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#1
Old 04-06-2013, 03:19 AM
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Ten-hut??

An army or police officer comes into a room and someone always says this word and the men come to "attention". How did the word "attention" morph into "ten-hut"? Or am I wrong, and "ten-hut" means something else?
#2
Old 04-06-2013, 03:29 AM
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Beats me. In my 21 years total service in three components (US Army, US Army Reserves (drilling Reservist), and US Navy), I never actually heard anyone say "ten hut" or even "tin hut" ("That's a Quonset, Mister; NOT a command!") except in movies and TV shows. My best guess is that some script writer or director just thought it sounds better than the actual command and it got traction on screen.
#3
Old 04-06-2013, 03:50 AM
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I had a WAG about this. But then I tried this new thing called google, and it seemed to match up my WAG, which was this: Try and shout ATTENTION to a group of 40 people. And draw it out. It sounds weird, right? Now try shouting "A- TEN -HUT" all drawn out. It actual sounds close to the word.

Well, that was my WAG and wikipedia tends to agree:
#4
Old 04-06-2013, 05:02 AM
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When we call a group to the position of attention in the Air Force, we say "Tench- HUT." It is easier to project one's voice when pronounced this way. Or, what Frumpy Jones said.

Last edited by AirFarce1; 04-06-2013 at 05:03 AM. Reason: Added missing word :)
#5
Old 04-06-2013, 05:56 AM
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I thought it was "ten-shun" but shouted so shortly and loudly that it's distorted to the ear.
#6
Old 04-06-2013, 08:44 AM
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When I did basic training the drill sergeants hated that, and would correct our pronunciation of "attention".
"This is the army. Your barracks are a brick building. Only Marines sleep in tin huts."
#7
Old 04-06-2013, 09:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMax View Post
When I did basic training the drill sergeants hated that, and would correct our pronunciation of "attention".
"This is the army. Your barracks are a brick building. Only Marines sleep in tin huts."
Yep, that was my experience as well, virtually to the word. They made a point to always keep the sibilant and ending in an "n". But when yelling sharply the final "n" can drift into "t" territory" to the listener.

From various media I get that Brit/Commonwealth militaries tend to abbreviate it to merely "shun". (As in "Squwaaahd, Shun!")


BTW the Marine reference did have something to it in that when at joint bases we had different services co-located, to our ears the Marine commands and count calls were far more "clipped"/guttural (Joke being that ours attempted to somehow resemble the words, whereas a Marine would say something that to us sounded like "Hyuurhn -- Wep!" and then his comrades would move in obvious undestanding of what was intended; we concluded they rehearsed it beforehand just to make everyone else look stupid).

Last edited by JRDelirious; 04-06-2013 at 09:39 AM.
#8
Old 04-06-2013, 12:17 PM
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Say wha?

Tennnnnnn - SHUT....... rusted!
#9
Old 04-06-2013, 12:51 PM
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IME, it was more like "uh-tennn-HUH!" Easier to expel the breath loudly on the last syllable than "shun".

Last edited by Chefguy; 04-06-2013 at 12:51 PM.
#10
Old 04-06-2013, 01:19 PM
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In my (limited) experience it was always Ateeeeen-SHUN.
#11
Old 04-06-2013, 01:37 PM
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When I was in the army, they explained us that close order drill commands consist of two parts.

The first part is the preparatory part. This lets the soldiers know that a command will be issued and also which drill they are going to execute. Then there's a very short pause and then comes the executionary part which signals the execution of the drill. This part has to be spoken sharply because that helps the soldiers execute the drill simultaneously.

The word "attention" is awkward cannot be cleanly split into these two parts. Therefore it becomes teeeeen-HUT!
#12
Old 04-06-2013, 01:58 PM
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Former platoon sergeant here. Yes, like Dog80 said,

a preparatory command, clearly given and somewhat drawn out, to prep the troops for what's coming next;
a distinct pause, but not too long; and then
a sharp, quickly-given command of execution so that the facing movement or marching order is executed together and the platoon (or squad, or detail or rank) moves as one.

