#1
Old 10-16-2011, 10:31 PM
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Is the Toyota Tundra good?

There are several Toyota Tundras (2000-2001) for sale locally and I am thinking about buying one. One of them has over 100,000 miles, the other has 252,000. Does anyone here know anything about these trucks? I don't know anyone who owns one. Chevy, Ford and Dodge are the big 3 here, and Toyota trucks are fairly rare.

Is the gas mileage decent (for a V-8 engine?) Is the interior upholstered with that ultra-fine microfiber crap or is it the more tolerable (to me) coarse cloth velour? Is the backseat comfortable? Does it have a battery meter in the dash? (My 1990 4Runner had one - I'll be really disappointed if the Tundra doesn't.)
#2
Old 10-17-2011, 03:16 PM
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My neighbor has one. Decent trucks but terrible gas mileage. They're thinking of selling it just because of the gas mileage.
#3
Old 10-17-2011, 03:29 PM
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I can only say this: we've owned 2 Toyotas and they both have been outstanding cars, so I'd recommend looking closely at them just on that basis. Further, a co-worker of mine, who is a very typical construction worker type who likes to haul heavy cargo around all the time, has told me on more than one occasion that he is so in love with his Tundra that he would never, ever go back to a domestic pickup. Take those notes with as many grains of salt as you see fit.
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#4
Old 10-17-2011, 03:39 PM
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I've owned two Toyotas and they've been utter junk. At 100k, they become crushingly expensive.

There are too many sites dedicated to trouble shooting all that stuff that goes wrong with some Toyota model runs. God forbid your check engine light comes on or you get some squeal that won't stop. When it comes to Toyotas, the Camry and Corrolla pad their numbers and make them what they are. Run and hide from the rest. Older Celicas and Tundras (and some others) ain't worth the grief.

Run from any non-Camry/Corrola, esp 1998-2003 when they kicked up the technology a bit! RUN.

.

Last edited by Philster; 10-17-2011 at 03:40 PM.
#5
Old 10-17-2011, 06:02 PM
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I dunno but a friend bought a Tundra and loved the truck but sold it with 6000 miles (taking a huge loss in the process) for no other reason than the abysmal gas mileage.

YMWV I'll bet.
#6
Old 10-17-2011, 08:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Philster View Post
When it comes to Toyotas, the Camry and Corrolla pad their numbers and make them what they are. Run and hide from the rest.
How can this be? Toyota trucks are legendary all over the world for their longevity and ruggedness. The Toyota T100 and the various variants of Land Cruiser are probably the most common trucks in the world, and are used all over Africa and the Middle East as irregular military vehicles - frequently going over 400,000 miles, according to Wikipedia.

Is it that the newer Toyota trucks are not as good as the old ones?
#7
Old 10-17-2011, 09:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Argent Towers View Post
How can this be? Toyota trucks are legendary all over the world for their longevity and ruggedness. The Toyota T100 and the various variants of Land Cruiser are probably the most common trucks in the world, and are used all over Africa and the Middle East as irregular military vehicles - frequently going over 400,000 miles, according to Wikipedia.

Is it that the newer Toyota trucks are not as good as the old ones?
old '70s and '80s diesel HiLuxes have nothing to do with modern vehicles.
#8
Old 10-18-2011, 02:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Argent Towers View Post
How can this be? Toyota trucks are legendary all over the world for their longevity and ruggedness. The Toyota T100 and the various variants of Land Cruiser are probably the most common trucks in the world, and are used all over Africa and the Middle East as irregular military vehicles - frequently going over 400,000 miles, according to Wikipedia.

Is it that the newer Toyota trucks are not as good as the old ones?
Pro-tip: Top Gear is entertainment, not factual car buying advice.

You're looking at buying an 11 year old pickup truck. Maintenance and actual condition are much more important than make/model. That generation of Toyota truck is well known for frame rust. If the frame hasn't turned to powder it's probably fine, until it does. If you find one in good shape for a good price, sure, why not. I can't think of any reason to take it over a domestic truck, or a Nissan Frontier/Hardbody.
#9
Old 10-18-2011, 08:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Throatwarbler Mangrove View Post
I can't think of any reason to take it over a domestic truck, or a Nissan Frontier/Hardbody.
When I lived in L.A., the oldest pick-ups on the roads were predominantly Toyotas.
#10
Old 10-18-2011, 11:17 AM
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I don't see the point of the first generation of Tundras. They were Toyota's half-assed attempt to get into the full-size truck market, and I don't think it was very well executed. For instance, the V8 is laughably underpowered.

