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#1
Old 07-14-2015, 11:31 PM
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Recommend Me a Musical Instrument

I'm 23 years old, haven't played an instrument nor had any formal instruction since junior high, and have tiny hands that I am told would make piano or guitar very difficult to play (the former moreso than the latter, as you can just get a smaller guitar). Long ago I did very well in music theory and am confident I could learn to read music again. Recently I was asked to join a local songwriter's circle, with several members citing my background in spoken word and poetry as their reason for asking. After attending a few times, it's occurred to me that I'll get a lot more out of this and have a lot more to offer them if I begin to learn an instrument, any instrument.

Once I've decided on one, I'm going to want recommendations regarding the make and model too- quality sound vs ok sound, durable vs flimsy, cheap vs costly, etc.

I'm starting massage school at the end of August, so ideally I'd like to learn an instrument that won't cause/worsen carpal tunnel syndrome (I have a history of mild/moderate cases for which the primary treatment was to immobilize my wrists at night by wearing braces. I plan to keep up with prevention exercises and return to the braces if/when it acts up). But if there aren't any, I'll settle for something relatively light on wrist strain as far as music goes.

I already have an abundance of hand-based hobbies and don't want to add to the strain if I don't have to. I frequently fold origami; I produce and (locally) sell several types of handmade jewelry, the most popular of which is origami-based (paper crane earrings and that sort of thing); I regularly paint, embroider, bead, and sculpt; I occassionally cut hair and sew. And of course I'll be typing more often when the homework hits. I'm not sure how much (if any) I'll have to cut back on my current hobbies yet, and it would be really good for my sanity to have at least one creative avenue that wouldn't be affected.

If money, time, and carpal tunnel weren't concerns, my first choice would be the electric guitar or some other rock instrument, solely because that's the kind of music I love and what I listen to most often. But I know that one's a particularly demanding commitment, both time-wise and financially, and more importantly I presume it's not easy on the wrists. Maybe a few years after graduating, when I've got more downtime than I will as a student, that option will open up. Until then, I'd like to hear about other possibilities.
#2
Old 07-15-2015, 12:00 AM
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Hmm, not working the hands is going to be a big stumbling block for most acoustic instruments. I'm trying to think of one that isn't a workout of some sort for the hands, and I can't think of one. The stringed instrument with the lightest demand on the hands that I can think of might be a lap steel. You don't grip the neck, but you do have to hold a tone bar and strum.

Have you thought about just using a synth and sequencer?
#3
Old 07-15-2015, 12:08 AM
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A slightly different direction, but have you thought about voice lessons?
#4
Old 07-15-2015, 01:10 AM
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I thought about it a moment longer, and the theremin came to mind. It seems kind of perfect. The only strain on the hands is from holding them in the air.

It's apparently not easy to learn, but it is pretty versatile. You can start with a kit for fairly little money (you'll need an amp, too). If you get really into it, you can go crazy and build or get a polyphonic theremin, and play Stairway.

Full disclosure: there's no such thing as a polyphonic theremin.

Last edited by scabpicker; 07-15-2015 at 01:15 AM.
#5
Old 07-15-2015, 01:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scabpicker View Post
I thought about it a moment longer, and the theremin came to mind. It seems kind of perfect. The only strain on the hands is from holding them in the air.

It's apparently not easy to learn, but it is pretty versatile. You can start with a kit for fairly little money (you'll need an amp, too). If you get really into it, you can go crazy and build or get a polyphonic theremin, and play Stairway.

Full disclosure: there's no such thing as a polyphonic theremin.
Video posted on March 31st. Cute.
#6
Old 07-15-2015, 02:08 AM
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jaw Harp?

https://youtube.com/watch?v=Mrxxed54hcg
#7
Old 07-15-2015, 03:12 AM
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Just posting to say that hand size is a rubbish consideration, play what you love. I have small chick hands and play piano. I'm sure arpeggios are easier for dudes with spidery graceful man-hands, but that's not going to stop me from enjoying it.