If you don't give commands this way, you end up with a CF, or a GF. Sloppy COD.


ten, HUT!
a - tench, HUH! (this was how I did it)


Also...

lay - eft, HUH! (left face, the "t" being clear)
right, HUH!
a - bout, HUH!


There's also...

Drop and give me 50! For the true fuck ups.

Last edited by Bullitt; 04-06-2013 at 02:01 PM.
#13
Old 04-06-2013, 02:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by echo7tango View Post
There's also...

Drop and give me 50! For the true fuck ups.
For the Air Force, it's "drop and give me however many you want, if you feel like it."
#14
Old 04-06-2013, 08:49 PM
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When I was in boot camp, the RPOC tried to call us to attention by saying "ten-HUT!" The Company Commander stopped him and said, "Don't bark, RPOC - Marines and other dogs bark."

Last edited by SCAdian; 04-06-2013 at 08:51 PM.
#15
Old 04-06-2013, 10:39 PM
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In the Army, the person in charge shouts, "ATTEN-TION!" Leaders are taught that in the Leadership courses they take.

When I went to the Airborne School for the Army, we had a Marine Gunny Sergeant as our Platoon Sergeant. He would say, "TIN-HUT!" to bring us to attention. He would also say "HEP, Right, HEP, Right" when marching us. When I finally had the balls to ask him why Marines talk so funny, he said that the words don't carry so well over the sounds of combat and the Marines have developed a way of issuing commands that carry better.

I don't know if he was screwing with me, or if that is the actual explanation.

SFC Schwartz
#16
Old 04-06-2013, 11:55 PM
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"TEN HUT" shows up in Bugs Bunny cartoons from the 40s and 50s. It makes me wonder if it came into use by the general public from stories and movies (and cartoons) about WWII drill sergeants.
#17
Old 04-07-2013, 12:21 AM
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Right flank ( just before the right foot hits the ground ) march ( on the right foot ) so everyone is ready to pivot on their next left foot.

If march is called too early, there is 100% chance that 1 or more will screw it up.

And when the General's wife is driving by & you are marching to jody cadence, tis best to be looking sharp.

Of course this is from pre 1964 ARMY before it got all PC & dainty in the military where you have to say please all the time.
#18
Old 04-07-2013, 12:29 AM
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Forgot to add that march, harch, huh, or whatever had to be short, loud & fast for crisp marching.
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#19
Old 04-07-2013, 01:00 AM
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CF, GF, sloppy cod
RPOC
Jody cadence

I know I'll get another 50 for asking....
#20
Old 04-07-2013, 01:35 AM
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cluster f___

gaggle f___

close order drill


No 50 just for asking, but 50 tomorrow if you ask the same question!


I need help with the RPOC.
#21
Old 04-07-2013, 01:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GusNSpot View Post
Right flank ( just before the right foot hits the ground ) march ( on the right foot ) so everyone is ready to pivot on their next left foot.

If march is called too early, there is 100% chance that 1 or more will screw it up.

Most definitely. And while marching, the command of execution is given on the boot strike of the direction to be taken: left, if column left or column half left; and right if to the right. Right boot, also, for halt, mark time, and to the rear.

As for the right flank example above, the command is "by the right flank," (pause), "HUH!"

If this represents the boot strikes:

left
right
left
right


etc...


then the commands would be given with the following timing:

left
right
("by the")
left ("right")
right ("flank")
left (pause)
right ("HUH!")


Commands for a column right would be,

left ("column")
right ("right")
left (pause)
right ("HUH!")