What do you need a truck for? If it's for occasional hauling/truck use, I'd go for the Tacoma (either generation). If you need a workhorse, go with a second generation Tundra (07-present).

FWIW, I own an 06 Tacoma bought new. I've put 130k on it, and have never had any issues. I replaced the break pads two weeks ago, and that was the first non-fluid/non-standard maintenance I've done.

Out of the two generations of Tacoma and two of Tundra, the first gen Tundra is the only one I wouldn't want to own. YMMV.
#11
Old 10-18-2011, 12:35 PM
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Us Beatas just happily purchased a fully warrantied 2010 Toyota Tundra 4wd v6 with 11,000 miles. The crew cab (non-extended version) is not large, but we don't need that feature often. The upholstery is basic grey microfiber which cleans up very well with a damp cloth. We will do occasional towing and mostly use this for driving on our Wisconsin land.
We've owned various Toyotas for the past 25 years and just feel that Toyota makes great vehicles.
#12
Old 10-18-2011, 12:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Argent Towers View Post
How can this be? Toyota trucks are legendary all over the world for their longevity and ruggedness. The Toyota T100 and the various variants of Land Cruiser are probably the most common trucks in the world, and are used all over Africa and the Middle East as irregular military vehicles - frequently going over 400,000 miles, according to Wikipedia.

Is it that the newer Toyota trucks are not as good as the old ones?
In the USA, good ol' Toyota hasn't figured out how to make reliable emissions systems on some model runs that span years, so if you'd like to have a car that will lock on its check engine light, go ahead and buy a Toyota, then buy a sledge hammer and beat it to a pulp at the inspection station when you find out you can't get the car to pass with the engine light on and you can't get it to pass if if was recently reset. Of course, you can't get the car fixed in any meaningful way to completely fix the issue.

Also: the discussion is about the Toyota Tundra. Additionally, commercial grade vehicles, military grade vehicles, and vehicles built to go 400k miles often do.

Last edited by Philster; 10-18-2011 at 12:48 PM.
#13
Old 10-18-2011, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Throatwarbler Mangrove View Post
Pro-tip: Top Gear is entertainment, not factual car buying advice.
I've never watched an episode of that show in my life. I know what I know because I research things myself, not because I watch a TV show.

I would think that Toyota's trucks would retain some of the quality factors that made the older models last as long as they do; after all, if they could do it in the 1980s, they could do it today. But maybe I am wrong.
#14
Old 10-18-2011, 01:07 PM
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I'm in boating clubs with hundreds of guys hauling 5000-9000 lb boats. These guys would rather lose a testicle than lose a day on their performance boats and offshore boats, which they haul up/down the coast from ramp to ramp. They all haul with American trucks. The variety is amazing, from 25 year-old F150's to brand new Hemi-engined Rams (my choice after racking up 120k miles on my previous Ram w/out more than a minor fix along the way).

I'm surrounded by farms and water. Trucks, trucks and more trucks. Get yourself a truck with a lineage: F150, Ram, Silverado/Sierra. They last, and business people who need them to eat run 'em for hundreds of thousands of miles. They're easy to fix, and they have a good predictability when repairing.

I am not a 'buy American' type. But the case for American trucks is solid.

Anecdotal evidence, but valuable.

.

Last edited by Philster; 10-18-2011 at 01:09 PM.
#15
Old 10-18-2011, 03:13 PM
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Acquiring an American truck locally at a good price is certainly much more do-able than a Toyota. I'll take a look at some Dodge Rams.
#16
Old 10-18-2011, 07:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Argent Towers View Post
I've never watched an episode of that show in my life. I know what I know because I research things myself, not because I watch a TV show.

I would think that Toyota's trucks would retain some of the quality factors that made the older models last as long as they do; after all, if they could do it in the 1980s, they could do it today. But maybe I am wrong.
he brought that up because Top Gear did a segment some years ago where they took an old diesel HiLux and bashed the crap out of it. Well, the body, anyway. they did nothing that would have hurt the engine, then made it out like it was amazing that the thing still ran (and the ninnies who think watching Top Gear makes them automotive experts ate that shit up.) keep in mind that this vintage of diesel truck requires a single 12 volt wire to the injection pump for the motor to run.

