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#1
Old 03-02-2015, 10:56 PM
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Wake up America, and start drinking squash!

I think that I know more about British culture than the "average" American does, not that that is very much. But until my recent trip over there, I had never heard of this fruit syrup drink you dilute with water, known there as squash. My friend introduced me to it and I loved it! So much better than Kool-aid or other powder "juices."

For those who don't know about it, it's basically just concentrated juice and syrup sold in small bottles, containing some percentage of juice (they even have double strength squash). You add tap water on a per-glass basis so you don't have to have a giant jug of juice taking up space in your fridge all the time. Basically, it's amazing. And the flavor is just like any juice you'd buy off the shelf here, if not better, because you have control over how sweet or dilute you want it.

Why is it that in America we don't have squash? My British friend was amazed that I had never heard of squash.

Now I know that we do have those frozen concentrates which are somewhat similar. But other than that and powdered drink mixes... we don't have anything like squash. Is there a potential untapped market here?

Last edited by drewtwo99; 03-02-2015 at 10:57 PM.
#2
Old 03-03-2015, 02:13 AM
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What an unappetizing name for a drink. You know, maybe that's the reason that it hasn't made inroads in America.
#3
Old 03-03-2015, 05:30 AM
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It can also be known as cordial - is that more appetising? It even comes in some quite posh versions:

Bottlegreen Cordials
#4
Old 03-03-2015, 05:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Scougs View Post
It can also be known as cordial - is that more appetising? It even comes in some quite posh versions:

Bottlegreen Cordials
Indeed. See also Belvoir:

http://belvoirfruitfarms.co.uk/o...type/cordials/

I'd describe squash as what you give to kids, and cordial to adults. Even if it does come out of the same bottle.
#5
Old 03-03-2015, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Snooooopy View Post
What an unappetizing name for a drink. You know, maybe that's the reason that it hasn't made inroads in America.
Maybe we should call it "marrow."
#6
Old 03-03-2015, 09:12 AM
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Then there's Ting.
#7
Old 03-03-2015, 09:45 AM
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First Flymos and now squash, two things surprisingly unavailable in the USA (unless things have changed since my last survey of the hover mower market). Surely these are business opportunities?
#8
Old 03-03-2015, 09:57 AM
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I'd say there are 3 reasons-

One, pre-made drink mixes like Kool-Aid are somewhat more shelf-stable and convenient, and are a common and time-honored US tradition.

Two, juice seemed to be a bigger deal here than in the UK.

Third, and probably largest, soft drinks are cheaper and more ubiquitous here.

I found myself drinking a lot of squash/cordials when I was over there, because sodas were expensive relative to the price of cordials, and that wouldn't be so here.
#9
Old 03-03-2015, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Ximenean View Post
First Flymos and now squash, two things surprisingly unavailable in the USA (unless things have changed since my last survey of the hover mower market). Surely these are business opportunities?
But Flymos are rubbish for creating proper lined lawns.
#10
Old 03-03-2015, 10:51 AM
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Thank you. Now I understand this better
#11
Old 03-03-2015, 12:18 PM
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If it tastes like any juice you'd get in the States, then wouldn't it just be concentrate, with no added syrup? We have that, it's just not all that popular, and is not usually done on an serving-by-serving basis.

If it is sweetened, I'd say part of the problem is the American obsession with 100% juice. Apple juice, orange juice, grape juice, etc are always just pure juice (albeit sometimes more concentrated than the real thing.) Cranberry juice is the one exception.

As for cordials--I associate them with alcohol.
#12
Old 03-03-2015, 12:52 PM
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Is it anything like Mio here in the U.S.?

We have a bunch at home. I don't particularly like them, but my wife likes to use them in vodka.
#13
Old 03-03-2015, 01:37 PM
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Super-concentrated products like that have been on the market in the UK for a few years too, e.g. Robinsons Squash'd. I suppose it is similar, apart from being more concentrated. I mean, how many different formulations of fruit juice and syrup can there be? ISTR that they are more cordial-like though.
#14
Old 03-03-2015, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Shadowfyre View Post
Is it anything like Mio here in the U.S.?