I hope that makes sense and is clear.
#22
Old 04-07-2013, 02:50 AM
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"Sir, hold up. I don't get it...you said "right" when I was on the left foot. Did you get that right?"
#23
Old 04-07-2013, 07:11 AM
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This post doesn’t really answer the OP, but it addresses some of the other stuff that’s been posted. It is obvious that different branches of the military have a different way of doing things. I’ll explain how it is in the Army. Or, rather, how it is supposed to be in the Army. Not everyone does it properly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dog80 View Post
The word "attention" is awkward cannot be cleanly split into these two parts. Therefore it becomes teeeeen-HUT!
Every command in the Army should have distinctiveness and inflection. Each syllable in the command should be enunciated properly and distinctly. The command of execution ATTENTION should sound like the word attention, as SSG Schwartz mentions. “tench-huh”, “teeeen-hut” or any other variation is not the proper way to deliver a command.
The command of execution should also have infliction. The preparatory command is given at a normal pitch, and the command of execution is given at a higher pitch, with sharper tone, and plenty of snap.
Properly given, the command should sound like this:
“Platoon” (pause) “Ah-tenn-SHUHN” (inflection on the last syllable.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by echo7tango View Post
Former platoon sergeant here. Yes, like Dog80 said,
…a distinct pause, but not too long; and then
a sharp, quickly-given command of execution so that the facing movement or marching order is executed together and the platoon (or squad, or detail or rank) moves as one.
The pause should be the time amount of time a step takes. Normal marching cadence is 120 steps per minute. That’s 2 steps per second, so the pause should be a half second.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GusNSpot View Post
Right flank ( just before the right foot hits the ground ) march ( on the right foot ) so everyone is ready to pivot on their next left foot.
Currently, the preparatory command should be given as the appropriate foot strikes the marching service. So, for a right flank, it’s the right foot. When that foot strikes the ground, the leader gives the command “Right Flank”, the next step with the left foot is the intermediate step. This is the pause between the two commands. The very next time the right foot strikes the ground, the leader gives the command of execution, “MARCH”. The next step with the left foot is the additional step between the command of execution and the action step. The following step with the right foot should be in the new direction as the Soldiers carry out the command.
Quote:
Originally Posted by echo7tango View Post
Most definitely. And while marching, the command of execution is given on the boot strike of the direction to be taken: left, if column left or column half left; and right if to the right. Right boot, also, for halt, mark time, and to the rear.
As for the right flank example above, the command is "by the right flank," (pause), "HUH!"
For the Army, it would be like this:

left
right
("Right Flank")
left (Intermediate step)
right ("MARCH")
left (Additional step)
right (Soldiers execute the Action by stepping off with this foot in the new direction)

Commands for a column right would be,

left
right ("Column Right")
left (Intermediate Step)
right ("MARCH")
left (Additional step)
right (Soldiers execute the Action by stepping off with this foot in the new direction)
#24
Old 04-07-2013, 08:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
For the Air Force, it's "drop and give me however many you want, if you feel like it."


"Oh, and Airman? You might want to consider a haircut. Keep in mind this is only a suggestion."
#25
Old 04-07-2013, 08:43 AM
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Slightly off-topic, but I am recollecting my Drill Sergeant, SSG Jackson, from basic training at Fort Knox (Agony! Misery!) in 1988 being thoroughly chewed out by the post chaplain, whom happened to be wandering by as we were being marched to the PX to a cadence that contained some colorful phrases.

SSG Jackson was pissed at being browbeaten in front of us by that guy, and in retrospect, it really wasn't a professional thing to do on the part of the officer, even if he was only a chaplain.
#26
Old 04-07-2013, 09:23 AM
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Chefguy, FoieGraslsEvil, the comments about the Air Force were uncalled for! How can you expect us to do 50 push ups? IN A ROW? We are the Chair Force after all. Hair cuts? If we cut our hair, we would be indistinguishable from the rabble that joined the other branches. Sheesh.

Last edited by AirFarce1; 04-07-2013 at 09:23 AM. Reason: Spelling
#27
Old 04-07-2013, 09:37 AM
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For those who asked, RPOC is Recruit Petty Officer in Charge. There was also the RCPO, or Recruit Chief Petty Officer.

A jody is a chant while marching, which is call and response, such as:

Platoon leader: "I don't know but I've been told. . ."
Platoon: repeats
PL: "Eskimo pussy is mighty cold"
Platoon: repeats
PL: Sound off!
Platoon: one, two!
PL: Sound off!
Platoon: three, four!

Repeat with other witty combinations.

