Closed Thread
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 05-30-2012, 04:55 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Posts: 19,294
I need to glue a plastic piece in my freezer.... how?

A piece that helps attach the little shelf/bins to the door of the freezer has broken off and needs to be glued. The freezer and fridge are full of food and we only have a medium sized ice chest, so taking the food out and turning off the fridge is something we're trying to avoid. Anyway, our lease is up at the end of the month and we're trying to fix everything up, so we need to fix this broken plastic piece...

What kind of glue would A) work adhering plastic to plastic and B) set up in the cold, dry atmosphere of the inside of a freezer? Is there a way to do it?

I suppose as a last ditch we could wait until the last day when we're moving out and have removed all of the food and unplug it and glue it then, but we're really like to get it fixed before that (partially to make sure our fix works!). Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
#2
Old 05-30-2012, 05:01 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 14,896
If this won’t glue it together, nothing will.
However, I doubt it will set up in sub-zero temperatures. You might be able to just remove the food from the door, and hand a thick blanket over the open freezer for the 20 minutes it takes to set up.
#3
Old 05-30-2012, 05:14 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 3,843
JB Weld. I'd go for the more is better rule in this application. If you can fill the inside area and duct tape the piece in place while it cure it might work.
#4
Old 05-30-2012, 05:19 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 38,291
Empty whatever part of the freezer you can. Shove everything else over as far as it will go. Get some two-part epoxy, similar to what was linked to above. Turn the freezer OFF temporarily. Use a hair dryer to heat the area to be glued. Work quickly to apply the epoxy and to hold it in place. Let it set up for the required time, probably about 5 minutes for an initial cure. It will take about 24 hours for full cure at room temp (only about 90 minutes for it to be usable). Why not go buy a cheap Styrofoam cooler and pack your frozen stuff in ice for a day while this cures? Freezing temps are not going to be good for an exothermic adhesive.

Last edited by Chefguy; 05-30-2012 at 05:21 PM.
#5
Old 05-30-2012, 06:37 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Encinitas
Posts: 2,410
I'd recommend JB-Kwik. I have worked with a lot of urethanes, epoxies and such and the general rule was that cure time doubles (or halves with an increase in temperature) with every 10 degree Fahrenheit drop in temperature. If the full cure time for 65 degrees is 4 hours (like JB Kwik) and your freezer is at 5 degrees F that means you're going to have to keep the pieces aligned for 26 or 32 times longer. The good news is that JB-Kwik sets in about five or ten minutes. Setting means it's no longer runny and will hold its shape. So you can figure 3 hours to set and three weeks to full hardness. I assume by "the end of the month" you mean the end of June? Otherwise get some good quality CA (SuperGlue) adhesive and spray it with an accelerator on June 29!
#6
Old 05-30-2012, 06:48 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Encinitas
Posts: 2,410
On re-reading the suggestions Chefguy's idea is good too. But I'd keep the blow dryer on it as long as feasible. Tightly packed frozen food takes at least a few hours to thaw so that should give you some leeway.
#7
Old 05-30-2012, 06:54 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 3,070
Borrow another ice chest from a neighbor or fashion a temporary ice chest? I'm thinking a large plastic bin, some ice and a sleeping bag to throw over the top.
#8
Old 05-30-2012, 11:05 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Northern USA
Posts: 1,943
What type of plastic? JB weld and other epoxies won't stick to many plastics. Often a recycle symbol will tell you what kind it is. Look for something made for it. When in doubt, I use 3 way plastic pipe cement. Big can for a few dollars, sticks to vinyl and ABS, both of which are hard to glue. Sets up almost instantly at room temperature. I have used it for a bunch of stuff besides pluming, the shift boot on my car, a printer, etc.

Also super glue will show less then JB weld.

Last edited by thelabdude; 05-30-2012 at 11:07 PM.
#9
Old 05-30-2012, 11:38 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 14,896
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelabdude View Post
What type of plastic? JB weld and other epoxies won't stick to many plastics. Often a recycle symbol will tell you what kind it is. Look for something made for it. When in doubt, I use 3 way plastic pipe cement. Big can for a few dollars, sticks to vinyl and ABS, both of which are hard to glue. Sets up almost instantly at room temperature. I have used it for a bunch of stuff besides pluming, the shift boot on my car, a printer, etc.