We have a bunch at home. I don't particularly like them, but my wife likes to use them in vodka.
They're sort of like a fruit-flavored syrup that you mix with water; I can't think of a direct modern-day equivalent, but the closest thing I can think of is how Hawaiian Punch used to be sold in pint bottles of concentrate syrup which was diluted for actual drinking.

So imagine if you could get a bottle of syrup that was composed of sugar and lemon juice (and a few other ingredients) intended to be diluted for making lemonade. That's essentially what a cordial/squash is.

I think the prevalence of normal strength, pre-bottled versions here in the US is the big killer of the category. Right now if you want lemonade, you can get the real-juice stuff in the cold section, you can get powdered lemonade like Country-Time, and you can get bottled lemonade in 2 liter bottles by Minute Maid or other companies.

Where exactly would a bottled syrup compete, and what advantage would it offer vs. the existing forms available in the US? Same thing for orange flavored drinks.
#15
Old 03-03-2015, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by bump View Post
Where exactly would a bottled syrup compete, and what advantage would it offer vs. the existing forms available in the US?
Powdered drinks aren't common in the UK, so maybe the cordial fits that niche?
#16
Old 03-03-2015, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bump View Post
I think the prevalence of normal strength, pre-bottled versions here in the US is the big killer of the category. Right now if you want lemonade, you can get the real-juice stuff in the cold section, you can get powdered lemonade like Country-Time, and you can get bottled lemonade in 2 liter bottles by Minute Maid or other companies.

Where exactly would a bottled syrup compete, and what advantage would it offer vs. the existing forms available in the US? Same thing for orange flavored drinks.
I guess in the UK it's partly just a traditional product that people are used to, partly the versatility -- as mentioned, you can vary the dilution yourself, and you can choose to have it carbonated or still or even put it in other drinks --, partly for people on extremely limited budgets, because a 50p bottle of squash goes a long way, and lastly I guess it could be down to space, because we have smaller houses = smaller fridges = less space to store undiluted drinks. Although 2 litre bottles, real fruit juice etc. are also very popular here.
#17
Old 03-03-2015, 03:31 PM
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Thanks, drewtwo99. Now I finally understand a joke in a British novel, where a newspaper ran an article saying "so-and-so broke his toe drinking squash," and then later ran a correction saying "that should say, playing squash."
#18
Old 03-03-2015, 03:48 PM
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We have Crystal Light liquid and a few other products I can't remember the name of. Is that the same?

Last edited by Aquadementia; 03-03-2015 at 03:48 PM.
#19
Old 03-03-2015, 04:06 PM
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What's wrong with watering down your juice to taste? Do Brits just have tiny refrigerators or something?
#20
Old 03-03-2015, 04:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCube View Post
What's wrong with watering down your juice to taste?
What if you prefer it stronger than standard?

Quote:
Do Brits just have tiny refrigerators or something?
On average, compared to US households, I suspect yes.
#21
Old 03-03-2015, 04:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ximenean View Post
First Flymos and now squash, two things surprisingly unavailable in the USA (unless things have changed since my last survey of the hover mower market). Surely these are business opportunities?
ISTR Flymos were sold in the US in the 80s. I think they had litigation problems from people getting injured using them contrary to the instructions.
#22
Old 03-03-2015, 07:03 PM
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The mio and crystal light liquids are somewhat similar, I suppose. But do they have any real juice in them? If not, it's not the same as squash.

The great thing about squash is that you aren't paying for all that water like you are here in the states. I don't see any reason why they couldn't have "100%" juice squash, just by evaporating some of the water out. But I think it only goes up as high as 30 or 40% juice.
#23
Old 03-03-2015, 08:30 PM
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After some ponderation, I think the space held by squash in the UK is held by iced tea in the US.

Our drink mixes are usually powdered. We have syrups, but they're more typically added to coffee. Most coffe places will make you an "italian soda" though - syrup and carbonated water.

