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#1
Old 07-29-2013, 05:19 PM
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Contemplating a trawler to cross the Atlantic and Pacific

I've owned a 36 foot coastal cruiser for the last seven years. It's a nice boat. Sleeps four comfortably, six in a pinch. Has most of the amenities of home in a tiny package. Here is a photo of when I first took ownership. Here is a photo from last season after I had a new canvas enclosure installed.

Over the last two years, I've become less and less enamoured with it, primarily because of its limitations. Its superstructure was not designed for rough waters. Its relatively small fuel tanks provide a maximum distance of approximately 230 miles, much less at WOT. Also, the boat has simply become too small for us.

I began looking at new models with better accommodations, updated systems with more efficient and precise maneuverability controls, eg, IPS, etc..., more contemporary styling, more space to entertain, and the ability to cruise at a somewhat longer range.

For the last year, I've been fixated on the Prestige 550S. It's a 55 foot cruiser with an open concept salon and a retractable roof. It also sleeps 7 comfortably. Here's an exterior shot. Another exterior shot in a different color. Here's a photo of the master state room.

The problem with Prestige is their cruisers are also coastal boats. You can take them down river, and a few miles off shore, but they're not fit for the open sea.

Recently, I've been looking into trawlers. Trawlers are built for ocean sailing and circumnavigating the globe. They're structured to take a pounding and, with fuel tank capacities in the range of 1500 to 3500 gallons, are able to sail very long distances between refuels. Another great thing about trawlers is the living accommodations can be configured to your tastes and give you the full comforts of home. Here are a few interior photos of the model I'm considering: Pilothouse , master stateroom, an exterior shot, and another exterior shot.

Through various forums and blogs, I've been communicating with other trawler owners. Hearing and reading about their experiences and adventures has awakened something in me (no, not a xenomorph), and I now have a strong desire to travel the world on my own schedule. I've already called one of the world renowned trawler builders, Nordhavn, and am going to see a Nordhavn trawler at Trawlerfest in Baltimore in September. If I like what I see, I may visit their offices and get the build process started. Nordhavn builds to order, so even if I do purchase one it'll be sometime in 2015 before it's completed, commissioned, and handed over to me.

My wife is scared because she knows when I become obsessed with something like this there's nothing she can do to dissuade me.

If anyone here has trawler experience and can offer any advice, want to go over pros and cons, or even if you just have questions, I'd be happy to discuss them.
#2
Old 07-29-2013, 05:44 PM
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I have zero advice, but I'm sure there are approximately 9 zillion boat owners on the internet ready with their opinions.

I know more about cruising under sail (still not a lot), but my father maintians that you cannot go wrong with a Nordhavn. The one you're looking at is pretty damn big. I see more in the 42-49-ft range.

Have you looked at a Kadey-Krogen? Some of their boats have really pretty lines. Obviously you've heard about Grand Banks, which are probably the most well-known.

Last edited by Labrador Deceiver; 07-29-2013 at 05:45 PM.
#3
Old 07-29-2013, 05:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labrador Deceiver View Post
I have zero advice, but I'm sure there are approximately 9 zillion boat owners on the internet ready with their opinions.

I know more about cruising under sail (still not a lot), but my father maintians that you cannot go wrong with a Nordhavn. The one you're looking at is pretty damn big. I see more in the 42-49-ft range.

Have you looked at a Kadey-Krogen? Some of their boats have really pretty lines. Obviously you've heard about Grand Banks, which are probably the most well-known.
Yeah, I've looked at a few Kadey-Krogen trawlers, but haven't been impressed with their styling.
#4
Old 07-29-2013, 06:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labrador Deceiver View Post
I know more about cruising under sail (still not a lot), but my father maintians that you cannot go wrong with a Nordhavn. The one you're looking at is pretty damn big. I see more in the 42-49-ft range.
I'm looking in the 55 - 62 foot range. From the photos, videos, and customer testimonials, the 62 seems the most appealing at this point. Most of the trawler owners I've spoken with say I should consider the largest that I can manage and afford, but they're liveaboards, and I haven't committed to taking such a leap...yet.
#5
Old 07-29-2013, 07:34 PM
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Have you yet been at sea in a storm so bad that you puked your stomach dry? What about your family? Don't commit yourself to a major expense until you know you can cope.

