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#1
Old 02-29-2012, 02:04 PM
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City nicknames that city residents actually use

The people of San Francisco never refer to their city as "San Fran" or "Frisco" and, from what I understand, really don't like it when other people do.

No one from Philadelphia uses the nickname "The City of Brotherly Love", at least if it's not dripping with sarcasm. On the other hand, they frequently refer to Philly.

What are some other nicknames that people actually use for their own cities? (Please note that LOTS of places use "the City" - I'm thinking here of unique nicknames, not just descriptions.)
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#2
Old 02-29-2012, 02:06 PM
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Los Angeles is called LA far more than anything else.
#3
Old 02-29-2012, 02:11 PM
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Washington, DC = "the District"
#4
Old 02-29-2012, 02:17 PM
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Philadelphia is "Philly"
Pittsburgh is "the Burgh"
New Orleans is "N'awlins" or "NOLA"
Baltimore is "Charm City", but my impression is that most residents use it ironically if at all
#5
Old 02-29-2012, 02:18 PM
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It's not completely unheard of to hear Charlotte residents refer to it as the Queen City.

Not common, mind you, but not unheard of.

When I lived there, I never heard anyone from Winston-Salem refer to it as the Twin Cities despite having seen that nickname listed in more than one source now. As a rule, if they want to shorten the name, folks will tend to just say "Winston."

Last edited by KneadToKnow; 02-29-2012 at 02:21 PM.
#6
Old 02-29-2012, 02:19 PM
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Cincinnati: The Queen City

The Nati.

The Nasty Nati.

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#7
Old 02-29-2012, 02:22 PM
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San Jose is called Man Jose.

NYC is sometimes, but not often, referred to as The Big Apple.
#8
Old 02-29-2012, 02:23 PM
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I've heard news reporters refer to Columbus as "Capital City." I'd say C-Bus is a more popular slang term among residents.
#9
Old 02-29-2012, 02:29 PM
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The San Franciscans I know say "S.F."
#10
Old 02-29-2012, 02:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
The San Franciscans I know say "S.F."
Yes, that's pretty common. But San Jose is never SJ. The only other Bay Area city that I'm familiar with that goes by initials is Los Gatos: LG. For example, I've never heard Palo Alto called PA, although Palo Alto High is often called Pally.

Last edited by John Mace; 02-29-2012 at 02:32 PM.
#11
Old 02-29-2012, 02:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barkis is Willin' View Post
I've heard news reporters refer to Columbus as "Capital City." I'd say C-Bus is a more popular slang term among residents.
I've been known to say Cowtown too.
#12
Old 02-29-2012, 02:32 PM
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Tucson is often referred to as "Too Stoned."
#13
Old 02-29-2012, 02:33 PM
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Despite some Chicagoans claiming that "Chi-town" is used only by outsiders, my experience as a born-and-bred is that it is, indeed, used by at least some of our denizens and, no, not just transplants or suburbanites. The one I don't like that I am hearing with increasing frequency is "the Chi."
#14
Old 02-29-2012, 02:41 PM
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I hear San Fran relatively frequently, grates on my ears. Frisco mostly in rap songs but otherwise uncommon. SF semi-common, most commonly "the City." Still a fine for saying Frisco, per Emperor Norton.
#15
Old 02-29-2012, 02:42 PM
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Well, I grew up in Troy, NY and we called it "The Troilet"
#16
Old 02-29-2012, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
Washington, DC = "the District"
Also, just "DC."

Not a nickname, but residents often abbreviate "Schenectady" as "Sch'dy."
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#17
Old 02-29-2012, 02:57 PM
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Minneapolis-St Paul metro area is called The Twin Cities or The Cities by almost everyone.
#18
Old 02-29-2012, 02:58 PM
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Yeah, but if you say DC, a lot of people think you actually mean one of the suburbs, if you say the District, it's usually understood that you mean DC proper.
#19
Old 02-29-2012, 03:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barkis is Willin' View Post
I've heard news reporters refer to Columbus as "Capital City." I'd say C-Bus is a more popular slang term among residents.
Yeah, I came in to say C-bus. You do see "Capital City" or "Cap City" a lot in the names of businesses, but people don't use it in conversation much.
#20
Old 02-29-2012, 03:07 PM
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Atlanta has not to my knowledge ever actually been called Hotlanta except by the media. It has been called "The ATL" but rarely in my neck of the woods.

We have a Ft. Stewart in Georgia on the other hand, whose denizens call it "Ft. Stupid."
#21
Old 02-29-2012, 03:08 PM
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The ATL

A-T-L iens
[as Demonym]

are present, but are too forced. You might get one or two residents to use it, but I would not consider the usage to reach the threshold needed to suffice the OP.
#22
Old 02-29-2012, 03:09 PM
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And a nice simulpost too, while I Was looking up Demonym.
#23
Old 02-29-2012, 03:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
Also, just "DC."