Given that vageuly fruit flavored, powdered drink mixes already exist, plus the popularity of iced tea, squash syrup doesn't have any traction. Its not like America needs more sugary drinks.

Last edited by Hello Again; 03-03-2015 at 08:31 PM.
#24
Old 03-03-2015, 09:00 PM
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Cordial isn't just a fruit juice replacement, it's a way of adding some flavour to tap water. Those powdered things are horrible. I can't believe you don't have cordial.
#25
Old 03-03-2015, 10:44 PM
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Huh, I'd come across references to squash in British novels, etc., but I was under the impression that this was just the UK term for what we call lemonade in the US. I gather that in the UK "lemonade" refers to clear, lemon-flavored sodas similar to Sprite and 7-Up rather than a non-carbonated drink made from lemon juice, sugar, and water, although I guess I could be mistaken about that too!
#26
Old 03-03-2015, 11:35 PM
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Sounds rather like Zarex syrups. I may have the spelling wrong, it was a vaguely fruit juice flavored drink they inflicted on us at Vacation Bible School mainly.
#27
Old 03-03-2015, 11:44 PM
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Aussie Cordial.
#28
Old 03-03-2015, 11:44 PM
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The closest thing to squash I can think of was that noncarbonated "orange drink" they used to sell at White Castles in Minneapolis. (Maybe they still do, for all I know.)
#29
Old 03-03-2015, 11:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamia View Post
Huh, I'd come across references to squash in British novels, etc., but I was under the impression that this was just the UK term for what we call lemonade in the US. I gather that in the UK "lemonade" refers to clear, lemon-flavored sodas similar to Sprite and 7-Up rather than a non-carbonated drink made from lemon juice, sugar, and water, although I guess I could be mistaken about that too!
Except for the fact that "Lemonade" doesn't really taste lemony, spot on. We (Aussie) call carbonated drinks such as Sprite, Coke, Root Beer etc all collectively "Soft Drink"
#30
Old 03-04-2015, 12:10 AM
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I've always liked mixing a bit of fruit juice concentrate with carbonated water, but it's become very difficult to find in the US. Ocean Spray once sold 12-ounce cans of cranberry and cran-raspberry concentrate, but I haven't been able to find those for a decade. Juicy Juice brand could be found with the kiddy fruit juice, but it was nearly all apple juice even if it claimed to be some other flavor.

The problem I have with Mio and the similar "water flavorings" is that they're full of artificial sweeteners. I don't want very much sweetness, and I want that to come from sucrose or fructose.
#31
Old 03-04-2015, 12:29 AM
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The closest thing I get with any regularity is elderberry flower syrup from Ikea. The instructions say to dilute it 1:6, but I generally use 1:15 or less. It makes for a light, refreshing drink.
#32
Old 03-04-2015, 02:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCube View Post
What's wrong with watering down your juice to taste? Do Brits just have tiny refrigerators or something?
Because that would taste weak. Squash often (but not always) has some juice in it, but various other bits and pieces keeps the flavour pretty strong. Watered down juice is a radically different beast.
#33
Old 03-04-2015, 02:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Dr. Strangelove View Post
The closest thing I get with any regularity is elderberry flower syrup from Ikea. The instructions say to dilute it 1:6, but I generally use 1:15 or less. It makes for a light, refreshing drink.
That basically is squash, Swedes call it "Saft". I just had some of this with my breakfast:

http://funlight.se/smaker/original/#wild-berries
#34
Old 03-04-2015, 03:24 AM
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Originally Posted by amanset View Post
That basically is squash, Swedes call it "Saft".
It's good stuff! I just wish I could get it in gallon jugs. I go through bottles too quickly to justify a trip to Ikea.
#35
Old 03-04-2015, 04:06 AM
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Originally Posted by stui magpie View Post
Except for the fact that "Lemonade" doesn't really taste lemony, spot on. We (Aussie) call carbonated drinks such as Sprite, Coke, Root Beer etc all collectively "Soft Drink"
Or sometimes, "Lemon Squash", and, rarely, "Orange Squash", and (brand name) "Pub Squash"

I buy Raspberry fruit cordial (concentrated Raspberry Juice with cane suger). I refuse to buy Raspberry Flavoured cordial. I don't pay much attention, but where I shop I don't think I can buy something labled "Lime Fruit Cordial" or "Orange Fruit Cordial", only their bastard offspring "Lime flavoured cordial" and "Orange flavoured cordial".

