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#1
Old 12-28-2014, 10:09 PM
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What's the deal with people whose voice mail box is always full?

I have a friend whose voice mail box is always full. When I call him, if he doesn't answer (which is most of the time,) I almost always hear "Hi, you've reached David. Leave a message and I'll call you back," followed immediately by the Verizon voice saying "The mailbox is full and cannot accept messages at this time. Goodbye." If there's something I really wanted to tell him right away, or I want to explicitly ask him to call me back, I then have to send him a text. Once in a while I used to text him, "delete your voicemails!" but he never seemed to do this.

I was about to ask why someone would never delete their voicemails, but in the course of thinking about this, I realized the problem might be that he never even listens to them. Because on the rare occasion when I was able to leave a message, he'd call me back and say "what's up?" I'd go "uh..." thinking he was about to say something pertaining to whatever I'd said in the message, and he'd say "I saw you called, but I didn't listen to my voicemail." So it seems that if he sees a missed call, he just calls the person back without checking his voicemail. I have to assume that on those rare occasions I've been able to leave a message, it's only been because some old message had just expired.

So I guess the question is, why do some people never check their voicemail? Lack of patience? Does it seem easier to them to just call the person back and ask what's up? It would drive me crazy to have my little voicemail indicator perpetually on, never knowing what was in all the many messages that must be in there, nor who had left them. Do you know anyone who does this?

(I've asked my friend why he never deletes his voicemails. He basically just hemmed and hawed and didn't answer the question.)
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#2
Old 12-28-2014, 10:24 PM
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I'd guess laziness, don't give a fuckness, or some sort of avoidant disorder- mostly laziness. There are also people that you can't leave a message for because they haven't set up their voicemailbox yet. I think it's related.
#3
Old 12-28-2014, 10:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcite View Post
on the rare occasion when I was able to leave a message, he'd call me back and say "what's up?" I'd go "uh..." thinking he was about to say something pertaining to whatever I'd said in the message, and he'd say "I saw you called, but I didn't listen to my voicemail."
At least he didn't say "Did you call me?".
#4
Old 12-28-2014, 10:58 PM
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I don't check voice mail. ..why bother?

1. Checking uses my outgoing minutes
2. I get a text notification of missed calls..so just call back
3. If its important they'll call back...If it's not important...why bother?
#5
Old 12-28-2014, 11:00 PM
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It's partially a control-freak thing.
I had (emphasis on had) a friend who used to do this. Basically, she used this as a way to waste other people's time instead of her own. I finally told her that i was going to call her exactly once, and if I didn't get her, and couldn't leave a message, too bad for her - no matter how important it was.
#6
Old 12-28-2014, 11:12 PM
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What's the deal with people whose voice mail box is always full?

Voicemail is kind of stupid. For me at least I have to call the number, put in a code, hear "you have x new new voicemails and y old
Voicemails. New voicemail number one, December 24 nine twelve a m." Then comes the message. Then I gotta remember which number deleted and which saves and which replays, or listen to the menu that tells me. Then hear more text to get to the next message.

Ain't nobody got time for that! Easier just to see who called and call them back.

Send a text. It's 2014.

Last edited by ZipperJJ; 12-28-2014 at 11:12 PM.
#7
Old 12-28-2014, 11:22 PM
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Yeah, voicemails are annoying. I'd rather receive texts than voicemails.
#8
Old 12-28-2014, 11:23 PM
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Almost everyone I know refuses to use voicemail. The standard protocol is, if it's something important, text the information. If it's not, wait for the person to call or text you back. A text lets you scan it in 1 second as it comes in and you can immediately triage it. A voicemail is like, 6 button clicks and a good half minute of time.

Hell, most people I know barely use voice anymore. It's 90% messaging of some kind.
#9
Old 12-28-2014, 11:32 PM
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My big thing (and I got this from my dad) is just call me, I'll see you're missed call and I'll call you back...promise.
If you have a message (and don't need a return call) go ahead and leave it but don't, for the love of god, make me call my VM just to hear you say "Hey, this is John, call me". No shit it's John, I saw the missed call.