If you want to travel, have you considered a flying boat?
#6
Old 07-29-2013, 08:03 PM
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I commend you. I would never dream of a trans-oceanic voyage where I needed to depend on my engines alone. (I also recognize my limitations and would not want to skipper a sailing journey that long. No problem being crew despite my advanced age.)
#7
Old 07-29-2013, 08:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Quartz View Post
Have you yet been at sea in a storm so bad that you puked your stomach dry? What about your family? Don't commit yourself to a major expense until you know you can cope.

If you want to travel, have you considered a flying boat?
I've sailed through quite a few storms, the worst was in the Chesapeake Bay a few years ago, which was so bad that my depth finder got damaged from the boat being thrown around. Another reason to get a better boat.

Nothing, other than bad food, has ever caused me to puke my guts out, so I think I'll be alright.
#8
Old 07-29-2013, 09:03 PM
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Gotta say, I'm with DrFidelius here. While I have no shipboard experience, I find something horribly romantic about just taking to the open waters in one's own craft. I wish you luck with the idea!
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#9
Old 07-29-2013, 09:28 PM
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Originally Posted by DrFidelius View Post
I commend you. I would never dream of a trans-oceanic voyage where I needed to depend on my engines alone. (I also recognize my limitations and would not want to skipper a sailing journey that long. No problem being crew despite my advanced age.)
I think you may be very surprised to know that the number of people who make transatlantic and transpacific voyages every year is now higher than 6000. Also, many of these are regular folks without much prior experience, if any.

Here's a YouTube video of a couple, Eric & Christi Grab, who circumnavigated the globe in their Nordhavn 43 foot trawler in just over 2 years. Here's another couple, Dick and Gail Barnes, a little older than the previous, who sailed first their Nordhavn 50, then their 57 footer to Alaska, Hawaii and beyond. Here's yet another couple, Larry & Mary Mason, who sailed their 57 foot Nordhavn trawler through open seas.

When I see folks such as these, who are all older than I am by the way, not only taking risks but complete control of their lives and destinies, I become even more inspired to do it myself.

I realize this is not for everyone but, if you have caught the bug, and have the money, I say why not?
#10
Old 07-29-2013, 09:36 PM
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Originally Posted by ArrMatey! View Post
Gotta say, I'm with DrFidelius here. While I have no shipboard experience, I find something horribly romantic about just taking to the open waters in one's own craft.
As do I, although I probably would have chosen a less ominous sounding word than 'horribly'.
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Originally Posted by ArrMatey! View Post
I wish you luck with the idea!
Thanks! It will be some time before I am able to start my journey, if at all, but I am definitely in anticipatory mode and more excited about its prospect than I have been about anything in years.
#11
Old 07-30-2013, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Labrador Deceiver View Post
Obviously you've heard about Grand Banks, which are probably the most well-known.
Yep, I've looked at a number of Grand Banks trawlers. They're not bad, and the company has been around for a long time. Apples to apples, their ships don't seem to be quite up to the specs of the Nordhavns, although they do seem to be nicely appointed and solidly constructed.

Speaking of construction, Bering has some amazing, all steel trawlers, such as their Bering 60, with some pretty impressive stats.

On another note, I really don't understand short range trawlers. Azimut has the beautiful Magellano 50, although the pilothouse leaves a lot to be desired. The main problem I have with it, however, is its range is only 400 nm. What's the point?
#12
Old 07-30-2013, 04:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quartz View Post
Have you yet been at sea in a storm so bad that you puked your stomach dry? What about your family? Don't commit yourself to a major expense until you know you can cope.

