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#1
Old 04-15-2012, 07:13 PM
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Can I Get Out Of The Military??

Ok so I tried doing research on my own but everything that came up was a few years old. I recently joined the USAF after not getting accepted into college and thinking it was my only option, well as you probably guessed it was NOT the right chouce for me. I was wondering if there is anything i can do to leave active duty without getting a dishonorable discharge and without being close to my date of seperation. If there is anything anyone can think of to help me please let me know, im not looking to get dishonorable discharge i just want out somehow...
#2
Old 04-15-2012, 07:56 PM
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Have they paid for any schooling? How long was your contract?
#3
Old 04-15-2012, 07:58 PM
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no schooling just the training for my job, and my contract is 6 years
#4
Old 04-15-2012, 08:00 PM
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http://usmilitary.about.com/od/theor...qdischarge.htm

The link squares with what I remember. Basically, you can ask for an early separation (up to a year early, but usually less than that). However, unless your rating is WAY overcrowded, this generally requires joining the Reserves or Nat. Guard.

It also says you can request up to a six-month early discharge to start college. That one I didn't know about and I wonder if it started after I got out ('89).

NM, you answered the question.

Last edited by Zakalwe; 04-15-2012 at 08:01 PM.
#5
Old 04-15-2012, 08:14 PM
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i was looking at that article and it talkes about entry level seperation if you havent served for more than 180 days? do you possibly know what this means
#6
Old 04-15-2012, 08:19 PM
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If you get an administrative discharge, it was be characterized an Honorable or General(under honorable conditions) discharge. If it's in the first 180 days of service, the discharge won't be categorized at all.

There is some information here.

Here are some of the conditions required for an administrative discharge before the end of your contract: early release to further education, early release to accept public office, dependency or hardship, pregnancy or childbirth, conscientious objection, immediate reenlistment, separation to accept a commission, and sole surviving family member.
#7
Old 04-15-2012, 08:28 PM
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From the article linked to in my original link:

Quote:
Entry Level Separation (ELS). As I said, this characterization is often misunderstood, as some people think that it's some kind of special separation program that allows them to quit if they have less than 180 days of service. It's not. It's simply another type of service characterization. If the servicemember has less than 180 days of service, and is discharged, the commander can say "I didn't have enough time to adequately measure this person's conduct and performance," by characterizing the service as "Entry Level." That's all an ELS is.
More in the article: http://usmilitary.about.com/od/theor.../a/getout4.htm

So, in other words, you canNOT ask for an ELS. If you are getting out anyway, it's something the CO can choose to say about your service.

Note: At the bottom of that article is a list of ways to gain that initial separation that might (or might not) be characterized as ELS.

Honestly, you're probably stuck unless you're willing to live with the possibility of an "other than honorable" (which you should not be - that shit follows you around for a LONG time). Think of it as a very expensive lesson learned. Some advice - play the game the way they want it played, but don't let the game get to you (it actually does help to think of it as a game). You can survive it and you might even learn a few things that will help you later on (I know I did).

If I can ask, how long *have* you been in? Are you still in Basic or A-School? If so, just suck it up and get through it. The actual service is way different than the initial stuff. I didn't really like Basic (although I was Navy, so it was actually pretty easy) and hated School, but loved my actual job once I hit the "real" Navy.
#8
Old 04-15-2012, 08:35 PM
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Im at my first duty station, ill admit its better than basic and tech school but idk the stress and something inside me just wants to get away from it all
#9
Old 04-15-2012, 08:53 PM
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If I were advising my younger self in the first or second years of service, I would point out that an other-than-honorable discharge is not the same as a dishonorable discharge. An OTH basically means you can't get any military benefits, can't join the reserves, and shouldn't mention your past military service when applying for a job. In my case these meant absolutely nothing, as the benefits were weak and, and all prospective employers cared about was whether I had the job skills they were looking for. Nobody really gave a shit about how wonderfully your character is improved by the military unless you're applying a job with the government or with one of those mercenary contractor outfits.

