Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 03-15-2012, 02:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 31,112
What the hell is Kafka's "The Metamorphosis" supposed to represent?

Spoilers, major and minor, for this story.








It's just a novel in which a man named Gregor one day wakes up turned into a giant bug. His family, whom he had been supporting entirely, don't know what to make of it of course. He loses his job and is pretty helpless as a giant bug.
His sister takes care of him and brings him rotting food which he likes to eat. However his mother catches a glimpse of him once and freaks out, and the father, thinking Gregor had attacked the mother, drives him back into his room with thrown apples.
Time goes on, and the rest of the family get other jobs, and Gregor's sister grows tired of taking care of him, as do the rest of the family. Upon hearing this, Gregor understands (they never thought he did) and he goes back into his bedroom and...dies.

Wow.

I mean, it was a good story, but I'm not really sure what the point of it was. Whenever you try to apply things that make sense - him supporting the whole family, him being tired of being a salesman, his family finding a life without him, it all kind of hits a brick wall when you remember he was turned into a GIANT BUG.

I do recommend it. It's a fairly quick read, and interesting enough.
#2
Old 03-15-2012, 03:04 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Schenectady, NY, USA
Posts: 40,712
I think that the point was that Gregor's life before turning into the insect was just as insignificant as it was after. He was, in a way, an insect to begin with; the change only highlights how little his life was worth. He was accomplishing nothing, so the change only highlighted that.

I have a button I sometimes wear that says, "Every have one of those mornings? -- Gregor Samsa." Few people get it, but those that do, love it.
#3
Old 03-15-2012, 03:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 31,112
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
I think that the point was that Gregor's life before turning into the insect was just as insignificant as it was after. He was, in a way, an insect to begin with; the change only highlights how little his life was worth. He was accomplishing nothing, so the change only highlighted that.

I have a button I sometimes wear that says, "Every have one of those mornings? -- Gregor Samsa." Few people get it, but those that do, love it.
That's a pretty awesome button. And now I would get it!


ETA: But - he wasn't accomplishing things? Wasn't he trying to get his sister through school, and feed the rest of his family?

Last edited by Anaamika; 03-15-2012 at 03:10 PM.
#4
Old 03-15-2012, 03:11 PM
I Am the One Who Bans
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 78,234
I've read - maybe here - that the story can be seen as a response to Kafka's own health problems and the feeling that he was a burden to his family. I don't know how well founded that is, but I think it adds a poignant element to the story that you don't necessarily get from the text.
#5
Old 03-15-2012, 03:16 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Toronto
Posts: 6,655
Have you read "The Trial"? It has the same atmosphere of self-loathing and helplessness and incomprehension. Maybe he just got his jollies from writing stories like that.
#6
Old 03-15-2012, 03:17 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 17,865
If you are freaked by that, don't read In the Penal Colony .

My take on "The Metamorphosis" is that it is exploring the theme of alienation through fantasy and projection. Gregor's phsyical metamorphosis is a metaphor for the mental metamorphosis of a man alienated from his family and from society as a whole.
#7
Old 03-15-2012, 03:44 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Chicago Il
Posts: 9,456
I sure it's just me but most of Kafka's work (to me) comes off as an exercise in writing. It doesn't seem to have any moral underpinning or even a point, it's more like an assignment in a creative writing class.

But I'm one of the great unwashed so, yeah.
#8
Old 03-15-2012, 03:48 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 8,596
My first thought was age or infirmity, reversal of roles as the breadwinner becomes the supported etc.
#9
Old 03-15-2012, 03:58 PM
bup bup is offline
Guest
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: glenview,il,usa
Posts: 11,905
I'm with Marley23 and grude - I took it as a thin metaphor for being a breadwinner who becomes incapacitated.