Last edited by Chefguy; 04-07-2013 at 09:40 AM.
#28
Old 04-07-2013, 09:44 AM
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IIRC you did live in Alaska, chefguy. So I have to ask: is it?
#29
Old 04-07-2013, 11:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
"Sir, hold up. I don't get it...you said "right" when I was on the left foot. Did you get that right?"
Yes. The command you mentioned is the preparatory command. The key is that the command of execution is given on the right foot for this command.
#30
Old 04-07-2013, 11:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bear_Nenno View Post
For the Army, it would be like this:

left
right
("Right Flank")
left (Intermediate step)
right ("MARCH")
left (Additional step)
right (Soldiers execute the Action by stepping off with this foot in the new direction)

I'd like to modify this slightly:

left
right
("Right Flank")
left (Intermediate step)
right ("MARCH")
left This is where the command is executed. Everyone in the platoon pivots on this foot, to the right.
right (Soldiers execute the Action by stepping off with this foot in the new direction)
#31
Old 04-07-2013, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FoieGrasIsEvil View Post
IIRC you did live in Alaska, chefguy. So I have to ask: is it?
I have no first-hand knowledge of the climatic (or climactic) condition of the nether regions of our Alaska Native brethren.
#32
Old 04-07-2013, 08:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
"Sir, hold up. I don't get it...you said "right" when I was on the left foot. Did you get that right?"
Quote:
Originally Posted by echo7tango View Post
Yes. The command you mentioned is the preparatory command. The key is that the command of execution is given on the right foot for this command.
echo7tango, you are really too kind here--I was trying to get a rise out of you as drill sergeant.

Now you look whooshed, and I feel bad. Sorry.
#33
Old 04-07-2013, 09:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
For those who asked, RPOC is Recruit Petty Officer in Charge. There was also the RCPO, or Recruit Chief Petty Officer.

A jody is a chant while marching, which is call and response, such as:

Platoon leader: "I don't know but I've been told. . ."
Platoon: repeats
PL: "Eskimo pussy is mighty cold"
Platoon: repeats
PL: Sound off!
Platoon: one, two!
PL: Sound off!
Platoon: three, four!

Repeat with other witty combinations.
Such as:

PL: If I die on a Russian front
Platoon: Repeats
PL: Bury me with a Russian...Rifle
Platoon: Huh????


I still love doing that one.

SFC Schwartz
#34
Old 04-07-2013, 11:06 PM
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SSR or SFC Schwartz (who said a life of beer, NASCAR, and baseball could keep a man down?),

All I know from Army is what Hollywood tells me and what I learn here.

So: in Eyes Wide Shut they do the "Eskimo pussy" one. (Thats from Vietnam time--I wonder about the history and the whole repertory of those. I'll do some Googling).

The famous Drill Instructor (Sergeant? Army/Marine is different, I think), runs with his men.

Coupla questions:

First, which prompted this post: what do they --- the recruits-- call that guy? If it's you, they're not calling you by your rank, but by your role.

But anyway, the guy calling out the jody--did i say that right in a sentence?--is always...who? RPOC is you, otherwise a SSG or SFC? And the "in charge" part is a come and go thing? (Ad hoc, one might say. )

Finally, in the movie the DI's pets are those in the barracks. One DI, one barracks-worth? What's a barracks-worth? (Insert joke here), ie what is that grouping called, and how many men? A platoon, as in your Jody examples?

And the two other dudes who appear when he wakes up the men. Who are they (assuming the movie is historically correct)?

And that's the DI's load for all basic training? That's the impression the movie left me with.

Thanks,
Leo

Last edited by Leo Bloom; 04-07-2013 at 11:08 PM.
#35
Old 04-07-2013, 11:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by echo7tango View Post
I'd like to modify this slightly:

left
right
("Right Flank")
left (Intermediate step)
right ("MARCH")
left This is where the command is executed. Everyone in the platoon pivots on this foot, to the right.
right (Soldiers execute the Action by stepping off with this foot in the new direction)
No, because the pivot does not happen as part of that count. They cannot pivot until the left foot is down. And once it is down, that step has concluded. The pivot is simultaneous with the start of the final count, if that makes sense. The act for that count is simply a 30" step forward with the trail foot (left foot). Once the left foot strikes the marching service, the next movement begins. That movement is all part of the final count, the action step. The action step in that particular movement involves both pivoting on the left foot and stepping off with a 30" step in the new direction with the trail foot (right foot).
#36
Old 04-07-2013, 11:51 PM
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Though we're probably just splitting hairs. However, the Army uses PICAA to identify each step in a movement.

