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#1
Old 05-11-2012, 07:13 PM
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So just how long can a human female produce breast milk?

Unfortunately I saw the recent Time Life cover with the 5 year old sucking moms titty. Plus she's nursing an adopted child from Africa.

Could these kid still nurse off her as teenagers?

Is there a limit on how long mothers can produce milk? Will the breast keep producing milk as long as a kid is nursing off it?

Makes me wonder if that Dugger woman has been nursing those 20 kids of hers non-stop.

Last edited by aceplace57; 05-11-2012 at 07:18 PM.
#2
Old 05-11-2012, 07:23 PM
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I'm pretty sure there's no correlation and one doesn't even need to have been pregnant to produce milk in the first place. Can't surrogate or adoptive mums produce milk given the stimulation?

I'm willing to participate in a study.
#3
Old 05-11-2012, 07:28 PM
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*All women are different, in any medical question there is a big variation.

That said I think it is like a switch that comes with your first pregnancy, it has been two years since my wife was pregnant and she never really breast fed but not due to lack of trying.


Yet if we have sex too frequently my wife starts lactating again(due to sucking). If we back off on that it quickly stops.
#4
Old 05-11-2012, 07:32 PM
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That's a three year-old she's breastfeeding on the cover, and in a pose the photographer put them in rather than the usual half-sitting position breastfeeding toddlers take. She does not feed her child standing up, like a calf and a cow.

Typically, a (male or female) breast will produce milk as long as it's properly stimulated to do so; there are countries where children are breastfed until 5 or older b/c of a lack of nutritious food. There have been women throughout history who were paid wet-nurses for years and years; that was their job.

Did you mean to put this in General Questions, where factual questions w/o a subjective basis go? Or IMHO?
#5
Old 05-11-2012, 07:36 PM
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This is a factual question.

How long can a human breast produce milk? There should be a physical limit.

You wouldn't expect that it would be possible for a 8 or 10 year old child to breastfeed from mom. But is it possible?
#6
Old 05-11-2012, 07:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nawth Chucka View Post
Typically, a (male or female) breast will produce milk as long as it's properly stimulated to do so
Men can lactate usually under unusual conditions, but from stimulation alone? I find it difficult to believe if I hooked up a electric breast pump to a normal adult male he would just start lactating.
#7
Old 05-11-2012, 07:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
This is a factual question.

How long can a human breast produce milk? There should be a physical limit.

You wouldn't expect that it would be possible for a 8 or 10 year old child to breastfeed from mom. But is it possible?
To the bolded, why would you think that? Mammary glands produce as long as they're asked and able to do so. If you go to the link I included in my first reply you can see by what mechanism. Be warned, there are pictures of breasts with babies and toddlers feeding from them at that link.

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Originally Posted by grude View Post
Men can lactate usually under unusual conditions, but from stimulation alone? I find it difficult to believe if I hooked up a electric breast pump to a normal adult male he would just start lactating.
You're right as that's not proper stimulation. Lactation can be stimulated by any number of means, be they herbal, hormonal or by physical manipulation.

Last edited by Nawth Chucka; 05-11-2012 at 07:53 PM.
#8
Old 05-11-2012, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Nawth Chucka View Post
Lactation can be stimulated by any number of means, be they herbal, hormonal or by physical manipulation.
Can you provide some evidence for this claim that males are able to lactate through physical manipulation?
#9
Old 05-11-2012, 08:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Blake View Post
Can you provide some evidence for this claim that males are able to lactate through physical manipulation?
I would speculate that combining herbal or hormonal protocols w/ the physical manipulation of a breast pump would be more successful for men to lactate but some have written otherwise. This page has many of the same sources I've read since I started looking into inducing lactation myself (though I'm a woman). **Be warned there are GRAPHIC thumbnail pictures of naked women and women giving birth at the link.**
#10
Old 05-11-2012, 09:25 PM
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Scientific American article:
Quote:
The little anthropological evidence documented suggests it is possible. In the 1896 compendium Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine, George Gould and Walter Pyle catalogue several instances of male nursing being observed. [...]

Jack Newman, a Toronto-based doctor and breast-feeding expert, insists that in order to produce milk, a hormone spike must occur. [...]