One other thing I took from the story was that after the family stopped depending on him, and cared about him less and less, they became more self-sufficient and better off. They were more selfish than he had ever been, too. The horror comes from his family's response every bit as much as his being a bug.
#10
Old 03-15-2012, 03:58 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Alaska
Posts: 840
I though it was just angst crisis and acceptance of the tragedy of a hopeless existence.
#11
Old 03-15-2012, 04:37 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 1,670
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
I have a button I sometimes wear that says, "Every have one of those mornings? -- Gregor Samsa." Few people get it, but those that do, love it.
That is awesome. I desperately need to get it on a t-shirt.

As for the work itself, I also agree with with grude that it reflects the transformation from breadwinner to burden that comes with age or infirmity. I don't agree with the interpretation that Gregor was initially worthless/dehumanized/insignificant and that the outward metamorphosis simply reflected his inward/societal state because I don't think that working to support your family is at all worthless or insignificant, especially if it also involved putting his sister through school. (I seem to remember that it did, but I haven't read the story in years.)
#12
Old 03-15-2012, 04:45 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 31,112
I think I also like the intrepretation of being old and infirm. He was bringing home a steady salary, and his parents and sister were all living off him. She was going to violin lessons, or school, or some such thing.

His boss totally didn't give any leeway, either! Five years of working, not one sick day, and the first time he doesn't arrive, he comes to his house and starts banging on the door. can you imagine?
#13
Old 03-15-2012, 04:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 16,587
I just want to say this is one of those stories when you hear the general description your first reaction is "thats the stupidest premise I have ever heard". Then you read it and its moves you or stirrs something in your heart/mind...perhaps you are not even sure what exactly but it puzzles you or intriques you or makes you think or ask questions.

I think that writing/art/tv/various creative endeavors that fits that description are some of the best there are. Its like making a five star meal out of spam and ritz crackers. Even if it ain't the best of the best, the fact the person that did it even got close says something about their skill. And the consumer gets something they never even thought possible.

I remember when I first read that story. It bugged (heh) me on several levels. As others have posted there is probably more than one "moral" you take away from it. And they are probably all a bit on the dark/life is cruel side.
#14
Old 03-15-2012, 06:22 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: San Diego
Posts: 3,916
One thing I got out it was the need to question your assumptions. Gregor expected some loyalty back from the company he slaved for, but got none. He was also supporting his family because his parents were old and his sister young, but really when given the need, they were perfectly able of supporting themselves, and even happier that way. Gregor's whole life, even before the transformation, seemed a pointless struggle.
#15
Old 03-15-2012, 07:12 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,116
I read it as someone with a debilitating mental or physical illness becoming odious to the people who once loved him. Once he truly realizes what a burden and disgrace he is to his family, he dies of...sadness or loneliness, I guess. I thought it was a pretty powerful metaphor, and one of Kafka's best works (the rest of his stuff tends to be a bit....incomprehesible).
#16
Old 03-15-2012, 10:31 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,700
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoid View Post
But I'm one of the great unwashed so, yeah.
Hey! Welcome to the club!
#17
Old 03-15-2012, 10:52 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2001
Posts: 21,299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
My take on "The Metamorphosis" is that it is exploring the theme of alienation through fantasy and projection. Gregor's phsyical metamorphosis is a metaphor for the mental metamorphosis of a man alienated from his family and from society as a whole.
Came in to post this, but Malthus summarized it well. This is how I read it and how it's been discussed it in Lit classes I've been part of.
#18
Old 03-16-2012, 12:50 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Garage & Lab
Posts: 1,232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Charles View Post
One thing I got out it was the need to question your assumptions.
Funny you mention that. I'll respond to it last.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Charles View Post
Gregor expected some loyalty back from the company he slaved for, but got none. He was also supporting his family because his parents were old and his sister young, but really when given the need, they were perfectly able of supporting themselves, and even happier that way. Gregor's whole life, even before the transformation, seemed a pointless struggle.
I read Kafka's Metamorphosis as part of a class during high school, in the early 1980's. We understood it as an extremely allegorical tale. Gregor represented the Soviet government, originally focussed on throwing off the yoke of monarchy and feudalism and helping the working classes gain strength and political clout, later becoming a parasitic unproductive behemoth generating fear and loathing amongst the People it was designed to benefit, and losing efficacy over time. We read it along with The Crocodile and The Phoenix, which were also both very allegorical.