Even worse was back when people had pagers. Just page me, I'll call you, but don't leave a VM on the paging system to say 'call me'. The pager would beep with my VM number, I had to put a quarter into the payphone, call my voicemail to hear 'this is John, my number is xxx-xxxx, call me' then memorize your number (unless I already knew it), put another quarter in the phone and call you. Hey asshole, there was an easier way to do that. When it said "To page this person type in your number, to leave a voicemail press star...don't press star, just type in your number, why would you do that?"
#10
Old 12-28-2014, 11:48 PM
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I don't use voicemail on my personal cell. I had to call the carrier to disable it. Otherwise, I'd be just like Dave. If I see I missed your call, you'll get a call back. If it's something urgent, text me to call asap.
#11
Old 12-29-2014, 12:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bengangmo View Post
I don't check voice mail. ..why bother?

1. Checking uses my outgoing minutes
2. I get a text notification of missed calls..so just call back
3. If its important they'll call back...If it's not important...why bother?
Both my friend and I have unlimited voice, so the outgoing minutes thing is not an issue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
Voicemail is kind of stupid. For me at least I have to call the number, put in a code, hear "you have x new new voicemails and y old
Voicemails. New voicemail number one, December 24 nine twelve a m." Then comes the message. Then I gotta remember which number deleted and which saves and which replays, or listen to the menu that tells me. Then hear more text to get to the next message.
I agree, all that's a pain. For a mundane "hey, call me when you get a chance," I guess I prefer texts too, and I don't leave those pointless "hey, call me back" voicemails. But, for the aforementioned reasons, in the event that I receive a voicemail, I feel compelled to listen to it. And it's usually something I can delete; hence, my voice mail box is never full.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shalmanese View Post
Almost everyone I know refuses to use voicemail. The standard protocol is, if it's something important, text the information. If it's not, wait for the person to call or text you back. A text lets you scan it in 1 second as it comes in and you can immediately triage it. A voicemail is like, 6 button clicks and a good half minute of time.

Hell, most people I know barely use voice anymore. It's 90% messaging of some kind.
For aimless banter and idle chit-chat, or some sort of one-off factual announcement, I do often use texts, including with this friend. However, we're pretty good friends, and live a long distance apart, so we sometimes have long phone conversations about deep issues and what's going on in our lives.

Also, being good friends, we have a number of running jokes. Therefore (and I realize this might seem petty or trivial,) it's kind of frustrating that he always gets to leave me humorous voicemails, but I never get to leave him one. (Some of our running jokes involve doing accents, so a text isn't the same.)

Only partially related, but maybe compounding the frustration, is the fact that this friend just has some weird phone habits in general. He talks on the phone a lot, actually, especially to family. I swear, he talks to his parents or brother on the phone just about every day. When we lived in the same city, some evening when we'd make plans to out, he'd swing by my place, and I'd see him pull up outside, park his car, and sit in it talking on the phone for 10 minutes. Then he'd come in and say "sorry, I was on the phone with my brother." Or when I'm on the phone with him, if he gets a call, he'll say "hang on, my mom is calling me. Can I call you back in 5 minutes?" Invariably he doesn't call me back until a week later.
#12
Old 12-29-2014, 12:11 AM
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Voicemail is a relic. At least in current form.
#13
Old 12-29-2014, 07:20 AM
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I don't listen to many of my voice mails. Most people now realise that your call IS equivalent to a VM because I see the contact and call details on the screen and assume you want me to call you back. Which I will do as soon as I can. I am prompt about returning phone calls; most people who know me realise this. Also most people I know (who have smart phones) will text instead. Texting is less obtrusive and much more convenient. Leaving a voicemail saying "what's up, call me back" is utterly pointless. I am going to call you back when I see that I've missed your call; listening to the message is a waste of time. I have two friends who are particularly bad about leaving me those pointless voicemails, but I give them a break because neither has a smartphone.

The exception - I'm a contractor so I do get business-related calls from people I don't know. Wanting estimates, questions answered, and so on. If I miss a call from a number I don't recognise I will listen to the message before returning the call.