If you want to travel, have you considered a flying boat?
Here is a HU-16 for a lot less than a Nordhavn, though I'm guessing the operating expenses would make up for that :
http://courtesyaircraft.com/Current%...s%20HU-16D.htm

Plus it doesn't have quite the same room either, and it probably can't handle quite as rough of seas either. (probably more likely to tip over end-to-end than side to side)

Brian
#13
Old 07-30-2013, 04:51 PM
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Just sit right back and you'll hear a tale,
a tale of a fateful trip....
#14
Old 07-30-2013, 05:10 PM
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Some years back, I attended the wedding of a couple who'd sailed all the way from Oz to the U.K. in a yacht they'd built themselves. Well, he built it, mainly. BYKWIM.
#15
Old 07-30-2013, 05:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Oakminster View Post
Just sit right back and you'll hear a tale,
a tale of a fateful trip....
With the right equipment, knowledge, and confidence, there are few sea routes one can't safely sail anymore. Of course there are waterways that would be insane to even attempt, eg, Northwest of the Seychelles, etc...
#16
Old 07-30-2013, 05:28 PM
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What the hell do you do for a living and can you get me a job?
#17
Old 07-30-2013, 06:02 PM
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A part of me thinks that could be so cool...foot loose, ground loose, and fancy free...nothing but endless ocean, blue skies and adventure ahead!

The other part of me remembers the film A Perfect Storm.

Somehow, sitting in the middle of the ocean at 3:00 AM with 90 foot waves and 100MPH winds and everything flying around in the boat doesn't sound like a whole bunch a chuckles to me.
#18
Old 07-30-2013, 06:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrFidelius View Post
I commend you. I would never dream of a trans-oceanic voyage where I needed to depend on my engines alone. (I also recognize my limitations and would not want to skipper a sailing journey that long. No problem being crew despite my advanced age.)
Nordhavn also makes a very nice motor-sailer so you are not stuck if the engines crap out, but you do need to actually know how to sail bluewater.

I lust after one, but the used ones run half a million bucks, new they run about a million. Ain't happening any time soon.
#19
Old 07-30-2013, 07:57 PM
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Originally Posted by aruvqan View Post
Nordhavn also makes a very nice motor-sailer so you are not stuck if the engines crap out, but you do need to actually know how to sail bluewater.

I lust after one, but the used ones run half a million bucks, new they run about a million. Ain't happening any time soon.
Yeah, the 56MS is very nice, and the perfect size, IMO, but I am not interested in having to manage sails.
#20
Old 07-30-2013, 08:13 PM
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Originally Posted by DMark View Post
A part of me thinks that could be so cool...foot loose, ground loose, and fancy free...nothing but endless ocean, blue skies and adventure ahead!

The other part of me remembers the film A Perfect Storm.

Somehow, sitting in the middle of the ocean at 3:00 AM with 90 foot waves and 100MPH winds and everything flying around in the boat doesn't sound like a whole bunch a chuckles to me.
Hehe. Reading your post made me chuckle.

It is near impossible to find yourself in that kind of weather without a lot of advance notice. Even in my cruiser I have instrumentation and communications gear with which I recieve various indications of approaching weather far enough in advance to either tack out of its path, heave to, or find safe harbor.

I have never gone through a storm I didn't know about in advance. Oh, I have certainly gone through weather I shouldn't have, with a lump lodged in my throat throughout the entire ordeal, but that was my idiocy in believing I could handle anything. Of course I made it through, but things could have gone horribly wrong. I'd like to believe I wouldn't take such chances in the future.
#21
Old 07-30-2013, 08:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Quartz View Post
Some years back, I attended the wedding of a couple who'd sailed all the way from Oz to the U.K. in a yacht they'd built themselves. Well, he built it, mainly. BYKWIM.
IDKWYM. DHRBIH?

Seriously, I would love to see it. Do you have photos?
#22
Old 07-31-2013, 05:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Onomatopoeia View Post
IDKWYM. DHRBIH?