[\Quote=bup] One other thing I took from the story was that after the family stopped depending on him, and cared about him less and less, they became more self-sufficient and better off. They were more selfish than he had ever been, too. The horror comes from his family's response every bit as much as his being a bug. [/quote]

Meanwhile, the allegorical People, if they learned to just live their lives and essentially ignore the Party and its politics, could really (eventually) achieve better than the State could offer.

* * *
Interpreting Kafka's Metamorphosis as a critical allegory for the Soviet system seemed to fit moderately well, provided we didn't try too hard to figure out what rotten apples or other elements of the story represented in the global political scene.
[Try The Story of Ah Q for similar treatment of revolutionary China.] However, it seemed like the teacher was pushing especially hard on the anti-Soviet angle for interpretation . I felt I could just as easily see the allegory as criticisms of the Capitalist paradigm (slaving for a company and getting no loyalty in return, etc.) or Church or even elected government's turning from a benevolent institution into a parasitic drain on the society it was designed to manage -- good intentions turned into wasteful pests. I was definitely questioning assumptions all around.

--G!


Ch-ch-ch-ch

Changes
(Turn and face the strange)

Changes!

. --David Bowie
. Changes
#19
Old 03-16-2012, 01:15 PM
I Am the One Who Bans
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 78,234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grestarian View Post
I read Kafka's Metamorphosis as part of a class during high school, in the early 1980's. We understood it as an extremely allegorical tale. Gregor represented the Soviet government, originally focussed on throwing off the yoke of monarchy and feudalism and helping the working classes gain strength and political clout, later becoming a parasitic unproductive behemoth generating fear and loathing amongst the People it was designed to benefit, and losing efficacy over time.
Did your teacher mention the story was written in 1915, before the Russian Revolution even happened? I mean, maybe the story can be applied to the USSR, but it sure as shit wasn't what Kafka was writing about.

Last edited by Marley23; 03-16-2012 at 01:19 PM.
#20
Old 03-16-2012, 01:17 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Bama
Posts: 10,747
It has also been argued that Samsa's father killing him by *penetrating* him with an apple is symbolic of the loss of sexual innocence (apple? Eden? Geddit?) of some sort which his father takes as a barrier between them. Gregor takes the abandonment as a betrayal and dies from despair.

Last edited by Ogre; 03-16-2012 at 01:18 PM.
#21
Old 03-16-2012, 01:35 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 728
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grestarian View Post
Funny you mention that. I'll respond to it last.



I read Kafka's Metamorphosis as part of a class during high school, in the early 1980's. We understood it as an extremely allegorical tale. Gregor represented the Soviet government, originally focussed on throwing off the yoke of monarchy and feudalism and helping the working classes gain strength and political clout, later becoming a parasitic unproductive behemoth generating fear and loathing amongst the People it was designed to benefit, and losing efficacy over time. We read it along with The Crocodile and The Phoenix, which were also both very allegorical.



Meanwhile, the allegorical People, if they learned to just live their lives and essentially ignore the Party and its politics, could really (eventually) achieve better than the State could offer.