Also super glue will show less then JB weld.
Which is why I suggested the two-part plastic welder. It is designed to soften and bond to many different types of plastic, and will glue almost anything but low-surface-energy plastics (like Teflon and PPE).
#10
Old 05-30-2012, 11:55 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 12,056
solvent welding works good when the fit is very tight. that can be hard to achieve with broken pieces, easy to have the parts stick together misaligned and weak.
#11
Old 05-31-2012, 12:11 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 14,896
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpost View Post
solvent welding works good when the fit is very tight. that can be hard to achieve with broken pieces, easy to have the parts stick together misaligned and weak.
If you are replying to my post, this isn't a cement. It's a thick, epoxy-like glue that can be built up to fill large gaps.
#12
Old 05-31-2012, 12:40 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Posts: 19,294
Thanks for all the tips. I'll research the various glues you guys have mentioned online tomorrow.

I'll call the appliance place tomorrow from work and find out if they know what kind of plastic it is... I don't think we can turn off the freezer without turning off the refrigerator, too, and it really isn't feasible to find a way to keep everything from the freezer AND the refrigerator cold for several hours... it would take a lot of ice chests (when you take into account that part of the space has to be taken up with...ICE...) If we can't find a glue that will set in the cold, we'll probably have to wait until move-out day and hope for the best...

Dan has some Gorilla Glue that he thought might work--anyone have any experience with that?
#13
Old 05-31-2012, 12:49 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 14,896
I wouldn't use Gorilla Glue to glue plastic.
#14
Old 05-31-2012, 01:47 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 13,516
Quote:
Originally Posted by OpalCat View Post
A piece that helps attach the little shelf/bins to the door of the freezer has broken off
In many refrigerators, this whole shelf is removable. Check to see if that's the case in yours. If so, remove it, let it sit and warm up for a day or so, glue it, let it sit another day to cure, and then replace it in the freezer.

Note: it's probably advisable to remove the stuff in the door into the ice chest while the gluing is happening. Otherwise a forgetful person opening the door too quickly will dump out all the contents. A friend once did this, and a frozen tub of lard landed on her toe and broke it.
#15
Old 05-31-2012, 06:27 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Lovely Montclair, NJ
Posts: 12,415
Spend the next week eating your frozen food. lower the temperature on your freezer to max cold the day before you do the work. Put the frozen food in a cooler while you work, leave the refrigerator section closed, it'll be fine for a few hours if you don't open it. You can get a disposable styrofoam cooler really cheap if you need more space. Pack the coolers tight and don't open them until you're ready to put the food back in the cold freezer, they'll be fine for a few hours.

Warm the freezer up with a hair dryer, glue it, keep the hair dryer on it for a while to speed the cure, then turn on the fridge, wait for it to get cold and move your food back.
#16
Old 05-31-2012, 07:40 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Northern USA
Posts: 1,943
If it is removable, can you buy a new one? I just found a new lint screen for our 70's dryer on Ebay.
#17
Old 05-31-2012, 08:56 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 13,183
If the size of the pieces permit, consider including a pin in your fix along with the adhesive.. A small length cut from a paper clip would be sufficient. That way, you aren't entirely depending on glue to hold everything together when the clip has a load placed on it.
#18
Old 05-31-2012, 09:17 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Great White North
Posts: 3,989
You could also try a Loctite product.

If everything in your freezer is frozen, it would take hours (maybe days) for it to thaw out.

Fill your freezer(the less air the better), add towels/blanket to insulate it, then seal up the door opening with tape and a garbage bag.
This should give you lots of time to get the door up to temperature, make the repairs, and allow for drying time.
#19
Old 05-31-2012, 09:32 AM
Registered User
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,980
My fridge has separate controls for freezer and refrigerator, located on the top wall of the fridge section. They are two dials that go from 0 (off) to 10 (ice age). If yours has the same you can turn the freezer off but leave the fridge on.