I'm no orthopedic surgeon, but I wonder if playing piano isn't good exercise for your hands? I knit sometimes, and I type for hours every day. The computer causes weakness/numbness/pain on occasion. Playing piano never has.
#8
Old 07-15-2015, 12:56 PM
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Dulcimer! You'd be surprised what pleasant music even non-musicians can get out of it, and virtuosos can do amazing things...
#9
Old 07-15-2015, 01:52 PM
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Maybe something like a xylophone? Not a huge strain on the wrists and - if your CTS is a result of typing - will use a completely different hand position.
#10
Old 07-15-2015, 02:54 PM
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I'd recommend ukulele - that'd be all right for your hand size, though I don't know how much of a strain that'd be on your hands (maybe depends on how much you practice.) And you can actually play rock music on the ukulele (or at least, I do sometimes.)

Autoharp might work, though I don't know if it'd be a strain to hold (I don't know much about the instrument.) Also, it pretty much only plays chords, but it might be nice to accompany songs.
#11
Old 07-15-2015, 04:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyG View Post
I'd recommend ukulele - that'd be all right for your hand size, though I don't know how much of a strain that'd be on your hands (maybe depends on how much you practice.) And you can actually play rock music on the ukulele (or at least, I do sometimes.)

Autoharp might work, though I don't know if it'd be a strain to hold (I don't know much about the instrument.) Also, it pretty much only plays chords, but it might be nice to accompany songs.
Agreed, and with the nylon strings on a uke, you are likely to experience few tendon issues.
#12
Old 07-15-2015, 04:15 PM
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Harmonica fits well with both the rock music you like to listen to yourself and the songwriter's circle you've been invited to.
#13
Old 07-15-2015, 04:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hungover Heartthrob View Post
and have tiny hands that I am told would make piano or guitar very difficult to play
Yikes. How tiny are you? I've seen some very small people play the guitar.
#14
Old 07-15-2015, 07:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scabpicker View Post
Hmm, not working the hands is going to be a big stumbling block for most acoustic instruments. I'm trying to think of one that isn't a workout of some sort for the hands, and I can't think of one. The stringed instrument with the lightest demand on the hands that I can think of might be a lap steel. You don't grip the neck, but you do have to hold a tone bar and strum.

Have you thought about just using a synth and sequencer?
Doesn't need to be a stringed instrument by any means. I don't have a preference for type. Just, well... Something on which not all the music made necessarily has to be soft and pretty. I'm not likely to stick with an instrument that doesn't have something like raw, epic or energetic as an option. As a listener, 80% of my favourite music is hyperactive and loud. Hearing relaxation CDs on repeat during all my practical classes and clinic hours is probably going to kill my taste for the other 20% very quickly.

Synths are definitely an option. I don't know how difficult they are to learn, but I know they can and sometimes do produce music I enjoy.

Theremin, also an option. Although apparently not a polyphonic one.

I really love what Owen Pallett has done with classical instruments and synths on his recent album In Conflict. It's turbulent, it's dance-able, it runs the gamut from bright to dark and hops from gentle to brutal and back as needed... Rock music without an electric guitarist or bassist in sight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CatastrophicFailure View Post
A slightly different direction, but have you thought about voice lessons?
Thought about them. They're still an option, but the disadvantage to voice lessons is that solo a capella doesn't have many listeners. Collaboration is great, but I want the option to perform independently as well. I know many guitarists whose first love was singing; they learned to play just to give their voices a wider audience, rather than rely on having another musician around to provide accompaniment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoToEleven View Post
Dulcimer! You'd be surprised what pleasant music even non-musicians can get out of it, and virtuosos can do amazing things...
I've seen those on a shelf but I have no idea how they're played or what it sounds like. Been meaning to google it for a while now actually.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mascaroni View Post
Maybe something like a xylophone? Not a huge strain on the wrists and - if your CTS is a result of typing - will use a completely different hand position.
Not really a fan of the xylophone's sound, but I have considered playing something like the metallophone or glockenspiel. I liked the sharpness of the 25-note fold-up glock I tried out yesterday, and they're only like thirty bucks. I'll check out some experienced players on Youtube before deciding, but for now that's an option.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyG View Post
And you can actually play rock music on the ukulele (or at least, I do sometimes.)
Does it sound... acoustic-y? Do ukes come in electric? I have heard of the "guitarlele", which seems to be just my size, but I don't know enough about guitars in general to even guess at whether it makes a difference in the sound and versatility of the thing. Basically my knowledge of that whole instrument family stops at "well, there's usually a body and a neck, and some funny looking pins to tune the strings or something".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Martian Bigfoot View Post
Yikes. How tiny are you? I've seen some very small people play the guitar.
About as small as adults get without having some kind of medical condition that affects growth. I weigh 110 pounds, and I'm not thin.