* * *
Interpreting Kafka's Metamorphosis as a critical allegory for the Soviet system seemed to fit moderately well, provided we didn't try too hard to figure out what rotten apples or other elements of the story represented in the global political scene.
As oneo f the unwashed myself, i HAAAATE when teachers do this. sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. I could honestly find a made up "deeper meaning" in "ass goblins of Auschwitz" if i set my mind to it.
#22
Old 03-16-2012, 01:47 PM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: TX
Posts: 13,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by bup View Post
I'm with Marley23 and grude - I took it as a thin metaphor for being a breadwinner who becomes incapacitated.
My take as well. Samsa goes from being the self- sufficient breadwinner to being not only a burden but hideous and loathesome to himself and his family, all in a manner more dreamlike than real. It's about the loss of self, both to one's own self and to the world at large, particulary to those closest to you. It plays on the fear that something could happen to the reader that makes them burdensome and unrecognizable as the person that they once were to themselves or to those who love them, and it's horrifying.
#23
Old 03-16-2012, 02:00 PM
I Am the One Who Bans
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 78,234
Quote:
Originally Posted by pope_hentai View Post
As oneo f the unwashed myself, i HAAAATE when teachers do this. sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.
Sometimes it is and sometimes it isn't, but I agree that turning non-allegorical stories into allegories ruins them and it's a bad way to teach.
#24
Old 03-16-2012, 02:42 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: N of Denver & S of Sanity
Posts: 12,252
I've always heard it was an allegory for Kafka's TB. What I find most interesting is that Gregor is never really part of the family. He works to support them but for his family its more of a monetary arrangement than family obligation. When he turns into the vermin, it's easy for them justifying excluding him from the inner-circle of 3, but is it really any different than before he metamorphorsized?
#25
Old 03-16-2012, 03:00 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Schenectady, NY, USA
Posts: 40,712
I think that the point of the story is more than just and infirmaries of age, and less than an allegory. Samsa is living a dismal life to begin with; changing to an insect is a metaphor for the fact that he was always insignificant. He went through life like a cockroach, accomplishing nothing at all. Certainly his job gave him no satisfaction, and he had no wife or children. By becoming a insect, it was just a reflection of his own insignificance. The point is that you need to do something with your life, or you're no better than an insect.
#26
Old 03-16-2012, 04:21 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: An East Hollywood dingbat
Posts: 7,653
Many of the themes throughout Kafka's writing derive heavily from his relationship to his father. His father was extremely and often inexplicably critical and overbearing with him, and imposed a crushing, life-long psychic burden on Kafka, that obsessed him and in many ways drove him to write many of the the things he did. Kafka didn't entirely see himself as someone writing purely for publication--the great majority of his writings were published posthumously, by his friend Max Broad, who didn't burn the manuscripts after Kafka's death, as Kafka had requested.

If you really want to know what Kafka was about, read the Letter to his Father (Brief an den Vater), a hundred-page attempt to explain to his father the emotional effect he'd had on his son. After you read this, a lot of the things in The Metamorphosis (and The Trial) make more sense.

In fact, the term "kafkaesque" to refer to something that is nightmarishly bureaucractic really is a misnomer, IMHO, because for Kafka, the bureaucracies in his writings were merely metaphors for his psychological state of mind. He actually used legal proceedings and bureaucracy mostly for comedic effect, and when he first read The Trial out-loud to his friends he mostly laughed. He was a bureaucrat himself, and could see the humor in exaggerating it.

To experience the same humor from Kafka without the bureaucratic context, read Amerika, which is a hilarious and fabulous account of characters journeying through the the U.S., a place which Kafka himself never actually visited.

Last edited by guizot; 03-16-2012 at 04:23 PM.
#27
Old 03-16-2012, 04:31 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: An East Hollywood dingbat
Posts: 7,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by bup View Post
I'm with Marley23 and grude - I took it as a thin metaphor for being a breadwinner who becomes incapacitated.
(Missed edit window...) Indeed, one of the things that Kafka's father did was constantly call into doubt his son's ability to be an "upright, man of the house," making a "decent" living to support a family.
#28
Old 03-16-2012, 04:43 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 17,865
This brings to mind the debate as to how much the personal motive of an author matters as to the meaning of his or her work.

Perhaps Kafka only had his relationship with his father in mind when writing "The Metamorphosis". Unless you know about his relations with his father, there is no way of knowing this by simply reading the story. However, many people who have no idea about his retations with his father have read the story and evidently got something out of it.