Seriously, I would love to see it. Do you have photos?
Yes, he did build it himself. He is, after all, a professional shipwright. Alas, no photos.
#23
Old 07-31-2013, 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by zoid View Post
What the hell do you do for a living
I run a small MedEd company.
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Originally Posted by zoid View Post
and can you get me a job?
Depends. PM me a link to your CV.
#24
Old 07-31-2013, 11:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onomatopoeia View Post
With the right equipment, knowledge, and confidence, there are few sea routes one can't safely sail anymore. Of course there are waterways that would be insane to even attempt, eg, Northwest of the Seychelles, etc...
That's what I was wondering about. I sort of had an image of the maritime equivalent of those fools who die climbing Mt. Everest. Not so?
#25
Old 07-31-2013, 11:33 AM
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Also - what's the smallest boat one could safely cross the Atlantic in?
#26
Old 07-31-2013, 11:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onomatopoeia View Post
Yeah, the 56MS is very nice, and the perfect size, IMO, but I am not interested in having to manage sails.
Many people only use them as motor yachts <shrug> Baffling to see them with the masts only used to deploy stabilizers for when they are moored. I talked to an owner who removed the sails and didn't understand that you could do a long blue water trip without motors and burning through a very expensive tankful of fuel, or running out of fuel or some other mechanical damage in the middle of the ocean. Of course this was after the coasties had rescued them from a broken propeller.

Though I personally would kill for a similar sized Elco flat top from the 1920s-30s, even though it doesn't have a mast and sails. It might be tricky to make the Canada-Greenland leg of a transatlantic crossing, I don't think it would have the range without taking a few barrels of fuel on as cargo. Of course you might be able to top the flattop with solar cells, add a battery bank and an auxilliary electric drive to the thing. Elco is noted for their electric marine motors, and they do have one rated for a 53 foot boat.
#27
Old 07-31-2013, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr. Excellent View Post
That's what I was wondering about. I sort of had an image of the maritime equivalent of those fools who die climbing Mt. Everest. Not so?
Well, there are people who die at sea for being foolish and ill-prepared, but surprisingly few considering the ridiculously few restrictions on anyone who decides they want to go to sea. For example, I have my maritime safety certification and my captain's license, but because enforcement is so lax on many inland waterways, anyone without safety certification can take to the water in a PWC and be pretty confident they won't ever be stopped or boarded, and in many cases there's no requirement for a captain's license unless you're helming a commercial vessel, or serving as an instructor. What that means is there are a lot of people on the water who have no business being there, especially this time of year.

Thank goodness there are many serious boaters, those who tend to travel 50 miles or more from their home ports, who do take the appropriate precautions and typically have the appropriate training and knowledge to not only manage their vessels properly, but to be ready for emergencies as well.
#28
Old 07-31-2013, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr. Excellent View Post
Also - what's the smallest boat one could safely cross the Atlantic in?
I'm not sure, but this guy did it in his 26 foot sailboat.
#29
Old 07-31-2013, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr. Excellent View Post
Also - what's the smallest boat one could safely cross the Atlantic in?
If you want to view a very nice series of videos of a couple who sailed their 27 ft Vega Albin sailboat from San Fransisco to Hawaii, click here. It'll take a couple of hours to view the entire series, but their exploits are very interesting.

Of course, I would never make a trek like that in a sailboat, especially in a small sailboat, but they show that it is possible.
#30
Old 07-31-2013, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by aruvqan View Post
Many people only use them as motor yachts <shrug> Baffling to see them with the masts only used to deploy stabilizers for when they are moored.
Yeah, that makes little sense to me as well, especially as the sails, rigging, and their components take up extra space both topside and in the cabin.
Quote:
Originally Posted by aruvqan View Post
I talked to an owner who removed the sails and didn't understand that you could do a long blue water trip without motors and burning through a very expensive tankful of fuel, or running out of fuel or some other mechanical damage in the middle of the ocean. Of course this was after the coasties had rescued them from a broken propeller.
On the one hand, with a boat like the 56MS you have an opportunity to save gas, and thereby money, by using the sails during periods where there is adequate wind. On the other hand, in addition to having to tack left and right, making progress significantly slower than when under power, there are places it is simply impractical to go via sail, and in some places, impossible.
Quote:
Originally Posted by aruvqan View Post
Though I personally would kill for a similar sized Elco flat top from the 1920s-30s, even though it doesn't have a mast and sails. It might be tricky to make the Canada-Greenland leg of a transatlantic crossing, I don't think it would have the range without taking a few barrels of fuel on as cargo. Of course you might be able to top the flattop with solar cells, add a battery bank and an auxilliary electric drive to the thing. Elco is noted for their electric marine motors, and they do have one rated for a 53 foot boat.
That's what I like so much about today's trawlers, especially the Nordhavns, Outer Reefs, and Berings. They're so fuel-efficient that going 3500 nm between refills, depending on the size of the tanks, is a piece of cake.