Last edited by Hungover Heartthrob; 07-15-2015 at 07:48 PM.
#15
Old 07-15-2015, 08:58 PM
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Play drums. The world always needs more good drummers, IMO.

Or try sax. Saxomophones are way easy to learn and be competent on. They can blow loud and distorted (Steve Mackay, Jørgen Munkeby) or play soft and jazzy (David Sanborn, some other dick) or play wild in the streets (John Coltrane, John Gilmore). They're very versatile instruments and have great potential for interplay with other instruments, especially guitar (here, check this out: Universal Congress Of - Dancing On Plato's Tomb). Obviously, it takes a lot of effort to reach the level that those guys play at, but trust me, it's fairly simple to reach "competent" level on sax.
#16
Old 07-16-2015, 01:50 AM
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If you're starting off on a musical instrument and it's not like you've been dreaming of playing a particular one for a long time, do NOT start out with an expensive one. A uke is a good starter instrument, especially if you have small hands. George Harrison loved playing them, he always had some extras around his house so visitors could play one along with him. He even had one that was strung left handed. And if you make a go of it, you can upgrade to a better uke, you could probably put a pickup on one. And it's not to difficult to transition from a uke to a guitar.

Ukulele Orchestra Of Great Britain

Imagine if they had a wah wah pedal!
#17
Old 07-16-2015, 02:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
Or try sax. Saxomophones are way easy to learn and be competent on. They can blow loud and distorted (Steve Mackay, Jørgen Munkeby) or play soft and jazzy (David Sanborn, some other dick) or play wild in the streets (John Coltrane, John Gilmore). They're very versatile instruments and have great potential for interplay with other instruments, especially guitar (here, check this out: Universal Congress Of - Dancing On Plato's Tomb). Obviously, it takes a lot of effort to reach the level that those guys play at, but trust me, it's fairly simple to reach "competent" level on sax.
Agree with this suggestion. Saxes figure in a lot of R&B and soul and funk, for example. Plus, as a woodwind, the sax can help you learn other woodwinds, as they all work on the same principle. Learn the sax, and you can teach yourself the flute, and then play music by the Moody Blues and Jethro Tull, among others.

As Ranger Jeff suggested, do not start with an expensive instrument. Start with a "student model." They play just fine (though not superior) but they're built a little tougher--your fingers will hit the wrong keys/strings/etc. and you'll try to compensate by hitting others, often hitting whatever sideways or backways or too hard, which expensive instruments are not designed for. When you learn the basics, you can move up to more expensive, more delicate instruments.
#18
Old 07-16-2015, 02:59 AM
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Drums
#19
Old 07-16-2015, 03:20 AM
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Trombone? Not much manual dexterity needed there - gripping the slide is a whole-hand thing and you move it, I guess, with whole-arm or elbow movement, probably about as much effort as swinging a table-tennis bat since everything should be well lubricated and moving freely.

You have several options musically - the usual B flat tenor, or the E flat alto or the bass if you want something a little different. There are even such things as slide trumpets though I don't know how hard you'd have to search or what they would cost you.
#20
Old 07-16-2015, 08:41 AM
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I have heard of electric ukuleles.
#21
Old 07-16-2015, 08:57 AM
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I'll just chime in to mention that I know many very fine pianists with small hands. You're not going to be playing a lot of Brahms and Rachmaninoff, but there's plenty of stuff out there that doesn't need big hands.

And of course the best instrument is voice. I may be biased.
#22
Old 07-16-2015, 09:07 AM
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I have tiny hands and have played piano for many years - through to certification! So don't let tiny hands stop you if you're interested in playing piano. Yes, there are certain styles of music you will need to adapt or simply be unable to play well, but there are plenty of styles that work for small hands just fine!
#23
Old 07-16-2015, 10:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff View Post
If you're starting off on a musical instrument and it's not like you've been dreaming of playing a particular one for a long time, do NOT start out with an expensive one. A uke is a good starter instrument, especially if you have small hands. George Harrison loved playing them, he always had some extras around his house so visitors could play one along with him. He even had one that was strung left handed. And if you make a go of it, you can upgrade to a better uke, you could probably put a pickup on one. And it's not to difficult to transition from a uke to a guitar.

