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#1
Old 02-07-2014, 05:23 PM
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Why have some banks gotten pissy about counting coins?

Like everybody else now and then I empty out my car ashtray and the dish on my nightstand and cash in my change. Today I had $22 worth.

I understand banks only want to do this for customers. But on top of my account number they want ID and my social security number. And they always act kind of put off by it.

Are the terrorists breaking into gumball machines and cashing in the coins? Why the big hub bub, Bub?
#2
Old 02-07-2014, 05:35 PM
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I can't tell for sure from your post: ARE you a current paying customer at that particular bank?
#3
Old 02-07-2014, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
I can't tell for sure from your post: ARE you a current paying customer at that particular bank?


Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
But on top of my account number
How would I have an account number if I wasn't an account holder?

And it's not just the bank I used today. I have accounts at 3 for varying reasons. All of them make a big deal about using that machine. I'm not using the machine in the grocery store and paying a fee. That's ridiculous.
#4
Old 02-07-2014, 05:54 PM
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I think the reason is the expense of dealing with coins. I used to bring coins to my bank, but they required that they be rolled. On the other hand, the bank my parents use has a coin counter that's free for customers.

BTW, I believe the Coinstar machine will give you 100% of the value of your coins if you get paid in the form of an Amazon gift card. (I think they may offer other gift cards as well.) I'm always buying something from Amazon, so this works for me.
#5
Old 02-07-2014, 10:52 PM
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My bank recently installed a self service coin counter in the lobby. Similar to a CoinStar machine except it spits out a slip with your total. If you have an account there you can deposit or redeem it for no charge. If you don't they charge a % like the CoinStar machines do.
#6
Old 02-07-2014, 10:56 PM
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I am confused whether you are using the faux-CoinStar or handing money to the teller. If you are giving the teller a handful of loose coins, knock it off. They usually give the rolls for free. For some transactions, they want two ways to identify you. IME SSN is never mandatory as they can ask phone number, bank where you opened account, etc. to verify you. If it's with the machine, they probably had problems or are trying to limit non account holders from tying it up.
#7
Old 02-07-2014, 11:00 PM
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My credit union counts coins at no charge. I just tell them to deposit into my account.
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#8
Old 02-07-2014, 11:11 PM
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Hell if I know. I went to my local Chase (my bank) and gave them a big-ass baggie full of coins, and they dropped it in their machine without even asking if I was a customer of theirs. He did ask if I wanted it in an account or in cash, and I said cash, and that wasn't a problem either.

Maybe they break a lot or something, and they're trying to discourage frequent use where you go?
#9
Old 02-07-2014, 11:27 PM
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I remember as kid regularly depositing large volumes of coins from a busibess my parents ran. I was always impressed with how fast that money could be counted by hand. But then with a bit of practice I could do it reasonably quickly as well.
Now, cash handling skills seem to b a thing of the past (right along side mental arithmetic). I am really surprised how tediuos and slow cash counting is now and that is including bank staff who presumably have to do it reasonably regularly.
I am all for automation when it is needed, but counting a couple of handfulls of change really shouldn't require it.
#10
Old 02-07-2014, 11:29 PM
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Assuming it's not just your imagination (bankers always seem irritated to me), it might be the sound. Those machines are noisy, and no doubt irritate the whole bank. I suspect that they'd rather not have the machines at all, but feel they'd be at a disadvantage if they didn't.
#11
Old 02-07-2014, 11:34 PM
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It's not peculiar to Cheeseladn Philly?, in the UK a bag of 10 is treated as the max to exchange for a note.
I don't run a business but I suspect that if you need to transfer a large ammount of coinage into notes a Business account would do ?
P
#12
Old 02-07-2014, 11:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thelurkinghorror View Post
I am confused whether you are using the faux-CoinStar or handing money to the teller. If you are giving the teller a handful of loose coins, knock it off.


I'm handing them a plastic bag full of coins and they dump it in their machine. In a few seconds it spits out the amount. Unless I'm also making a deposit I just take the amount in paper money.

For decades this was no big deal but over the last year or so they've gotten kind of onery about it. I gave them my account number and an ID, why on Earth would they need my SS#? I only do this about 2-3 times a year for Kripes sake. It's not like I'm walking in there every day with bags of coins.
#13
Old 02-08-2014, 12:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
Like everybody else now and then I empty out my car ashtray and the dish on my nightstand and cash in my change. Today I had $22 worth.