Last edited by Onomatopoeia; 07-31-2013 at 03:55 PM.
#31
Old 07-31-2013, 04:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Onomatopoeia View Post
I'm not sure, but this guy did it in his 26 foot sailboat.
The Bristol Channel Cutter is famous for it's blue water capabilities. 28' is mundane, as far as size goes. It isn't particularly small.
#32
Old 07-31-2013, 04:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Onomatopoeia View Post
On the other hand, in addition to having to tack left and right, making progress significantly slower than when under power, there are places it is simply impractical to go via sail, and in some places, impossible.
There aren't very many places you can't go in a sailboat with a small motor. Certainly none that would be open to a similar-sized trawler.

Last edited by Labrador Deceiver; 07-31-2013 at 04:22 PM.
#33
Old 07-31-2013, 05:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Labrador Deceiver View Post
There aren't very many places you can't go in a sailboat with a small motor. Certainly none that would be open to a similar-sized trawler.
With a motor, yes. I'm talking about under sail alone.
#34
Old 07-31-2013, 05:31 PM
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You'd be surprised.

Regardless, it doesn't make sense to restrict a boat with a small motor from using it in a hypothetical situation. They're primarily built for sailing, but that's doesn't disqualify them from using their other available tools when the need arises.
#35
Old 08-03-2013, 01:07 AM
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Update.

I communicated with a Nordhavn representative yesterday who is going to try to get me a private showing of an N64! Fingers crossed.

The Baltimore Trawlerfest in September will probably have an N46, which is a discontinued model, and an N47, which is a bit smaller than I am interested in.

Nordhavn is going to have a new N60 in Florida for public showing within the next few weeks, so I may fly down to take a look as that size is right in my sweet spot.
#36
Old 08-03-2013, 10:45 AM
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Keep us posted. I'd like to hear how the build process goes, if you decide to go that route.

Have fun looking, regardless of which one you pick.
#37
Old 08-03-2013, 01:50 PM
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I've heard good things about Nordic tugs.
#38
Old 08-03-2013, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by drastic_quench View Post
I've heard good things about Nordic tugs.
They're okay, but not my cup of tea. Most Nordic Tug trawlers are small; their largest model is a 54 footer. Their systems also don't seem to be primarily purposed, nor mechanically kitted, for long distance, blue water cruising. Having large fuel tanks doesn't automatically mean a vessel can, or should, make transoceanic voyages.
#39
Old 08-03-2013, 10:23 PM
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Originally Posted by DMark View Post
A part of me thinks that could be so cool...foot loose, ground loose, and fancy free...nothing but endless ocean, blue skies and adventure ahead!

The other part of me remembers the film A Perfect Storm.
I had pretty much the same reaction, but I also remembered just how horrendously seasick I get.

My father was in the Navy and he never got seasick. I think I inherited his seasickness as well as my own...

But sailing around the world sounds so cool.

Last edited by Sunspace; 08-03-2013 at 10:24 PM.
#40
Old 08-05-2013, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Labrador Deceiver View Post
Keep us posted. I'd like to hear how the build process goes, if you decide to go that route.

