Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 12-28-2011, 06:40 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 30,561
Home Repair Question--Sliding Patio Doors.

My condo does not have windows; instead, it has 2 glass patio doors, one in the living room, one in the bedroom, both rather old.

Cold air is coming in under the bottom of both, mostly the bedroom door.

I have put old towels at the bottom of the door, to help with the drafts. I desire a better solution, though.

Remember, patio doors run on tracks.

Replacing the doors is out, financially.

Also, no sealing off the doors completely, please.

Suggestions from HandyDopers?
__________________
The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over.
~~~~Hunter S. Thompson
#2
Old 12-28-2011, 07:03 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Texas... Need I say more?
Posts: 2,042
There is a replaceable piece[s] on the bottom of the 'active' half of the unit.
(Active = the half that slides back and forth)
It is a 'strip' that slides in from one end or the other.
On the ones that I've worked on, IIRC (it's been quite a while) the first thing to do in order to replace the 'weatherstrip' is take the door out of the frame and lay it down so that you can access the bottom of the door.
To take the door out of the frame you'll have to slide it open about halfway, then pick up on the door and swing the bottom out past the tracks so that the top will then come out of the frame. It would be advisable to have someone help you with this task.

Once you have the door out of the frame, lay it down on some old quilts or 'moving pads'. You should be able to see the weatherstrips at this point.
On the sides of the door at the bottom there should be a small plate that can be removed. Remove the plate, slide out the old weatherstrips and then just reverse the whole procedure.
Home Depot or Lowe's might carry the replacement weatherstripping, I'm not sure. If they don't, then you'll have to get out the Yellow pages and look for parts there.
If you can post some pics I might be able to give you a little more detailed advice.
I'll check back in a little while.
If you want you can PM me and I'll give you my # and maybe I can "walk you thru" some of it.
__________________
"Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut." Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961)

Last edited by JBDivmstr; 12-28-2011 at 07:07 PM. Reason: coreckt speling is a gud thang
#3
Old 12-28-2011, 07:04 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 14,892
You can buy self-stick weatherstripping designed for sliding doors. You lift the doors out of the track, apply the weatherstripping, and replace the doors. Ask at your local hardware store.
#4
Old 12-28-2011, 07:15 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Quantum foam
Posts: 24,250
A vinyl door sweep might solve your problem. Sold on the same aisle as weatherstripping at Home Depot and Lowes. Meant primarily for swinging doors, but one of the styles might work on your old slider.

Last edited by AncientHumanoid; 12-28-2011 at 07:16 PM.
#5
Old 12-28-2011, 07:17 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Denver
Posts: 7,205
If you do the weatherstripping yourself, (1) get someone to help, those things are reallllly heavy, and (2) Lay down a tarp so you won't scratch your floor when you take it out/put it back in. Oh, and (3) do it on a warm day. (Duh.)

I will further caution that my husband and I did this ourselves, and the goddamn door has not worked properly since and probably never will again. It now requires serious muscle and a learned technique to open it. No cold air coming in though.
#6
Old 12-28-2011, 07:23 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Texas... Need I say more?
Posts: 2,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoClueBoy View Post
A vinyl door sweep might solve your problem. Sold on the same aisle as weatherstripping at Home Depot and Lowes. Meant primarily for swinging doors, but one of the styles might work on your old slider.
Not trying to be dismissive, but I don't think that a vinyl sweep is the way to go.
Vinyl sweeps are designed to be used on "swinging" doors (hence the name 'sweep').

On sliding doors, the weatherstrip consists of a strip that's about 1/8"-3/16" wide x the width of the door unit, which can vary from 2' to 3'+, with 'fur' or 'hairs' protruding from it along the length of the strip.
The strip itself slides into a groove[s] on the underside of the door unit.
#7
Old 12-28-2011, 07:28 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Texas... Need I say more?