My phone has a handy dandy feature: I can visually look at my VM list and delete them without listening. Also I can clear the annoying notifications with a single tap. Also I get a notification when my inbox is almost full, so I never inadvertently am in a situation where someone can't leave me a message.
#14
Old 12-29-2014, 07:28 AM
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What about people who can't get texts? Like on landlines? Yes, they still exist. Granted, it's my mother's line and she does listen to her messages and she purges the old ones. But if you don't talk to her machine, you won't hear back from her.

I wish I had a feature to delete VMs without listening, but if I do, I haven't found it yet.
#15
Old 12-29-2014, 07:43 AM
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Voicemail is the worst of all worlds, and makes zero sense on a mobile phone.
#16
Old 12-29-2014, 08:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
The exception - I'm a contractor so I do get business-related calls from people I don't know. Wanting estimates, questions answered, and so on. If I miss a call from a number I don't recognise I will listen to the message before returning the call.
Business purposes are the rebuttal to this "voicemail is dead, get over it" chorus. I'm a psychiatry resident, and I sometimes have to call patients. For privacy reasons, I have to do it from a hospital phone (and, in the event that there are extenuating circumstances and I have to use my cell phone, I block my number, because there's no way I'm giving my personal cell phone number to psych patients.) The extension I call from will almost never be the best one to call me back on, and depending on which it is, may not even show up correctly on their caller ID. And I can't send a text from a hospital phone. If someone doesn't answer their phone and for whatever reason I can't leave them a voicemail, there's zero way for me to get in touch with them.

Also, I recently ordered a piece of furniture, and over the weekend I began getting daily automated phone calls from the store telling me it was ready for pickup. When I didn't answer, their automated system left me a voicemail. If it hadn't been able to, I would have had no idea this was happening.

Last edited by Arcite; 12-29-2014 at 08:28 AM.
#17
Old 12-29-2014, 08:36 AM
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Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
What about people who can't get texts? Like on landlines? Yes, they still exist. Granted, it's my mother's line and she does listen to her messages and she purges the old ones. But if you don't talk to her machine, you won't hear back from her.

I wish I had a feature to delete VMs without listening, but if I do, I haven't found it yet.
Well in the OP the question was about two people who know each other and have smartphones so I think people were responding to that. (and people with landlines aren't immune to the OP's complaint of having voice mail tapes/machines/whatever they use get full.

Probably speaking for most, I don't assume everyone who calls me is calling from a phone that has texting capability. I know lots of people still use landlines, or "dumb" mobile phones. But if I know the person who I'm communicating with is using a smartphone, I'll assume they know how to use it. When it's a business-related communication I always ask if it's OK to text. Most people prefer that, at least in my experience.
#18
Old 12-29-2014, 08:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
Send a text. It's 2014.
Amen. I probably send over 100 texts for every one call I make.
#19
Old 12-29-2014, 08:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcite View Post
Business purposes are the rebuttal to this "voicemail is dead, get over it" chorus. I'm a psychiatry resident, and I sometimes have to call patients. For privacy reasons, I have to do it from a hospital phone (and, in the event that there are extenuating circumstances and I have to use my cell phone, I block my number, because there's no way I'm giving my personal cell phone number to psych patients.) The extension I call from will almost never be the best one to call me back on, and depending on which it is, may not even show up correctly on their caller ID. And I can't send a text from a hospital phone. If someone doesn't answer their phone and for whatever reason I can't leave them a voicemail, there's zero way for me to get in touch with them.

Also, I recently ordered a piece of furniture, and over the weekend I began getting daily automated phone calls from the store telling me it was ready for pickup. When I didn't answer, their automated system left me a voicemail. If it hadn't been able to, I would have had no idea this was happening.
Similar to this, I receive calls from medical professionals and they need to leave messages sometimes. The number they call from is never the number I call back. I need VM for these types of calls.

But personal calls? Yeah, just text.
#20
Old 12-29-2014, 08:46 AM
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At work, I suspect it's a way to avoid having to listen to some breathlessly frantic half-coherent voice mail about whatever the problem du jour is, and then having to call the person back and have an even longer conversation about the same thing.

Better to just punt by ignoring the voice mails, and have them either find them face-to-face, or send a more coherent email or text.

(disclaimer- I work in corporate IT, and this is not uncommon among my co-workers.)