I understand banks only want to do this for customers. But on top of my account number they want ID and my social security number. And they always act kind of put off by it.

Are the terrorists breaking into gumball machines and cashing in the coins? Why the big hub bub, Bub?

No, its because the person doing the deposit that is responsible for any fees due to improper coins, or for depositing fake coins... And so they can return any foreign coins to you. They may not pick up all issues when you leave the coins with them.

They may ban people who cause trouble (fills the mix with bent coils from the casino.)
from making coin deposits.

Forgot to say . I friend told me about how the time he was working at the bank... he had some coins which were in a coin box polluted with some other sort of deposit.

Last edited by Isilder; 02-08-2014 at 12:13 AM. Reason: added different deposit
#14
Old 02-08-2014, 12:40 AM
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I have noticed this as well. However, the orneriness of the teller usually corresponds with the type of account you have with the bank and the balance of your accounts. I've taken a big jar - probably a year and a half to two years worth of change - into my regular bank and asked for it to be deposited into my checking account. The teller, though not exactly in those words, told me to get the hell out of there and find a coinstar machine. I was pissed - I had a checking account balance in the mid 5 figures with them and wasn't going to be trudging down to a coinstar machine to get a percentage taken off - so I asked for a manager. I told him that I wanted to deposit this change into my checking account - and he basically told me the same thing. I was fuming at this point so I asked that my account be closed and I get a cashiers check for my balance. He said fine and asked for my ID and debit card and opened up my account. At this point his attitude turned around 180 degrees.

All of a sudden "Oh I'm so sorry, we can get this change deposited into your account right away. I thought you weren't a customer of ours." Yeah right - why would I come to your bank and ask for it to be deposited into my account if I DIDN'T HAVE AN ACCOUNT AT THIS BANK? He kept going on and on how much I was a valued customer and blah, blah, blah. I stuck to my principles and closed out that account. So that bank that rhymes with "hank of domerica" can suck it.

I think banks just don't want to deal with change because counting it is loud, it takes time, and there really isn't any profit in it for the banks.
#15
Old 02-08-2014, 12:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdmiralQ View Post
takes time, and there really isn't any profit in it for the banks.


Takes time? It takes about 2 seconds to dump a bag of coins into that machine and the machine takes all of 20 seconds to count it up.

And there isn't any profit in the free notarizations they do for me about 10 times a year. They don't even ask if I have an account for that.

I'm thinking theres something else.
#16
Old 02-08-2014, 01:16 AM
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Just use the self service checkout at your supermarket to buy something cheap when you have excess coins. You get your change back in notes.
#17
Old 02-08-2014, 02:03 AM
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Originally Posted by don't ask View Post
Just use the self service checkout at your supermarket to buy something cheap when you have excess coins. You get your change back in notes.
If someone in front of you paid for something with $22 in coins you'd be in the Pit bitching your head off.

I used to put my change in piggy banks for nieces and nephews, but they've grown up. My grandkids are a bit young to appreciate it yet.
#18
Old 02-08-2014, 02:07 AM
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Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
If someone in front of you paid for something with $22 in coins you'd be in the Pit bitching your head off.
Have you ever used one? You just throw them in and they disappear down the slot. You don't put them in like in a drink machine.
#19
Old 02-08-2014, 02:13 AM
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Although on reflection we have $1 and $2 coins so two handfuls of change could be $30 or more. And we don't have 1 cent coins.
#20
Old 02-08-2014, 03:52 AM
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Originally Posted by don't ask View Post
Have you ever used one? You just throw them in and they disappear down the slot. You don't put them in like in a drink machine.
The ones I've used here in the US only let you deposit coins one at a time. So yes, it is like putting them in a drink machine. This will definitely cheese off anyone in line behind someone who is paying with a large number of coins.
#21
Old 02-08-2014, 03:53 AM
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I work at a bank. If your bank gives you stress about taking coin, you should close all of your accounts at that bank by cash or cashiers check and call the boss afterward to tell them why you did. Keep your money someplace where people are nice to you!

If you bring me a bucket of coin, I'm delighted to take it and it's fairly likely to wreck my workday. There are a lot of reasons why.