Posts: 2,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hilarity N. Suze View Post
If you do the weatherstripping yourself, (1) get someone to help, those things are reallllly heavy, and (2) Lay down a tarp so you won't scratch your floor when you take it out/put it back in. Oh, and (3) do it on a warm day. (Duh.)

I will further caution that my husband and I did this ourselves, and the goddamn door has not worked properly since and probably never will again. It now requires serious muscle and a learned technique to open it. No cold air coming in though.
There are usually 'adjusting' screws on both ends of the door at the bottom. The adjusting screws are sometimes located behind the small plate, recessed inside of a small hole. After installing new weatherstripping it's sometimes necessary to readjust the door for proper clearance in order for the door to slide freely.
#8
Old 12-28-2011, 07:33 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Texas... Need I say more?
Posts: 2,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBDivmstr View Post
There are usually 'adjusting' screws on both ends of the door at the bottom. The adjusting screws are sometimes located behind the small plate, recessed inside of a small hole. After installing new weatherstripping it's sometimes necessary to readjust the door for proper clearance in order for the door to slide freely.
ETA... When adjusting the door for proper clearance, it can help if you'll take a 'flatbar' and gently lift up on the door (on the side that you are trying to adjust) just enough to take some of the weight off of the rollers, while tightening or loosening the adjusting screw.

Last edited by JBDivmstr; 12-28-2011 at 07:35 PM. Reason: corekt speling is a gud thang
#9
Old 12-28-2011, 07:46 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Quantum foam
Posts: 24,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBDivmstr View Post
Not trying to be dismissive, but I don't think that a vinyl sweep is the way to go.
Vinyl sweeps are designed to be used on "swinging" doors (hence the name 'sweep').

On sliding doors, the weatherstrip consists of a strip that's about 1/8"-3/16" wide x the width of the door unit, which can vary from 2' to 3'+, with 'fur' or 'hairs' protruding from it along the length of the strip.
The strip itself slides into a groove[s] on the underside of the door unit.
Read my last sentence. Thanks
#10
Old 12-28-2011, 07:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Quantum foam
Posts: 24,250
BTW, I've installed scores of sliding doors for Home Depot. The sweep was offered as a possible fix, since one has to give Bosda a good amount of options.

He might also check for gaps between the track and the floor. Some elastomeric caulk (inside or out) might help if that ends up being the issue.
#11
Old 12-28-2011, 07:54 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 30,561
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoClueBoy View Post
BTW, I've installed scores of sliding doors for Home Depot. The sweep was offered as a possible fix, since one has to give Bosda a good amount of options.

He might also check for gaps between the track and the floor. Some elastomeric caulk (inside or out) might help if that ends up being the issue.
Wouldn't caulk screw up the door?
#12
Old 12-28-2011, 07:55 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Quantum foam
Posts: 24,250
He could also use that to completely caulk both doors shut. That way, he never has to go outside again. Or inside again, depending on what side of the door he caulks last.

Handy no longer posts here.
#13
Old 12-28-2011, 07:56 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 30,561
Come tomorrow, when daylight is there, I'll get a look at the doors.

BTW--they may date to the late 50s early 60s.
#14
Old 12-28-2011, 07:57 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Quantum foam
Posts: 24,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor View Post
Wouldn't caulk screw up the door?
Under the track

Not under the door.

Look between the track and the floor, see if there are any gaps.

If not, don't worry about it.
#15
Old 12-28-2011, 08:52 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Texas... Need I say more?
Posts: 2,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoClueBoy View Post
BTW, I've installed scores of sliding doors for Home Depot. The sweep was offered as a possible fix, since one has to give Bosda a good amount of options.
My apologies sir, I stand corrected.

Quote:
He might also check for gaps between the track and the floor. Some elastomeric caulk (inside or out) might help if that ends up being the issue.
Excellent suggestion, and one I had overlooked.
#16
Old 12-28-2011, 10:28 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Quantum foam
Posts: 24,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBDivmstr View Post
My apologies sir, I stand corrected.
Dude, we stand together!