In my personal life, I don't really have an issue with voice mails- most people who leave them for me only do so when the amount of info they want to convey is too much for easily sending via mobile phone text message or email, but within 20-30 seconds of speech. Of course, my parents and other old-timers still think of it as an answering machine, so I get the usual "Hey- call me back." voice mails, and then when I do, get asked something like "What was the name of that show you said I might enjoy?". So yeah, texts would be perfect in that situation, but everyone over the age of about 60 seems oddly resistant to the concept.
#21
Old 12-29-2014, 09:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcite View Post
Business purposes are the rebuttal to this "voicemail is dead, get over it" chorus. I'm a psychiatry resident, and I sometimes have to call patients. For privacy reasons, I have to do it from a hospital phone (and, in the event that there are extenuating circumstances and I have to use my cell phone, I block my number, because there's no way I'm giving my personal cell phone number to psych patients.) The extension I call from will almost never be the best one to call me back on, and depending on which it is, may not even show up correctly on their caller ID. And I can't send a text from a hospital phone. If someone doesn't answer their phone and for whatever reason I can't leave them a voicemail, there's zero way for me to get in touch with them.
Likewise. I work in an immigration law practice in a firm of ~ 70 people. If I leave a message for a client, the main office number is what shows up on the missed calls log. If the client doesn't listen to the voice mail, they will have no way of knowing whether I called, or the partner I am working for called, or the billing office called, etc. If they call back the main office number, they may not even speak the same language as the receptionist. It makes me batty. Especially when I am calling in a brief window between other appointments with specific information that may be useful to the client and that I may not have memorized (a case number, a phone number, a hearing date/time, etc.) It's a huge waste of time, and the client is paying on an hourly basis for my time, so they are just costing themselves money.
#22
Old 12-29-2014, 09:38 AM
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Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
What about people who can't get texts? Like on landlines? Yes, they still exist. Granted, it's my mother's line and she does listen to her messages and she purges the old ones. But if you don't talk to her machine, you won't hear back from her.

I wish I had a feature to delete VMs without listening, but if I do, I haven't found it yet.
Every smart phone I've had (all two of them) had a voicemail app that would show you your messages with the phone number and length of message. You could listen and delete the messages without ever actually calling your voicemail. They also had a speech-to-text function, but that required a paid subscription.
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#23
Old 12-29-2014, 09:42 AM
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Most of the time that message doesn't mean it is really full. It almost always means the VM was never configured or is disabled.
#24
Old 12-29-2014, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Eva Luna View Post
Likewise. I work in an immigration law practice in a firm of ~ 70 people. If I leave a message for a client, the main office number is what shows up on the missed calls log. If the client doesn't listen to the voice mail, they will have no way of knowing whether I called, or the partner I am working for called, or the billing office called, etc. If they call back the main office number, they may not even speak the same language as the receptionist. It makes me batty. Especially when I am calling in a brief window between other appointments with specific information that may be useful to the client and that I may not have memorized (a case number, a phone number, a hearing date/time, etc.) It's a huge waste of time, and the client is paying on an hourly basis for my time, so they are just costing themselves money.
I'm betting that like me, you're dealing with lots of low socioeconomic status people who don't seem to have the foresight to do things like set up their voicemail. A lot of people I call for work don't answer their phone and don't have voicemail set up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quimby View Post
Most of the time that message doesn't mean it is really full. It almost always means the VM was never configured or is disabled.
I doubt it. I can't recall calling anyone other than my friend mentioned in the OP and getting the "the mailbox is full" recording, and I know he has voicemail. I frequently call people for work and get a recording that explicitly states "this customer has not set up their voicemail."
#25
Old 12-29-2014, 11:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Arcite View Post
I'm betting that like me, you're dealing with lots of low socioeconomic status people who don't seem to have the foresight to do things like set up their voicemail. A lot of people I call for work don't answer their phone and don't have voicemail set up.
Sometimes, yes. And besides low socioeconomic status, the most frequent culprits are people who don't speak English, who speak Spanish as a second language (they are Mayans), usually not fluently, and may have a year or two of formal education at most. When I eventually manage to talk to them and explain why I need to be able to reach them reliably (they don't always return phone calls either, or they return calls and leave messages without mentioning who's calling), they seem to understand why having voice mail set up would be useful, and promise that they will go back to the phone store to get help setting it up if they can't figure it out themselves. But then either they never do, or they set it up once and deactivate it or...I don't know what, and then I end up having to send them letters anyway because I can't reach them by phone.