P- Preparatory Command
I - Intermediate Step
C- Command of Execution
A- Additional Step
A- Action Step
#37
Old 04-08-2013, 12:32 AM
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[QUOTE=Leo Bloom;16172186] So: in Eyes Wide Shut they do the "Eskimo pussy" one. (Thats from Vietnam time--I wonder about the history and the whole repertory of those. I'll do some Googling).

So, Leo, I suspect the Kubrick flick you're thinking of is Full Metal Jacket.
#38
Old 04-08-2013, 02:13 AM
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Thats the scene where Joker goes to this mansion where everyone's wearing masks and screwing.

#39
Old 04-08-2013, 08:35 AM
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Army says "A-ten-HUT", Air Force cuts out the "A" and replaces it with whoever you're addressing, such as "Room Ten HUHH" or "Squadron Ten HUHH".

When you are in joint training environments, it can get interesting. Was once in a room full of Army, Navy, Marines, and Air Force (about half of the room being from that last category) that got roused out of our seats with a call of "OFFICER ON DECK".

It was an Army base, naturally.
#40
Old 04-08-2013, 08:46 AM
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And "Jody," btw, is the guy who's screwing your wife or girl while you're marching around a base.
#41
Old 04-08-2013, 10:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
The famous Drill Instructor (Sergeant? Army/Marine is different, I think), runs with his men.
Marine Gunnery Sergeant Hartman was the platoon Drill Instructor, played by former Marine Staff Sergeant and Drill Instructor R Lee Ermey.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
Coupla questions:

First, which prompted this post: what do they --- the recruits-- call that guy? If it's you, they're not calling you by your rank, but by your role.
"Sir aye aye sir" mostly.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
Finally, in the movie the DI's pets are those in the barracks. One DI, one barracks-worth? What's a barracks-worth? (Insert joke here), ie what is that grouping called, and how many men? A platoon, as in your Jody examples?

And the two other dudes who appear when he wakes up the men. Who are they (assuming the movie is historically correct)?

And that's the DI's load for all basic training? That's the impression the movie left me with.

Thanks,
Leo
I'm sure some former military types can provide the specifics, but my assumption is that there is one Senior Drill Instructor per platoon during a boot camp cycle plus some number of assistant DIs. Remember, the DI's "load" is preparing around 40 men for combat in 16(?) weeks. So I think it pretty much would be a full time job. Sort of like the coach of a football team.
#42
Old 04-08-2013, 10:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
I have no first-hand knowledge of the climatic (or climactic) condition of the nether regions of our Alaska Native brethren.
I think it's the sistren that are in question. ;-)
#43
Old 04-08-2013, 10:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msmith537 View Post
I'm sure some former military types can provide the specifics, but my assumption is that there is one Senior Drill Instructor per platoon during a boot camp cycle plus some number of assistant DIs.
When I went through US Army Basic Combat Training (the actual name for "Boot Camp") back in the late 1970s, the platoon had one Senior Drill Sergeant and two Assistant Drill Sergeants.

By the way, anyone else remember Jack Webb as The D.I.? My platoon's Drill Sergeant was a lot like that--no cursing, no assaulting of the trainees.
#44
Old 04-08-2013, 01:31 PM
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Funny Drill and Ceremony Story

This is completely off topic, but since the question seems to have been answered:

While I was attending Drill Sergeant School at Ft. Benning in '98, we were marching back to the barracks with one of the Drill Sergeant Candidates leading the formation and calling cadence. The Candidate in question meant to call out a "Column Right, March", but screwed up. The platoon was sounding off loud and strong, when he gave the wrong preparatory command "Column Left" which was heard by the first and second squad leaders. But he said it on the right foot which was what the third and fourth squad leaders heard. So on the Command of Execution "March" the first and second squads executed a column left, while the third and fourth squads went right.