When you drop a penny on the street, you lose a cent. When I drop a penny, I don't balance. Loose coin from a customer in quantity means I probably won't balance. If I were dishonest and took a penny out of my pocket in order to balance, I would lose my job. Loose coin isn't loose coin; it's usually US currency and bonus arcade tokens, 20c pieces from a country that no longer exists, paper clips, and (honest-to-god) a couple toenails.

Exceptional people do not try to deposit toenails at the bank. Exceptional people drop coin off and pick up their folding money in the afternoon or tomorrow morning instead of waiting around for it. There is less risk of a loss or correction on both sides when you leave your currency and walk away--just like night drop.

The opportunity cost of accepting coin where I work is almost certainly higher than the losses taken from cashing bad checks. Here's one recent example. A customer came by on a busy day with quite a bit of coin at 10:30 AM. We didn't finish counting it until 3:30 or so. The math didn't work, then the recounts didn't work, the boss took it over even though there were the infamous recent credit card frauds to deal with, there was too much silver in it to accept ethically, and every other little thing. Compare the value of all transactions going through a bank in one business day to a three figure change order on a busy Friday. It's insane. (By the way, we were fathoms more than friendly to him despite complaining while he wasn't there, because we are a bank and taking money is the job.)

I used to think that Coinstar was a scam. The cut they take is, everything considered, very generous.
#22
Old 02-08-2014, 04:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimeWinder View Post
Assuming it's not just your imagination (bankers always seem irritated to me)
Bankers or tellers? In my experience, bankers sound smarmy, because they are essentially working in sales, and need to make that quota.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
I'm handing them a plastic bag full of coins and they dump it in their machine.
Ah, gotcha. I was thinking either: machine outside, or rolls behind the counter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
For decades this was no big deal but over the last year or so they've gotten kind of onery about it.
Honest question: do you mean they've had coin counting machines for decades? Because I haven't noticed, but then where I'm from seems different than other places. E.g. we didn't and AFAIK don't have drivethrough ATMs whereas other places have had them for awhile.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALOHA HATER View Post
I work at a bank. If your bank gives you stress about taking coin, you should close all of your accounts at that bank by cash or cashiers check and call the boss afterward to tell them why you did. Keep your money someplace where people are nice to you!
I used to work in a bank. If you base your entire working relationship with possibly an international bank with tens of thousands of employees on one teller, then you need to chill out, complain to a higher up, and change your relationship only if you aren't given some minimum of attention. But a single branch manager isn't going to get too beat up if you left, especially if you already made the decision.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALOHA HATER View Post
If you bring me a bucket of coin, I'm delighted to take it and it's fairly likely to wreck my workday. There are a lot of reasons why.
Yep, not going to complain about your bucket, but me or my boss wouldn't be very happy to spend lots of time sorting your filthy lucre. And my boss' boss will only care about how much the line is backed up and make it a big deal without talking directly to the customer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALOHA HATER View Post
When you drop a penny on the street, you lose a cent. When I drop a penny, I don't balance.
IIRC (your bank may be very different), I got some incentive (forget what, gift card after a few per quarter?) for balancing to the penny, absolutely no issues or complaints from higher ups if I balanced to < ~$3.00, but would get immediately fired if I was out some huge amount (> $ 1,000 or something). Everything else would be investigated but not necessarily a problem immediately, e.g. let a counterfeit $20 get in your pool, might get a talking to, but not discipline if it's not frequent.
#23
Old 02-08-2014, 05:03 AM
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Originally Posted by thelurkinghorror View Post
IIRC (your bank may be very different), I got some incentive (forget what, gift card after a few per quarter?) for balancing to the penny, absolutely no issues or complaints from higher ups if I balanced to < ~$3.00, but would get immediately fired if I was out some huge amount (> $ 1,000 or something). Everything else would be investigated but not necessarily a problem immediately, e.g. let a counterfeit $20 get in your pool, might get a talking to, but not discipline if it's not frequent.
I'm trying to think of how I could count cash out 1000- off or find a good percentage of well-made phonies in stacks of cash in, and I'm at a loss.
#24
Old 02-08-2014, 02:21 PM
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Coin counting machines are disappearing from banks. The last time I asked about depositing coins at a branch of the bank I work for, they offered a bag that I could put the coins into with a deposit ticket, and they'd be shipped off to the local cash vault facility for counting.