Sigh. Sometimes I get lucky and they have a spouse or child who knows how to use voice mail.
#26
Old 12-29-2014, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
Amen. I probably send over 100 texts for every one call I make.
100? Really? Wow. I feel like such an alien sometimes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bump View Post
In my personal life, I don't really have an issue with voice mails- most people who leave them for me only do so when the amount of info they want to convey is too much for easily sending via mobile phone text message or email, but within 20-30 seconds of speech. Of course, my parents and other old-timers still think of it as an answering machine, so I get the usual "Hey- call me back." voice mails, and then when I do, get asked something like "What was the name of that show you said I might enjoy?". So yeah, texts would be perfect in that situation, but everyone over the age of about 60 seems oddly resistant to the concept.
I'm 32. I don't leave voicemails with simple questions like "the name of that show", but I suppose I have always assumed it's just like an answering machine. It's never really occurred to me that it might be something else.

It would never occur to me to disregard a voicemail. What am I missing here?

I don't like texts, in that I can't type them while walking (and I hate when others do this; I want to scream some non-sequitur to make them jump), and I sit and ponder my word choices, and so on.
#27
Old 12-29-2014, 02:13 PM
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Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
Voicemail is kind of stupid. For me at least I have to call the number, put in a code, hear "you have x new new voicemails and y old
Voicemails. New voicemail number one, December 24 nine twelve a m." Then comes the message. Then I gotta remember which number deleted and which saves and which replays, or listen to the menu that tells me. Then hear more text to get to the next message.

Ain't nobody got time for that! Easier just to see who called and call them back.

Send a text. It's 2014.
One consideration: You can't send a text while driving, but you can leave a voicemail, if you are in handsfree mode.
#28
Old 12-29-2014, 03:40 PM
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Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
Voicemail is kind of stupid. For me at least I have to call the number, put in a code, hear "you have x new new voicemails and y old
Voicemails. New voicemail number one, December 24 nine twelve a m." Then comes the message. Then I gotta remember which number deleted and which saves and which replays, or listen to the menu that tells me. Then hear more text to get to the next message.

Ain't nobody got time for that! Easier just to see who called and call them back.

Send a text. It's 2014.
Who's living in the past?
My iPhone gives me a list of voicemails, who left them, and when. I can then listen to them in any order, skip through them, save or delete with a swipe of my finger.

My Ooma box at home even emails me when I get a voicemail, and I can listen to it on any of my computers or iDevices.

Personally, I think that texting sucks. I always run across people who would rather have a two-hour texting marathon for something that would take 30 seconds on the phone. Gahh!
#29
Old 12-29-2014, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by suranyi View Post
One consideration: You can't send a text while driving, but you can leave a voicemail, if you are in handsfree mode.
You can send text messages hands free now. Cortana will do it. I think Siri will do it and I'd be sort of surprised if there isn't a way to do it on Android too.
#30
Old 12-29-2014, 04:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Lemmytheseal2 View Post
100? Really? Wow. I feel like such an alien sometimes.


I'm 32. I don't leave voicemails with simple questions like "the name of that show", but I suppose I have always assumed it's just like an answering machine. It's never really occurred to me that it might be something else.
I meant in the sense of the old tape-style answering machine, where it was the only way to even identify if someone had called at all. Now we have the caller ID, text messages, etc... so we know someone called, and can call them back without a message to instruct us to do that, which isn't something you could do in the answering-machine era. You literally had to say "Hey.. it's Bump and it's 2 o'clock.. call me back.", and in my experience, a lot of older folks still think that way.
#31
Old 12-29-2014, 04:09 PM
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But to the OP - it's because voice mail sucks. It's a pain in the ass to listen to voice mail messages; it sometimes costs money to get them, but in some contexts, they can't be turned off. On a previous mobile contract, I recorded a voicemail greeting saying "Please don't leave a voice message, because I won't pay to listen to it".