As every child knows, cordials are only for children: adults drink soft drinks. As most adults know, on a hot day, sometimes a non-alcoholic, non-carbinated drink is what you want.
#36
Old 03-04-2015, 04:28 AM
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Originally Posted by stui magpie View Post
Except for the fact that "Lemonade" doesn't really taste lemony, spot on. We (Aussie) call carbonated drinks such as Sprite, Coke, Root Beer etc all collectively "Soft Drink"
Ahh, but there is lemony lemonade too. The most famous brand would be Solo, but Schweppes sell it as Pub Squash - and my dad calls all lemony lemonade drinks Squash, which seems like the word used to describe all post mix drinks sold in a pub... Or maybe just the lemon flavored ones (my dad's generation are more likely to use the word, so I'm not really clear on exactly what isn't squash.)

(I got interrupted halfway through writing this - looks like new posts came in while I was distracted)

Last edited by Eliahna; 03-04-2015 at 04:30 AM.
#37
Old 03-04-2015, 05:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amanset View Post
That basically is squash, Swedes call it "Saft". I just had some of this with my breakfast:

http://funlight.se/smaker/original/#wild-berries
Norwegians do as well, which is linguistically funny, as 'saft' literally means "juice" and current Norwegian reserves that word, when refering to drinks, for the concentrated-then-dilluted stuff, and uses the loan word "juice" (or jus) for the unadultered stuff. (Although the cheaper orange juice will have spent some time in transit as a concentrate.)

Last edited by naita; 03-04-2015 at 05:08 AM. Reason: More commas!
#38
Old 03-04-2015, 05:18 AM
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Yeah, Lemon squash was the name for the lemon cordial usually with carbonated water, like Solo or Pub Squash.

Going to the pub as a kid with the parents for a meal (or just to sit in the corner while dad had a few pots) you'd have either a squash or a raspberry and lemonade.

I remember wandering into the bar at Kelly's pub in Tocumwal as a 6-7 year old after getting bored while the parents were having their after dinner argument and getting put to work washing glasses behind the bar.

Happy with that but old Brien wouldn't give me a go at pulling a beer.
#39
Old 03-04-2015, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by vd View Post
ISTR Flymos were sold in the US in the 80s. I think they had litigation problems from people getting injured using them contrary to the instructions.
That, and for a big swath of the country, the grass probably grows too thick for the mower to both cut and hover at the same time. My St. Augustine grass can easily bog down my 6.5 HP mower during August, if I'm not careful about how I mow.
#40
Old 03-04-2015, 11:44 AM
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Being married to an Australian, he often gets hankering for products from home, so we order things online from various places. Here is a link to some cordials you can order. https://simplyoz.com/products/au...ttee_s_cordial

(I don't work for them, we just order things we can't get elsewhere. They also have TimTams for those of you who eat stuff like that.)
#41
Old 03-05-2015, 01:19 AM
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Squash is drunk in Pakistan too. Shocked you cannot find it in the US. Nothing better on a summer day.
#42
Old 03-05-2015, 04:25 AM
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If you ever get the chance to try this stuff, do. Mixed with soda water, it's divine.
#43
Old 03-05-2015, 07:47 AM
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Quote:
Why is it that in America we don't have squash?
because we have a bunch of other things people like and nobody's asking for it.
#44
Old 03-05-2015, 07:50 AM
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For years I wondered what the drink Heinlein was referring to in Starship Troopers. It was casually referred to as [fruit] "Squash", but Heinlein never defined it. I assume it was a made-up futuristic drink, but he might have picked up the name "squash" during his travels.