Hence my point is that the story can best be read as being about alienation in general, and not narrowly about Kafka's alientation from his father specifically.
#29
Old 03-16-2012, 04:59 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: An East Hollywood dingbat
Posts: 7,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
This brings to mind the debate as to how much the personal motive of an author matters as to the meaning of his or her work. . . .
Hence my point is that the story can best be read as being about alienation in general, and not narrowly about Kafka's alientation from his father specifically.
Yes, and the appeal that his writing eventually acquired was almost despite his own efforts--I don't think his personal motives matter so much as that the majority of his works came out when and where they did, between WWI and WWII, in the middle of Europe (and in German).
#30
Old 03-17-2012, 10:48 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Halifax, NS, Canada
Posts: 527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaamika View Post
That's a pretty awesome button. And now I would get it!


ETA: But - he wasn't accomplishing things? Wasn't he trying to get his sister through school, and feed the rest of his family?
I've always taken it as the family exploiting him (making him put her through school and do all the breadwinning) to the point of taking his humanity away.
#31
Old 03-18-2012, 08:11 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: The Tropics, not in US
Posts: 3,615
I did read the book during my graduate studies while in a class on Magical Reality. One point being made is to compare what happened to Gregor as a major illness, such as cancer, and how everyone in family tries to handle it. It become such a major drain on them that everyone is happy that he is gone.
#32
Old 03-18-2012, 03:24 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imago View Post
I've always taken it as the family exploiting him (making him put her through school and do all the breadwinning) to the point of taking his humanity away.
I read it this way as well. He was doing all the "right" things, taking care of his family and being a hardworking loyal employee, but doing those things didn't serve him well in the end. There was no reward for good behavior.

I read it in high school and my english teacher was a total stoner so I was on my own as to what it meant, but what I took from it was that if you lived like a bug (family doormat, corporate lackey) you would die like a bug. Society doesn't want what's best for you, it wants what's best for it.

I don't mean that in a negative way necessarily, just that you do have to prioritize your own needs along with the needs of others. What you want has to stay somewhere near the top of the list if you're ever going to get it.
#33
Old 03-18-2012, 05:07 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Outer Control
Posts: 10,394
Quote:
Originally Posted by guizot View Post
his friend Max Broad.
Brod
#34
Old 03-18-2012, 05:28 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Maryland
Posts: 897
It's a story that explores the theme of what would happen if you woke up as a giant insect. Or vermin, whichever the case. It posits one way your family and job would react if such a thing occurred.

I do not believe it 'represents' anything more than this. Kafka wanted to tell a story, wanted to see what would happen. Of course, humans being what they are, he brought much of his own experiences and insight into the story. So maybe, subconsciously, his father or the impending Russian revolution were weighing heavily upon him, and this allowed him to better capture the mood of claustrophobic helplessness, or perhaps even toss in some kind of symbol. But I do not believe there is any one-to-one relation between the characters or events of the story and a grand statement on some higher idea.

It's an interesting story because, given the reactions of Gregor's family and workplace, it could happen to any of us. Maybe sometimes people just wake up as bugs. But I think it does a disservice to both author and story to not say that it is a first and foremost a tale about what happens when a young man suddenly finds himself an insect - nothing more, nothing less.
__________________
FICTION - Creative Prose with Rhythm. Something to tug on everyone's heartstrings.
#35
Old 03-18-2012, 05:32 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: the western edge.
Posts: 2,383
Kafka was writing about what it is like to be a member of a family/society which devalues and demeans you no matter what you do -- I always read the turning into an insect as simply Samsa becoming a physical manifestation of what he meant to his family/boss all along -- less than human, disgusting and creepy, and ultimately of little interest, like an insect. It is horrifyingly comic.

I relate to Kafka's work on such a visceral level I can't read it anymore. It's way beyond allegory, more like nightmare. Just like nightmare.