Ukulele Orchestra Of Great Britain

Imagine if they had a wah wah pedal!
Thanks for that link - Their version of Psycho Killer is killer!
#24
Old 07-16-2015, 01:17 PM
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This is like recommending a kind of exercise: sure, someone could analyze your body type, goals, etc and recommend something exactly suited, but the bottom line is the best instrument is one that you have fun playing.
Since you mostly listen to rock and roll, get a guitar. That is what I think you'll want to play. If possible, rent or borrow one for long enough to be sure that it doesn't make your carpal tunnel worse.

I'd start with an acoustic; you can always get an electric later if you want, but an acoustic is better for learning on. Plus you can get all singer-songwriter-y with it. And if you want to get a ukulele or pedal steel or mandolin or who knows what later, you can and transfer a fair amount of the skill, but in the meantime, it will be a lot easier to get a guitar and get lessons for it than for something quirky and exotic.
#25
Old 07-16-2015, 02:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spoons View Post
Agree with this suggestion. Saxes figure in a lot of R&B and soul and funk, for example. Plus, as a woodwind, the sax can help you learn other woodwinds, as they all work on the same principle. Learn the sax, and you can teach yourself the flute, and then play music by the Moody Blues and Jethro Tull, among others.

As Ranger Jeff suggested, do not start with an expensive instrument. Start with a "student model." They play just fine (though not superior) but they're built a little tougher--your fingers will hit the wrong keys/strings/etc. and you'll try to compensate by hitting others, often hitting whatever sideways or backways or too hard, which expensive instruments are not designed for. When you learn the basics, you can move up to more expensive, more delicate instruments.
Sure, sax is great (been playing for 40 years), easy to learn fingerings, but difficult for a beginniner to produce a good sound on, so most get discouraged. It's also a "high-maintenance" instrument - a used one might need a couple hundred dollars worth of repairs (replacing pads, etc.) to get into top playing condition. Then there's the confusing choice of mouthpiece and reeds. Imperative that you get a good teacher to help you.

I'd recommend flute...
#26
Old 07-16-2015, 02:23 PM
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I'm quite older than you (46) and just a few months ago I started learning my first musical instrument - the fiddle (violin). Just throwing that out there because IME, tiny hands would be a big plus over my big sausage fingers.

The downside, of course, is you don't hear too many (but some!) fiddles in rock music. But check out some songs by Old Crow Medicine Show to see why the fiddle totally rocks.

Oh one other thing I've discovered: the violin is really, really hard. But someone told me that you can become an expert after about 10,000 hours of practice so I figure I'll be pretty good in another 30-40 years.
#27
Old 07-16-2015, 03:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enginerd View Post
Harmonica fits well with both the rock music you like to listen to yourself and the songwriter's circle you've been invited to.
This. It's inexpensive (until you start amassing a collection), forgiving, and there are lots of decent video lessons online.

And if you really practice...

Last edited by Cartoonacy; 07-16-2015 at 03:33 PM.
#28
Old 07-16-2015, 05:48 PM
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Oh, and if you're going to buy a starter instrument, go to the store with a friend who is experienced in playing that instrument. A lot of those nylon string guitars on the hangers behind the counter with the big price tags with low prices on them are unplayable. Consider a used instrument for a starter also. A LOT of instruments that people buy to learn on end up in a corner just collecting dust, so you want to try to limit your potential $$ loss.
#29
Old 07-16-2015, 07:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyG View Post
)

Autoharp might work, though I don't know if it'd be a strain to hold (I don't know much about the instrument.) Also, it pretty much only plays chords, but it might be nice to accompany songs.
Autoharps can be "plucked" but that is for the seriously advanced level. And they can get really expensive without trying hard. Playing them they aren't much of a strain to hold though.

My thoughts are running towards recommending a recorder but those you can't sing along to and play at the same time.