Have fun looking, regardless of which one you pick.
Yep, I plan to use this thread as an ongoing log of my progress. I also plan to post photos and insights from my trip to Baltimore's Trawler Fest next month.
#41
Old 08-05-2013, 11:09 AM
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A few questions from a non-boat-person, if you please?

Isn't a "trawler" a type of fishing boat? I have this image in my mind of sailors winching in nets full of shining silvery fish. Are these boats you're showing us built new upon the same plans without the fishing equipment?

How much fuel/supplies/etc can you take on board. and how long is the resulting voyage? Do you desalinate your own water as you go?

Is it possible to automatically steer the boat, as pilots can some planes?

Is it legal to carry weapons to fend off pirates?

Do you need to hire crew? Can people work their way across the Pacific doing this? I presume you need passports, etc, when visiting other lands.

If you live on board for extended times, and have kids, how do they get schooling? Can you do paying work while traveling?

Are there lifeboat or escape drills? (Are there lifeboats?) I was looking at that stateroom pic and imagining having to escape in the middle of the night...
#42
Old 08-05-2013, 11:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
A few questions from a non-boat-person, if you please?

Isn't a "trawler" a type of fishing boat? I have this image in my mind of sailors winching in nets full of shining silvery fish. Are these boats you're showing us built new upon the same plans without the fishing equipment?
They are pleasure boats built in the style of fishing trawlers.

Quote:
How much fuel/supplies/etc can you take on board. and how long is the resulting voyage? Do you desalinate your own water as you go?
Usually, there are fresh water tanks on board for drinking and occational showers. I'll let the OP answer your provisioning questions, as they differ greatly based on the leg of the voyage.

Quote:
Is it possible to automatically steer the boat, as pilots can some planes?
Yes. It's called Auto-helm.

Quote:
Is it legal to carry weapons to fend off pirates?
It's legal in international waters (Legal is the wrong term. Laws gret weird in international waters), and many people do carry guns. I'm sure there are all kinds of different laws for when you are in port abroad.

Quote:
Do you need to hire crew?
Not for the size boats we're talking about in this thread.

Quote:
Can people work their way across the Pacific doing this? I presume you need passports, etc, when visiting other lands.
Yes, and yes.

Quote:
If you live on board for extended times, and have kids, how do they get schooling? Can you do paying work while traveling?
I know people who have pulled their kids out of school for extended voyages. The children are homeschooled.

Quote:
Are there lifeboat or escape drills? (Are there lifeboats?) I was looking at that stateroom pic and imagining having to escape in the middle of the night...
Yes to both. There are life boats (life rafts) and survival suits.