The Drill Sergeant Leaders (the instructors) alternated between laughing their asses off and screaming at the Candidate. "What you going to do now, Sergeant?" "How you gonna fix this?"
#45
Old 04-08-2013, 06:10 PM
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Air Force Basic Military Training similarly has a three-person instructor team, with one Military Training Instructor designated as the team lead. He is usually, but not always, the senior of the three (I did see one Staff Sergeant leading a team with two Tech Sergeants working for him once. I just assumed they got promoted recently and that he was senior up until then.)

During the first week or so of Basic, they will also have a rotating roster of mostly-done trainees who will work one hour shifts helping ride herd on the confused recruits. When I was in Basic, this meant three Instructors (nicknamed "Hats" for obvious reasons) assisted by two 5th or 6th week trainees (at the time, it only took the Air Force 6 weeks to produce a professional soldier, unlike some other branches. Now it only takes 8 weeks...)

This was all five or six years ago, as a search of my posting history will indicate, and I know they have revamped the program once or twice since then (for instance, to be eligible to be an MTI at all now, I understand you need to be a Tech Sergeant, as part of their ongoing efforts to weed out the predatory scum from the MTI ranks...)

In any case, my experience was that the instructors would not lay a hand on you, and would go out of their way not to swear. They would get as close to both as they could manage, which meant getting close enough to you to feel body heet from their skin (one TI had a habit of holding his hand, palm out, about a half inch from your forehead, like he was contemplating picking you up by it, others would chicken-peck you a bit with the hat to try and get a reaction). If you kept your bearing, all they'd do is make theatrics at you to try and get you to flinch or laugh (either was bad and would open you up to more attention).

They'd also use interesting turns of phrase like "WHAT THE PISS, CLOWN?!" and gesture at you with a "knife hand", which is kind of like using a karate chop as a pointer finger. Somehow this is deemed less threatening than just pointing at someone with the index finger.
#46
Old 04-08-2013, 07:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
Coupla questions:

First, which prompted this post: what do they --- the recruits-- call that guy? If it's you, they're not calling you by your rank, but by your role.
Call which guy?

Quote:
But anyway, the guy calling out the jody--did i say that right in a sentence?--is always...who? RPOC is you, otherwise a SSG or SFC? And the "in charge" part is a come and go thing? (Ad hoc, one might say. )
Depends. If it's a squad, it's the squad leader; platoon, the platoon leader or platoon sergeant usually; company, could be the company commander or a senior sergeant/NCO. There were times when I had to go somewhere and would just say "Petty Officer Smith, front and center. Take charge and march the platoon to wherever." The RPOC or RCPO is just another recruit who is nominally in charge of the recruit company. Or at least he takes all the heat when the company fucks up from the Company Commander, who is usually either an actual Chief or senior petty officer. He remains in that position throughout boot camp, unless he's a real fuck-up and is replaced by the company commander.

Quote:
Finally, in the movie the DI's pets are those in the barracks. One DI, one barracks-worth? What's a barracks-worth? (Insert joke here), ie what is that grouping called, and how many men? A platoon, as in your Jody examples?
In Navy boot camp, a barracks full of guys is called a company, but it's basically just a large platoon. My boot camp company (434, Sir!!) was comprised of five or six squads, as I recall. A normal military company is usually three or more platoons. Bravo company in a Seabee battalion usually had two rifle platoons and a weapons platoon, while Alpha company was usually much larger.

Last edited by Chefguy; 04-08-2013 at 07:06 PM.
#47
Old 04-08-2013, 08:10 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raguleader View Post
Army says "A-ten-HUT"
Some Army Soldiers may say that, but it isn't correct. The Army says, "Ah-tenn-SHUHN" per FM 3-21.5 Fig. 3-1.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
The famous Drill Instructor (Sergeant? Army/Marine is different, I think), runs with his men.
Coupla questions:
First, which prompted this post: what do they --- the recruits-- call that guy? If it's you, they're not calling you by your rank, but by your role.
If it's a Drill Sergeant, he/she is called "Drill Sergeant". When the Soldiers get to their units and someone is running the formation, he/she is called by rank and name.