So I would have started smoking pot immediately and heavily*, and let it slip out that I was doing so until I failed a drug screen. Then I would have gritted my teeth and borne the humiliation of an OTH discharge, and gotten on with reality.

* Edited to add, of course I wouldn't have been impaired while at work, and I wouldn't have gotten busted possessing, especially not in traffickable quantities. That escalates it to a whole other ballgame.

Last edited by HMS Irruncible; 04-15-2012 at 08:55 PM.
#10
Old 04-15-2012, 09:09 PM
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NM.

Last edited by MsRobyn; 04-15-2012 at 09:10 PM.
#11
Old 04-15-2012, 09:10 PM
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The easiest and fastest way to get an early separation is to fail the new PT test numerous times. It will take over a year, but the new regs have teeth and they will eventually run you out. How you'll be able to do that is beyond me because they will work you out regularly until you pass or get the boot, but that is up to you.

You could also have your girlfriend get a PFA on you. The Lautenberg Amendment guarantees that you will be drummed out.

Yet another way is to injure yourself such that you have a medically disqualifying condition. That's not the way I would go, but that's your call.

The bottom line is this: if you don't want to be there, we (fellow enlisted) don't want you to be there. Make a decision and live with your decision, Airman. Go talk to your First Sergeant tomorrow and see what happens. But whatever you decide, until it's resolved do your job to the utmost of your ability. Someone somewhere is depending on you, even if it's just to get paid. At least pretend you care.
#12
Old 04-15-2012, 09:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmic Relief View Post
If I were advising my younger self in the first or second years of service, I would point out that an other-than-honorable discharge is not the same as a dishonorable discharge. An OTH basically means you can't get any military benefits, can't join the reserves, and shouldn't mention your past military service when applying for a job.
Or a VA-backed home loan (and most government jobs *of any kind* will look askance at an OTH (incl. City, County, State, etc). That's a ton of job market to cut yourself out of esp. in this economy.

jampaintball, go talk to your chaplain or find a buddy or something. This is *not* a decision to make lightly in a moment of stress.
#13
Old 04-15-2012, 09:12 PM
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but if i were to fail a drug test wouldnt that lead to dishonorable and jail time? or is that only if you are caught in posession of it
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Old 04-15-2012, 09:16 PM
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im not letting this affect my work at all believe me i know how important this is and that its not to be taken lightly ive been off and on with this whole thing for some time now, its like every day im either fine with it all or i hate it and want out desperately, idk if thats normal for people who serve but it seems to me like everyone loves it
#15
Old 04-15-2012, 09:53 PM
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Former Personnelist here, with good contacts at AFPC(I'm now civil service).

If you don't mind my asking, what is your AFSC? How long have you been in? That will help me determine some of your options.

Aside from that, what exactly is it that has you thinking you don't want to stay in? I used to tell all my young folks to hang in a little longer. If you've just gotten to your first duty station out of tech school things *will* get better. The "real" Air Force isn't like BMT or tech training.

Don't do anything stupid like intentionally fail your PT test or drug test. You won't get kicked out right away by failing PT...it starts a long, drawn out process that will be worse than just toughing it out. As far as drug testing, there are major consequences to failing that, and I'm certain you don't want to deal with that. Dishonorable Discharge is the least of what can/will happen.

I suggest talking to your Shirt or to a Chaplain (even if you aren't particularly religious--they can't tell anyone what you talk about unless you tell them you're planning a murder).

Feel free to PM if you want to talk more about it...
#16
Old 04-15-2012, 10:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jampaintball View Post
its like every day im either fine with it all or i hate it and want out desperately
i think that's how 95% of people feel about their civilian jobs.
#17
Old 04-15-2012, 10:18 PM
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Dude, you're in the Air Force. Be glad you didn't join the Marines or the Army. Just serve your enlistment period. Its not like PT in the Air Force is all that demanding if you're in reasonable shape and relatively young. Tough it out man. You even get lowered grooming standards than the other services...and since you're enlisted you'll never have to worry about piloting a warplane to a fiery conclusion...just hang in there and you'll be fine. You signed up for it, you had time to think about it...deal with it. Your three or four years will be up before you know it and you will likely be grateful for the experience as a result.