Last edited by jz78817; 10-18-2011 at 07:31 PM.
#17
Old 10-18-2011, 07:35 PM
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I just bought my second one and have been very happy. Both have been very reliable, and the resale value on my first one was excellent. Gas mileage isn't great, but it has enough power to pull my horse trailer or my boat. It's very comfortable, and I got a good deal on a new one. YMMV.
#18
Old 10-18-2011, 07:57 PM
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The only thing Toyota trucks have over American trucks is the price tag IMO. I feel you pay a lot extra for very little.
#19
Old 10-18-2011, 10:30 PM
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Originally Posted by boytyperanma View Post
The only thing Toyota trucks have over American trucks is the price tag IMO. I feel you pay a lot extra for very little.
This. You get a nice half ton truck for a 3/4 ton price. The Tundra is a bit better than a F150, but for what one costs you could buy an F250.
#20
Old 10-18-2011, 10:43 PM
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Forget the Tundra then...between the replies here, and a conversation I just had with a Toyota mechanic who told me that the first generation Tundra is plagued by transmission problems, I am no longer interested.

Tacoma, possibly. There seems to be a big problem with frame rust on Tacomas, however. Not only did this mechanic tell me about it, but a completely random guy with a Tacoma who I struck up a conversation with also mentioned it.
#21
Old 10-18-2011, 11:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Argent Towers View Post
Tacoma, possibly. There seems to be a big problem with frame rust on Tacomas, however. Not only did this mechanic tell me about it, but a completely random guy with a Tacoma who I struck up a conversation with also mentioned it.
Roomie has a 1999 Tacoma. She loves it. It's a four-cylinder, manual transmission Extended Cab. I told her about the rust recall a few years ago, and she didn't have any. It seems it's really only a problem where they salt the roads. And I recall Toyota had fairly generous recall remedies.
#22
Old 10-19-2011, 02:44 AM
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Do all of the first-generation Toyota Tacomas have these hideous, wretched, vile, cheap-looking white instrument binnacles? I absolutely could not tolerate having to stare at those fucking things every time I drive. Is there a way to remove them and replace them with binnacles that don't look like they came off a fucking PowerWheels?
#23
Old 10-19-2011, 05:38 AM
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Old Hilux:

http://streetfire.net/video/top-...t-1_168169.htm

http://streetfire.net/top-gear/t...2-b_742339.htm
#24
Old 10-19-2011, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by jz78817 View Post
he brought that up because Top Gear did a segment some years ago where they took an old diesel HiLux and bashed the crap out of it. Well, the body, anyway. they did nothing that would have hurt the engine, then made it out like it was amazing that the thing still ran (and the ninnies who think watching Top Gear makes them automotive experts ate that shit up.) keep in mind that this vintage of diesel truck requires a single 12 volt wire to the injection pump for the motor to run.
Er...didn't they submerge it in the ocean for half a day and then put it on top of a building that was being demolished by explosives?

It may have been for entertainment purposes, but it was still impressive that they could get it to turn over after all that.
#25
Old 10-19-2011, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Finagle View Post
Er...didn't they submerge it in the ocean for half a day
Yes

Quote:
and then put it on top of a building that was being demolished by explosives?
Yes
#26
Old 10-19-2011, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Argent Towers View Post
Forget the Tundra then...between the replies here, and a conversation I just had with a Toyota mechanic who told me that the first generation Tundra is plagued by transmission problems, I am no longer interested.

Tacoma, possibly. There seems to be a big problem with frame rust on Tacomas, however. Not only did this mechanic tell me about it, but a completely random guy with a Tacoma who I struck up a conversation with also mentioned it.
Again your paying a lot more for not enough IMO.

A few years ago I was shopping for a small pick-up. I mainly looked at Chevy Colorado's, Toyota Tacoma's, and Ford Ranger's. I rejected the Colorado's do to really bad ergonomics. I really liked the Tacoma's but I couldn't justify the extra money over the Ranger's. If I had a plan other then running it into the ground the Tacoma's resale value would have done it for me but I don't resell cars I kill them.

The lifetime ownership cost of the Ranger was far cheaper then that of the Tacoma. Ranger parts and service are dirt cheap in comparison.

