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#1
Old 02-22-2013, 01:52 PM
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Ask the 25 Year Old with Dentures

Go ahead, ask me. I'm a 25 year old male, in good general health. Due in part to poor dental coverage, problems with dentists, resulting fear of dentists, and accidents, I am 25 years old and rely on dentures.

I do this because I know it is very difficult for some, and I had a lot of questions when I had mine...I was very afraid and confused. So ask!
#2
Old 02-22-2013, 02:50 PM
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full or partial?
#3
Old 02-22-2013, 02:54 PM
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Full upper and lower. I actually kept the back tooth on each side on the top for an easier grip
#4
Old 02-22-2013, 03:03 PM
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Do you feel your dentures are adequate for your needs or would contemplate getting a full set of implants assuming you had the funds to do so?
#5
Old 02-22-2013, 03:50 PM
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The dentures I have are working quite well for me. I can eat an apple, a steak, hard bread, easily. When my gums are more healed and shrunk I may get "mini implants". These are basically horseshoe-shaped gum-only (no pallette) dentures that lock onto your gums with a set of small, less invasive pair of implants. But that is because the pair I have now is cheap and thick in the pallette.

I have considered implants. The cost is quite prohibitive and to get my entire mouth done would be around $20,000. Even if it were free I would decline the offer. I don't like how far they go into the jaw bone...I fear that if I were to fall etc etc that the impact would shatter my jaw bone instead of the teeth. Also there is a chance of infection and rejection.
#6
Old 02-22-2013, 05:00 PM
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How much did they cost?
Is there anything you can't eat? Like caramel, corn on the cob, etc?
What's the daily maintenance like?
Can you sleep with them in?
Will you ever need dentures for your dentures? As in, what happens if these go bad?
#7
Old 02-22-2013, 06:59 PM
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Did they hurt terribly when you first got them? How long did it take to get used to them?
#8
Old 02-22-2013, 07:23 PM
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What is the process for removing all your original teeth like?

How does it look?
#9
Old 02-22-2013, 09:19 PM
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I'm also curious about the comfort. Grandma griped about hers but I always thought it was because she didn't wear them enough, not that they were ill-fitting in the first place. She was the type to tell people (even doctors) what she thought they wanted to hear, though, so it wasn't outside the realm of possibilities that they just fit wrong in the first place due to her being a numbnut.
#10
Old 02-24-2013, 09:17 PM
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How much did they cost?

$2,500 total, not including surgery. Insurance is good - they pay 80% up to $1000 total...plus I have Flex, and that helps.

What can't I eat?
I can't eat anything incredibly hard...like I can't chomp through ice or candy...but I never liked doing that with my regular teeth. Anything chewy is iffy. With these if the material sticks better than the adhesive...grip is a gamble. Also, I eat a lot more candy now that I don't have teeth to worry about than I ever did before.

Daily Maintenance?
I like to sleep without them in. I leave them soaking in a rinse and when I wake up I run them in hot water for a minute, brush them, dry, add adhesive and they are good to go. I try to avoid coffee for the first 10 minutes they are in. Same cleaning at night.

Can I sleep with them in?
Absolutely. If I clean them before bed they are fine. If you were not to...it would be just as gross as if you didn't brush before bed. Maybe worse....don't plan to try.

Denture for Denture?
If these go bad I can upgrade early...I have the luxury of good dental, flex, and cash to do so. They are STURDY though. As mentioned I would like to get the mini implant horseshoe type.

Did it hurt?
Don't be awake for the surgery. I consider myself a tough person, and I had quite a few pulled already, so the remaining few weren't that bad...but an eye tooth was really in deep..lets say I can feel bruising next to nostril for weeks. It was emotionally jarring to have them pulled. I remember when the eye tooth shattered the 3 time the dentist tried to pull it, I nearly passed with fright. No pain at all. Get them done while asleep like when I had my wisdoms pulled. I don't remember discomfort then.

They look GREAT. I mean compared to a mixed tooth smile; unreal. compared to my real teeth? 90% I'd wager good money you'd never know, and if I had the mini implants I'd guess 99%.