Don't look for some bullshit way out. That's lame.
#18
Old 04-15-2012, 10:28 PM
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#19
Old 04-15-2012, 10:46 PM
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Suck it up, Airman (talking to the OP, not Doors). You made it through basic and tech school, you can make it through the rest of your hitch. Given that military budget cuts are likely in the next few years, you may have an opportunity to get out via RIF (Reduction in Force) before your enlistment contract would expire. Save some money, take advantage of the Community College of the Air Force to pick up an AA degree in your spare time, and figure out what you want to do when you do get out.

Whatever you do, do not do something stupid....like intentionally fail PT, get yourself on the "fat boy" program, or get involved with drugs. Those things have consequences that will make your life suck way more than you think it does now.

Last edited by Oakminster; 04-15-2012 at 10:50 PM.
#20
Old 04-15-2012, 10:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jampaintball View Post
im not letting this affect my work at all believe me i know how important this is and that its not to be taken lightly ive been off and on with this whole thing for some time now, its like every day im either fine with it all or i hate it and want out desperately, idk if thats normal for people who serve but it seems to me like everyone loves it
Welcome to life with a job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FoieGrasIsEvil View Post
Dude, you're in the Air Force. Be glad you didn't join the Marines or the Army. Just serve your enlistment period. Its not like PT in the Air Force is all that demanding if you're in reasonable shape and relatively young. Tough it out man. You even get lowered grooming standards than the other services...and since you're enlisted you'll never have to worry about piloting a warplane to a fiery conclusion...just hang in there and you'll be fine. You signed up for it, you had time to think about it...deal with it. Your three or four years will be up before you know it and you will likely be grateful for the experience as a result.

Don't look for some bullshit way out. That's lame.
Yeah, this. Seriously? Not bagging on the Air Force, but you should be able to hack it, even if you don't really dig your job. In the meanwhile, look at the bright side: you won't get fired, you have a place to sleep and stuff to eat, and when you leave you get some pretty decent bennies.
#21
Old 04-15-2012, 11:01 PM
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Plus, Air Force chicks...we're hot. Give yourself a little time. At least until you deploy...you may find that you love that, lots of people do.
#22
Old 04-15-2012, 11:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
Plus, Air Force chicks...we're hot. Give yourself a little time. At least until you deploy...you may find that you love that, lots of people do.
Oh, and totally this.

Wanted to pop back in and say that I knew many, many guys, myself included, who would have taken an easy, no ramifications out had it been available. *

That's why you sign a contract. It's a volunteer force up until the moment you ship to boot camp.

* disclaimer - this was in the late 90's. I can't speak to the situation of currently serving military members.
#23
Old 04-15-2012, 11:31 PM
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Man up, quit whining, honor your contract, serve your time, try to grow some balls along the way and learn responsibility. The fact that somebody actually has to tell you this shows that you're exactly where you should be at this point in life.

Last edited by Chefguy; 04-15-2012 at 11:31 PM.
#24
Old 04-16-2012, 03:13 AM
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Originally Posted by jampaintball View Post
but if i were to fail a drug test wouldnt that lead to dishonorable and jail time? or is that only if you are caught in posession of it
Like I wrote, failing a drug screen gets you other-than-honorable discharge, which is not the same as dishonorable. Other-than-honorable is something that's fine as long as you feel comfortable never working a government job and basically never mentioning your past military service for any reason. No jail time. Dishonorable is worse than that, but you won't get a dishonorable just for failing a drug screen.

But as others have mentioned... the Air Force is what's stressing you out? Seriously? You are never going to crawl in mud. You are never going to know the horrors of life without air conditioning. What's to stress, really?
#25
Old 04-16-2012, 03:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmic Relief View Post
Like I wrote, failing a drug screen gets you other-than-honorable discharge, which is not the same as dishonorable. Other-than-honorable is something that's fine as long as you feel comfortable never working a government job and basically never mentioning your past military service for any reason. No jail time. Dishonorable is worse than that, but you won't get a dishonorable just for failing a drug screen.