Newman explains that medical disruptions involving prolactin, the hormone necessary to produce milk, have resulted in spontaneous lactation. Thorazine, a popular antipsychotic used in the mid-20th century, impacted the pituitary gland—the pea-size endocrine gland located near the base of the brain—often causing it to overproduce prolactin. If prolactin levels remained high, milk could follow. [...]

In a 1995 article for Discover titled "Father's Milk," Pulitzer Prize-winning author and one-time physiologist Jared Diamond reconciles the nipple stimulation and hormone quandary, pointing out that such stimulation can release prolactin. He also notes that starvation—which inhibits the functioning of hormone-producing glands as well as the hormone-absorbing liver—can cause spontaneous lactation, as observed in survivors of Nazi concentration camps and Japanese POW camps in World War II.
#11
Old 05-11-2012, 09:31 PM
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As for the question about a time limit on female lactation, AFAICT the other respondents are correct that there's no physical limit on the natural duration of lactation, as long as periodic suckling stimulation keeps the prolactin flowing. Apparently induced lactation can occur even in postmenopausal women.

And when you consider how vitally important breastfeeding has been for the survival of offspring throughout most of human history, you can kind of see why having more emergency options for producing breast milk might be evolutionarily advantageous.
#12
Old 05-11-2012, 10:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Kimstu View Post
Those are all unusual conditions, ditto for hormone supplements.
#13
Old 05-11-2012, 10:24 PM
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I'm having no luck finding her name at the moment, but the oldest woman reputed to be working as a wet nurse was 85. It's very possible, of course, that she wasn't quite that old, as record keeping in the days of yore wasn't all that great, but she was certainly elderly.

Now...that's not "normal". Most women don't lactate nearly that long. But that could be because most women don't want to or try to, so we don't really know what the "normal" limit is. Most women can lactate as long as they keep extracting milk, whether it be by mouth, hand or, if they're lucky, pump. (Some women can't extract milk with a pump at all - babies don't remove milk by sucking exactly, but by compression. Pumps suck, and only work for some.)

There have been substantiated reports of male lactation, but again, it's not "normal". It's probable that they have some sort of hormonal issue going on that hasn't been diagnosed...especially probable as most of these reports come from third world countries, where the medical care is a bit different than ours.

But many (I don't know if it's "most") non-biological mothers, non recent mothers and fathers can lactate if you give them enough hormones first. The most common therapy involves giving high doses of estrogen/progesterone (birth control pills) and domperidone - a medication that indirectly increases prolactin levels - for a few months (if possible) and then abruptly stopping the estrogen/progesterone. This mimics the hormone pattern of pregnancy and then childbirth. Nipple stimulation is generally advised, as well. Sometimes herbs such as blessed thistle and fenugreek are suggested too. Google Newman-Goldfarb Protocols if you want to know more.

There are special feeders which adoptive parents can use to help things along. Basically a bottle or bag of milk or formula is hung around the parent's neck with a tube that goes around to the nipple. The tube and nipple are placed in the infant's mouth. As the child feeds, he gets milk from the tube and the stimulation increases the prolactin level in the parent. Ideally, the parent begins to produce his/her own milk and the bottled milk and tube are discontinued. Google Lact-aid supplementer for more information.
#14
Old 05-11-2012, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by grude View Post
Those are all unusual conditions, ditto for hormone supplements.
I don't think anybody here has claimed that human males lactate except under unusual conditions.
#15
Old 05-11-2012, 10:40 PM
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Originally Posted by WhyNot View Post

There have been substantiated reports of male lactation, but again, it's not "normal". It's probable that they have some sort of hormonal issue going on that hasn't been diagnosed...especially probable as most of these reports come from third world countries, where the medical care is a bit different than ours.
There's this guy. (What's up with the woman sitting in the bathtub full of milk?)
#16
Old 05-11-2012, 10:47 PM
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Originally Posted by WhyNot View Post
But many (I don't know if it's "most") non-biological mothers, non recent mothers and fathers can lactate if you give them enough hormones first.
Have you ever actually seen a father(or even read of one in medical journals) actually successfully doing this and breast feeding a child?
#17
Old 05-11-2012, 10:58 PM
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Amazing. I would have thought the hormone changes in menopause would have stopped milk production.

Ok, this brings up the obvious question. Did primitive societies use women instead of livestock for milk production? If a primitive tribe had no cows or goats, but hey had fifty women and a bucket.