Discomfort?
I eat all the time. I'm thin but I really lay into it. These things slowed me down for a week, but now I chow through it just the same. However I am young and heal quickly. For an older woman that may not be the case. There are still sometimes where my mind goes GET THESE OUT OF HERE. Almost like a claustrophobic feeling if that makes any sense.
#11
Old 02-24-2013, 10:02 PM
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The OP probably knows this but it is recommended that dentures be replaced every 5-7 years. After extractions the jaw bones and gum tissue continue to shrink and the dentures need to be remade to keep the jaws the proper distance apart. Also it is recommended that you see a regular dentist once a year even when you have no teeth!

To the OP:
Were you open with friends, family and co-workers about getting dentures?
Were your original teeth pretty gnarly looking to a casual observer?
If so, was it weird the first time people that know you saw you with the perfect white teeth ?
#12
Old 02-24-2013, 10:20 PM
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How long has it been since the extractions?
Does your denture-dentist do an immediate set of dentures and then a complete new "permanent" set? If so are you in the permanent stage yet?
Did you go to one of the "Dentures-R-Us" chains? How did you choose where you went?
#13
Old 02-24-2013, 11:05 PM
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Given your age, was there much argument from the dentist about having all your real teeth pulled and replaced with dentures?
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Last edited by elfkin477; 02-24-2013 at 11:06 PM.
#14
Old 02-25-2013, 09:04 AM
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RiverHippie you are absolutely right; replace them 5 to 7 years! Its 4 or 5k, not that much...save $1000 a year for it. Treat yourself, god knows you deserve it.

My family knew - mom and dad had them early too. We suspect there are some really weak teeth in our family. My sisters were supportive as they are in all respects of life. I told close friends but aside from that I try to keep it down. They look perfect but I don't want anyone staring just to stare. As for co-workers - my department knows but not the whole organization.

My teeth looked fine until a year and a half ago. Looked fine. For the past 4 years I had no back teeth - though you wouldn't know it by looking. It was odd to me. At the time (year and a half ago) I was tutoring college student athletes and, being a handsome extremely fit college guy myself, used to get hit on A LOT by the girls I tutored. (I never fell for the study at my dorm stuff and always kept it professional...although these tennis players....jesus...) When my tooth between front and eye tooth broke I got hit on a lot less. When the eye tooth on the otherside went...no one hit on me. Now that my teeth are fixed? Gold baby, gold. lol

It wasn't wierd - I think - because people EXPECT to see perfect white teeth. When they see this they DON'T think. It's the broken mouth that brings attention. The only person at work that didn't know I had work done and commented was a woman at PD, hadn't seen me in a month. She said my dental work looked great and I genuinely appreciated it.

It's been 6 months since the extraction.

You get two sets; immediate and permanent. The immediate, although somewhat harder to chew with, will provide you social comfort. With these no one will know you are missing teeth. When I had my teeth pulled an hour later I had these put in and was at work. No one knew I had them done that day. They look great. The temporaries can also be relined after the first week when the most radical shrinking and healing occurs. This makes them a tight fit and I could eat easily with them. After 5-6 months when you are done with a majority of shrinking you get your perms. They look perfect. Perfect.

I picked the dentist that was a 2 minute walk from the house. He is very highly regarded by several prominent people in the area. He was against me getting dentures - wanted me to get implants. I will be honest and say the fact that he was older comforted me. I knew he had a LOT of experience and reputation. He didn't argue when I made up my mind as I did have many options anyway.

When I went in to have them done I brought my girlfriend for support. When I got home I laid down and waited for the pain meds to kick it, about half an hour, and held in the tears. I consider myself very fortunate but it is traumatic and gut wrenching to have no teeth.
#15
Old 02-25-2013, 01:00 PM
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Do you have to take them out every night? Sleeping toothless would feel REALLY weird.

Have you had any weird tooth nightmares (teeth chasing you, all falling out, etc)?