I got the sense that they offered this option only because I work there, but this was a branch that had no merchant services. I may have had different results at a more merchant-focused location, but ever since I found Coinstar gives 100% on Amazon cards, I've never looked back.
#25
Old 02-08-2014, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by cochrane View Post
The ones I've used here in the US only let you deposit coins one at a time. So yes, it is like putting them in a drink machine. This will definitely cheese off anyone in line behind someone who is paying with a large number of coins.
Thank you. Same here. ALL of the self check out lanes have one-coin-at-a-time slots.
It would take forever to put a significant amount in.

I put coins in my car ashtray and in a little dish on my nightstand. After a couple of months They're both overflowing. I used to put my coins in piggy banks for my siblings kids, but they're all grown now. So now I'm back to cashing them in.
#26
Old 02-08-2014, 04:57 PM
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I've heard that some grocery stores have installed their own machines and pay out 100% on them. This is profitable for them because otherwise, they'd have to buy bulk coins at higher than face value. Plus, of course, it's something that customers like, which can lead to more customers.
#27
Old 02-08-2014, 05:42 PM
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The amusement park I worked at we had dozens of vending machines and such scattered around the park as well as a propensity for being on the receiving end of many coins from customer transactions. The owners created an "exchange fund" for managers doing the deposits and such to dump excess coins into. Basically there was a cash box in one of our safes that was expected to balance against a bunch of bags of loose coins so if a customer came in with $23 in loose coins we happily took it, counted it up and sold it to the coin pile.

Every couple months we would run the bags through a coin sorter and counter. We had cloth bags with little crimp on seals and the bag was some specified amount the bank wanted like $1000 in quarters or $500 in nickels something like that. We then took those to the bank.
#28
Old 02-09-2014, 08:12 AM
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Thanks for your insights, ALOHA HATER, that's interesting and helpful. MY bank still does coin-counting, and will let me deposit it or give me bills, and it usually only takes a few minutes (depends on what I bring in, I suppose, a jar or a ten-gallon jug.) I've had to occasional odd bit (arcade token) get mixed in, and felt embarrassed about it, but didn't realize how much extra time that takes.

My sister-in-law banks at the same company (rhymes with Face) in Cleveland, and her bank doesn't have a machine any more.
#29
Old 02-09-2014, 09:11 AM
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I had this problem many years ago with a small local bank. Now I'm with Chase and, much as I don't like them for other reasons, they've been unfailingly polite and cheerful about taking my glass pumpkin full of coins once a year or so.

Although after ALOHA HATER's post, I'm reconsidering that, because I'm a nice person and would really hate for someone to get disciplined or worse simply because my pocket lint messed something up. The machine is good at returning paper clips and buttons (yes, really, sorry!) but since I don't visually inspect every coin I'm handed in change, there very well may be the odd token or foreign coin getting through. I don't really think a token is going to break Chase, but it sounds like it might break an individual teller, and that's unfortunate. I'd rather banks change their policy about that, but since I have no control over that, I may have just become a Coinstar customer.
#30
Old 02-09-2014, 09:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbites View Post
Like everybody else now and then I empty out my car ashtray and the dish on my nightstand and cash in my change. Today I had $22 worth.

I understand banks only want to do this for customers. But on top of my account number they want ID and my social security number. And they always act kind of put off by it.

Are the terrorists breaking into gumball machines and cashing in the coins? Why the big hub bub, Bub?
the last time I took coins to my bank, the teller informed me they don't take rolled coins any more. She commented that in order to count the pennies, she would have to unroll them all. Sigh. I kind of like the ritual of counting up the pennies and filling the little tubes. Another tradition falling to the god of efficiency.
As for the bank being annoyed about taking coins, I find that if you leave the sack of coins with the teller so that they can deal with them at their leisure, they are much friendlier about it.
#31
Old 02-09-2014, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by rbroome View Post
the last time I took coins to my bank, the teller informed me they don't take rolled coins any more. She commented that in order to count the pennies, she would have to unroll them all. Sigh. I kind of like the ritual of counting up the pennies and filling the little tubes. Another tradition falling to the god of efficiency.
As for the bank being annoyed about taking coins, I find that if you leave the sack of coins with the teller so that they can deal with them at their leisure, they are much friendlier about it.
Back in the day when I deposited coins, they had to open the rolls, too. But that didn't stop them from accepting them. They'd break them open and pour them in the machine. They did discourage us from using them, but they didn't forbid it.
#32
Old 02-09-2014, 12:34 PM
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The Coinstar machines have a minimum for the gift cards, $20 I think. That would be a great way to set yourself an Amazon gift card balance to chip away at w/ orders or gifts and such.
Our self-checkouts have the one-at-a-time coin slots; but if it's really quiet I'll use that to get rid of all my pennies at once. I put the silver coins aside until I take my metal recycling in and then use them to round up to the next dollar or so in order to be deposited in the ATM. And they ALWAYS want change at the recycler.
#33
Old 02-09-2014, 01:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Nawth Chucka View Post
The Coinstar machines have a minimum for the gift cards, $20 I think.
Less than that - in November I got an Amazon gift card for $13-something using Coinstar.
#34
Old 02-09-2014, 01:19 PM
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I agree; I cashed about fourteen dollars in coins last year at Coinstar and took the money in the form of an Amazon gift card. (Not literally a gift card, though. It was just a code that I entered on the sites to apply against an order.)
#35
Old 02-09-2014, 01:20 PM
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I would like to ask, just what is the problem?