That wouldn't fly today. That's for sure. But, it might be a solution for a very primitive tribe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimstu View Post
As for the question about a time limit on female lactation, AFAICT the other respondents are correct that there's no physical limit on the natural duration of lactation, as long as periodic suckling stimulation keeps the prolactin flowing. Apparently induced lactation can occur even in postmenopausal women.

And when you consider how vitally important breastfeeding has been for the survival of offspring throughout most of human history, you can kind of see why having more emergency options for producing breast milk might be evolutionarily advantageous.

Last edited by aceplace57; 05-11-2012 at 11:00 PM.
#18
Old 05-11-2012, 11:08 PM
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Even men with prolactin secreting tumors of the pituitary gland (where elevated prolactin levels are sustained for years and at levels far in excess of those produced by manual stimulation) rarely, if ever, lactate.

That observation reminds us that only a breast primed by sufficient estrogen will respond to prolactin stimulation to produce milk. So unless a man also has abnormally high estrogen levels as well as high prolactin levels (no matter how induced), he will almost never lactate.

Last edited by KarlGauss; 05-11-2012 at 11:09 PM.
#19
Old 05-11-2012, 11:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
Amazing. I would have thought the hormone changes in menopause would have stopped milk production.

Ok, this brings up the obvious question. Did primitive societies use women instead of livestock for milk production? If a primitive tribe had no cows or goats, but hey had fifty women and a bucket.

That wouldn't fly today. That's for sure. But, it might be a solution for a very primitive tribe.
A single goat can outproduce a woman any day of the week and twice on Sundays. Even superlactators can't match a cow or a yak.

And before modern breast pumps, there was really no good way to milk a woman unless the milker swallowed the milk. Most of us can't get more than a few dribbles or quick squirt by hand, and as I said before, many of us can't even get out much milk with a good pump. Udders are better than breasts for milking without immediate consumption.
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Originally Posted by grude View Post
Have you ever actually seen a father(or even read of one in medical journals) actually successfully doing this and breast feeding a child?
Seen? No. But I'll be honest, I've only seen maybe a dozen women lactate with my own eyes. Anecdotal reports and case reports yes, most of which were mentioned in the thread or in articles linked to in the thread already. I've heard tell of some gay fathers giving it a go, too. But as far as I can tell, there have not been scientific studies of the issue.
#20
Old 05-12-2012, 12:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
Ok, this brings up the obvious question. Did primitive societies use women instead of livestock for milk production? If a primitive tribe had no cows or goats, but hey had fifty women and a bucket.

That wouldn't fly today. That's for sure. But, it might be a solution for a very primitive tribe.
As WhyNot noted, in pre-modern times it was hard to milk a human female except by direct suckling.

Probably more importantly, though, it's unlikely that any early humans drank breast milk after young childhood, except in very unusual circumstances. AFAIK, no other mammalian species habitually consumes mother's milk in adulthood (because they, like early humans, habitually become lactose-intolerant at that stage), and I don't know any reason to think that humans would have done so.

Probably most importantly of all, though, it's not efficient to feed a female perfectly good people-food just in order to get milk from her. If you've got enough high-quality omnivore-diet sustenance to keep a "milch woman" lactating, you might as well just eat it yourself and skip the dairy-production step. The only people who can't eat regular people-food instead of breast milk are infants, so it makes sense to restrict breast milk production to infant use only.

The advantage to using ruminants instead of humans when it comes to dairy farming (besides the greater yield and greater ease of milking that WhyNot mentioned) is that they'll produce all that milk on a diet of pasture grass that is nutritionally useless (or at least very low-value) to you. They turn low-calorie forage that you mostly can't eat anyway into high-protein, high-calorie milk that you can.
#21
Old 05-12-2012, 04:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
Amazing. I would have thought the hormone changes in menopause would have stopped milk production.

Ok, this brings up the obvious question. Did primitive societies use women instead of livestock for milk production? If a primitive tribe had no cows or goats, but hey had fifty women and a bucket.

That wouldn't fly today. That's for sure. But, it might be a solution for a very primitive tribe.
I can't find a cite at the moment, but I am pretty sure I have heard of something like this among desert dwellers in southern Africa. Certain women of the tribe would be kept fat so that they could provide milk during times of drought.
#22
Old 05-13-2012, 09:53 AM
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I've always though that if a child is old enough that they could remember breastfeeding when the reached adulthood, maybe the child should not be breastfeeding.