What kind of adhesive do you use? How does it hold your dentures in all day, but not damage your gums when you take them out?
#16
Old 02-25-2013, 01:38 PM
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I can sleep with them in - I just prefer them out. It is wierd not having a jaw "rest" but I still prefer it.

No dreams so far. I dream a lot. Wierd stuff too. But no teeth dreams.

I use polygrip for adhesive. You wouldn't notice it if not looking, but groceries, walmart, and near every gas station I go to has it in stock. It grips like a weak glue bond...the more tension I put on the more it gives way. It doesn't hurt because the grip is actually fairly weak - it doesn't have to resist MY pulling, just resist movement from eating, which is generally lower pressure. Shearing can be an issue. So it never really hurts.
#17
Old 02-25-2013, 02:18 PM
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I am glad i found this. My sister had the upper teeth on left side pulled a few weeks ago. The sutgeon told her she could probably get a partial. Well today she was told that all top teeth would have to be pulled and she eould have to get partial dentures. She is 25 yrs old and this is very traumatic for her. Any advice you could give would be greatly appreciated. And are there any words of encouragement or anything that was helpful to you when you went through this?
#18
Old 02-25-2013, 03:16 PM
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I would let her know that having full upper dentures is NOT a life changing event.

Make sure she understands that when they are done right NOBODY will know they aren't real. There are many days I will look at my teeth in the mirror and forget myself. Her diet doesn't have to change at all.

As far as the people close to you...think of it as a good thing; anybody worth knowing will understand and accept the changes as part of living a healthy life, anybody who would put you down for it didn't belong in your life anyway.

Also, if you can afford it, BE PUT UNDER! By far the toughest thing to cope with was the process of pulling them out. At one point my dentist said it was getting pretty tough and there was nearly nothing to grip on my eye tooth to pull. I asked if it were an emergency and my dentist replied calmy "If I packed up and went home right now? Yes. But I won't do that Anthony, we're in this together". Helped.
#19
Old 02-25-2013, 03:49 PM
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Thanks for starting this thread. At 42 years old I still have all my teeth (minus four wisdoms), and just a couple of fillings, so I rarely think about these things. I wouldn't have thought I would find an "Ask The..." thread from a guy about his dentures would be so interesting, and yet I read right throug the whole thing.
#20
Old 02-25-2013, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keitra34 View Post
I am glad i found this. My sister had the upper teeth on left side pulled a few weeks ago. The sutgeon told her she could probably get a partial. Well today she was told that all top teeth would have to be pulled and she eould have to get partial dentures. She is 25 yrs old and this is very traumatic for her. Any advice you could give would be greatly appreciated. And are there any words of encouragement or anything that was helpful to you when you went through this?
A few years ago I had a dental appointment where the dentist talked a lot about gums receding and bone loss and I had at that point already lost one back molar. I was pretty freaked out and imagining the worst I started researching dentures on the internet. I lurked for a while at a denture support board that was really helpful and informative. You see the good and bad experiences. The OP seems to have had a pretty easy transition but some people struggle with them.
My teeth have remained stable so no worries for now.

Dentures, A New Smile message board
#21
Old 02-25-2013, 04:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keitra34 View Post
I am glad i found this. My sister had the upper teeth on left side pulled a few weeks ago. The sutgeon told her she could probably get a partial. Well today she was told that all top teeth would have to be pulled and she eould have to get partial dentures. She is 25 yrs old and this is very traumatic for her. Any advice you could give would be greatly appreciated. And are there any words of encouragement or anything that was helpful to you when you went through this?
Depending on why she needs the denture, it could be a life-changing event in a good way. I got my first partial when I was about 30, because my front teeth were very loose due to a bad case of gum disease. I only wish I had gotten it sooner. After I got the denture, I could eat normally and the extractions were actually less painful than having my teeth moving around. My diet did change- I could eat sandwiches and fried chicken and ribs again. As long as they are done right ( mostly meaning that the tooth color matches her natural teeth), no one will ever know.
#22
Old 02-25-2013, 05:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keitra34 View Post
I am glad i found this. My sister had the upper teeth on left side pulled a few weeks ago. The sutgeon told her she could probably get a partial. Well today she was told that all top teeth would have to be pulled and she eould have to get partial dentures. She is 25 yrs old and this is very traumatic for her. Any advice you could give would be greatly appreciated. And are there any words of encouragement or anything that was helpful to you when you went through this?
I know this isn't my thread, and this is kind of but-in-sky, but I figure your sister needs all the encouragement she can get.