I can see that if you did not personally experience anything like what Kafka did, it would seem artificial or pointless. It isn't.
#36
Old 03-18-2012, 05:34 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Outer Control
Posts: 10,394
If you liked this, BTW, read Philip Roth's novella THE BREAST, in which a New Jersey professor wakes up to discover he has been transformed overnight into a gigantic tit.
#37
Old 03-18-2012, 07:08 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Fidèle
Posts: 730
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunshine and Smiles View Post
It's a story that explores the theme of what would happen if you woke up as a giant insect. Or vermin, whichever the case. It posits one way your family and job would react if such a thing occurred.
I haven't read the story in a while, but for some reason, I was under the impression that it was Kafka's expression that physical attributes would make one behave in certain ways. So while Gregor was trying to behave like himself right after being turned into a bug, he eventually got more and more 'buglike', based on what was easier and/or more natural for him due to his new body and abilities.

So I guess I'm saying that Kafka felt that, say, everyone's brains were suddenly placed into different bodies (people, animals, etc), those new physical characteristics would be the most important factor in how one behaves. Does that make sense?
#38
Old 03-19-2012, 06:58 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Garage & Lab
Posts: 1,232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marley23 View Post
Did your teacher mention the story was written in 1915, before the Russian Revolution even happened?
Not at all. For what it's worth, he didn't seem like a nationalistic America Uber Alis type of guy, either. But I have to admit I never even thought to find out anything about him beyond the fact that he showed up and taught each day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marley23 View Post
I mean, maybe the story can be applied to the USSR, but it sure as shit wasn't what Kafka was writing about.
Well, that's why I made a point of separating for emphasis the questioning-your-assumptions issue. Yeah, I questioned the allegorical assumptions the teacher provided, expanding them enough to see Metamorphosis as criticizing all socio-political institutions -- American, British, Chinese, etcetera, not just the Soviet system -- as starting out with benevolent intentions and turning into an unwanted drain on the intended target of the intended help.


From this discussion, I like what MoeJoe takes away from the story.

--G!

I had to hear you wonderous stories
. Chris Squire (Yes)
. Wonderous Stories
#39
Old 03-20-2012, 04:58 PM
Charter Member
Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 73,145
Does the story even need a point? Even without making sense, it still somehow manages to work.
__________________
Time travels in divers paces with divers persons.
--As You Like It, III:ii:328
Check out my dice in the Marketplace
#40
Old 03-20-2012, 09:14 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Between pole and tropic
Posts: 7,544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
This brings to mind the debate as to how much the personal motive of an author matters as to the meaning of his or her work.
In all seriousness, I ask - is that what is called hermeneutics? As is evident, I really don't understand the term. Thanks!
#41
Old 03-21-2012, 10:25 AM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 31,112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Does the story even need a point? Even without making sense, it still somehow manages to work.
It does, and it occasions a lot of discussion, as evidenced by this thread. All the same, I do like to know if there's something I missed, which is why I come here.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:14 AM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: yoohoo alcoholic drink sean bean quotes 1.3 megapixels angel devil cartoon miranda short wetbacks meaning sbcourts.org jury your very pretty non sequitur jokes insomnia and itching aspergers isn't real cat farted dead person eyes onion editorial cartoon dented wheel repair glue in german intermediate vision lenses tovarich russian uranium on amazon fork vs chopsticks 35mm film prints doctors associates christopher norris actress clair danes hot slang for died java lyrics norway ww2 10 fold definition robotussin tripping retard cats lefthanded actors transplanting dianthus mad tv kenny rogers reality show 1997 lincoln town car problems song that goes oh oh oh vampire the masquerade bloodlines morgue miller genuine draft vs miller high life no filter in air conditioner 9 volt battery uses 4 wheel drive on pavement how long can my car idle will bug zapper kill flies sticking knife in toaster pvc leaking at joint what does jct stand for one man has the rifle the next man has the bullets housewarming party invite wording funny how long does it take to recover from a gunshot wound to the abdomen certified mail not delivered soothe app happy ending how to say phi how to listen to audible books on pc why is my freezer frosting over charles coburn james coburn related how to use atm card without pin foot rest for shower shaving how to count money fast like a bank teller aye aye sir marines bugs that look like praying mantis is romeo and juliet a comedy how do you play post office how many loads of laundry per day can you get high off catnip