If it's really important that someone gets hold of me, that's their problem until they succeed.
#32
Old 12-29-2014, 04:27 PM
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ETA: Mangetout's post wasn't there when I started. Not trying to pile on.


The real question for the OPs friend is why, if he doesn't like voicemail, he doesn't call his carrier and turn it off.

Leaving it full is misleading his callers into thinking that maybe there is an opportunity to leave a message that will be heard and acted on, but just not right now.

If his personal policy is to not use voicemail, then by golly, he ought to quit head-faking his correspondents & friends with almost-voicemail.

Or else maybe he's just a lazy jerk.

Last edited by LSLGuy; 12-29-2014 at 04:29 PM.
#33
Old 12-29-2014, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Mangetout View Post
You can send text messages hands free now. Cortana will do it. I think Siri will do it and I'd be sort of surprised if there isn't a way to do it on Android too.
If you're talking about voice to text, then yes, you can do that on Android.
#34
Old 12-29-2014, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
If you're talking about voice to text, then yes, you can do that on Android.
Sort of voice-to-text, but with Cortana and (I believe) Siri, you don't just dictate the text - you instruct the machine "send a text to my wife to say I will be 10 minutes late" and it does the whole job. Does Android have that too now?
#35
Old 12-29-2014, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
I don't listen to many of my voice mails. Most people now realise that your call IS equivalent to a VM because I see the contact and call details on the screen and assume you want me to call you back. Which I will do as soon as I can.
Several other people made this point too, and I forgot to address it earlier. I don't like calling back a missed-call number from someone who evidently neither left a voicemail nor sent a text, and I don't do it. The reason is that I don't like it when people do it to me. Sometimes I pocket-dial someone, or my phone is lagging and misinterprets my swipe to do something else as a swipe to call someone. I hang up as soon as I see my phone is accidentally dialing, but I hate it when the person then calls me and says "you just called?" and I have to say "sorry, it was an accident." If I want you call me, I'll leave a voicemail or send a text.

Also, as several of us have pointed out, if it's a business-related call from an institution with an internal phone system, the correct phone number to call back might not show up. Dialing out on some of my department's phones causes "999-9999" to display in the caller ID.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemmytheseal2 View Post
It would never occur to me to disregard a voicemail. What am I missing here?
I agree. I don't really like checking my voicemail, and I'll allow it's a bit of a chore. But to me, an unheard voicemail message is like an unread text or an unopened envelope of snail mail which you can't tell what it is. I guess this is the central issue I'm raising in the OP: I would never, say, go to bed knowing I had unread texts or unopened personal envelopes that arrived in the mail that day. I don't know what's in them. It could be something important and I just feel compelled to find out. Same thing with voicemail. So why are some people content to completely disregard it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
Who's living in the past?
My iPhone gives me a list of voicemails, who left them, and when. I can then listen to them in any order, skip through them, save or delete with a swipe of my finger.
My friend has an iPhone, which I guess raises the question of why he doesn't do this.
#36
Old 12-29-2014, 05:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangetout View Post
Sort of voice-to-text, but with Cortana and (I believe) Siri, you don't just dictate the text - you instruct the machine "send a text to my wife to say I will be 10 minutes late" and it does the whole job. Does Android have that too now?
Yes.