Last edited by Labrador Deceiver; 08-05-2013 at 11:27 AM.
#43
Old 08-05-2013, 02:03 PM
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A few questions from a non-boat-person, if you please?
Certainly. I'll try not to repeat Labrador Deceiver's responses, but elaborate wherever possible.
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Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Isn't a "trawler" a type of fishing boat?
These are primarily yachts. You can certainly fish from them, and they can be designed to facilitate fishing, but fishing is not their primary purpose. They're designed for blue water voyages, first and foremost.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
I have this image in my mind of sailors winching in nets full of shining silvery fish. Are these boats you're showing us built new upon the same plans without the fishing equipment?
Not exactly. They have a basic shape that is reminiscent of old fishing trawlers, but that's the facade only. The architecture and foundation of trawler yachts and fishing trawlers is quite different, although both are designed to be very rugged.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
How much fuel/supplies/etc can you take on board. and how long is the resulting voyage? Do you desalinate your own water as you go?
Depends entirely on the brand, model, size, purpose, and amenities of the trawler. Trawlers designed for long distance voyages can carry enough fuel to get you from Nova Scotia to Gibraltar and beyond without having to refuel. As far as supplies are concerned, whether you're talking about provisions or redundant equipment like spare parts, etc... there's usually plenty of room for everything. Food storage is usually very plentiful with some models having two or even three freezers and up to three refrigerators. Most have more non perishable storage than the average home because you need to have enough food for transoceanic voyages of upwards of 30 days. Most of the newer trawlers have 'water makers' on board that allow you to draw and desalinate water on an ongoing basis.
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Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Is it possible to automatically steer the boat, as pilots can some planes?
Yes, many trawlers have autopilot systems with redundancy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Is it legal to carry weapons to fend off pirates?
What Labrador Deceiver said. But really the idea is to stay clear of areas frequented by pirates. For example, off the East coast of Africa near Somali waters.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Do you need to hire crew? Can people work their way across the Pacific doing this? I presume you need passports, etc, when visiting other lands.
You don't necessarily need to, and there are many trawler owners who are owner/operators, but depending on your level of expertise, experience, and the size of trawler, it is probably a good idea to have at least one professional crew member aboard. I've been boating for as long as I can remember, going back to when I was a kid, and I've owned my own cruiser for the last 7 years, and if I buy a 62 foot trawler, even I will probably have crew on board the first few times I take it out. Trawlers are behemoths, with complex systems, and a lot can go wrong.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
If you live on board for extended times, and have kids, how do they get schooling?
Some homeschool their kids, but many slip their boats at a single marina during the school year so their kids can attend school.
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Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Can you do paying work while traveling?
Depends on the type of work you do. If all you need is a phone line, a computer, and access to the internet, then yes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Are there lifeboat or escape drills?
Yes, any smart captain creates a muster plan and does muster drills. I do it, and my boat is just a 36 foot cruiser. I wouldn't think of taking my boat out before ensuring everyone is clear on emergency procedures.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
(Are there lifeboats?)
Yes, there are life rafts as standard equipment on most trawlers. Some have a dinghy (or 2) and a life raft.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
I was looking at that stateroom pic and imagining having to escape in the middle of the night...
Many people, even a surprising number of boaters, believe that the overhead hatches are just to let light in when they're really meant as a means of escape during emergencies.

Last edited by Onomatopoeia; 08-05-2013 at 02:08 PM.
#44
Old 08-05-2013, 02:55 PM
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Cool! Thanks for your answers!

I've spent the last half hour looking over websites related to the Trent-Severn Waterway to get an idea whether your vessel would fit... because once you sail around North America and up the St Lawrence, you'll have to come for a visit!
#45
Old 08-05-2013, 03:13 PM
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More questions...

In Canada, operators of pleasurecraft need to get a license. I presume there are other licenses for commercial use. Did you have to progress through stages of licensing to command larger and more complicated vessels, as aircraft pilots need to?

Are you required to keep watch (listen?) for distress calls?

Do you have to scrape the barnacles off the hull, and, if so, do you assign this duty as punishment?

Are there special cooking skills required on a boat? Can you carry livestock, such as chickens?

Do the boats recycle water? Do they treat sewage, or just store it like an RV? Are you allowed to dump it?

Edit: now I remember the other question I wanted to ask. Why are the front-facing windows in some of the pilothouses tilted outward, so that their top edges are further forward?

Thanks!

Last edited by Sunspace; 08-05-2013 at 03:16 PM.
#46
Old 08-05-2013, 03:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Cool! Thanks for your answers!

I've spent the last half hour looking over websites related to the Trent-Severn Waterway to get an idea whether your vessel would fit... because once you sail around North America and up the St Lawrence, you'll have to come for a visit!
I know the Trent-Severn Waterway! It's part of America's Great Loop boaters use to circumnavigate Eastern North America.
#47
Old 08-05-2013, 03:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
More questions...

In Canada, operators of pleasurecraft need to get a license. I presume there are other licenses for commercial use. Did you have to progress through stages of licensing to command larger and more complicated vessels, as aircraft pilots need to?
As I stated upthread, I have my safety certification and my captain's license. It is a requirement to have safety certification in order to operate a water vessel in the US. The problem is this is rarely enforced. The captain's license has certain limits depending on experience that determines the type of vessel you are legally allowed to helm. For example, my license allows me to helm a vessel of up to 25 tons