But as others have mentioned... the Air Force is what's stressing you out? Seriously? You are never going to crawl in mud. You are never going to know the horrors of life without air conditioning. What's to stress, really?
Yep, a question to the OP - what's stressing you out? It may be better to get to the root of the problem than to just randomly going about finding a solution. Talk to a help-line or a counselor?
#26
Old 04-16-2012, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Crowbar of Irony +3 View Post
Yep, a question to the OP - what's stressing you out? It may be better to get to the root of the problem than to just randomly going about finding a solution. Talk to a help-line or a counselor?
People tell him what to do all the time. Oh, the horror.
#27
Old 04-16-2012, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Hampshire View Post
i think that's how 95% of people feel about their civilian jobs.
Yeah, no kidding. I don't want to be an asshole, but "Oh, you hate your job? Why didn't you say so? There's a support group for that. It's called everybody, and it meets at the bar on Friday."

In other words, it sounds to me (just from what you've said here, mind you - I don't know your life) that you aren't having a hard time adjusting to the military, you're having a hard time adjusting to grownup life. Which, mind you, sucks. And there's only more of it. They want that mortgage payment every damned month, you know. And the dog absolutely has to go out in the morning - nobody else is gonna do it, so you absolutely have to get up. And the toilet does not fix itself. It's all things that you just learn to deal with, and you do find out that there are compensating benefits.
#28
Old 04-16-2012, 10:34 AM
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Originally Posted by jampaintball View Post
Can I Get Out Of The Military??
No. Honor your commitment.
#29
Old 04-16-2012, 10:35 AM
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jampaintball, your situation is completely identical to someone I knew in the USAF twelve years ago: me.

I was a young A1C stationed at Moody AFB, GA. I enlisted for the same reason as you: I was 18, my college prospects weren't good, and I had no idea what to do with myself. My recruiter knew I wanted in and that I would sign anything to make it happen. I went in on a 4-year enlistment with no bonuses and no guaranteed rank or job. I scored a 95 on the administrative portion of the ASVAB and only a 67 in the mechanical portion, but for some reason, the USAF decided to make me an A-10 mechanic. Since it became obvious that I would've killed a pilot if I were allowed to graduate from tech school, I was quietly reassigned to Transportation, a job that requires little more brainpower than a moderately trained baboon.

I was miserable. The Air Force was not for me. I hated my job and I was a high-strung Yankee living in what was probably the most conservative part of the U.S. I didn't fit in with the other Airmen and spent all my time either on my computer or sleeping.

I eventually gave up trying. I started coming into work consistently late with a messy uniform and constantly made mistakes on the job. After a few LOR's, an Article 15, and a demotion, my papers were finally on the desk of the Base Commander for my separation. He waited three months until the day after my 21st birthday to sign them, the punishment that stung the most. I ended up receiving a General Under Honorable after 23 months in the service.

I don't recommend you do what I did, as there are far less humiliating ways to separate. Talk to your Shirt. Get it on the table right now that you do not want to be in anymore. They'd rather discharge an Airman who's a problem before he or she does anything that kills someone or causes embarrassment to the Squadron.

You'll be told you need to take responsibility for signing that dotted line and that you put yourself in this situation. While that's true, 18-year-olds are not known for making the best decisions, not to mention the fact that it's a recruiter's job to make the military look like life in a college dorm. Eventually the message will get across and you'll be given the boot, but not before several uncomfortable meetings with your entire chain of command.

Good luck.

Edit: The General Under Honorable discharge didn't hurt me one bit. In fact, just the fact that I had military experience was impressive to a lot of employers. Just make sure you downplay it on your résumé... stick it way at the bottom under Education or bury it amongst your employment history.