http://dragonmobileapps.com/android/
#37
Old 12-29-2014, 06:07 PM
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This isn't quite what the OP is talking about (or I don't think it is) but we--no, let's be honest, I--fired a guy this year for not listening to (and replying) his work voice mails. That wasn't his only offense, but it was the one that put him over the edge.
#38
Old 12-29-2014, 06:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skald the Rhymer View Post
This isn't quite what the OP is talking about (or I don't think it is) but we--no, let's be honest, I--fired a guy this year for not listening to (and replying) his work voice mails. That wasn't his only offense, but it was the one that put him over the edge.
Several of us have made a distinction between work/business and personal communication, which is often more time-sensitive.
Not that I'm advocating ignoring personal communications mind you.
#39
Old 12-29-2014, 07:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangetout View Post
Sort of voice-to-text, but with Cortana and (I believe) Siri, you don't just dictate the text - you instruct the machine "send a text to my wife to say I will be 10 minutes late" and it does the whole job. Does Android have that too now?
You guys must be luckier than I with respect to Siri. It only understands half to two/thirds of what I tell it.
#40
Old 12-29-2014, 08:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangetout View Post
You can send text messages hands free now. Cortana will do it. I think Siri will do it and I'd be sort of surprised if there isn't a way to do it on Android too.
Interesting, of course, I don't have (and don't want) a phone like that. I have a semi-smart phone, because I'm too addicted to the internet as it is.
#41
Old 12-29-2014, 08:59 PM
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I think it's culture arising out of the limitation of technology. Back when voicemail was the only thing, people got used to it, and it became culturally ingrained in the US. Here in Singapore, nobody uses voicemail. Nobody. I technically have it on my service, but I wouldn't know how to access it even if I did use it, and nobody ever leaves voicemails. It's all about texting. If I'm at work, people send me an email if they can't get me on my phone, or they call my mobile, or they text my mobile.

Even back when there were only pagers, we used alphanumeric pagers, and us kids got pretty adept at typing out entire messages using the T9 keypad on public phones. Even now, my fingers still have the muscle memory to type out my name on T9. I'd wager that's the case in all societies that didn't develop with voicemail.

Heck, it might even be a US particular thing. I don't recall voicemail being all that hot in the UK where I lived for a while.
#42
Old 12-30-2014, 01:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcite View Post
Several other people made this point too, and I forgot to address it earlier. I don't like calling back a missed-call number from someone who evidently neither left a voicemail nor sent a text, and I don't do it. The reason is that I don't like it when people do it to me. Sometimes I pocket-dial someone, or my phone is lagging and misinterprets my swipe to do something else as a swipe to call someone. I hang up as soon as I see my phone is accidentally dialing, but I hate it when the person then calls me and says "you just called?" and I have to say "sorry, it was an accident." If I want you call me, I'll leave a voicemail or send a text.
Same here. If I see a missed call, but no voicemail message or follow up text, I'm not calling it back as it clearly wasn't anything important.
#43
Old 12-30-2014, 01:28 AM
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I come from a culture which when it comes to voicemail is the opposite of the US. By the time we got voicemail, we'd had the ability to see missed calls for a couple of years; people had even developed codes based on missing calls on purpose*. So we never got used to that thing. My inbox is full by now, I assume... I have no idea how to access that thing, but for some reason most providers don't offer the option of just shutting the damn thing off.

People with normal phone numbers know I'll call back when I can; people who need to contact me for business reasons and who call from Skype or from an extension have my email or can SMS me.



* Ex: "call and let it ring twice, we're meeting at the post office. Let it ring five times, we're meeting at the train station." Or "I'll drop a call when we're leaving the house." (where "dropping the call" = hanging up after the first ring).

Last edited by Nava; 12-30-2014 at 01:32 AM.
#44
Old 12-30-2014, 07:11 AM
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I'm one of those that won't return a call without a VM or text, unless it someone on my contact list.

Also, I reject any call that shows "blocked" or "unknown" on my caller ID, so without a message of some kind, I'm just going to assume you're a telemarketer.
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#45
Old 12-30-2014, 11:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tabby_Cat View Post
I think it's culture arising out of the limitation of technology. Back when voicemail was the only thing, people got used to it, and it became culturally ingrained in the US. Here in Singapore, nobody uses voicemail. Nobody. I technically have it on my service, but I wouldn't know how to access it even if I did use it, and nobody ever leaves voicemails. It's all about texting. If I'm at work, people send me an email if they can't get me on my phone, or they call my mobile, or they text my mobile.

Even back when there were only pagers, we used alphanumeric pagers, and us kids got pretty adept at typing out entire messages using the T9 keypad on public phones. Even now, my fingers still have the muscle memory to type out my name on T9. I'd wager that's the case in all societies that didn't develop with voicemail.

