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ClairificC
07-20-2002, 02:03 AM
I have a few friends who are going to various other countires to study abroad for their Junior year. A bunch of us are getting togother to throw them a going away party and I was thinking of getting them gifts of stuff that you can only find in the US.

But that actaully spaked my own curiosity……

What are things that you can only find in the United States??

Or even

Stuff that is unique to other counties/reigons?

ClairificC
07-20-2002, 02:05 AM
Preview is my friend :rollseyes:

sparked my curiosity,
not spaked or spanked or what not
geez…

Hippy144
07-20-2002, 02:26 AM
A good bet is peanut butter. I took some of that with me to France, and my host family loved it. They have some really bad imitation stuff over there.

Kayeby
07-20-2002, 02:30 AM
Can you get Yankee Candles outside of the US? I remember looking for some here, but ended up buying a whole heap from an American seller on eBay. Including shipping, it's going to cost me around $80-90 AUD, so these had better be nice candles!

Seven
07-20-2002, 04:34 AM
Hanging Chads. ;)

Already in Use
07-20-2002, 04:43 AM
It seems that in other countries one of the stereotypes of the US is the whole Wild West cowboy thing, so maybe you could get them some cowboy gear. Or some Native American things, since after all, that's the ethnic group native to the US.

Fern Forest
07-20-2002, 04:55 AM
A Yardstick.

Neidhart
07-20-2002, 06:58 AM
Stuff that is unique to other counties/reigons?

Curry-flavored potato chips don't seem to have made it out of the UK yet.

EggNogg
07-20-2002, 07:12 AM
Fortunatly for the rest of the world, Marmite doesn't seem to have emigrated out of Britain yet.

egg

Aceospades
07-20-2002, 07:38 AM
rootbear is something that i can't do with out but it seem's that all of europe somehow does.

Spoons
07-20-2002, 08:01 AM
Oroginally posted by EggNogg
Fortunatly for the rest of the world, Marmite doesn't seem to have emigrated out of Britain yet.
No, it's made it to Canada. Seen it one the supermarket shelves. I don't know anybody who buys it though.

As for "stuff available only in the USA," my American wife always enjoys her Christmas packages from her friends back in the US. They always have an assortment of candy that she can't get here: Red Vines, $100,000 Bars, Paydays, Almond Joys, and a whole bunch of other things we never had in Canada. Some specialty shops do sell them now, but those are few and far between.

But there's an idea, ClarificC: American candy.

kittenblue
07-20-2002, 08:37 AM
Perhaps times have changed, but when friends went traveling years ago, they took their own toilet paper because the european stuff wasn't as user friendly as our squeezably soft stuff. The TP they brought back was really really awful. But as I said, perhaps times have changed.

Kal
07-20-2002, 09:03 AM
Originally posted by aceospades
rootbear is something that i can't do with out but it seem's that all of europe somehow does.

Mc Donald's used to serve rootbeer years ago in the UK. I used to be able to get I.B.C. here as well. After a ten year rootbeer drought (poor me :() Asda - A supermarket chain now owned by Walmart - have started to sell the stuff. :)

Back to the OP, is the UK the only place that has dandelion & burdock?

kiz
07-20-2002, 09:38 AM
Originally posted by EggNogg
Fortunatly for the rest of the world, Marmite doesn't seem to have emigrated out of Britain yet.

Nope, not true! My local yuppie deli-gourmet shop sells Marmite, as well as Vegemite!

No, I've never tried either one. From what other people have told me, I'm not planning to...

;)

c-of-cyn
07-20-2002, 09:43 AM
What's the point of studying abroad if you surround yourself with America when you're there? Jeesh!

c-of-cyn
(an American living in Sweden who has also done a stint in France)

Crusoe
07-20-2002, 09:54 AM
Pickled onion flavour Monster Munch.

Neurotik
07-20-2002, 11:04 AM
I second root beer. Can't find that anywhere. And stay away from the ginger beer in the UK...nasty stuff. Peanut butter, too...the stuff over there is usually nasty, but you can sometimes find some delicious Skippy.

Maybe also blue jeans that cost less than $70 :D

Fretful Porpentine
07-20-2002, 11:43 AM
Originally posted by c-of-cyn
What's the point of studying abroad if you surround yourself with America when you're there? Jeesh!

c-of-cyn
(an American living in Sweden who has also done a stint in France)
I don't think a few jars of peanut butter constitute "surrounding yourself with America." There's no harm in having some comfort objects to ease the culture shock a little.

Candy is a good idea, and I'd also recommend English books if your friends are going to non-English-speaking countries.
And stay away from the ginger beer in the UK...nasty stuff.
I disagree. Ginger beer is heaven (but then, I like Marmite too).

I had a hard time finding catfish in the UK, but I guess your friends wouldn't want a sack of fish fillets to take on the plane. :) Decent Mexican food is also hard to come by, so people who cook might appreciate some seasoning mix or similar staples.

Mockingbird
07-20-2002, 11:56 AM
I recommend crabs. They are easy to transport and fun to give.

:D

ClairificC
07-20-2002, 12:04 PM
I gess this just proves the original point, but


What is "Marmite"??

Rootbeer and Candy are great suggestions.

Motorgirl
07-20-2002, 12:50 PM
Not sure if these products are truly unique to the US, but...