Quote:
But anyway, the guy calling out the jody--did i say that right in a sentence?--is always...who?
During initial entry training, it's always a Drill Sergeant. Once at a unit, it could be anyone (often taking turns) but usually an NCO.

Quote:
Finally, in the movie the DI's pets are those in the barracks. One DI, one barracks-worth? What's a barracks-worth? (Insert joke here), ie what is that grouping called, and how many men? A platoon, as in your Jody examples?
For us, there are 4 platoons of 60 per company. Each platoon has (in theory) 2 Drill Sergeants in the rank of SSG, and 1 Senior Drill Sergeant in the rank of SFC. So 12 Drill Sergeants total for 240 Soldiers. What fun!

Quote:
And the two other dudes who appear when he wakes up the men. Who are they (assuming the movie is historically correct)?
Drill Sergeants.

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And that's the DI's load for all basic training? That's the impression the movie left me with.
Yes, the Drill Sergeants and Soldiers stay in their assigned platoons.

Quote:
Originally Posted by msmith537 View Post
I'm sure some former military types can provide the specifics, but my assumption is that there is one Senior Drill Instructor per platoon during a boot camp cycle plus some number of assistant DIs. Remember, the DI's "load" is preparing around 40 men for combat in 16(?) weeks. So I think it pretty much would be a full time job. Sort of like the coach of a football team.
If fulltime = an average of 110 hours per week, then yea. Fulltime.
#48
Old 04-08-2013, 08:13 PM
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To add to my previous post, the three MTIs would be collectively in charge of two Flights of about 50-60 trainees each. They appointed "Student Leaders" from those Flights to help run things, usually a Dorm Chief, a Guideon Bearer, and four Element Leaders from each flight. From what I understand, getting some of the recruits to fill lower leadership roles to help maintain organization is a pretty common thing in recruit training.
#49
Old 04-08-2013, 08:43 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bear_Nenno View Post
Some Army Soldiers may say that, but it isn't correct. The Army says, "Ah-tenn-SHUHN" per FM 3-21.5 Fig. 3-1.
To try to put to rest this "ten-hut" stuff WRT the US Army, Nenno is absolutely correct. Saying that was actively discouraged when I was in from 1988-1992, and I am sure they keep that faith now. As he notes, "Attention" is a clearly delineated order with a marked accentuation on certain syllables that is causing this confusion.

I was in the Field Artillery, so the common command (that actually could be given by anyone when an officer approached your AO, and privates often scrambled to be the first to do so as if that would confer some type of kiss-ass benefit) was "Battery! Atten-SHUN!"

I never once heard a DI or anyone say "ten-hut" in the four years I was in the US Army.

The only thing I have noticed that's remarkably different in terms of speech from when I was in is the prevalence of the "HUA!!" thing, something we never did or had to do when addressed as a group (platoon/battalion/division) by a commanding officer.
#50
Old 04-09-2013, 06:44 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 4,086
There are 4 ways to do anything. The right way, the wrong way, the {army/navy/airforce/marin} way, and MY way. Guess which one you should do, recruit?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dog80 View Post
When I was in the army, they explained us that close order drill commands consist of two parts. ... The word "attention" is awkward cannot be cleanly split into these two parts. Therefore it becomes teeeeen-HUT!
Bingo. As much as the brass might want to ramrod a totally common way throughout the service, it ends up being up to the whim of whomever happens to care in any given unit. The important thing is doing it so that it works, and the rhythm as noted above is critical.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SSG Schwartz View Post
When I went to the Airborne School for the Army, we had a Marine Gunny Sergeant as our Platoon Sergeant. He would say, "TIN-HUT!" to bring us to attention. He would also say "HEP, Right, HEP, Right" when marching us. When I finally had the balls to ask him why Marines talk so funny, he said that the words don't carry so well over the sounds of combat and the Marines have developed a way of issuing commands that carry better.

I don't know if he was screwing with me, or if that is the actual explanation.
Screwing. You don't march in formation during battle, at least, not in a few centuries. However, it does also matter during a parade, where there can be a lot of noise. So, he wasn't completely screwing with you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
"Sir, hold up. I don't get it...you said "right" when I was on the left foot. Did you get that right?"
They'd have loved you.
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