As for ukes, I offer
https://youtube.com/watch?v=2KZjnFZvCNc

(Ranger and I clearly cruise some of the same places )
#30
Old 07-16-2015, 07:50 PM
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steelpan
#31
Old 07-17-2015, 03:46 PM
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What instrument to do with a poetry background?

Bongos, hands down.
#32
Old 07-17-2015, 10:52 PM
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kopek, it's a relief to see there's someone with good taste here amid all the muggles.

Look closely at the instruments they're playing. I can easily imagine a single cutaway uke, but a resonator uke? Some serious work and $$ went into that. And some of the inlay work on the fret boards.
#33
Old 07-18-2015, 12:19 AM
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Ukuleles are great. You can play any style of music on them. It's inexpensive to get into and it's fairly easy to learn basic chords and songs. One of my go-to places is The Ukulele Site. One of the things I like about it is that all of the instruments have demonstration videos and I liked the variety of music that is played and could see what ukuleles are capable of. The store comes highly recommended and there are also tutorials. Ukulele underground is a big forum for the ukulele community. I keep a ukulele by my chair and plunk away at it whenever the mood strikes.

http://theukulelesite.com
#34
Old 07-18-2015, 09:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skammer View Post
...Oh one other thing I've discovered: the violin is really, really hard...
And it sounds horrible until you develop some skill. My brother did "Suzuki" violin lessons for a while in school. It sounded like he was torturing a cat. It was a huge relief when he switched to trumpet.
#35
Old 07-18-2015, 08:39 PM
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Augh. So much to consider.

It's not a decision I'm in some kind of hurry to make, but once I do I will update with how things turn out in terms of progress. I may say to heck with it and just stick to what I'm already good at.
#36
Old 07-18-2015, 10:33 PM
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I think uke and harmonica are your best bet. Inexpensive, versatile, easy to quickly develop some minimal proficiency thru self teaching. Might want to consider tin whistle as well. If you try any of these, and decide you don't really enjoy music, you're not out a ton of coin. But you could play along with many different instruments/styles with any of these, and learn more about other instruments you might want to pursue.
#37
Old 07-19-2015, 05:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scabpicker View Post
I thought about it a moment longer, and the theremin came to mind. It seems kind of perfect. The only strain on the hands is from holding them in the air.

It's apparently not easy to learn, but it is pretty versatile. You can start with a kit for fairly little money (you'll need an amp, too). If you get really into it, you can go crazy and build or get a polyphonic theremin, and play Stairway.

Full disclosure: there's no such thing as a polyphonic theremin.
Iso
Directional
Inductive
Oscillator
Technology

#38
Old 07-19-2015, 03:30 PM
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Cowbells! (until they come home)
#39
Old 07-19-2015, 04:10 PM
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Originally Posted by TheseGoToEleven View Post
Dulcimer! You'd be surprised what pleasant music even non-musicians can get out of it, and virtuosos can do amazing things...

Right! I don't know about rock dulcimer but it's an instrument that's possible to play with a slide bar and a pick, without any finger action. And it can be an acceptable singing accompaniment without a lot of technical skill. You can even buy a kit and build your own.

http://everythingdulcimer.com/discus...ic.php?t=25250

Last edited by Nefario; 07-19-2015 at 04:13 PM.
#40
Old 07-19-2015, 04:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff View Post
If you're starting off on a musical instrument and it's not like you've been dreaming of playing a particular one for a long time, do NOT start out with an expensive one. A uke is a good starter instrument
Bingo.

Regarding hand size, forget it. Everyone starting on guitar thinks their hands are small, even guys who can palm a basketball (which I can't do, not by a long shot.) Zillions of youtube videos show 12-yr-old kids with tiny hands playing like masters. (Unfortunately, zillions more showing them shredding playing too many notes with an absence of passion, but that's beside the point!) So, don't rule out guitar. It's a great instrument. But, so is uke! Take your pick.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff View Post
Oh, and if you're going to buy a starter instrument, go to the store with a friend who is experienced in playing that instrument.
Again, bingo.

Physically, uke is easier than guitar. Mentally, guitar is actually quite a bit simpler. However, IMHO, they're both the quickest and easiest instruments for an adult to learn and go from complete novice to sounding good enough not to annoy people. That's because, unlike wind and bowed instruments, it doesn't take much technique to get decent tone, and strumming simple chords in simple patterns sounds great, especially when accompanied by a good voice.