Your post about the brush type of weather stripping was the correct way to go for someone that is kind of handy. I only added what I did to get someone else thinking outside the box for other possible fixes.

Certain styles of sweep might end being useful. Tho I haven't done it myself, I've seen it used as a "sort of" fix on really old sliding doors. The problem that comes up is it dragging along the track. But some of those really cheap self stick vinyl sweeps have a little bit of a bend (or flare) in them and might just clear the track while still blocking enough airflow.

If the door is so old that the proper weatherstripping isn't available anymore, a really handy person might even want to try making (with a break and some snips) their own addition to the doors out of some metal coil. I've seen some pretty ingenious solutions from some people. I've also seen some total crap.

Best thing for the OP to do is to see if the brand of the door is still readable somewhere. Maybe on a plate near the top of the dead side or somewhere on either edge close to the latch. With that brand in hand (and possibly even a model number), do a web search for parts.

As usual on the SDMB, all of this is YMMV.
#17
Old 12-28-2011, 10:31 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Quantum foam
Posts: 24,250
I still think the best thing to do is caulk him into his apartment, see how long he lasts with no food or newspaper ads.

j/k Bosda!
#18
Old 12-29-2011, 09:39 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Texas... Need I say more?
Posts: 2,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoClueBoy View Post
I still think the best thing to do is caulk him into his apartment, see how long he lasts with no food or newspaper ads.

j/k Bosda!
If you killed his Internet access, my WAG would be approximately .75 nanoseconds!

(Of course, I wouldn't last much longer than that. )
#19
Old 12-29-2011, 01:27 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 30,561
OK, a gap seems to exist between the carpet and the base the track is resting on.

I can't tell how deep.

Or if it runs underneath the track.
#20
Old 12-29-2011, 02:34 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Texas... Need I say more?
Posts: 2,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor View Post
OK, a gap seems to exist between the carpet and the base the track is resting on.

I can't tell how deep.

Or if it runs underneath the track.
Take a piece of wire that will fit into the crack and see if you can guage how deep it is. I'll wait for you to check if you're going to do it ASAP.

Last edited by JBDivmstr; 12-29-2011 at 02:36 PM.
#21
Old 12-29-2011, 02:37 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Montreal, QC
Posts: 55,937
Plus there's always the incense trick. Light a stick, move it to various places around the door's frame, let the smoke indicate where the drafts are.
#22
Old 12-29-2011, 02:43 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Texas... Need I say more?
Posts: 2,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan Ekers View Post
Plus there's always the incense trick. Light a stick, move it to various places around the door's frame, let the smoke indicate where the drafts are.
That's a damn good idea!
Wish I had thought of it.
I sure won't forget it.
#23
Old 12-29-2011, 03:46 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Montreal, QC
Posts: 55,937
I first saw it used when an inspector was checking a house my girlfriend was buying. He sealed the doors, put in an heavy fan to exhaust air from the house (thus creating negative pressure within) and wandered around with an incense stick, checking window and door frames, electrical outlets (which can be surprisingly drafty) and whatnot. I was amused, and he explained that some inspectors use elaborate smoke machines, but the incense was a lot cheaper and smelled a lot better.
#24
Old 12-29-2011, 04:05 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Texas... Need I say more?
Posts: 2,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan Ekers View Post
I first saw it used when an inspector was checking a house my girlfriend was buying. He sealed the doors, put in an heavy fan to exhaust air from the house (thus creating negative pressure within) and wandered around with an incense stick, checking window and door frames, electrical outlets (which can be surprisingly drafty) and whatnot. I was amused, and he explained that some inspectors use elaborate smoke machines, but the incense was a lot cheaper and smelled a lot better.
(bolding mine)

Now there's a man with a little "horse sense".

FWIW, even though I've been in the construction industry for over 30 years, I'm still learning little "tricks of the trade". (not so often now, though )

One thing I have to admit is... I've learned more than a couple of 'em right here on the SDMB.