Heck, it might even be a US particular thing. I don't recall voicemail being all that hot in the UK where I lived for a while.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nava View Post
I come from a culture which when it comes to voicemail is the opposite of the US. By the time we got voicemail, we'd had the ability to see missed calls for a couple of years; people had even developed codes based on missing calls on purpose*. So we never got used to that thing. My inbox is full by now, I assume... I have no idea how to access that thing, but for some reason most providers don't offer the option of just shutting the damn thing off.

People with normal phone numbers know I'll call back when I can; people who need to contact me for business reasons and who call from Skype or from an extension have my email or can SMS me.



* Ex: "call and let it ring twice, we're meeting at the post office. Let it ring five times, we're meeting at the train station." Or "I'll drop a call when we're leaving the house." (where "dropping the call" = hanging up after the first ring).
This seems odd to me. Did people in your countries not have answering machines on their landlines before wireless phones became common? Did wireless phones not become common until texting was standard? Because in the USA, the chronological progression went:

Landline with answering machine -> wireless phone with voicemail -> texting

So when everyone started getting wireless phones, the voicemail was immediately analagous to their home answering machine, and there was no other way to send them a message.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sario View Post
I'm one of those that won't return a call without a VM or text, unless it someone on my contact list.

Also, I reject any call that shows "blocked" or "unknown" on my caller ID, so without a message of some kind, I'm just going to assume you're a telemarketer.
This is another annoying thing about my friend's phone. His brother used to work for Verizon Wireless corporate, and he's the one who initially set him up with service. He must have been some kind of privacy nut or something, because he had it set up so that my friend's number was blocked from caller ID by default. So my friend's calls always show up as "Restricted," which means I never know it's him calling (I have other people who call me for business purposes as "Restricted" as well.) He can enter a prefix when dialing to unblock the number on that particular call, but if he saves that prefix as part of a stored contact's phone number, texting to that person then doesn't work. What's annoying about it is that for a long time he seemed to either not care about this or secretly like for it some unknown reason: as with the issue with the OP, I asked him "why don't you call Verizon and get them to unblock your number" and he basically hemmed and hawed and didn't answer the question. Though he did tell me just a month or 2 ago that he finally did try to do so, and they told him "I don't see any block feature on your account, sorry, can't help you." So his brother must have done something way behind the scenes that's now impossible to figure out.

Last edited by Arcite; 12-30-2014 at 11:45 AM.
#46
Old 12-30-2014, 01:54 PM
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I've also disabled my mobile voice mail - it was just the sound of people hanging up. Rubbish, I'll see you called and call you back ... at some point!

My landline does have an answering machine where I ask you to please state your shoe size and recite the alphabet backwards

Pro tip: If you press '1' during the message you won't have to listen to it anymore and go straight to the beep!

Last edited by Bam Boo Gut; 12-30-2014 at 01:55 PM.
#47
Old 12-30-2014, 03:00 PM
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I like voice mail. I don't always have my phone next to me and I don't expect the caller to keep calling trying to reach me. I also reason that if it's important then the caller will leave a message.
#48
Old 12-30-2014, 04:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nava View Post
I come from a culture which when it comes to voicemail <snip>
Oh? Tell me about this culture? Is it an obscure culture? Or more well-known? Do tell!
#49
Old 12-30-2014, 04:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcite View Post
This seems odd to me. Did people in your countries not have answering machines on their landlines before wireless phones became common? Did wireless phones not become common until texting was standard? Because in the USA, the chronological progression went:

Landline with answering machine -> wireless phone with voicemail -> texting

So when everyone started getting wireless phones, the voicemail was immediately analagous to their home answering machine, and there was no other way to send them a message.
Back when minutes were expensive, if you got voicemail, even for a second, it could be as much as a dollar but missed calls were not charged for so you could send free information by using the number of rings as the message.
#50
Old 12-30-2014, 04:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shalmanese View Post
Back when minutes were expensive, if you got voicemail, even for a second, it could be as much as a dollar but missed calls were not charged for so you could send free information by using the number of rings as the message.
I never heard of anyone doing this in the USA. I got my first cell phone in September 2000, and I think my plan had 250 daytime minutes per month. Yeah, I suppose checking your voicemail used up a couple of those minutes, but I don't remember anyone ever complaining about this.
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