She is FAR better off with partial or even full dentures and a healthy mouth than a mouth of of decaying/broken teeth constantly battling infections. Bottom line is her health and welfare. Her age doesn't matter - if she's in pain and this will cure it then it is worth it. If her teeth are failing and this will remedy the problem then it is worth it.

People lose teeth for a lot of reasons - accident, birth defect, decay, whatever. Anyone who disses someone for dental restorations needs to STFU because it's no different than looking down on someone with an artificial limb or a hearing aid or even glasses. She has a problem. She should not feel bad for fixing it, if anything, she should be praised for taking proper care of herself. Even if it was her own neglect that lead to this (I'm not saying it is, just hypothetical), she's facing up to the problem and dealing with it, unlike all too many people I've encountered in life who have crap teeth and the means to fix them but can't be bothered.

So good on her for doing what needs to be done. I wish her good luck and speedy recovery.
#23
Old 02-25-2013, 06:38 PM
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Interesting topic, since I know that it is in my future at some point. FWIW I had a "permanent" implant for 3 missing teeth at one point, but it loosened several times over a few years and the physics of it just didn't work. The time and money just got to be too much of a hassle to try and keep it working right. I can't imagine a full-bridge implant actually lasting. So now I'm just living with the gap in back, not visible unless I smile really wide. If I had to do it over again, I probably would have just opted for a semi denture.
#24
Old 02-25-2013, 07:19 PM
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Does it change how things taste? My husband has dentures and, unfortunately, hates them. He swears nothing tastes any good to him anymore.
#25
Old 02-25-2013, 09:47 PM
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Well there is a bit of taste loss of the palette being covered by the denture in most pieces. I personally don't find it to be that inhibiting. I eat a great variety of foods and they all taste the same...heck I never burn my mouth with pizza anymore.
#26
Old 02-26-2013, 01:30 AM
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Longtime lurker here. I just want to commend Anthony for handling this so well!

I got dentures at a very young age too and have had them for almost 30 years now. Best thing I ever did but I remember how terrified and stressed out I was at first. I can eat anything I want and they feel so normal to me that I don't even notice them. The trick is to wear them at least during all your waking hours. They should not hurt and if they do you go back to the dentist and get whatever the problem is fixed. I use the adhesives too and sometimes have a hard time getting them out when I want to. No slippy sliding around for me. You can also brush your teeth between cleanings with a normal toothbrush while they are still in your mouth if you want or need to.

The best part is that I don't ever have to go to the dentist for a bunch of expensive and sometimes painful procedures like most of my friends and family do. That's the silver lining.
#27
Old 02-26-2013, 04:15 PM
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You mentioned your girlfriend...did she have reservations about you going forward with the dentures? Do you go toothless around her? Have you ever headed out the door and forgotten to put them in?
#28
Old 02-26-2013, 11:01 PM
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Thank you for starting this thread. I just forwarded it to my fiance because he's getting ready to start the process and has a lot of questions.
#29
Old 02-27-2013, 12:38 AM
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When I first mentioned it she seemed put off. When I mentioned my father had them she was taken a bit by surprise. My dad always looked young...late 20's when in 40's type. You'd never guess he has them, but he does. It reassured her a bit. When I actually got them done she was shocked by whole great they looked. I try to keep my teeth in my mouth unless I'm uncomfortable and I think its rude to do otherwise.
#30
Old 02-27-2013, 12:54 AM
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Do you have trouble with your teeth clicking (uppers and lowers striking each other) when speaking or eating? Do you have trouble speaking letters like "s" without hissing? I've noticed one or the other, if not both, in a few people I've known who have dentures.
#31
Old 02-27-2013, 09:53 AM
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My teeth don't click; that is a sign that they are not fitting right.