Last edited by Agent Foxtrot; 04-16-2012 at 10:39 AM.
#30
Old 04-16-2012, 12:25 PM
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I just want to chime in with the "a real job would suck twice as hard crowd". Right now you are doing an important job for and effective and well-established organization. Most folks 'in the real world' don't have that and it adds several layers of frustration and dissatisfaction. If you were my kid (and my kid is about your age), I'd advise you to stick it out. As someone who has worked for 30 years in the same building, I can tell you, it will go by quick enough.
#31
Old 04-16-2012, 12:39 PM
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I'm an Army medic (1022 days until I get to be a civilian! oh god please speed up time right now). I have been where you are and have seen others there as well. I have suggestions not so much for how to get out but how to deal with your problem, whether it results in getting out or not.
1. Talk to your buddies. Seriously, there's a very good chance that someone right around you feels the same way. I went from "I seriously cannot deal with this another day" to "Okay, it sucks, but I can cope" in the course of one evening by finally breaking down and talking with some friends. (I won't advocate drinking if you're underage, but liberal application of alcohol helped me in that case.)
2. Talk to your leadership. Is there an NCO who you like and feel you can talk to? Talk to him - "Hey, sergeant, could I talk to you when you have a couple minutes free?" It doesn't need to be anything soul-baring, but you're most certainly not the first junior enlisted who discovers they hate life in uniform.
3. Talk to someone in medical. I don't know exactly how the Air Force works but I know that if you walk into the troop clinic here, you are presented with any number of opportunities to say, "I've been feeling really stressed out lately." Within the Army there's about five different routes you can go from there - and that's assuming you don't just go to behavioral health yourself. It is not for crazy people; they can connect you with someone who can A) sit and listen to you vent and B) offer coping strategies.
4. Check out Military OneSource. They have a ton of resources, including free, anonymous counseling face-to-face, online or over the phone. They'll probably also be able to point you at other resources if you call and ask.
5. Go and talk to your chaplain. Believe me, you will not be the first guy to go to him with the main problem of, to use military language, "Fuck this shit". Again, he may also be able to point you at further resources.

As Agent Foxtrot pointed out: they'd rather find a way to work with you even if it means getting you out, than see another idiot in the newspaper doing something incredibly stupid* and making them look bad, or - worse - seeing someone hurting themselves.

*Like a night full of drunk driving, car accidents, kidnapping, rape and assault, as happened here recently.
#32
Old 04-16-2012, 01:07 PM
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Non-military here. Injuries kept me out. Still, let me offer my opinion.

There are people who bitch and moan about their assignments, and hate every minute of them. there are those who make the best of their situations, and grow from them. Isn't it better to make the best of it? At worst, it's only temporary. At best, you get promotions, experience that can help you when you get out, and you get to go places you've never considered going.

The economy is improving, but still struggling. You get three hots and a cot, and a paycheck as well. By the time you get out, the job situation will (IMO) be better than it is now. You'll be in a better position to get a job then, and an HD will be of benefit in your search. Or if you mkae the best of it, 'find your own fun' as it were, you may decide you like it.

My SO was in the Army for six years. The bad news is that she was sent to Iraq for the first Gulf War. The good news is that she was a Black Hawk pilot. She got to fly a machine I can only dream about (I can't even afford to rent a Cessna -- let alone a Schweizer 300 helicopter -- at the moment), and she got paid for it. Is she glad she's out? Definitely. It's not easy to be a woman in a Man's World. (At least it wasn't at the time.) But she's glad she did it. It has opened several doors for her in civilian life. She also has benefits such as preferred hiring and VA benefits that I can never have.

Nobody forced you to sign the contract. Maybe it seemed like a good idea at the time, and now it doesn't. But you're in. You made a decision, and now you need to live up to your promise.

I can think of a lot of jobs that are worse than being in the Air Force. How about a soul-crushing job as a fast-food worker? Not that there's anything wrong with being a fast-food worker. They are needed, and a lot of people like it. It's just not for me. In the military you can see what jobs appeal to you, and you can probably get support to advance into them. My dad started out as an enlisted man, and was recommended for a commission. He retired as an O3 (Navy Lieutenant). Or you can take what they give you, do your job responsibly, and get out at the end of your hitch in a better situation for the rest of your life than you would have sweeping floors in a factory.