I suppose the other problem with using women to produce milk is that they have not been bred, like goats or cows, for the best configuration to be milked. Unfortunately, society is going in the wrong direction on this, since silicone implants don't help with milk production, and nobody is selecting for easily manually milkable nipples. There are breast pumps, though. I wonder if they make electric/vaccuum ones...
#23
Old 05-13-2012, 10:14 AM
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Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
I've always though that if a child is old enough that they could remember breastfeeding when the reached adulthood, maybe the child should not be breastfeeding.
Thank you for your opinion. Given the rest of your post, I'll be sure to give it all the weight it merits.
Quote:
I suppose the other problem with using women to produce milk is that they have not been bred, like goats or cows, for the best configuration to be milked.
Goats and cows weren't bred to have udders. They evolved from animals (cows from aurochs and goats from, erm, wild goats) that already had udders. Good milk producers were selected for, sure, but the basic anatomical set up was not. They were domesticated because they were already the ideal shape.

Quote:
Unfortunately, society is going in the wrong direction on this, since silicone implants don't help with milk production,
Most people with silicone implants can successfully breast feed. They don't help, but with modern surgical techniques and a good surgeon, they tend not to hinder, either.

And silicone implants are not an inheritable trait. If your mother's bad boob job left her unable to breastfeed, that doesn't mean you can't breastfeed your infant.

Quote:
and nobody is selecting for easily manually milkable nipples
Well, yes, this part is true.
Quote:
There are breast pumps, though. I wonder if they make electric/vaccuum ones...
Am I missing a joke here? Most breast pumps are electric vacuum ones. There are manual vacuum ones, but they're only used for occasional pumping. If you pump more than once a day, you get an electric, preferably a double pump that can do both breasts at once.

I am unaware of any breast pump that doesn't work by vacuum.
#24
Old 05-13-2012, 01:09 PM
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Compare a modern "Holstein" with the traditional cow of that sort. In the last century, intense breeding has produced a cow much larger and udders 2 or 3 times larger, so it produces significantly more milk. This of course is all milk gland - adding volume with silicone inserts does not increase milk production, it simply fools those desiring to select for the trait. (A common male fantasy these days, if mens' magazines are to be believed).

OK, I am throughly unfamiliar with the whole field of lactation with or without oral assistance. The only breast-pump I recall seeing was one on the news (or was it a comedy movie?) that was hand-pumped. So we have reached the stage where they function like at a modern dairy farm, there are just not any (I hope) designed to milk a whole herd of women at once...

Seriously, breastfeeding is a healthy and natural practice. Just, at a certain age, it is time to let go the things of a child...
#25
Old 09-21-2012, 01:56 PM
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Related (???) question . . . How much?

How much milk can a woman produce at a sitting, and how much in a 24-hr period? I have been living in Ecuador for some years, married to an Ecuadorian girl who routinely produces a liter from each breast at a sitting, although 4 doctors in the last 6 years have told me that is not possible (I only asked them, without mentioning my wife). We have 3 children—a boy 6, another who is 5, and a girl 3—who were all breast fed and still are. Peasant, indigenous women here are not tall and do have big breasts. I asked my wife if her sisters (2) and mother had/have produced similarly, and she seemed astonished or confused by the question, but said yes, that it is common among all the women she has known. I am also wondering if its ethnicity or what that apparently makes them so strikingly different than European and North American women. For prodigious nursing they don't appear to suffer nutritionally in advanced age. When she visits family an leaves one or two of our older children with me, they help themselves to my wife's saved milk from the fridge or freezer (we also use her milk in place of cow's milk for everything that comes from the kitchen).

Last edited by Word Wizard; 09-21-2012 at 02:01 PM.
#26
Old 09-21-2012, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
I'm pretty sure there's no correlation and one doesn't even need to have been pregnant to produce milk in the first place. Can't surrogate or adoptive mums produce milk given the stimulation?