I do have somewhat of a hiss when I say a word that ends in "S", but it isn't long or pronounced and only when I am speaking quickly. Unfortonately the more nervous I am about speaking the more likely I am to have quirks in my speach...but heck this is a life thing, not a dentures thing.
#32
Old 02-27-2013, 11:44 AM
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Thanks.
#33
Old 11-12-2013, 01:13 AM
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I'm 25 as well and am just a few months off from getting all of my teeth pulled and they told me I would have to wait about 2 months before I would have my dentures. After talking to a few people, this doesn't seem right. Do I need to ask for something specific to be sent home that day with a temporary set? Also, all of this work is being done at a dental school and not at a regular dentist as I do have financial problems and a lack of insurance. Could this be why? And do you have any advice for social interactions while not having teeth?
#34
Old 11-12-2013, 09:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mssierra View Post
I'm 25 as well and am just a few months off from getting all of my teeth pulled and they told me I would have to wait about 2 months before I would have my dentures. After talking to a few people, this doesn't seem right. Do I need to ask for something specific to be sent home that day with a temporary set? Also, all of this work is being done at a dental school and not at a regular dentist as I do have financial problems and a lack of insurance. Could this be why? And do you have any advice for social interactions while not having teeth?
You need to ask them about a temporary set of dentures. They aren't as hearty, they won't last as long, and they won't fit as well. However, they are relatively cheap - mine were $690 for the top part. They are right that you want to wait at least 2 months for your long-term high quality dentures.

The reason is that over time the swelling will go down and your gums will shrink. Then the dentures that were made to custom fit your swollen mouth will suddenly be too big.

If you ask people with dentures how they like them you will get two typical replies - they love them and are a perfect fit, or they are way too loose and they hate them. If they fall in the latter camp it is because they had their dentures fitted while their mouth was too swollen.

If you have no choice and you are going to be out of teeth for two months this will be a difficult question to answer. Are you employed? Employment would be the most difficult thing to work with. If you have the sick time saved up, you could use that. If not, and it is an office job, you can explain the situation to your boss and see if you can telecommute for work. Don't be afraid to explain the situation to your boss - it is a medical issue and they are legally required to keep it private or risk getting sued. The other part, if you are lucky enough to be able to stay home, would be food. Stock up on low cost, highly-nutritious foods that are easy to eat. Think sweet potatoes, canned fruits/meats/soups. These will store well. Get powdered milk. It won't be an outstanding time, but it can be done. Put on a hat and go to a fast food place in the drive-thru. When your meal is served and you pay just don't talk. You will seem rude but it gets you through it. I've done this a few times when I've had to have the teeth out for a few days.

Another option would be to put a bandanna over your mouth area. People will assume it is medical and leave you alone about it.

Let me know a little more about your situation and I might be able to give more useful responses.
#35
Old 11-12-2013, 02:30 PM
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As someone who got a complete upper denture in about two weeks ago, my question is this - how long was it before you could eat comfortably with your dentures? I've gotten to the point where I can eat small bites and food that isn't too chewy or too hard, but I find I have to chew slowly because it makes my gums ache too much if I put too much pressure on them. I also find it almost impossible to bite into anything - I tried eating a slice of pizza the other day and had to take a knife and fork to it.
#36
Old 11-12-2013, 03:30 PM
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Yes - swollen gums are quite painful. I would say by the end of week 3 I could eat 60% of what I normally do. By week 5 I was eating heartily. Some things, like apples, take a little skill to master.
#37
Old 11-12-2013, 06:23 PM
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AnthonyElite, it was my understanding that the bone/tissues need a rest overnight from the pressure of partials, let alone full dentures. Have you discussed it with your dentist?
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#38
Old 11-12-2013, 06:46 PM
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It's been a while now since you got your dentures. How are they feeling? I got my first set while in my early twenties. I remember that the plastic palette made it feel like I had a wad of gum stuck in my mouth, but that goes away. Now I'm so used to wearing them they almost feel real when I touch a tooth.