If you do pack up your frozen stuff, as long as it is frozen solid and packed together tightly in an insulated container it will stay frozen for days without needing a whole lot of ice in the cooler. Last fall when we had the flood scare we packed up the good stuff from the freezer when we evacuated, and it was still frozen solid 3 days later.

Last edited by Azeotrope; 05-31-2012 at 09:34 AM.
#20
Old 05-31-2012, 09:51 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 13,170
I'll agree with what several others said... OPen the freezer door, use masking tape or something and seal a piece of plastic over the opening in the freezer. Put insulation (blanket, towel) over that. If necessary, tape the corners of the towel to ensure it's held agains the plastic for good insulation.

A big lump of frozen food takes long enough to thaw in nice open room temperature. So what if your fridge is working a little bit overtime? It will stay cold with that setup. That setup is not that different than the door closed.

Try to figure out what glue you need. Generally, min expoxy sticks to almost everything. If it turns out the stuff does not work, repeat as necessary. If it won't stick, it should peel off easily...

Last edited by md2000; 05-31-2012 at 09:52 AM.
#21
Old 05-31-2012, 01:05 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,418
Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
I wouldn't use Gorilla Glue to glue plastic.
I'll second this. Gorilla Glue expands as it cures. Even if the parts fit together nicely with little or no gap, unless you can clamp or otherwise fixture the piece in place there is going to be a very noticeable seam after it cures.
#22
Old 06-01-2012, 09:27 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 466
If you can find the model number of your refrigerator and it is not ancient, you probably can find the part online. Google the model number (they are usually pretty unique strings of numbers and letters, so googling can usually get you to a site that has parts for ordering). I have done this a number of times for various types of appliances.
#23
Old 06-01-2012, 10:53 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: 127.0.0.1
Posts: 3,469
How about Instamorph, not to stick the piece, but to make a new one? It hardens by cooling, so it should work better in the freezer. I assume the piece you're fixing isn't load-bearing. I've never tried using it, so I don't know what it's like, but it seems to stick to things pretty well.

No matter what, I'd roughen up both surfaces first, so they'd stick better.
#24
Old 06-01-2012, 03:47 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 3,437
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hbns View Post
I'll second this. Gorilla Glue expands as it cures. Even if the parts fit together nicely with little or no gap, unless you can clamp or otherwise fixture the piece in place there is going to be a very noticeable seam after it cures.
I use Rhino Glue, which is supposed to be one step up from Gorilla Glue. Don't get any on your hands though, it takes days for it to wear off.
#25
Old 06-02-2012, 12:31 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Posts: 19,294
Ok, update. First, to answer a few questions: I called the place that the landlord bought the fridge from and they don't know what kind of plastic it is. We did buy a replacement piece, but the place that the part hooks into the door on the freezer is snapped off--that isn't a replaceable part. It's part of the door itself. And yes, it will be load-bearing as it will be holding up the shelf.