I'm willing to participate in a study.
Anecdotal, admittedly second-hand: a friend of mine had adopted kids. He swore his wife had spontaneously begun lactating when one couldn't handle formula.
#27
Old 09-21-2012, 04:09 PM
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Originally Posted by grude View Post
Men can lactate usually under unusual conditions, but from stimulation alone? I find it difficult to believe if I hooked up a electric breast pump to a normal adult male he would just start lactating.
"I have nipples, Greg. Can you milk me?" [/Jack Byrnes]
#28
Old 09-21-2012, 05:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Word Wizard View Post
How much milk can a woman produce at a sitting, and how much in a 24-hr period?
How are you measuring the liter? Is this when she's pumping milk? Or are you weighing a baby/child who is nursing?

A liter sounds like a lot. A whole lot. A newborn rarely takes more than 100mL at once. A two month old may take 200mL. The general rule of thumb for pumping moms is that you take the baby's weight in pounds, multiply by 2.5, and that's how many ounces the child will likely take in 24 hours. So...if I haven't forgotten everything I know about conversion factors, in metric you'd multiply the baby's weight in kg by 163, and the result is how many mL of milk he's likely to need.

So a baby is near 15 pounds (~7 kg) before he requires a liter of milk in a whole day. He'd be in third grade by the time he needed a liter per feeding!

I'm not going to say it's impossible - there are women, as mentioned earlier in the thread, who are just super duper lactators. Theoretically, if you keep stimulating the nipples, you'll make more and more milk. I don't know if there's a limit to that, beyond the speed at which milk ducts can make more milk. I just wonder what the situation is that would create that much milk.

There was one (white, European descent) woman in my Lactation for Moms of Preemies class who was very confused by the directions the hospital gave us.

"I don't understand...it says, 'pump 2 minutes past the end of the flow of milk.' What does that mean?"

The lactation consultant said, "Well, when the milk stops, pump for two more minutes. That will stimulate your breasts to make more milk next time."

"But...what do you mean, stops? It doesn't stop." She'd pumped for 45 minutes, waiting for her milk flow to stop, and it never did. (Most women drain a breast in about 20 minutes, give or take.)

I tried not to hate her too much, as I struggled to make even 50 mL at a time.

Quote:
Peasant, indigenous women here are not tall and do have big breasts.
Large breast size is not an indicator of good milk production. In fact, for complex hormonal and physical reasons, very large breasted women (like myself) tend to have more trouble producing milk than smaller women.

If I ever hear, "What? How could YOU not be making enough milk?! They're huge!" again, noses will be punched.
#29
Old 09-21-2012, 07:09 PM
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As far as how much milk a woman can produce, the example that comes to my mind is the Chinese policewoman & mother who kept at one point nine babies fed after a major earthquake.
#30
Old 04-17-2017, 04:42 AM
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Question...

I also have this problem.... I am 37 almost 38 and my daughter is almost 22. I still have leaking of breast milk.
My hubby also has noticed and so have i. I have had all tests done and nothing seems to be wrong. Any ideas?............
Quote:
Originally Posted by grude View Post
*All women are different, in any medical question there is a big variation.

That said I think it is like a switch that comes with your first pregnancy, it has been two years since my wife was pregnant and she never really breast fed but not due to lack of trying.


Yet if we have sex too frequently my wife starts lactating again(due to sucking). If we back off on that it quickly stops.
#31
Old 06-07-2017, 09:33 AM
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Originally Posted by smbear09 View Post
I also have this problem.... I am 37 almost 38 and my daughter is almost 22. I still have leaking of breast milk.
My hubby also has noticed and so have i. I have had all tests done and nothing seems to be wrong. Any ideas?............
There's quite a long list of things that can cause women to produce nipple discharge (that may or may not look like milk) when they're not breastfeeding. The list includes common things like birth control pills or other medications. It also includes benign (not-cancer) tumors in the breast tissue or in the brain. But of course, it can also be a sign of cancer, so it's always important to get it checked out by a doctor. I'm glad to hear you've done that.

Since nothing seems to be wrong, it's likely got to do with hormonal fluctuations during your menstrual cycle, and should stop when you enter menopause.