So change your perspective. Six years isn't that long.
#33
Old 04-16-2012, 01:40 PM
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Thing is, if they let you go tomorrow, then what?

You'd have to get some crap job and you'd be living with a bunch of your asshole buddies in some run-down apartment, because you won't have the income to live on your own. How is your life going to be better if you get out?

19 years old with no skills and no college means you're back where you were when you signed up. Your plan can't just be to get the fuck out of the Air Force, you have to plan for what happens next. Because when you're stuck cleaning carpets or some such and can't take it and want out, what then? There is no out, you either show up to work and get paid or you don't.
#34
Old 04-16-2012, 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Lemur866 View Post
Thing is, if they let you go tomorrow, then what?

You'd have to get some crap job and you'd be living with a bunch of your asshole buddies in some run-down apartment, because you won't have the income to live on your own. How is your life going to be better if you get out?

19 years old with no skills and no college means you're back where you were when you signed up. Your plan can't just be to get the fuck out of the Air Force, you have to plan for what happens next. Because when you're stuck cleaning carpets or some such and can't take it and want out, what then? There is no out, you either show up to work and get paid or you don't.
We don't know the OP's full story. Perhaps he has a safety net back home. If you get discharged from the military, life isn't guaranteed to suck. Obviously the military isn't the right place for jampaintball... he may do better in Americorps or something... I wish I had known about Americorps when I was his age.
#35
Old 04-16-2012, 03:55 PM
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Yeah, it may be that he's got some fallback. But my point is, he can't leave the military unless he has a plan for what he's going to do afterwards, even if that plan is go back home and live in his mom's basement and work at his uncle's carpet cleaning company.

I'm just thinking about what I would have done if I had dropped out of college at 19 because it was too much stress. My mom would have let me sleep at her place for a couple of weeks, probably. Then what? After I graduated from college, I went through a series of sketchy living situations and crappy jobs, and this is with a college degree. There were plenty of times I wanted to quit, but what would I quit from? I could leave my crappy living quarters or quit my crappy job, but then I'd have to find another crappy place to live and find another crappy job.

I'm not saying he's obligated to stay in the military, or that he's screwed if he leaves. Just that he needs to think beyond his immediate situation and think about what leaving would actually mean.
#36
Old 04-16-2012, 04:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Agent Foxtrot View Post
We don't know the OP's full story. Perhaps he has a safety net back home. If you get discharged from the military, life isn't guaranteed to suck. Obviously the military isn't the right place for jampaintball... he may do better in Americorps or something... I wish I had known about Americorps when I was his age.
He's not being discharged: he's quitting. The discharge is just the piece of paper. It sets the tone for the rest of his life. Sign up for Americorps? Sure, then quit again when somebody wants you to actually earn your check. Mothers' basements are full of 30-something "kids" whose solution to a bit of adversity is to quit and move home. Do the time, tough it out, be a better, stronger and more flexible person for it.

I mean, it's the fucking Air Force, for god's sake.

Last edited by Chefguy; 04-16-2012 at 04:02 PM.
#37
Old 04-16-2012, 04:19 PM
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When did this board revert back to 1964?

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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
He's not being discharged: he's quitting. The discharge is just the piece of paper. It sets the tone for the rest of his life.
This is pure and total bullshit propagated by the government to guilt wartime soldiers into not deserting. I quit the USAF and am doing just fine with a well-paying job, a good education, a nice house, two cars, a loving girlfriend, and four cats. Am I a loser?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Sign up for Americorps? Sure, then quit again when somebody wants you to actually earn your check. Mothers' basements are full of 30-something "kids" whose solution to a bit of adversity is to quit and move home. Do the time, tough it out, be a better, stronger and more flexible person for it.
So you're assuming that if he quits the service, then that's all he's going to be for the rest of his life? A quitter that'll move back to his parents' couch, smoke pot and play WoW all day? You sure have this guy completely figured out after knowing absolutely nothing about him.