I ate baby food at first, and applesauce and soup, stuff like that. But when everything healed I could eat better than before.

If the dentures still feel loose they can put a permanent liner in them and you can't even tell it's there.

I get a new set about every 10-12 years. It usually takes a couple trips back to get them adjusted just right, but sometimes if there's a "hot spot" I lightly file it myself with an emery board.

Can you easily eat things like lettuce? With my previous set I could but have had some difficulty with these. When I go back for new ones I'm going to mention it.
#39
Old 11-12-2013, 07:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NotMyselfOfLate View Post
AnthonyElite, it was my understanding that the bone/tissues need a rest overnight from the pressure of partials, let alone full dentures. Have you discussed it with your dentist?
dentist here, yes this is correct.
#40
Old 11-12-2013, 08:47 PM
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My husband simply finds it uncomfortable to sleep in his dentures. In an emergency, like being in the hospital*, he can manage it for a night, but two nights and he'll have to take them out to rest his gums during the day.



*Dentures are a high theft item in hospitals. I know, right? It seems ridiculous, since they're such custom items. But people will steal them and sell them to black marketers, who reline them to kinda sorta fit a person who can't afford their own set. So if you can, send them home with a family member, or keep them in your mouth. Same for hearing aids. But don't keep those in your mouth.
#41
Old 11-12-2013, 09:36 PM
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Does food ever creep under the dentures?
#42
Old 11-13-2013, 04:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NotMyselfOfLate View Post
AnthonyElite, it was my understanding that the bone/tissues need a rest overnight from the pressure of partials, let alone full dentures. Have you discussed it with your dentist?
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsat3acr View Post
dentist here, yes this is correct.
Good to know - my dentist said sleeping with them initially was encouraged to help get used to them. I sometimes feel uncomfortable sleeping without them since there is nowhere to "rest" my jaw. I'll bring this up next time I see my dentist.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Becky2844 View Post
It's been a while now since you got your dentures. How are they feeling? I got my first set while in my early twenties. I remember that the plastic palette made it feel like I had a wad of gum stuck in my mouth, but that goes away. Now I'm so used to wearing them they almost feel real when I touch a tooth.

I ate baby food at first, and applesauce and soup, stuff like that. But when everything healed I could eat better than before.

If the dentures still feel loose they can put a permanent liner in them and you can't even tell it's there.

I get a new set about every 10-12 years. It usually takes a couple trips back to get them adjusted just right, but sometimes if there's a "hot spot" I lightly file it myself with an emery board.

Can you easily eat things like lettuce? With my previous set I could but have had some difficulty with these. When I go back for new ones I'm going to mention it.
I don't have the upper pallet anymore, I only had that when I had my temporaries. But when I did I noticed a LITTLE loss of taste of some foods. Smokiness didn't taste the same and I have no idea why. I actually had my temp relined - I had my temp for a while - it was cheap and helped a lot!

Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronX View Post
Does food ever creep under the dentures?
Sometimes, but usually I will just excuse myself after a meal, take a leak, and then wash them after washing my hands. It literally only takes a moment. Nothing ever sneaks up there so big that it is painful, though.

The only caveat to that is berries - the seeds get up there sometimes and lord almighty it feels like an army of ants crawling under there.
#43
Old 11-13-2013, 08:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthonyElite View Post
Good to know - my dentist said sleeping with them initially was encouraged to help get used to them. I sometimes feel uncomfortable sleeping without them since there is nowhere to "rest" my jaw. I'll bring this up next time I see my dentist.
Yes always check with your own professional. I tell my patients that if sleeping with them in feels better then do it but leave them out for 3-4 hours prior to bed or some other time during the day. Leaving them out takes pressure off the tissues so helps with sore spots, inflamation and yeast infections.
#44
Old 01-26-2014, 02:15 PM
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Dentures were the best thing I ever did

For various reasons I had terrible teeth. Despite going to the dentist regularly, at 40 I needed to make a decision whether to continue going to the dentist and (expensively and painfully) patching things up every few months or go for dentures. Not having insurance, implants were out of the question. We are each different, as is our experience and outcome, but for me it was the best decision. I never have had to wear denture adhesive--my dentures are a great fit. I don't wear them at night. I have had the same pair for 20 years without a problem. I have them checked every couple of years and the dentist says "if it ain't broke, don't fix it".