If money was no object I'd have gone for the Tacoma over the Ranger in a heart beat, it is a better truck IMO. As money is an object I'm very happy with my Ranger.

Keep in mind with small pick ups they are not a bargain over full size trucks. You will still be paying for a truck and the poor gas mileage that entails.
#27
Old 10-19-2011, 05:43 PM
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Your last sentence doesn't make sense. Of course a small pickup will give you better gas mileage than a big one. Bigger trucks tend to have V-8 engines and be a great deal heavier.
#28
Old 10-19-2011, 05:53 PM
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Your last sentence doesn't make sense. Of course a small pickup will give you better gas mileage than a big one. Bigger trucks tend to have V-8 engines and be a great deal heavier.
Compare F-150's to Rangers. You'll find some F-150's that have better mileage then some Rangers. Smaller does not equal better mileage. Sure if you compare the most powerful versions of each you'll find the F-150's on the higher end, but many seem to get stuck in your mind set. Smaller equals smaller, anything else you need to look at the data.
#29
Old 10-19-2011, 06:07 PM
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Be careful you aren't overlooking crash survivability too - Buying a used car it obviously isn't the number one priority, but it is important. I bought a 2002 Tundra brand new back in 2002 and I believe that the IIHS crash ratings vs the domestics were somewhat better, and that is what sold me on it the most - mechanically, hauling wise it was pretty similar or worse than the comparable domestic trucks (Dodge Ram, Ford F-150 are the others I was looking at).
#30
Old 10-19-2011, 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Finagle View Post
Er...didn't they submerge it in the ocean for half a day
Then changed the fluids and cleared out the cylinders before trying to start it again.

you know, exactly what you're supposed to do if your engine takes on water.

Quote:
and then put it on top of a building that was being demolished by explosives?
they didn't blow up the truck. And after all, the frame did break after that. but why is it so amazing that the engine started? it's not easy to bend a heavy iron casting.

Quote:
It may have been for entertainment purposes, but it was still impressive that they could get it to turn over after all that.
you are, of course, assuming that what they showed on TV is actually what they did. They've stretched the truth a number of times, like with their "test" of the Tesla roadster.
#31
Old 10-20-2011, 07:20 PM
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We get mid 90s Toyota Hiluxes here in Canada. The diesel versions (most of them) almost always have head gasket problems. The 4runner/Tacoma sold in the US also had head gasket problems with the last generation V6 engines. All are due to badly specced parts/engineering from the factory. Maybe submerging in seawater and being blown up is OK but regular highway driving, especially in climates hotter than Japan, is quite enough to do them in.

Japanese vehicles are big outside of Japan because Japan has a massive infrastructure and government incentives to export their used vehicles.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanes...icle_exporting

It is extensive enough that in many places like the Russian far east, Right hand drive cars Japanese imports outnumber left hand drive cars, in a place where left hand drive is theoretically the standard. There are some small island countries that have actually switched from LHD to RHD for this reason.

The continued strength of the JPY has basically killed this market. The Toyota pickup was all right in the 1990s when USD$1=JPY130. Now that the rate is JPY75 most African/third world pickups come from China.

Here's another pro-tip: Most African drivers are not wealthy and don't watch Top Gear. They just want a cheap truck.
#32
Old 10-20-2011, 09:52 PM
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FWIW, I own an 06 Tacoma bought new. I've put 130k on it, and have never had any issues. I replaced the break pads two weeks ago, and that was the first non-fluid/non-standard maintenance I've done.
You drove your truck for 130k miles and just now did your first break job on it? Are you kidding me? Either there is a part of the story I'm not understanding or you are a great example of someone who doesn't take care of their vehicles.

Unless it is all highway miles, like 100k+ of highway miles, I don't see how this is possible.
#33
Old 10-20-2011, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Argent Towers View Post
Acquiring an American truck locally at a good price is certainly much more do-able than a Toyota. I'll take a look at some Dodge Rams.
I bought an 04 Ram 1500 quad cab 4x4 5.7L brand new in 04. It's got 77k on it now and I have done nothing other than the brakes since I bought it. I'm getting ready to change the tie rod ends, which is easy and cheap, and replace the O2 sensors, which is also easy and cheap. They are pretty easy to work on and they are old enough now to find lots of after market parts for them.

