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#1
Old 07-07-2013, 03:16 PM
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Does anyone buy powdered eggs or milk anymore? What other powdered foods are available?

I've heard veterans talk about powdered eggs in the military. Not very fondly either.

Does anyone in the regular world buy powdered eggs? I can't ever recall seeing them at the grocery stores. What aisle would they be on?

I haven't seen powdered milk since the 1980's Government give away program. (they gave huge blocks of cheese and powdered milk to the poor).

What other powdered foods are available for my culinary delight?

Lets ignore dehydrated food that survivalists, camping, and backpackers buy from specialty places.
#2
Old 07-07-2013, 03:24 PM
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I bought powdered milk at the grocery store a few weeks ago. They had a fair selection of sizes and brands.

My wife uses it as an ingredient in some sort of homemade face scrub.
#3
Old 07-07-2013, 03:25 PM
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Powdered sugar, although I'm pretty sure that's not what you're getting at. Lots of powdered spices as well, but I'm pretty sure they don't apply either. Neither would flour or cornmeal.

I think the main things that lend themselves to powdering are ones that are liquid, like milk, or that are liquid before cooking. So with that in mind, milk and eggs are obvious, but things like powdered broth/bouillon, and powdered soups are probably available- I haven't ever actually looked. Powdered buttermilk is definitely available for baking, and there are lots of drink mix powders as well.
#4
Old 07-07-2013, 03:27 PM
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I buy powdered milk for adding to bread dough to make it a bit richer. My bread machine also has a delayed start feature and if you want milk in that bread you have to use powdered.

Powdered egg on the other hand sounds dreadful.
#5
Old 07-07-2013, 03:27 PM
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I just thought of powdered soup. Lipton Onion and theres a few others.
#6
Old 07-07-2013, 03:30 PM
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What other powdered foods are available?

Powdered Toast, of course!

Powdered eggs reminds me of camping with dad. Powdered milk reminds me of when I was a kid. Since I rarely (almost never) drink milk, I used to keep powdered milk so that I could mix some up when I needed milk as an ingredient.
#7
Old 07-07-2013, 03:57 PM
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Powders milk and eggs are used in a lot of foods you might buy, like all-in-one pancake and cake mixes.

Last edited by gaffa; 07-07-2013 at 03:57 PM.
#8
Old 07-07-2013, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kayT View Post
I buy powdered milk for adding to bread dough to make it a bit richer. My bread machine also has a delayed start feature and if you want milk in that bread you have to use powdered.
Carnation still sells dry milk but the website only mentions its usefulness in baking. When I was a kid, one of the neighbor families had a lot of children but not a lot of money so the mother would use this stuff for drinking, mixed 50/50 with real milk. And my mother used it in a particular recipe.

The OP mentions the use of powdered eggs and milk in the military. Those were settings where refrigeration might have been unavailable, so the powdered stuff was useful for them. Today, refrigeration is available virtually everywhere, and then there is UHT milk that doesn't need refrigeration.
#9
Old 07-07-2013, 04:09 PM
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My mom used to make cocoa mix out of powdered milk, unsweetened cocoa powder, and Sugar Twin. It was god-awful.
#10
Old 07-07-2013, 04:13 PM
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We bake with powdered milk all the time. Cornbread, biscuits, muffins etc. Use real milk for cereal and gravy.
#11
Old 07-07-2013, 04:16 PM
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Powdered eggs, no. But we always have powdered milk, powdered buttermilk and one people have forgotten so far - powdered gelatin.
#12
Old 07-07-2013, 04:16 PM
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I had powdered whey protein in my oatmeal this morning. I grew up on powdered milk and never bought a single box once I moved out. Yecch.
#13
Old 07-07-2013, 04:21 PM
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I buy powdered milk for baking bread. I also keep powdered buttermilk around for baking things that need buttermilk.
#14
Old 07-07-2013, 04:26 PM
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I've never seen powdered eggs in a store, but I would imagine you could get them at a camping outfitter or a survivalist or bulk-foods store, and they're definitely used for industrial cooking (like employee cafeterias) and packaged foods. But then again, I've never looked for them, either. This is what I've heard is done with lower-grade eggs, as one might imagine. They would be reconstituted and used like scrambled eggs or in baking, I guess.