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Are you required to keep watch (listen?) for distress calls?
You're not required to stand watch, but anyone with any sense will.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Do you have to scrape the barnacles off the hull, and, if so, do you assign this duty as punishment?
I guess you can send someone down in scuba gear to defoul the hull, but usually you just have the marina haul your boat out. I pay someone to clean my hull, and bottom paint if necessary.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Are there special cooking skills required on a boat? Can you carry livestock, such as chickens?
No, there are no special cooking skills required when cooking on today's pleasure craft; it's just like cooking at home. I've never seen anyone with livestock on their boat, although I don't see a reason why you couldn't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Do the boats recycle water? Do they treat sewage, or just store it like an RV? Are you allowed to dump it?
In the US, within a certain number of miles of the coast, you must store your waste, which gets evacuated at pump-out stations that nearly every full-service marina has these days. Marinas usually charge for the pump out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Edit: now I remember the other question I wanted to ask. Why are the front-facing windows in some of the pilothouses tilted outward, so that their top edges are further forward?

Thanks!
They supposedly offer a number of advantages: 1 - shade from the sun, 2 - water spray is pushed away from the glass faster, 3 - Glare reduction.

Last edited by Onomatopoeia; 08-05-2013 at 03:56 PM.
#48
Old 08-05-2013, 04:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onomatopoeia View Post
As I stated upthread, I have my safety certification and my captain's license. It is a requirement to have safety certification in order to operate a water vessel in the US....
Do you need any other license first as a prerequisite for the captain's license?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Onomatopoeia View Post
You're not required to stand watch, but anyone with any sense will.
Makes sense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Onomatopoeia View Post
In the US, within a certain number of miles of the coast, you must store your waste, which gets evacuated at pump-out stations that nearly every full-service marina has these days. Marinas usually charge for the pump out.
I believe you can get composting toilets for marine use. Presumably this would reduce the bill for pump-out. Are such harbour services expensive?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Onomatopoeia View Post
[Outward-tilted windows] supposedly offer a number of advantages: 1 - shade from the sun, 2 - water spray is pushed away from the glass faster, 3 - Glare reduction.
I was wondering whether they were for a better view when overlooking some sort of work area.

Are you allowed to sail through the Panama Canal? If so, do you have to be part of a group of pleasure boats? (I can't see them operating an entire lock of the Panama Canal for just one not-huge boat...)

Last edited by Sunspace; 08-05-2013 at 04:03 PM.
#49
Old 08-05-2013, 04:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Do you need any other license first as a prerequisite for the captain's license?
Other than CPR certification and proof of a physical exam, I don't think there's any other requirement.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
I believe you can get composting toilets for marine use. Presumably this would reduce the bill for pump-out. Are such harbour services expensive?
At my Marina, it is $25 per pump out, and $45 for non members.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
I was wondering whether they were for a better view when overlooking some sort of work area.
I don't think so, but I don't know for sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Are you allowed to sail through the Panama Canal? If so, do you have to be part of a group of pleasure boats? (I can't see them operating an entire lock of the Panama Canal for just one not-huge boat...)
Yes, recreational yachts are allowed to go through the Panama Canal. You don't have to be part of a group, but when you enter the lock they make you tie up to another boat as the water fills. You usually have to wait for access into a lock, but I think it's on a schedule and not based on a certain number of boats.
#50
Old 08-05-2013, 05:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onomatopoeia View Post
Other than CPR certification and proof of a physical exam, I don't think there's any other requirement.

At my Marina, it is $25 per pump out, and $45 for non members.
Not bad...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Onomatopoeia View Post
Yes, recreational yachts are allowed to go through the Panama Canal. You don't have to be part of a group, but when you enter the lock they make you tie up to another boat as the water fills. You usually have to wait for access into a lock, but I think it's on a schedule and not based on a certain number of boats.
Have you ever sailed through the Panama Canal?

I remember reading about someone swimming through the Panama Canal, but I thought that was a one-off publicity stunt.

I don't know why this never occurred to me before, but of course the Panama Canal has a website.

Last edited by Sunspace; 08-05-2013 at 05:21 PM.
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