next to someone. (Hey, gonna sit by you, another one rides the bus.) You don't sit at the table next to someone in a practically empty fast-food restaurant. If there are 7 occupied campsites in a 100-site campground, you don't pull up right next to or across from one of the occupied sites. And you don't park in front of someone else's house when there's room in front of your own house, and your guests try to park in front of your house, too, as long as there's room.

You just don't gratuitously intrude on the psychological space of people you don't know very well, even when they don't own that space in fee simple.
#46
Old 09-28-2011, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by RTFirefly View Post
You just don't gratuitously intrude on the psychological space of people you don't know very well, even when they don't own that space in fee simple.
Sure, OK. But I think what the OP was wondering was: when it happens, as it inevitably does, that someone remains in the outer reaches of your personal space (the space that you know isn't really your personal space as such, and if it were crowded, you would recognize that you would have to give it up), why do some people insist on becoming preoccupied with this minor violation, instead of moving on with their lives?

Which I think is a very good question.
#47
Old 09-28-2011, 11:58 AM
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I don't get why some people find it so upsetting when someone parks legally in front of their house. It's especially puzzling when the neighbourhood is near something like a hospital or school or something. I used to live across the street from the library of a large university, and one of my neighbours regularly left nasty notes and threatened to call the police on people who parked in front of her house*. If you bought a house across the street from a public university (one that had been there almost 200 years), why the hell would you expect that there would never be other people around? She just wanted the best of both worlds - the convenience of living in a nice area without the hassle of those pesky other people who also want to be there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
In Pittsburgh it is common for people to shovel the snow from the parking spot in front of their home, then to place lawn chairs to "save" the space. It is also common for others to move the lawn furniture and park there anyway.
I never heard of this until I started reading the Dope, and it still seems crazy and incredibly rude and stupid to me. And yet everyone who does it defends it to the death. I don't get it. And yes, I grew up (and still live) somewhere that gets plenty of snow all winter long, and I have shovelled out many a car. So it's not like I don't know the effort involved.



*Of course she also called the police on us once because we accidentally left our garbage can out for 24 hours after garbage pick-up, so she might just have been the kind of crazy old crank who shouldn't live near other people at all.
#48
Old 09-28-2011, 12:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Borzo View Post
And the lawn chair thing... that's just weird and terribly inappropriate.
This would be considered horribly rude here in the True North.

Plus, I don't see how it would work, really. When the snow plow comes it's supposed to go around all the lawn chairs and garbage cans? Around here your can/chair would just get smashed by the plow, I suspect. But even if they went around, the edge of the plow leaves a large piling/mound of heavy, densely packed snow, so your spot would be filled with the snow that should be piled at the curb. Much wiser to leave it clear so the plow can do the work, I say.

Last edited by elbows; 09-28-2011 at 12:02 PM.
#49
Old 09-28-2011, 12:03 PM
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I was thinking along the lines of what RTFirefly said.

Some of the responders are in the UK, I don't know whether they own the sidewalk in front of their house or not (nor whether there is a sidewalk), but when I first arrived to Miami, I was amazed by the existence of residential neighborhoods without sidewalks - and even more when I found out that often what sidewalks existed were part of what I would have considered the adjacent property: they were private property, in Spain sidewalks are public property.

Having sidewalks be public property and every street have them means that there is always a buffer between your space and wherever cars are parked, even if they've got two wheels on the curb. Someone parking beside your property in the US is touching your personal space; someone parking with two wheels in your lane (post #6) is trespassing.
#50
Old 09-28-2011, 12:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimmy_Gibbler View Post
Sure, OK. But I think what the OP was wondering was: when it happens, as it inevitably does, that someone remains in the outer reaches of your personal space (the space that you know isn't really your personal space as such, and if it were crowded, you would recognize that you would have to give it up), why do some people insist on becoming preoccupied with this minor violation, instead of moving on with their lives?

Which I think is a very good question.
Who does that, though? Unless it's actually a proper inconvenience, like blocking the driveway, forcing someone with a disability to walk a long way, or causing you to park two blocks away on a regular basis, do people actually get more het up than just grumbling about it? It's easy to mistake someone else's grumble for obsessive preoccupation even though you'd be annoyed if they made the same assumption about you.
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