I have some reconstituted powdered milk in my fridge right now. IMNSHO, instant powdered milk is dreadful, but mine is non-instant (bought on clearance because it was past its sell-by date) and tastes just like fresh skim milk. It actually mixes up in a matter of seconds, not just instantly.
#15
Old 07-07-2013, 04:29 PM
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You probably aren't going to find powdered eggs or powdered milk in very many grocery stores. I imagine not too many people buy them.

But they can be bought: eggs and milk.
#16
Old 07-07-2013, 04:35 PM
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The store I work at sells bulk jars of powdered eggs in a small section with other "emergency foods".
#17
Old 07-07-2013, 04:40 PM
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I will not eat them from a sack
I will not eat them in Iraq

I do not like powdered eggs and Spam,
I do not like them Uncle Sam
#18
Old 07-07-2013, 04:41 PM
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Beprepared.com has all the freezedried and powdered stuff you need if you're stocking your nuclear fall-out shelter.

Powdered tomato, peanut butter, whole eggs and eggwhite powder, butter powder or onion powder, anyone?
#19
Old 07-07-2013, 04:43 PM
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Potato.

Sometimes dried potato comes as flakes of little lumps, but I have also seen it as powder, and even had some quite recently. You can use it to make mash, but that is not very good. However, I use it in certain recipes where the real potato taste and texture would be submerged anyway, and using the dried stuff is a lot quicker than peeling, boiling and mashing.
#20
Old 07-07-2013, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Maastricht View Post
Beprepared.com has all the freezedried and powdered stuff you need if you're stocking your nuclear fall-out shelter.
Why am I not surprised that company is based in Utah?
#21
Old 07-07-2013, 04:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
You probably aren't going to find powdered eggs or powdered milk in very many grocery stores. I imagine not too many people buy them.

But they can be bought: eggs and milk.
Any grocery store will have powdered milk.

As for powdered potatoes, I could see using that in soup or bread (and trust me, just a little potato in homemade bread keeps it fresh MUCH, MUCH longer).

BTW, it wasn't just poor people who got free cheese, etc. Anyone who was on Social Security, regardless of income or assets, was eligible. My grandmother got commidities, and because it was more than she could possibly use herself, gave some to my parents who in turn passed some of it on to me.

Last edited by nearwildheaven; 07-07-2013 at 04:52 PM.
#22
Old 07-07-2013, 04:54 PM
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There was a damn good whole wheat pancakes recipe that called for powered milk that I got from one of the workout magazines a couple years ago. I wish I could find it.

I'm far from a master chef, but can't powered milk be substituted in many recipes which call for milk?
#23
Old 07-07-2013, 05:02 PM
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I remember powdered eggs all too well from my childhood. We were on welfare, and we were more likely to have powdered eggs than the real thing. No matter how you prepared them they came out as a mushy yellow goo.
#24
Old 07-07-2013, 05:04 PM
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Powdered eggs = nasty.

Powdered egg whites, for baking = genius!!
#25
Old 07-07-2013, 05:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dalej42 View Post
There was a damn good whole wheat pancakes recipe that called for powered milk that I got from one of the workout magazines a couple years ago. I wish I could find it.

I'm far from a master chef, but can't powered milk be substituted in many recipes which call for milk?
Yes, but in most cases, you have to reconstitute it first.
#26
Old 07-07-2013, 05:12 PM
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Powdered milk is useful for wilderness camping. No one I have ever known has taken powdered eggs, however.
#27
Old 07-07-2013, 05:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by njtt View Post
Potato.

Sometimes dried potato comes as flakes of little lumps, but I have also seen it as powder, and even had some quite recently. You can use it to make mash, but that is not very good. However, I use it in certain recipes where the real potato taste and texture would be submerged anyway, and using the dried stuff is a lot quicker than peeling, boiling and mashing.
Oh yes. I forgot. I always keep a packet of powdered potato on hand to rescue mashed dishes that have become too wet. I like the taste and the consistency.
#28
Old 07-07-2013, 05:18 PM
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I recently bought powdered buttermilk to make dry ranch seasoning.
#29
Old 07-07-2013, 05:20 PM
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of course there's POWDERED TOAST
http://http://youtu.be/xe2BUPqPSx4

Last edited by alted315; 07-07-2013 at 05:21 PM.
#30
Old 07-07-2013, 05:39 PM
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I read Modernist Cuisine, and they were very fond of using dried potato flakes in potato recipes as a way to goose potato flavor. One involved sauteing dried potato flakes in butter.
#31
Old 07-07-2013, 05:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
I've heard veterans talk about powdered eggs in the military. Not very fondly either.