Just so you know, what seems to be very nearly the same drink as described in the thread above was extremely popular in 18th-19th century America, under the name "Shrub":

Quote:
A shrub can also refer to a cocktail or soft drink that was popular during America's colonial era, made by mixing a vinegared syrup with spirits, water, or carbonated water.[1][4][5] The term "shrub" can also be applied to the sweetened vinegar-based syrup, from which the cocktail is made; the syrup is also known as drinking vinegar.[3][6][7] Drinking vinegar is often infused with fruit juice, herbs and spices for use in mixed drinks.[6][8][

...

The American version of the shrub has its origins in 17th century England where vinegar was used as an alternative to citrus juices in the preservation of berries and other fruits for the off-season.[10][11] Fruit preserves made in this fashion were themselves known as shrubs[10] and the practice carried over to colonial America.[4][6] By the 19th century, typical American recipes for shrubs used vinegar poured over fruit—traditionally berries—which was left to infuse anywhere from overnight up to several days; afterward the fruit would be strained out and the remaining liquid would be mixed with a sweetener such as sugar or honey and then reduced to make a syrup.[6][8][12] The sweet-and-sour syrup could be mixed with either water or soda water and served as a soft drink, or it could be used as a mixer in alcoholic cocktails.[4][11][12] Shrubs eventually fell out of popularity with the advent of home refrigeration.[10][13]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrub_(drink)


I've bought shrub in the gift store at Sturbridge Village, a re-created 19th century town in Massachusetts, but I've seen it on sale elsewhere. You have to go looking for it, though. Despite the fact that it's sweetened, and gets mixed with water or seltzer, the concept of "vinegar-based soft drink" is probably a hard sell in the US. Most hits on search engines are about making your own, but there are internet sites that sell them:

http://shrubdrinks.com/


This one is wonderfully entitled "Bring Me a Shrubbery"
https://drinkshrubs.wordpress.com/tag/vending/
#45
Old 03-05-2015, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by DrCube View Post
What's wrong with watering down your juice to taste? Do Brits just have tiny refrigerators or something?
Doesn't taste the same at all. Watered down juice is delicious as are cordials but cordials are way more artificial tasting.
#46
Old 03-05-2015, 07:55 AM
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Originally Posted by AK84 View Post
Squash is drunk in Pakistan too. Shocked you cannot find it in the US. Nothing better on a summer day.
Also popular in this former part of the empire, Miwadi being the most popular brand. I now have a huge craving for lime cordial.
#47
Old 03-05-2015, 07:56 AM
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Was completely expecting this to be a thread about pumpkin and zucchini smoothies.
#48
Old 03-05-2015, 08:38 AM
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I recall drinking orange squash while visiting my relatives in India. Back in the '70s if you wanted a carbonated drink (Thums Up, Limca, Campa-Cola, or Gold Spot) you had to drink it (through a stupid paper straw that closed up as soon as you took the first sip) right at the soft drink stand and return the bottle immediately.

I don't know if there was an option to pay a deposit and take the bottle with you, but I never saw anyone doing it.

At home, we would have squash in the fridge.

I also recall that in Indian movies, squash was the stand-in for booze. Bad guys would go on drunken rampages between gulps from a bottle of bright orange syrup.
#49
Old 03-05-2015, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
Back in the '70s if you wanted a carbonated drink (Thums Up, Limca, Campa-Cola, or Gold Spot) you had to drink it (through a stupid paper straw that closed up as soon as you took the first sip) right at the soft drink stand and return the bottle immediately.
Wow, that's crappy.
#50
Old 03-06-2015, 06:01 PM
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Australian cordials have been around for more than a century, so were mainly sold for mixing with water, before soda technology became domesticated. And popular especially in country areas to disguise the taste of water that often came from ground bores, tanks with floating carcasses and bird shit and had that interesting abrasive texture of suspended solids.

Being aimed at kids it was a way of delivering brightly coloured sugar concentrate straight into their bodies, while deceptively using words like 'fruit'.

Also some cordial may have a mild sanitising effect on buggy water. A good overview here.

Squash, at least in NSW, tends to be used for cordials where they leave the pulpy bits to make it more authentic, rustic and genuine. Cottees is now owned by Kraft.
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