I've said this before but I'll repeat it. Kids have three big advantages over adults when it comes to learning an instrument:

1) their brains are different; they learn faster -- way faster
2) they have a lot more free time
3) they haven't developed sophisticated judgment, and can get a thrill from doing something simple

Of the three of these, I'm confident that the third one is by far the most significant. So, if you're serious, do your best to cultivate your inner child and find a way to enjoy baby steps! Once you get in the feedback loop of appreciating each small advance, you're on your way to, over time, becoming a decent musician.
#41
Old 07-19-2015, 04:19 PM
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Harmonica is also a great instrument for an adult to learn, but only if you have a place to go where nobody will hear you. It's a great instrument for blues. But it takes a lot of work on technique to develop the basic licks that make playing fun. Bending notes is like whistling: some just never get it, others pick it up right away, but most have to fiddle with it a lot and slowly go from sucky to not terrible to not half bad to decent. Folks can give you tips on what to try, but for the most part, you have to try random stuff until it starts to work, and move from there.

It's not particularly good for accompaniment. Also, it's a bit of an investment, if you're going to play with others. One harp is cheap, but to play with others, you need one for each key you'll play in; a starter kit of at least 4 is minimal, for playing "cross harp" in A, C, G, and E. (For which you need D, F, C, and A harps.)

There are lots of good tutorials. After a couple years, you can menace the local blues jams.
#42
Old 07-19-2015, 04:46 PM
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No recommendations for tuba? Darn.

(Just bought one yesterday, and it was as absurdist an event as you might imagine. I don't think I've ever seen more than two tubas at once, and a room full of them - shelves, floor, racks - was as crazy as a Marx Brothers movie.)

Maybe not what the OP was after, though.
#43
Old 07-20-2015, 12:33 AM
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I hated walking to and from school wearing that Sousaphone. Lucky for me, I only had to do it once a week.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff View Post
Oh, and if you're going to buy a starter instrument, go to the store with a friend who is experienced in playing that instrument.
Let me add to that. Any experienced acoustic guitarist would be good in helping pick out a uke, even if he's never touched one himself. He'd be able to check out the action, the tuners, and how the strings attach to the bridge/tailpiece. I said acoustic because there's a lot more that's adjustable on an electric than there is on an acoustic. Some stuff on an acoustic you either have to pay a lot to get adjusted, or you have to learn to live with.
#44
Old 07-20-2015, 05:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Les Espaces Du Sommeil View Post
Iso
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Inductive
Oscillator
Technology

To be honest, I was kind of buying that video until that came up on the screen (ya know, it's Moog, they could have figured something out). After that, I checked when it was posted, and it made a lot more sense.

Of all the instruments mentioned so far, I'd have to add to the chorus saying the probably uke fits the bill the best, provided you can at least use your hands well enough to push down it's very light strings. Unlike any of the horns, the harmonica or the theremin, it's an instrument that you can actually accompany yourself with in non-sparse arrangements. A uke's strings don't really take any force at all, if you can drive a car across town comfortably, I don't see why you can't play a uke. Also, as mentioned above, they're cheap. You can get a decent ukulele for less than $50, and you kind of have to be shopping the rarefied makes to spend more than $100.

OTOH, you really can get a guitar that has loose strings, provided you're willing to compromise on looking like a rock star. In fact, a kid's guitar of acceptable quality can get you pretty far if you're looking to accompany yourself. I've played a toy guitar by that mfr. I'm not sure if it was the Lightning McQueen signature edition (which can be cured with some creativity), but it had the same tuners. It played with about the same string resistance as a ukulele. That kind of makes that video even more impressive, unless he learned to play on that guitar.

If you decide later (or who knows, maybe sooner) that you're willing to spend a bit more than that, and you must have rock guitar, Fender makes a mini strat. I've played my nephew's. It doesn't require much more force than a ukulele (but it does require more), and it sounds damn good. I kept asking to play it. I kind of want to get one just because it's so damn easy to play.
#45
Old 07-20-2015, 08:50 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Gumi, S. Korea
Posts: 9,122
The guitar and the trumpet will get you laid, a lot. The tuba and the oboe might do the opposite. Choose wisely.
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