I remember the questions I had at the time of the decision. I have friends who have had terrible experiences with prosthodontists and dentures. I just want to give the other side -- a good experience all around with only one concern. I was single, not in a relationship. I WAS embarrassed to be wearing dentures in intimate situations and avoided them for a while. My facial structure changes drastically without dentures/teeth. I had to bolster my ego to take the plunge but now wearing dentures in all situations is just part of who I am.

Anyone considering dentures needs to read and be prepared for the full spectrum of outcomes before making a decision.
#45
Old 01-26-2014, 11:34 PM
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Join Date: May 2013
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthonyElite View Post
I can sleep with them in - I just prefer them out. It is wierd not having a jaw "rest" but I still prefer it.
.
I have had full dentures for over 35 years. At night I put in a spare upper denture so my speech is still normal, and it just looks better somehow. Only my wife sees me at night but I still think it's better for her to see me looking and sounding "normal" at bedtime. Also if the phone rings I don't talk mumbly, if you know what I mean. I soak my day dentures overnight and my night ones during the day.
#46
Old 02-02-2014, 01:59 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthonyElite View Post
Go ahead, ask me. I'm a 25 year old male, in good general health. Due in part to poor dental coverage, problems with dentists, resulting fear of dentists, and accidents, I am 25 years old and rely on dentures.

I do this because I know it is very difficult for some, and I had a lot of questions when I had mine...I was very afraid and confused. So ask!
I am 31. I neglected my teeth for years as I always thought that in the end that I would have them all out. That happened a little over two years ago and so I have being wearing full dentures ever since.

There are positives and negatives to dentures. First the positives, they look great far better than your natural teeth ever looked. I am also free from any pain and discomfort. Dentures are easy to maintain. I had mine rebased after six months and haven't been back to the dentist since.

There is no doubt they are a challenge to get accustomed to while your gums are healing. After that it is much easier. However, it is a profound change. We express ourselves through our mouths, by speech and expression and we eat using our mouths. All this has to happen while your tongues and lips are keeping your dentures in place, particularly your lower denture. You cannot change inert pieces of plastic so all the changes come from you: how your mouth moves.

The most difficult aspect I found was eating with my dentures. At first it was hopeless. After a while you modify your expectations and work within what your dentures are capable of. There are certain hard and sticky foods and foods which work themselves under my plates I avoid. I am much more dependent on a knife and fork and find biting with my front teeth problematic. Obviously the appreciation of texture and temperature are dimished. Taste is fine but I know I spice things up more.

For all that, I am happier where I am than where I was before I had dentures. It is just that it requires you to accept all sorts of changes.
#47
Old 02-18-2014, 07:38 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 11
Hi I am new here as I am might be on my way to having full upper and maybe a partial lower I was looking for advice I am in the UK and I have a few issues in my head that I hope you can help with

First is I have always had a really bad gag reflex I had 4 of my uppers out over the last 3 years and the partial I was given by the nhs dentist well its palette just made me gag big time and his advice was I don't care if you don't wear it as you can imagine this worries me big time when it comes to dentures

also I am 36 next month and unmarried not even dating right now and my self confidence is not the best at all for reasons other than my teeth and there is a massive part of my mind that just keeps thinking this means my life is over and everyone will know you have them and the things like that
#48
Old 02-19-2014, 06:44 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 3,779
Since I'm up this a.m. and AnthonyElite hasn't answered yet...

The only time I experienced the gag reflex was when the dentist was making an impression of my gum line with that goopy stuff. After I got my dentures, at first the plastic palate felt thick and as I said above, like I had a wad of gum stuck to the roof of my mouth. But that gradually went away and now I don't even notice it.