Love my Ram and would definitely buy another one.
#34
Old 10-21-2011, 06:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Cubsfan View Post
You drove your truck for 130k miles and just now did your first break job on it? Are you kidding me? Either there is a part of the story I'm not understanding or you are a great example of someone who doesn't take care of their vehicles.

Unless it is all highway miles, like 100k+ of highway miles, I don't see how this is possible.
brakes can last a heck of a long time these days. When I had a 2000 Ram, by 88,000 miles the front pads weren't even 1/2 worn. The pads on my Neon would probably have lasted 130k if one of the front calipers hadn't stuck.
#35
Old 10-21-2011, 08:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Cubsfan View Post
You drove your truck for 130k miles and just now did your first break job on it? Are you kidding me? Either there is a part of the story I'm not understanding or you are a great example of someone who doesn't take care of their vehicles.

Unless it is all highway miles, like 100k+ of highway miles, I don't see how this is possible.
I drove a Suzuki Vitara for 290,000 km / 180,000 mi in a ten year period with only one brake pad change. I took it in for service every 5,000 km.
#36
Old 10-21-2011, 08:13 AM
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I have an old Nissan pick-up with almost 260,000 miles. Front brake pads have been replaced, four or five times (just last week) but rear brakes are original. Mechanic last week said they were still fine.
I think brakes get a little less use in a manual-shift vehicle.
#37
Old 10-21-2011, 10:34 AM
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Had a 2011 Dakota (4.7 V8) and Ram. Have a new Ram (for pleasure) and old Ram now (for a side biz). The Dakota was a V8 and logged 130k miles.

Dakota:
Tires = over 70k miles
Brakes = Fronts at 68k miles, Rears @ never
Repair list for Dakota: Rear window gear @ 75 U.S. bucks.

Actually, I think the Dakota should have been mentioned in here as a consideration given the size, power, economy and number of good reviews, etc.

I like the new Tundra. However, I just can't get past the issues over repair reliability in the long run. The sheer depth of lineage in American brands means that when you have an issue at 130,000 miles, the repair predictability is going to be solid. If you fix this for 350 bucks, go along your way.

At 130,000 miles from now, when the Tundra needs X, the cost is going to be 'unknown' and the success of the repair is going to be 'roll the dice'.

.

Last edited by Philster; 10-21-2011 at 10:35 AM.
#38
Old 07-12-2016, 03:39 PM
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You need your head examined. I sell Ford,Dodge,Chrysler and Jeep plus any other brand of truck and Toyota is as good as it gets. Calling them junk kinda takes away any credibility that you might have. My family has owned more than 15 Toy Trucks from 83 till the present and not only have we never had one break down with less than 300 k on it but brakes and oil changes are about the only thing you need worry with. I have a 2003 Toy Tundra V8 SR5 and I am the original owner and I have 327 k miles on it and the truck runs so quite that my friend who is a full time mechanic is amazed that every time I stop by he cannot hear me pull up and swears it is the quietest
v8 truck he has ever heard and that is with over 300 k on it. The truck runs like a corvette and Gets 20 miles a gallon on the Highway. It has never leaked or used oil, and the gas mileage is identical to the day it was bought. We gave two toyota's away to family members in the past because they were over 200 k and both of them got 350 k and as far as I know they never had a critical failure of the engine to this day. All vehicles are going to soar past 100 k today or your brand with be out of business within 5 years but Toyota Trucks are amazing and I have never had a Transmission problem. Just because you had a bad experience does not say anything bad about toyota and says more about you and how you must treat and maintain your vehicles. Do not make statements as if you are some expert please and stick to posting on the sporting sites where exaggerating and telling lies is common.
#39
Old 07-12-2016, 05:23 PM
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Do not make statements as if you are some expert please and stick to posting on the sporting sites where exaggerating and telling lies is common.
Runs like a Corvette, huh?
#40
Old 07-12-2016, 05:26 PM
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ZOMBIE ALERT!