Americorps would give him a less structured (but still fairly structured) lifestyle that would allow him to see new places and make new friends, all while making a paycheck and earning college credit and tuition. Most importantly, it'll allow him to make mistakes and learn from them without putting his life (or anyone else's) in jeopardy.

There's a difference between being a quitter and knowing when to cut your losses.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
I mean, it's the fucking Air Force, for god's sake.
And what exactly do you mean by that?
#38
Old 04-16-2012, 04:45 PM
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Would Americorps take him if he has an other-than-honorable discharge? And can he get out of the Air Force any time soon with an honorable discharge?

Obviously, we don't know much about him other than he's in the Air Force and he hates it. Perfectly normal, perfectly healthy. Everybody hates it. Now what? Is getting out of the Air Force going to solve his problem, or give him a worse problem?
#39
Old 04-16-2012, 05:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
I mean, it's the fucking Air Force, for god's sake.
Easy there, big guy. For most jobs, is the Air Force probably less physically demanding than other services, and probably more comfortable? Yeah, I'll buy that. But I'm about to go spend the next several months of my life getting my socks soaked with blood while I help re-assemble the jigsaw puzzles that various explosives make out human bodies, and I'll be doing it alongside 18, 19, etc. year old surgical technicians. And I'm not even anywhere slightly in the neighborhood of people like combat air controllers or PJs. It's not necessarily the most grueling gig in the world, but we don't all sit in front of computers all day.
#40
Old 04-16-2012, 10:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
Easy there, big guy. For most jobs, is the Air Force probably less physically demanding than other services, and probably more comfortable? Yeah, I'll buy that. But I'm about to go spend the next several months of my life getting my socks soaked with blood while I help re-assemble the jigsaw puzzles that various explosives make out human bodies, and I'll be doing it alongside 18, 19, etc. year old surgical technicians. And I'm not even anywhere slightly in the neighborhood of people like combat air controllers or PJs. It's not necessarily the most grueling gig in the world, but we don't all sit in front of computers all day.
A mere jape to take some sting out of my post. I was mighty glad to see the Zoomies laying down nape and high explosive.
#41
Old 04-17-2012, 01:19 AM
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If you are within your first 180 days just go for the discharge. People telling you to suck it up will cost you this option.

or

Just leave. Chances are they won't come after you or maybe they will I don't really know nowadays. Years from now just apply for a general discharge.
Do you really hate it this much? Pretty sure you can start college AND stay in.

I hear Canada is nice.
#42
Old 04-17-2012, 03:20 AM
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I haven't read all the replies, so FWIW, I'll say this:

The OP made a rash decision to join the USAF. Now, the OP is making a rash decision to leave the USAF.

OP, I will say this to you: as we grow, we find that we need to live with the consequences of our decisions. I bought this car, which may not have the gas mileage of that car; but which carries what I need it to when I need it to. I got this degree, which may not be immediately useful; but some potential employers will recognize my accomplishment. (And they have.)

Somewhat similarly, you need to realize that for some reason, you signed up with the USAF. There was something there to attract you. Why not the Navy or the Army? No, something about the USAF attracted you.

So you signed up for the USAF. Good for you, and I say that as a non-American. Because now, you have a job, and the opportunity to learn a trade, or get a degree, on the US Government's dime. It's up to you. Now, you need to "man up" to your decision, and go through with it.

If you leave, where will you go? What will you do? You may have good and valid answers; but I suggest that you do not. You are, as we all were when we were 18, pretty stumped by being handed adulthood, but not quite knowing what to do with it. So your job, right now, is to make the best of it. Commiserate with your squad--yes, your DI is an asshole. Shout "Sir, Yes,Sir," when you need to. Polish your shoes and your brass--honestly, I don't know, I'm going on the movies--but from what I see, such petty things will help make you an airman, and an adult to boot. I really don't like saying this, but grow up, grow a pair, and see where the USAF will take you. It just might surprise you.
#43
Old 04-17-2012, 05:44 AM
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Does your base have a staff psychologist? You need to see him/her right away.