Not a nickname, but residents often abbreviate "Schenectady" as "Sch'dy."
That's because your average Schenectady resident can't spell Schenectady.
#24
Old 02-29-2012, 03:38 PM
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New Orleans also goes by The Big Easy and The Crescent City. Both of those are sometimes used by locals.
#25
Old 02-29-2012, 03:40 PM
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In written form, Montreal is often shortened to MTL, but I don't think I've ever really heard it spoken.

In French, the provincial capital is often called La Capitale, to distinguish Quebec City from the province, although grammar and context rules usually make it clear anyways (au Québec, à Québec).

I've known people to refer to Sherbooke as Sherby in English, but never in French, and I commonly hear shortenings like Lennoxville as Lennox (and jokingly as Lennox-vegas), Drummondville as Drummond, Victoriaville as Victo, etc.
#26
Old 02-29-2012, 03:49 PM
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Boston is occasionally called the Hub or Beantown by the locals; it's not particularly frowned upon.

Manchester NH is ManchVegas, although that is used semi-ironically.

Crested Butte CO is often called "The Butte" or "Crusty Butt", but the latter isn't endorsed by the Chamber of Commerce
#27
Old 02-29-2012, 03:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Despite some Chicagoans claiming that "Chi-town" is used only by outsiders, my experience as a born-and-bred is that it is, indeed, used by at least some of our denizens and, no, not just transplants or suburbanites. The one I don't like that I am hearing with increasing frequency is "the Chi."
Local news broadcasts seem to like "The Windy City", but I don't hear it very often in person.
#28
Old 02-29-2012, 03:52 PM
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I've heard "Chicagoland" in commercials, but do people use it in conversation?
#29
Old 02-29-2012, 03:58 PM
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I have wondered whether people from Detroit and Baton Rouge use the nicknames "Motown" and "Red Stick"... I bet some do but IDK.
#30
Old 02-29-2012, 04:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
Not a nickname, but residents often abbreviate "Schenectady" as "Sch'dy."
I sometimes hear that actually spoken, pronounced "Skeedy".

The official Schenectady nickname "Electric City" (due to Edison and GE associations) is sometimes used in local business names but I don't think anybody calls it that in conversation.
#31
Old 02-29-2012, 04:03 PM
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Washington PA (south of Pittsburgh) is "little Washington" (to distinguish it from DC).

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnM View Post
Baltimore is "Charm City", but my impression is that most residents use it ironically if at all
Baltimore is Bawlamer, Hon.
(and yes you have to say Hon as part of the sentence, it's a rule)

I've only heard it referred to as Charm City in newscasts and political speeches. I don't think I ever heard an actual resident call it that while I lived there.

I have heard it called B-more.
#32
Old 02-29-2012, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
I've heard "Chicagoland" in commercials, but do people use it in conversation?
I use it all the time, but it doesn't refer to Chicago itself, but the general Chicago metro area. It's when I'm referring to Chicago + suburbs.

ETA: Yeah, "Windy City" is acceptable and used occasionally. That's probably the most common local nickname. I've always like "The City on the Make" myself.

Last edited by pulykamell; 02-29-2012 at 04:05 PM.
#33
Old 02-29-2012, 04:08 PM
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London used to known as "the smoke," but I doubt whether it is used much any more.

Pasadena, CA, is know as both "the city of roses" and "crown city." I don't suppose you will hear either in casual conversation, but local media use them. In a similar way, local media quite often refer to Los Angeles as the "city of angels."
#34
Old 02-29-2012, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tastes of Chocolate View Post
Minneapolis-St Paul metro area is called The Twin Cities or The Cities by almost everyone.
No, we don't give St. Paul that much credit. And the only people who use the term The Cities are yokels from outstate MN or Wisconsin.

There was an attempt many years ago to brand Minneapolis as the Mini-Apple. It didn't catch on.

Last edited by Laggard; 02-29-2012 at 04:10 PM.
#35
Old 02-29-2012, 04:11 PM
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When I lived near the fourth largest city in Missouri, St. Joseph, it was usually referred to as St. Joe. A quick google shows a business named St. Joe Harley-Davidson, and references to a St. Joe Talent Show. The beginning of the Wikipedia article is, "Saint Joseph (informally St. Joe) is the county seat of Buchanan County..."
#36
Old 02-29-2012, 04:14 PM
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I heard more than one Torontonian call the city T.O., although that's more in commercial use I think.

I have never heard a Buffalonian say "Queen City" or "Nickel City", but you do hear "B-Lo" these days.
#37
Old 02-29-2012, 04:16 PM
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Friends from St. Petersburg, FL regularly called it "St. Pete."

I've known severa; people from the big city in central Indiana. A couple used to refer to it as "India-No-Place"; a research physician who grew up there said that natives often referenced it as "Naptown."