Blather blather blather. Opens a five year old thread, responds to -- who? can't tell -- run-on sentences, no paragraph breaks. Thinks his experience is significant but whoever's isn't. What a waste.
#41
Old 07-12-2016, 10:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dionmax View Post
You need your head examined. I sell Ford,Dodge,Chrysler and Jeep plus any other brand of truck and Toyota is as good as it gets. Calling them junk kinda takes away any credibility that you might have. My family has owned more than 15 Toy Trucks from 83 till the present and not only have we never had one break down with less than 300 k on it but brakes and oil changes are about the only thing you need worry with. I have a 2003 Toy Tundra V8 SR5 and I am the original owner and I have 327 k miles on it and the truck runs so quite that my friend who is a full time mechanic is amazed that every time I stop by he cannot hear me pull up and swears it is the quietest
v8 truck he has ever heard and that is with over 300 k on it. The truck runs like a corvette and Gets 20 miles a gallon on the Highway. It has never leaked or used oil, and the gas mileage is identical to the day it was bought. We gave two toyota's away to family members in the past because they were over 200 k and both of them got 350 k and as far as I know they never had a critical failure of the engine to this day. All vehicles are going to soar past 100 k today or your brand with be out of business within 5 years but Toyota Trucks are amazing and I have never had a Transmission problem. Just because you had a bad experience does not say anything bad about toyota and says more about you and how you must treat and maintain your vehicles. Do not make statements as if you are some expert please and stick to posting on the sporting sites where exaggerating and telling lies is common.
Fascinating post. Unfortunately, it's also in violation of the rules of conduct around here. Please review the Registration Agreement and the FAQ regarding rules, guidelines and etiquette for reference, particularly as they pertain to insulting other posters.

Then please consider whether reviving a five-year-old thread to argue with posters who may not even be around any longer makes sense.
#42
Old 07-12-2016, 10:51 PM
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http://carsurvey.org/reviews/toy...0/single-page/

Some of those reviews could be helpful. I'm surprised there are so many bad reviews on a Toyota.

2001 reviews are a lot better for some reason.

http://carsurvey.org/reviews/toy...1/single-page/

Looking into it, the 2000 was the very first model. So I guess that one would have more bugs. But did they institute and changes from 2000 to 2001?

EDIT: Crap this thread is 5 years old.

Last edited by Wesley Clark; 07-12-2016 at 10:53 PM.
#43
Old 07-12-2016, 11:52 PM
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ZOMBIE ALERT!

Blather blather blather. Opens a five year old thread, responds to -- who? can't tell -- run-on sentences, no paragraph breaks. Thinks his experience is significant but whoever's isn't. What a waste.
Philster's post #4 almost certainly. Which isn't my experience at all. Toyota is one of the best brands out there.

I might consider a Tacoma for my next vehicle. The Tundra's mileage is the main point against it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wesley Clark View Post
Looking into it, the 2000 was the very first model. So I guess that one would have more bugs. But did they institute and changes from 2000 to 2001?
The only major revision was the 2007 to current model year.
#44
Old 07-13-2016, 11:42 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: NoWA
Posts: 57,675
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelurkinghorror View Post
I might consider a Tacoma for my next vehicle. The Tundra's mileage is the main point against it.
Mrs. L.A. has a 2000 Tacoma Extended Cab she bought new. She loves it. She had it repainted in its original colour a couple of years ago, as Toyota's red seems to be prone to fading. Her truck has a four-cylinder engine and a five-speed standard transmission. She bought the undercoating because she was living in Washington (does again now, of course) and wanted to protect it from the wet. She had the bed sprayed with 'Rhino'-type coating to protect it. She's put a little over 100,000 miles on it since she bought it.

She had two squawks about the truck. She had trouble getting up gravel roads on hills, and driving in snow, because the stock-type tires didn't grip well. Last year she bought beefier tires and that is no longer a problem. The other thing is the gas mileage, which is about 24 mpg. She has a heavy foot, so that might be a factor. The four-cylinder engine mightn't be the best choice for freeway driving. I know my six-cylinder Cherokee got better mileage than a former coworker's four-cylinder Wrangler because he was thrashing his engine on the freeway and the Cherokee's engine was just loafing. That said, I personally like the four-cylinder/five-speed combination in Toyota trucks. Dad's Hilux had a four-speed. (It got about 20 mpg.)

Mrs. L.A. bought a 2010 RAV4 recently as her work vehicle. Nice car. More practical than the Tacoma or Jeep for her job. And she wants to keep her Tacoma pristine.

If the Tundra is anything like the Tacoma, it's a great vehicle. Too big for my tastes though. (And the new Tacomas look as big as the Tundra. Hate 'em.)
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