Does anyone in the regular world buy powdered eggs? I can't ever recall seeing them at the grocery stores. What aisle would they be on?

I haven't seen powdered milk since the 1980's Government give away program. (they gave huge blocks of cheese and powdered milk to the poor).

What other powdered foods are available for my culinary delight?

Lets ignore dehydrated food that survivalists, camping, and backpackers buy from specialty places.
I've seen powdered butter and honey at my local Winco lately, and have powdered milk in my pantry. I also keep powdered buttermilk on hand for baking purposes (buying fresh, we'd either have to drink extra that neither of us cares for or dump it, and I object to the waste).

Check out places like emergencyessentials.com for more . (Note: I have no financial affiliation with the site in question.)

Last edited by Seanette; 07-07-2013 at 05:49 PM.
#32
Old 07-07-2013, 09:25 PM
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That's probably the main use for them. It works out really well for any packaged baking mix.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gaffa View Post
Powders milk and eggs are used in a lot of foods you might buy, like all-in-one pancake and cake mixes.
I was pleasantly surprised how much powdered/instant mashed potatoes have improved. I recall the ones from my childhood with disgust. They were like white paste. Thirty years later I decided to buy a couple packages on sale. They were really good! Not homemade good. But a big improvement over the product sold in the 70's.

Last edited by aceplace57; 07-07-2013 at 09:30 PM.
#33
Old 07-07-2013, 09:42 PM
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When I was cooking deep fried chicken for a living, we'd use powdered eggs for the egg wash part of the recipe. And I'm certain that I've eaten them while I was camping at one point or another.
#34
Old 07-07-2013, 09:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
I was pleasantly surprised how much powdered/instant mashed potatoes have improved. I recall the ones from my childhood with disgust. They were like white paste. Thirty years later I decided to buy a couple packages on sale. They were really good! Not homemade good. But a big improvement over the product sold in the 70's.
The difference is that they are now made by freeze-drying actual potato bits.
#35
Old 07-07-2013, 10:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seanette View Post
I've seen powdered butter and honey at my local Winco lately, and have powdered milk in my pantry. I also keep powdered buttermilk on hand for baking purposes (buying fresh, we'd either have to drink extra that neither of us cares for or dump it, and I object to the waste).

Check out places like emergencyessentials.com for more . (Note: I have no financial affiliation with the site in question.)
What's the point of powdered honey, unless it was to be used like sugar? Honey doesn't spoil unless it has something in it that does.

As for powdered peanut butter, I've seen that at my local natural foods store. I'm sure there's a specific use for that too.
#36
Old 07-07-2013, 10:36 PM
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I saw powdered milk just yesterday at my local Aldi (they keep it with flour, sugar and other baking ingredients.) Given that Aldi doesn't waste a lot of space, there must be people buying it for more than just mixing it into batter.

As for powdered eggs, I saw them at a local Whole Foods store.
#37
Old 07-07-2013, 10:51 PM
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I keep a packet of powdered milk in my cupboard, for emergencies when I run out of liquid milk and need a cup of tea quickly. Not as good as the real thing, but better than nothing.
#38
Old 07-07-2013, 11:04 PM
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We keep a supply of powdered milk around in case we lose power for a long stretch. Sometimes I'll use a bit to make chocolate milk or put some in instant coffee.
#39
Old 07-08-2013, 12:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
What's the point of powdered honey, unless it was to be used like sugar? Honey doesn't spoil unless it has something in it that does.
I was baffled by that item myself.
#40
Old 07-08-2013, 12:42 AM
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Years ago buying dry milk was a money-saving option. In New Hampshire where I do most of my shopping, it has been 10 years or more since that was true. It is now cheaper to buy fresh milk. I still buy it because powdered milk is especially convenient for bread recipes. Fresh milk has enzymes that interfere with the yeast, and pasteurization does not raise the temperature enough to destroy them. It has to be scalded, then cooled to lukewarm, which is time-consuming and inconvenient. With dry milk, you just add it with the other dry ingredients and substitute water for the liquid. I also use dry in a few other recipes that I make rarely, like fudge and some cake recipes. For drinking purposes, reconstituted dry milk is frankly nasty. If it's going to be cooked a long time, there is no difference I can tell between fresh and dry.