Ok so no to the gorilla glue--check.
I'll look into that Loctite« Stik’n Seal« Extreme Conditions stuff.
What about Super Glue? It cures so quickly it seems like we could just put a blow dryer on it for a minute or two and be done, and not have to find a way to keep the frozen food cold for an extended period of time... but would it hold strong enough? Does it still hold at freezer temps?
#26
Old 06-02-2012, 03:25 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: 127.0.0.1
Posts: 3,469
I think super glue becomes brittle at freezer temps
#27
Old 06-02-2012, 09:14 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: 127.0.0.1
Posts: 3,469
Oh, I thought the shelf was part of the door and the part you're trying to fix is the barrier to the shelf. In that case, I'm not sure any glue will be stronger than the original piece.
#28
Old 06-02-2012, 09:30 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 14,896
Go to Ace hardware, and get the two-part plastic welder i suggested above and stop messing around with "Gorilla Glue" and superglue! It will make a repair that is stronger than the original part.
#29
Old 06-02-2012, 10:26 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 4,564
Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
Go to Ace hardware, and get the two-part plastic welder i suggested above and stop messing around with "Gorilla Glue" and superglue! It will make a repair that is stronger than the original part.
This. This is the correct glue for most plastics you will see in a refrigerator. It will bond very quickly, and, as above, the fix will be stronger than the original. Don't mess about with glues not intended for the purpose. This glue is. It will create a strong enough result in less time than your frozen food would take to thaw.
#30
Old 06-02-2012, 11:30 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: 127.0.0.1
Posts: 3,469
I'm genuinely curious - you mean this glue can fix things like broken spectacle frames?
#31
Old 06-02-2012, 11:37 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 14,896
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronX View Post
I'm genuinely curious - you mean this glue can fix things like broken spectacle frames?
It can't work miracles. If you don't mind having the break "built up" with a fillet of glue, then yes, it could fix an eyeglass frame. But, these frames are a real compromise between strength and weight, and are usually on the hairy edge of failure anyway, so expecting a repaired break to last a long time is asking a lot.
#32
Old 06-02-2012, 09:17 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 4,564
Stronger than the original is something that is used with a bit if license. Here we are glueing something that is made from not very strong plastics from the start, and in truth, one that has probably not been assembled or glued all that well in the first place. Carefully using a two step solvent glue will yield a better than new result. It can't work miracles.

Solvent glues weaken the plastic slightly where they work, so no, you don't get some sort of super capability. But they do fuse the plastic surfaces together, something that the other glues don't do. Things like glasses frames are not made from garden variety plastics, and may be totally unsuitable for a solvent glue - and further - the weakened area will likely soon fail.
#33
Old 06-03-2012, 12:46 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Arvada, CO
Posts: 1,656
Put your frozen items into the refrigerator, tightly packed and insulated. It will take a long time for frozen items to thaw in the refrigerator if they are packed tightly. As a chef, I deal with this kind of thing daily. I need to be able to thaw things quickly or slowly, depending on the situation. A 30 pound case of frozen meat in a cardboard box will still be frozen solid after 24 hours in the refrigerator.
#34
Old 06-03-2012, 01:13 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: the front of beyond
Posts: 4,001
I did this same exact thing with marine epoxy. It's already white, and it's meant to hold up under moist conditions.

It will set in the cold, it just seems to take a little longer, like overnight. Make sure there's no pressure on the part til it's set.



P.S. Still holding 18 months later.

Last edited by brujaja; 06-03-2012 at 01:13 PM.
#35
Old 06-09-2012, 03:07 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Posts: 19,294
I ordered the stuff from the first reply, and it's shipped... just waiting for it to get here so I can try it out. (Free shipping, so it was easier than driving to hardware/etc stores looking for it)...
Closed Thread

┬ź Previous Thread | Next Thread ┬╗
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:45 AM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: block jw player auction arms.com motorcycle handicap green mammals philodendron flowers piers anthony firefly ag13 batteries polishing corian counters legal giant lefty handwriting oxygenated fluorocarbon emulsion uhaul vs penske mole removal cost witness wills midas tire sale bjork reporter oasis bicycle seats s6g reactor bluebird significance rolex service scat females milliput walmart r email pleistocene extinction ref chants cosigner repossession rights queeg strawberries mentally disabled sexuality nekkid wimmin ice bucket bags boxers guys bribe blowjob math is objective shock collar for cat what is the 9th and 10th amendment wolmanized wood home depot stripes on army dress blue uniform atomic clock off by one hour how to book a hotel without a credit card how many calories are in pho lord willing and the creek don't rise origin all tolled or all told what happened to mcgee's voice on ncis what is considered mid 20s wet clothes in dryer similar to stevie ray vaughan tom mullica cigarette trick what does ping me mean copy and paste don't share comcast dvr not recording why does bill clinton look so old lumps under skin after bruising mass effect andromeda message board canon mg5420 printer not responding how to keep corn tortillas from ripping how to remove markups in word 2010 my hands felt just like two balloons my hp printer says paper jam there isn't one can i get albuterol over the counter can you put a ziplock bag in the microwave average shoe size for men 6 foot brown spots in apples hymn to pan aleister crowley walking out on a job how to find out if someone is still alive