I thought banks had machines that would count coins in just a jiff. No?

Dump a bunch of coins into the machine and out comes your answer. Isn't it really just that simple?

No? Oh dear.

Well ... why not?

Last edited by Charlie Wayne; 02-09-2014 at 01:21 PM.
#36
Old 02-09-2014, 01:28 PM
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Look upthread; ALOHA HATER works at a bank and explained how it works at his/her bank. Other banks may have a simpler process. And some banks have self-service coin counting machines, although they may limit their use to customers.
#37
Old 02-09-2014, 01:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Nawth Chucka View Post
The Coinstar machines have a minimum for the gift cards, $20 I think.
I just checked the Coinstar website. There is a minimum amount but the exact number varies, depending on which company's gift cards you choose. The highest minimum I found was for Southwest Airlines, at $25 but many were at $5, including Amazon.com.
#38
Old 02-09-2014, 03:27 PM
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My credit union has a coin counter available for member use. In order to use it fee-free, I have to insert my debit card, and the money gets deposited directly into my account. If I want it back in folding paper, I have to make a withdrawal in a separate transaction, but I usually don't. It saves time and money because I don't have to use a teller's time to do what a machine can do.

Have you asked the bank manager why they're asking for this extra information? My WAGs are that the bank has some sort of internal reporting process, or that tellers are required to ask for ID and SSN on every transaction to make sure that the information is obtained for those transactions that actually require it.

Last edited by MsRobyn; 02-09-2014 at 03:27 PM.
#39
Old 02-10-2014, 02:25 AM
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The bank tellers at my current bank just accept whatever I say for the number of coins if it's just a roll. They don't even put them through machine (at least while I'm there), and I don't have to provide I.D. either.

Last edited by GreenElf; 02-10-2014 at 02:26 AM.
#40
Old 02-10-2014, 06:00 PM
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Wow, what banks do you folks go to that even have these machines? I used to use Coinstar machines to get Amazon gift cards, but then developed the idea that this could be unduly influencing me to buy something from Amazon. So, last summer, with a 2-year buildup of change to get rid of, I called my bank's headquarters (KeyBank) and asked if there were any branches that had coin counting machines where I could deposit it. They told me no, I'd have to roll the change myself. So I stopped by my local branch where I was at least able to get some free rolls, and painstakingly rolled it all--90 some dollars worth. They accepted the rolled coins without complaint.

For a long time, though, I really just wanted to be able to carry the jar in, hand it over to them, and have it deposited. I know TD Bank makes a point of having self-serve coin counting machines, free to account holders, in every branch, but AFAIK there's nothing like that around here.
#41
Old 02-10-2014, 06:11 PM
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Quote:
I used to use Coinstar machines to get Amazon gift cards, but then developed the idea that this could be unduly influencing me to buy something from Amazon.
Well, yeah, that's why they do it.
#42
Old 02-10-2014, 06:45 PM
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If you want to avoid Coinstar "unduly influencing you to buy something from Amazon", make sure to use the gift card only on something you were already going to buy. Or get a gift card from another retailer from which you already planned to buy something.
#43
Old 02-10-2014, 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by ALOHA HATER View Post
I used to think that Coinstar was a scam. The cut they take is, everything considered, very generous.
I might agree with you if they charged per coin. But they take percentage (usually 8% around here) of the total value. That means they charge only 1/12c per penny, and a whopping 2 cents per quarter. There's no way that I'm going to give them a quarter if all I get back is 23 cents.