__________________
"Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut." Ernest Hemingway (1899 - 1961)
#25
Old 12-30-2011, 11:34 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 30,561
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBDivmstr View Post
Take a piece of wire that will fit into the crack and see if you can guage how deep it is. I'll wait for you to check if you're going to do it ASAP.
Sorry, didn't get back to the Board until today.

A knife blade shows that most of the crack is accounted for by carpet & thr stuff the carpet is on.

The crack is about 3/4 inch deep near the side it opens on, though.
#26
Old 12-30-2011, 11:40 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 30,561
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoClueBoy View Post
I still think the best thing to do is caulk him into his apartment, see how long he lasts with no food or newspaper ads.

j/k Bosda!

Meet my Wet Trout.

<SLAP>
#27
Old 12-30-2011, 11:40 AM
Just Lovely and Delicious
Charter Member
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 23,668
Are the windows double-paned or just big single sheets of glass? You say the doors are from the 50s/60s - are the windows that old too?

You could be losing heat through the windows themselves, too. And even in the joints between the windows and doors.

A window insulator kit would solve that part of the draftiness and you'd be able to continue using the doors.
#28
Old 12-30-2011, 12:18 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 30,561
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
Are the windows double-paned or just big single sheets of glass? You say the doors are from the 50s/60s - are the windows that old too?

You could be losing heat through the windows themselves, too. And even in the joints between the windows and doors.

A window insulator kit would solve that part of the draftiness and you'd be able to continue using the doors.
Double paned.

And the kits seem to be a way to seal off the windows completely, which I don't wanna do, & might be against the condo rules anyway.
#29
Old 12-30-2011, 01:00 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Montreal, QC
Posts: 55,937
Well, the sealing kits aren't permanent, you can peel them off in the spring.
#30
Old 12-30-2011, 02:49 PM
Just Lovely and Delicious
Charter Member
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 23,668
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor View Post
Double paned.

And the kits seem to be a way to seal off the windows completely, which I don't wanna do, & might be against the condo rules anyway.
I assume with your sliding glass doors you have 2 big windows next to each other, one of which is a sliding door, right?

You would use the kit to seal over the two windows (one of which is a door) separately. Put the double-sided tape on the frame around each window/door and then put one sheet of cut plastic on each window/door and seal out the draft.

If you put the tape on the frame that holds the entire window/door unit (the sash) and then used one sheet of plastic to go over both windows (one of which is a door) then yeah you'd be sealing the thing off completely. But in this instance you'd be keeping the cold air out that comes through the glass itself.

You'd still have two separate windows (one of which is a door) and would still need to address any seams with caulk or weather-stripping, but at least you would be minimizing the air coming through the glass.
#31
Old 12-30-2011, 08:34 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 30,561
I'm wrong.

Not double paned.

Single only.

Now I know why it is so cold in winter.


Not counting the window-sealing-off stuff, is there an insulating, clear coating for windows?
#32
Old 12-30-2011, 08:35 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 30,561
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
I assume with your sliding glass doors you have 2 big windows next to each other, one of which is a sliding door, right?

You would use the kit to seal over the two windows (one of which is a door) separately. Put the double-sided tape on the frame around each window/door and then put one sheet of cut plastic on each window/door and seal out the draft.

If you put the tape on the frame that holds the entire window/door unit (the sash) and then used one sheet of plastic to go over both windows (one of which is a door) then yeah you'd be sealing the thing off completely. But in this instance you'd be keeping the cold air out that comes through the glass itself.

You'd still have two separate windows (one of which is a door) and would still need to address any seams with caulk or weather-stripping, but at least you would be minimizing the air coming through the glass.
Hmmm...this might work.
#33
Old 01-03-2012, 12:26 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Texas... Need I say more?
Posts: 2,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
... You would use the kit to seal over the two windows (one of which is a door) separately. Put the double-sided tape on the frame around each window/door and then put one sheet of cut plastic on each window/door and seal out the draft.