Walk straight in, and say "You can get anything you want, at Alice's Restaurant," and walk out. If you can get a friend to go with you...
#44
Old 04-17-2012, 07:53 AM
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Just to reiterate - maybe your Air Force job sucks. Getting an other-than-honorable discharge is going to make it a lot harder to get any civilian job that doesn't suck even worse.

You made it thru basic; you can make it thru this.

Regards,
Shodan
#45
Old 04-17-2012, 08:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shodan View Post
Just to reiterate - maybe your Air Force job sucks. Getting an other-than-honorable discharge is going to make it a lot harder to get any civilian job that doesn't suck even worse.
The private sector does not know or care how you were discharged unless you try to list your military service on your employment history (which you don't need to do unless there's a conspicuous gap between employers that would be likely to used against you if you said "unemployed").

OTH just obstructs your ability to serve in the military or reserves, or to get certain government jobs, or to claim veteran status and the benefits that go with that.

Really, contrary to the hoo-hah that recruiters blow up your arse, private employers are largely uninterested in whether you served in the military.. The only exceptions are (a) if you learned necessary job skills, or (b) if you commanded a large formation of troops, or (c) if the hiring manager was also in the military and that means something to them. If your future is not in the military then your best choice is to get out as quickly as you can and start building relevant job experience.
#46
Old 04-17-2012, 09:04 AM
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jampaintball, can I ask what your plan is if you do get out? If you don't have one, you probably should consider sticking it out and using the time to figure out what you want to do afterwards.

Don't be that guy who goes back to his hometown with no plan, drifting from crappy job to crappy job and living with his folks the rest of your life.
#47
Old 04-17-2012, 12:06 PM
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If the OP had been, "Can I Get Out Of This Marriage??" most of you would be suggesting getting a good lawyer, dump the bitch and move on with your life.
I doubt any of you would be saying, "Suck it up. Grow some balls. You said "I Do" and now you have to live with her even though you hate her guts."

The kid thinks he made a mistake. He wants out. Playing macho man and slapping him upside the head with platitudes about honor and duty isn't going to change his mind or help him one iota.
#48
Old 04-17-2012, 12:21 PM
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"and 'Billy,' that forelorn little second lieutenant never forgot the advice he received that night, and worked and studied, and never again neglected to empty his bladder before a long formation. And today we all remember him not as 'Billy" but as 'William...William Calley."

Paul Harvey...gooday!



Anyway: OP, do what ever you think is best. You're 19: short of a felony, this is your time of life to fuck up with low consequences. Bear in mind that everyone you go to for help: your CO, your sergeant, chaplain, psychiatrists etc. all get paid by the Air Force, and that's who's interest they'll really be protecting. If you don't believe me, try it, and watch for the little wheels rolling behind their eyes. It's will be as good a life lesson for you as anything else suggested here.
#49
Old 04-17-2012, 12:46 PM
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Suck it up. You already did the hard part, guy. And read madmonk's post and think really hard about what else you might do if you get your release.

ETA: this has nothing to do with honor and duty; if you had a better option, you'd have taken it in the first place.

Last edited by Really Not All That Bright; 04-17-2012 at 12:48 PM.
#50
Old 04-17-2012, 12:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DMark View Post
If the OP had been, "Can I Get Out Of This Marriage??" most of you would be suggesting getting a good lawyer, dump the bitch and move on with your life.
I doubt any of you would be saying, "Suck it up. Grow some balls. You said "I Do" and now you have to live with her even though you hate her guts."
Well, marriage is generally supposed to be for life - we're talking about a few more years in a "job contract" for this guy. Plus a no-fault divorce between two employed people without kids may be a hell of a lot easier than getting out of the military in this situation.

Anyway, he's being kind of vague about what exactly is wrong. It just kind of sucks sometimes, and sometimes it's fine, and he thinks he maybe made a mistake. As other people pointed out quite rightly, lots of people feel similarly about their jobs. He doesn't mention depression, anxiety, abuse, other terrible things, and others have rightly pointed out that at the very least, he needs a plan for afterwards.
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