So here's what I do when my change adds up: I bring the pennies and nickels to CoinStar, and I'm happy to let them take their cut; but the dimes and quarters go back in my pocket as 100% spending money. No one complains when I pay for a snack with 4-6 quarters.
#44
Old 02-10-2014, 10:09 PM
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To many of us, quarters are precious precious laundry tokens, worth more than twenty five cents, 'cause when you come up a quarter short on laundry day, ain't all the dimes and nickles in the world gonna help you now.
#45
Old 02-10-2014, 11:53 PM
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Originally Posted by WhyNot View Post
To many of us, quarters are precious precious laundry tokens, worth more than twenty five cents, 'cause when you come up a quarter short on laundry day, ain't all the dimes and nickles in the world gonna help you now.
Heh. In my previous apartment, the laundry accepted only loonies (Canadian $1 coin) and not toonies ($2), so the loonies were significantly more valuable to me than toonies. Toonies only existed to spent on things that would give a loonie in change.

My new place accepts toonies, loonies and quarters, so now I sort my spare change into a laundry bucket and a useless bucket each day. Last time I cashed in the useless bucket at my bank's coin counter I had almost $50.
#46
Old 02-11-2014, 03:56 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 5,557
The president of the local bank once told me they really like it when people bring in loose or rolled change as then they didn't have to order as much from the fed and it saved them shipping charges. They also have a machine and the teller gently scolded me for bringing in rolls when she could have just run the change through the machine.

I like to do the rolling so I know exactly how much I have. And it isn't that bad because I bought one of those little battery operated coin sorter machines at Walmart.
#47
Old 02-20-2014, 01:03 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Beyond The Fringe
Posts: 26,778
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALOHA HATER View Post
When you drop a penny on the street, you lose a cent. When I drop a penny, I don't balance. Loose coin from a customer in quantity means I probably won't balance. If I were dishonest and took a penny out of my pocket in order to balance, I would lose my job. Loose coin isn't loose coin; it's usually US currency and bonus arcade tokens, 20c pieces from a country that no longer exists, paper clips, and (honest-to-god) a couple toenails.
A long time ago, I was depositing money at the ATM but didn't have enough money in my account for cash back -- so I fudged the numbers a bit, and added $3-4 when I entered the dollar amount of my deposit. Presumably, I thought, the bank would catch the "error" and fix it by the next day...but, they never did. The $3-4 "error" was never corrected, at least regarding my personal account balance.

And now you've made me feel guilty that someone at the bank may have lost their job over it.

Last edited by buddha_david; 02-20-2014 at 01:05 PM.
#48
Old 02-20-2014, 10:12 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddha_david View Post
A long time ago, I was depositing money at the ATM but didn't have enough money in my account for cash back -- so I fudged the numbers a bit, and added $3-4 when I entered the dollar amount of my deposit. Presumably, I thought, the bank would catch the "error" and fix it by the next day...but, they never did. The $3-4 "error" was never corrected, at least regarding my personal account balance.

And now you've made me feel guilty that someone at the bank may have lost their job over it.
You can sleep soundly. Nobody got fired for that. I'm not sure how they didn't find it immediately when the balanced the ATM. Somewhere along the line, that $3 is listed in a ledger and taken as a loss. Poor bankers I was talking about cash balancing: offages happen. No bout a doubt it. People get fired for dishonesty about their offages (forced balancing) though, not for just losing track of a little cash occasionally.

I bet if you called the right person at the bank and said you entered your deposit wrong on whatever date of last year, they'd say "THERE'S that three dollars! I remember those goddamn three dollars!"
#49
Old 02-20-2014, 11:11 PM
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Join Date: May 2011
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 576
When I lived in NY a few years ago most banks didn't have coin sorters - an expensive license fee, or something. I never heard of Coinstar. There or somewhere else the banks wouldn't handle coins unless they were wrapped.
.
#50
Old 02-20-2014, 11:31 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 816
I'd bet they count your pennies if you had enough cash in the bank. It's a room in the back, a man with a towel on his arm will ask you the password, and then he offers you some scotch and a cigar. As you sit in a leather upholstered chair that costs more than your car, he will bring the newspaper, so that you have something to read while your coins are being counted.
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