If you put the tape on the frame that holds the entire window/door unit (the sash) and then used one sheet of plastic to go over both windows (one of which is a door) then yeah you'd be sealing the thing off completely. But in this instance you'd be keeping the cold air out that comes through the glass itself.

You'd still have two separate windows (one of which is a door) and would still need to address any seams with caulk or weather-stripping, but at least you would be minimizing the air coming through the glass.
(bolding mine)
FWIW, I live in a house that was built in 1930. Most of the windows on the ground floor are 'double hung' units, (the top and bottom portions both, are movable) that are 3'6" wide x 6'6" tall, and consist of 20 small single panes of glass. That's a considerable amount of glass, which equates to a lot of thermal energy going in the direction that you don't want it to go.
What I'm getting at is, quite a few years ago I installed exactly the type of barrier that ZipperJJ has described. I was a tad bit skeptical of the stuff at first.

Granted, I live on the Gulf Coast (Houston, Tx) and it doesn't get all that cold, (We won't discuss the only other season, we have here. ) but all of that single paned glass does make a difference.

My skepticism is (was) unwarranted, especially after the first years heating/cooling bills were compared to the previous.
It DID make a difference (summer and winter). YMMV
The only negative thing that I can say about it is, you might incur a certain amount of condensation on the glass. It depends on the temperature difference between inside and outside. (Although I'm sure you're already aware of the possibility of that occurring.)

ETA: If put on correctly it doesn't distort the view very much at all, if any. And IIRC, the cost was minimal as was the amount of 'technical skill' needed to install it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor View Post
I'm wrong.
Not double paned.
Single only.
Now I know why it is so cold in winter.

Not counting the window-sealing-off stuff, is there an insulating, clear coating for windows?
(bolding mine)
FWIW, not that I'm aware of.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor View Post
Hmmm...this might work.
It certainly sounds like a viable alternative.
IMHO, it can't hurt and it'll probably help.
#34
Old 01-03-2012, 02:16 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Texas... Need I say more?
Posts: 2,042
ETA: Great idea ZipperJJ, I had completely forgot about that method!
#35
Old 01-03-2012, 04:51 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 30,561
My repair ideas are on hold, due to family issues.

I'd rather do this, but I gotta do that.
#36
Old 01-03-2012, 05:01 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Texas... Need I say more?
Posts: 2,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor View Post
My repair ideas are on hold, due to family issues.

I'd rather do this, but I gotta do that.
I know that 'tune' well!






You can pick your nose. You can pick your friends. Hell, you might even be able to pick your friends nose, if you ask nicely.
But you can't pick your kinfolk!
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:04 PM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: swedish sleep system ewoks names imoscar.com google wwii mine sweeper eclair lightning pest offense reviews inverter microwaves boiling beef cum origin pronounce jaguar my gf boobs implied blowjob quinn the eskimo define mayhaps fryer lid flying winnebago hamster six money chain garbage disposal injury rain florence nsfw straight dope colette ferro wotcher meaning ugly painted toes alt infinity symbol dfo meaning thread bikini line teflon armor funny halloween names 5th grader kissing roy firestone hunyak chicago translation order of the awakened rep token traffic light at night why i love computer science tax return staple or paperclip failed dmv test 3 times california what was the goal of the progressive movement? home depot hours christmas eve honey sticks for tea liquor to put in coffee do fake transcripts work how to sell herbalife products wake up nauseous every morning male how much is 20 pence in us dollars 2004 liberty silver dollar value is the american flag copyrighted how much does a garmin update cost can i take 100mg of benadryl is douche a swear word can nyquil kill you mad men message board tv tropes chuck cunningham at what temp are celsius and fahrenheit the same what is a muffler scarf saturday night special gun sas mens shoes online bitch in other languages does your accent change when you move goody two shoes origin what is the difference between kosher and dill pickles comcast cable box ir extender how does first and last month's rent work