At first I got a partial for my lower teeth but since my biggest problem was weak tooth enamel, the "connecting" wires soon wore through my real teeth causing a lot of pain and trouble chewing. Within a year I had the remaining teeth pulled and got a full set of lowers.

The relief from toothaches and recurring abscesses was incredibly wonderful. I think I would have got them even if they only came in day-glo blue. But because they look so real my confidence grew in leaps and bounds. Before, I always covered my mouth when I smiled or laughed and sometimes didn't speak even when I wanted to say something because I was ashamed of my teeth. Having decent teeth made me feel like I blended in.

The dentist should show you a chart of tooth color to choose from. The brightest/whitest isn't for everybody, but the next-to-whitest looks perfectly normal and why shouldn't you look good?

When I was dating I didn't mention my dentures (even before kisses) but if things got more serious I did bring it up. I didn't want somebody to French kiss me and then draw back with a puzzled look on his face. And if that turned him off, good to know---you know? If my health and well-being meant less to him than my not being "perfect", well...I didn't want that kind of person in my life anyway. Anybody who cares about you will be glad for you. And strangers won't even notice.
#49
Old 02-19-2014, 07:36 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Becky2844 View Post
Since I'm up this a.m. and AnthonyElite hasn't answered yet...

The only time I experienced the gag reflex was when the dentist was making an impression of my gum line with that goopy stuff. After I got my dentures, at first the plastic palate felt thick and as I said above, like I had a wad of gum stuck to the roof of my mouth. But that gradually went away and now I don't even notice it.

At first I got a partial for my lower teeth but since my biggest problem was weak tooth enamel, the "connecting" wires soon wore through my real teeth causing a lot of pain and trouble chewing. Within a year I had the remaining teeth pulled and got a full set of lowers.

The relief from toothaches and recurring abscesses was incredibly wonderful. I think I would have got them even if they only came in day-glo blue. But because they look so real my confidence grew in leaps and bounds. Before, I always covered my mouth when I smiled or laughed and sometimes didn't speak even when I wanted to say something because I was ashamed of my teeth. Having decent teeth made me feel like I blended in.

The dentist should show you a chart of tooth color to choose from. The brightest/whitest isn't for everybody, but the next-to-whitest looks perfectly normal and why shouldn't you look good?

When I was dating I didn't mention my dentures (even before kisses) but if things got more serious I did bring it up. I didn't want somebody to French kiss me and then draw back with a puzzled look on his face. And if that turned him off, good to know---you know? If my health and well-being meant less to him than my not being "perfect", well...I didn't want that kind of person in my life anyway. Anybody who cares about you will be glad for you. And strangers won't even notice.
Thanks for the reply its good to find a place like this where I can get advice as doing net searches for help just got me more and more worked up I even found one guy saying on one of those yahoo question sites that he would rather kill himself then have them and other horror stories

I dont know if there is anyone else here from the UK but can anyone help me with cost I lost my job a while back and was on benefits so I got free nhs treatment the only problem because I did not want to live on the state I took a lower paying job and get tax credits to make it up but now I dont get free nhs and I only earn 200 a month

I have looked into payment plans and my old nhs dentist has one but with my teeth being bad already it says it would not cover me so can anyone help me out with how much it would cost also loans are out of the questions as I have so much other debt I cannot even get a new one
#50
Old 02-19-2014, 08:11 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Sweet Home Chicago
Posts: 33,496
As far as casual (not intimate) people realizing you have dentures...it probably won't happen. I'm a nurse, and my patients are generally elderly, so I see a lot of dentures...but I can rarely tell without getting a light up in their wide open mouth. The biggest give away is that, in my patient population, almost no one has very good teeth, so if I see a full set of teeth with none broken when they smile, I have a good idea that they might have dentures...but that's not a worry until you are in your 70's. And if it bothers you then, it's perfectly possible to break off a tooth from a set of dentures, if you're determined to make it look "natural"! (My husband lost a tooth off his top plate, and hasn't yet had it replaced. To be honest, I kind of like it - he was missing that tooth, and others, when I met him, so it looks right for him.)
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