I also use powdered potatoes in bread recipes. Fresh mashed potatoes works better, but powder is a lot more convenient and the difference isn't huge. I've never tried dry eggs. I've seen them in the store a time or two but they weren't cheaper than fresh, so what's the point?
#41
Old 07-08-2013, 01:06 AM
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In the 60s, I ate some powdered eggs. Of course, you had to scramble them. Didn't seem like too much, if any, difference from the real deal.

Powdered milk, I don't have fond memories of. I also checked, and it seemed that the cost for enough PM to convert to the real stuff would cost as much as the same amount of the real deal, so, cost efficiency isn't one of the advantages.
#42
Old 07-08-2013, 01:45 AM
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I mostly drink skim milk made up from powder. I don't drink a lot of it and carton skim milk is dearer than real milk so I begrudge throwing it away. When I make coffee I just throw some in the bottom of the espresso cup and dampen it with some water before I put it under the spout. For protein shakes and stuff I just grab one of the water bottles out of the fridge and use it with a few spoons of milk powder.

I keep that instant mash potato crap for use as a thickener only. Since it is basically tasteless I find it perfect for last minute thickening of stews and stuff before serving. I think you could use it in sweet dishes and no-one would know.
#43
Old 07-08-2013, 02:44 AM
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My mother raised us six kids on her own so we drank a lot of powdered milk - couldn't afford fresh and it kept a lot longer. Mom had these giant boxes of the stuff. And I remember Government cheese! Mom couldn't always afford meat so we ate a lot of dried beans and Government cheese. I remember this big brick of Velveeta-looking orangey stuff in a very unadorned box that said "CHEESE". I kind of liked it.

I keep powdered milk/buttermilk in the pantry for occasional baking purposes. Also for making ice cream - powdered milk improves the texture, not as icy. I recently came across powdered eggs on Amazon and bought some just out of curiosity. Haven't tried them as yet.

Come to think of it, I also have powdered porcini, powdered cheese, and powdered wine for flavoring purposes. Spices, etc has a bunch of these.
#44
Old 07-08-2013, 05:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
What's the point of powdered honey, unless it was to be used like sugar? Honey doesn't spoil unless it has something in it that does.

As for powdered peanut butter, I've seen that at my local natural foods store. I'm sure there's a specific use for that too.
Powdered honey won't leave a sticky puddle of glue when you spill it on the floor [or the cat]

I use powdered egg white to make royal icing for decorating cookies and cakes. I use powdered whole eggs and whole milk in baking and cooking, and will occasionally use powdered potatoes in breads, soups or stews and mrAru found some brand of instant mashed potatoes with garlic and herbs that is actually quite palatable.
#45
Old 07-08-2013, 08:13 AM
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I buy powdered skimmed milk fairly often - it's useful for some bread recipes. Also, it's a great way to enrich milkshakes without making them too fatty.
#46
Old 07-08-2013, 09:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
What's the point of powdered honey, unless it was to be used like sugar? Honey doesn't spoil unless it has something in it that does.
Only place I've seen it used is in "Modernist Cuisine at Home" in rub recipes and spice mixtures.

Clearly there's a larger market than just the geeks who have MC or MCAH by the looks of an Amazon search on "powdered honey", but I don't have a clue who else buys the stuff.
#47
Old 07-08-2013, 10:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post

What other powdered foods are available for my culinary delight?
Though I'm not sure it qualifies as a "delight," I'm surprised no one has mentioned Tang.
#48
Old 07-08-2013, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by bump View Post
Only place I've seen it used is in "Modernist Cuisine at Home" in rub recipes and spice mixtures.

Clearly there's a larger market than just the geeks who have MC or MCAH by the looks of an Amazon search on "powdered honey", but I don't have a clue who else buys the stuff.
There is a whole huge section in Modernist Cuisine about making powder out of random ingredients. I got the distinct impression that there was a lot of "because we can" to the whole thing.
#49
Old 07-08-2013, 10:13 AM
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Powdered milk may cost more to process than fresh milk, but it's cheaper because it isn't as perishable.

Many years ago, I worked with a woman who said that when she was growing up, her parents drank fresh milk but gave the kids powdered milk, and she wondered why. I speculated that her parents may have believed that powdered milk was more nutritious (I've heard that some people did or do believe this) and that was why.
#50
Old 07-08-2013, 02:27 PM
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Powdered milk can be useful for making homemade yogurt. Adding a little with the yogurt starter will give you a thicker, richer yogurt without having to strain it. Not exactly sure why (I assume it boost the concentration of the milk sugars that the yogurt cultures eat), but it does work pretty well.
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