Another friend who is proud to be a Des Moines transplant told me that more than a few people use the airport identifier DSM for it -- even though that has more syllables than the full name!
#38
Old 02-29-2012, 04:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
I use it all the time, but it doesn't refer to Chicago itself, but the general Chicago metro area. It's when I'm referring to Chicago + suburbs.
Agreed with this, and adding that both "Chicagoland" and "the Chicagoland area" are commonly used in referring to the metro area.
#39
Old 02-29-2012, 04:19 PM
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Toronto is often called Hogtown, based on the urban legend that famers used to drive their pigs up the main street. (Or else it had something to do with provincial politicians).
You can tell the locals, they pronounce the name "Tronna"
Ottawa is called Bytown, its old name from before ti became too self-important.
Sault Ste Marie is called "Soo", the pronunciation of the first name.

Do Detroiters really call it "Motown"?
I always thought Frisco was the "City of Brotherly Love".

There was the old joke about the lottery in Toronto. "First prize is a weekend in Buffalo, second prize is two weekends in Buffalo."

Last edited by md2000; 02-29-2012 at 04:20 PM.
#40
Old 02-29-2012, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
I always thought Frisco was the "City of Brotherly Love".
No, that's Philadelphia, always been. In fact, the literal English translation of the name from Greek is "brotherly love."
#41
Old 02-29-2012, 05:07 PM
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I think he was making a San-Francisco-Is-Full-of-Homosexuals joke.
#42
Old 02-29-2012, 05:14 PM
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St. Louis is in fact called "The Lou" by at least some locals. Never heard it called "St. Louie" except in song.
#43
Old 02-29-2012, 05:21 PM
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4 small towns in California:

San Luis Obispo is called SLO, pronounced "slow" or SLO town.

Palos Verdes is called PV.

Isla Vista is called IV.

Santa Barbara is sometimes called SB.

I understand that Kuala Lumpur is called KL, but I don't remember any one referring to it that way the in the short time I was there.
#44
Old 02-29-2012, 05:23 PM
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Albuquerque's official nickname is "The Duke City" and that gets used a fair amount. I think I heard a radio DJ say "It's a windy one in The Duke City today!" just yesterday. There are probably 100s of businesses named "Duke City <type of product or service offered>".

The unofficial one one that some people like to use, and others eschew is "Burque", pronounced BURR-kay. I am one of the eschewers: Sounds like the speaker is trying too hard to be edgy every time I have heard it used...pretty much like "Frisco".
#45
Old 02-29-2012, 05:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
Boston is occasionally called the Hub or Beantown by the locals; it's not particularly frowned upon.
Grew up just outside of Boston. Usually heard Beantown from out of towners. Hub or Hub of Universe was usually a newspaper/radio/tv thing "Hub Crime Rate Rises Again", "Hub Tax Revenues Down", etc. Don't remember real live (local) people using either.
#46
Old 02-29-2012, 05:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Darryl Lict View Post
4 small towns in California:

San Luis Obispo is called SLO, pronounced "slow" or SLO town.
Same area. Arroyo Grande is called AG.
#47
Old 02-29-2012, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by mnemosyne View Post
In written form, Montreal is often shortened to MTL, but I don't think I've ever really heard it spoken.

In French, the provincial capital is often called La Capitale, to distinguish Quebec City from the province, although grammar and context rules usually make it clear anyways (au Québec, à Québec).

I've known people to refer to Sherbooke as Sherby in English, but never in French, and I commonly hear shortenings like Lennoxville as Lennox (and jokingly as Lennox-vegas), Drummondville as Drummond, Victoriaville as Victo, etc.
The suburb of Montreal I live in is named "Town of Mt. Royal", but inhabitants (and nearly every other person on the island when speaking English) usually call it "TMR", sometimes "The Town" (not a description but a shortening of the name).

I grew in in Philly (West Philly to be exact) and hardly anyone called it anything else.

I lived for four years in the twin towns of Champaign and Urbana, IL (actually two years in each) and we sometimes jocularly called them Chambana.
#48
Old 02-29-2012, 05:55 PM
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Sometimes the residents of San Jose will jokingly refer to it as “San Joe-say” giving it a fake “American” accent. SJ is written but almost never said.

SF is called SF, it takes a ‘certain” kind of person to call it “The City”, mainly someone who has never been to a real city, like LA or NYC.

Fresno is sometimes Fresburg and Bakersfield is sometimes “Bakkers-feld”, mostly jokingly.

Last edited by DrDeth; 02-29-2012 at 05:57 PM.
#49
Old 02-29-2012, 05:58 PM
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Murfreesboro TN, home to Middle Tennessee State University is widely known in Middle TN as "The 'Boro."
#50
Old 02-29-2012, 06:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
Do Detroiters really call it "Motown"?
Sometimes. Also Motor City.

Usually though it's "thecityofdetroit" all run together like one word.
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