If it ever changes in appearance or quantity, go back to get it checked out again, though. Just because you have harmless leaking now doesn't mean you can't get cancer on top of it.
#32
Old 06-09-2017, 09:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Kimstu View Post
Probably more importantly, though, it's unlikely that any early humans drank breast milk after young childhood, except in very unusual circumstances. AFAIK, no other mammalian species habitually consumes mother's milk in adulthood (because they, like early humans, habitually become lactose-intolerant at that stage), and I don't know any reason to think that humans would have done so.
...
The advantage to using ruminants instead of humans when it comes to dairy farming (besides the greater yield and greater ease of milking that WhyNot mentioned) is that they'll produce all that milk on a diet of pasture grass that is nutritionally useless (or at least very low-value) to you. They turn low-calorie forage that you mostly can't eat anyway into high-protein, high-calorie milk that you can.
The interesting Thing is, that for humans with the right gene Mutation (mostly Europeans), if they Keep drinking milk (cows milk usually) after breastfeeding stops, they Keep producing lactase.
Though even there is a wide spread, and not all oler Europeans can drink milk without Problems.

However, as the genetic-Asian Mongols also did, even without having the Enzyme, humans can still use milk by curdling it into cheese (with herbs or from calves stomach) or letting the milk ferment into light alcoholic drink. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kumis

So letting dairy animals use the grass humans can't eat is useful even for lactose-intolerant humans.
#33
Old 06-09-2017, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by njtt View Post
I can't find a cite at the moment, but I am pretty sure I have heard of something like this among desert dwellers in southern Africa. Certain women of the tribe would be kept fat so that they could provide milk during times of drought.
I know this post is several years old, but since the zombie has been poked, I want to address what has got to be an Urban Legend. You need fluid to produce milk. If there is water to give a woman to make milk, then just give it to everyone.

I have been a nursing mother, and breastfeeding makes you thirsty. Whenever I sat down to nurse my son, I always made sure I had a glass of water to replace the fluid I was losing. At first I wasn't careful about this, and didn't understand why I was so thirsty all the time. All those wet diapers he was producing-- that had to go into me first.

When the boychik was about 14 months, I caught a stomach virus (from him) and couldn't even keep down water. My husband went out and got him some Pediasure, and gave it to him from a bottle when he wanted to nurse, because I was so dehydrated, I was afraid to nurse him. It lasted about 16 hours. 24, and I would have gone to the hospital.

Someone else already pointed out that there's no use in feeding women to get them to produce milk except for infants. If you have food, you give it to the adults. If you don't, women can't produce milk-- a woman with an infant and no food might produce milk for a few days, but that all comes from her own bodily resources, it's not free. Something I'd like to pound into Steinbeck's head.

Last edited by RivkahChaya; 06-09-2017 at 12:23 PM.
#34
Old 06-09-2017, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by constanze View Post
The interesting Thing is, that for humans with the right gene Mutation (mostly Europeans), if they Keep drinking milk (cows milk usually) after breastfeeding stops, they Keep producing lactase.
Though even there is a wide spread, and not all oler Europeans can drink milk without Problems.

However, as the genetic-Asian Mongols also did, even without having the Enzyme, humans can still use milk by curdling it into cheese (with herbs or from calves stomach) or letting the milk ferment into light alcoholic drink. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kumis

So letting dairy animals use the grass humans can't eat is useful even for lactose-intolerant humans.
Lactose-intolerant humans are usually intolerant only to cow's milk, not goat's milk. I don't know why. But it's the reason that goat and lamb cheese are so popular in the Mediterranean, because that's a region where people don't tend to have the lactase gene.

Anyway, when I was a teenager (1980s) I babysat a baby who was adopted, and happened to be both lactose-intolerant and allergic to soy, so her parents couldn't buy
formula off the shelves. When she was first diagnosed, she was on donor breastmilk for a few weeks, then on elemental formula for the next six months, which the parents had shipped to them every week, and which thankfully their insurance paid for. When she turned six months, they started making their own formula with goat's milk, water, Karo syrup, and a vitamin supplement they got with a prescription. She was also eating some foods by then, so she got a lot of vitamins that way.

I don't know if she ever could drink cow's milk, or if she outgrew the allergy to soy, but when she was three, which was about when I stopped babysitting for them (I finished high school), they still had goat's milk in the fridge.
#35
Old 06-09-2017, 01:16 PM
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Back in the day, goat's milk was fed to babies who weren't breast-fed. My maternal grandfather kept goats during the Depression for this reason. It's closer to human milk than cow's milk is; we use cow's milk and derivatives because it's cheaper and easier to obtain.
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