For several years we had an apartment-mate from Austria. He was fascinated by and became addicted to several foods while he was here, so we served them at his going away party, and also gave him large quantities as a going-away present.

Easy-Cheese (a metal squirt can which purports to be full of real cheese). Possibly made by Nabisco, but I'd have to check the label.

Nestle Quik/NesQuik (yeah, I know Nestle isn't a US company, but he looooved the containers of chocolate milk, and drank at least one every day). Since we didn't think milk would travel well, we made him a gift of a Costco-sized cannister of it in its powdered form.

Kraft Macaroni n Cheese (Dinner) - he loved this stuff. I know this is ultra-popular in Canada, but I don't know about Europe.

And when a friend of mine was living in Switzerland for a few years I sent him regular care packages of Oreos, Chips A Hoy, Kraft Mac-n-Cheese and Hamburger Helper. (the poor guy couldn't cook and complained that Swiss cookies weren't sweet enough).

MattK
07-20-2002, 06:06 PM
US stuff I can't get here in Germany, but I'd love to have:

Mountain Dew (illegal because of some ingredient)
Almond M&Ms
Nerds
Skittles
Snapple drinks
Vanilla Coke
Sweet peanut butter (ours tastes weird)
Real marshmellows

Kilt-wearin' man
07-20-2002, 06:52 PM
Decent salsa/picante sauce- I dunno about most of the world, but a friend who married an Aussie said that the stuff they had that claimed to be "salsa" was more like ketchup with onions in it. Ick.

Sunspace
07-20-2002, 08:20 PM
Fortunatly for the rest of the world, Marmite doesn't seem to have emigrated out of Britain yet. I found it next to the spices in a Loblaws food store near Ryerson University in Toronto. The store sells cleaning and home maintenance supplies as well as food, so that probably explains its prescence. :)

Mudshark
07-20-2002, 09:59 PM
Originally posted by EggNogg
Fortunatly for the rest of the world, Marmite doesn't seem to have emigrated out of Britain yet.

egg

I have Marmite in my kitchen. My father thought it was a "good" idea to buy it.

monica
07-20-2002, 10:14 PM
Already in Use, I actually saw Native American statues in a tourist shop in Greece.

divemaster
07-21-2002, 01:50 AM
Ok, you guys.

WHAT THE F*** IS 'MARMITE'??!!

:p

Equipoise
07-21-2002, 02:43 AM
We went to England a few years ago and a friend studying there BEGGED us to bring her some Captain Crunch cereal and Kool-Aid.

I know, I know, but we took her some anyway.

She also said that strawberries aren't that big over there, but we didn't even try to bring her any.

Urban Ranger
07-21-2002, 03:04 AM
Originally posted by Spoons
But there's an idea, ClarificC: American candy. [/B]

The only good US candy is jelly beans. Otherwise Belgian and Swiss chocolates beat you by a mile.

Urban Ranger
07-21-2002, 03:09 AM
I would say Native American handicraft.

Kal
07-21-2002, 02:37 PM
Originally posted by Equipoise
We went to England a few years ago and a friend studying there BEGGED us to bring her some Captain Crunch cereal and Kool-Aid.

If your friend is still in England, tell her to try Golden Nuggets - They are a different shape but taste just like original flavour Captain Crunch.

AHunter3
07-21-2002, 03:05 PM
I would imagine that corn on the cob, butternut squash, acorn squash, rutabaga, watermelon, tangerines, and possibly blueberries (?) would be hard to find if you weren't in the US.

'Course, most of that isn't terribly practical to ship, I suppose.

Lissla Lissar
07-21-2002, 03:07 PM
Marmite is a weird British spread- I've heard it's similar to Bovril- a meat flavoured spread made out of yeast. Someone correct me if I'm wrong. You can get it all over Toronto, and I have friends that eat it. I've never tried it, though.

Duckster
07-21-2002, 07:39 PM
Originally posted by kittenblue
Perhaps times have changed, but when friends went traveling years ago, they took their own toilet paper because the european stuff wasn't as user friendly as our squeezably soft stuff. The TP they brought back was really really awful. But as I said, perhaps times have changed.

Perhaps this is why Americans are hated around the world - our toilet paper. We can never truly be hard asses like the rest of the world when our toilet paper is so squeezeably soft. :D

Neurotik
07-21-2002, 09:29 PM
Nonsense, when I was in the UK, I found the toilet paper to be soft, quilted and very very luxurious. I can only hope that is a trend throughout Europe, as when I was in Spain a few years ago it was like wiping with parchment paper.

tritone
07-21-2002, 10:31 PM
I've heard a rumour that you can get peanut-butter M&M's in the USA, and I've certainly never seen those anywhere else - just as well, I suppose, cos if they sold them over here I'd probably be well and truly addicted by now. For a long time, we couldn't get Reese's Peanut Butter Cups over here, and every time anyone in the family went to the USA they would bring back bagfuls of the things.

Yup, I'd definitely go with the American candy/chocolate idea :)

Marmite is disgusting. Vegemite is delicious. Yes, there is a difference.

Neurotik
07-21-2002, 10:35 PM
I can confirm the peanut butter M&Ms and they are the absolutely best M&Ms ever created (I will NOT argue about this!). Maybe I'll send you a bag for your birthday :)

Karellen
07-21-2002, 11:50 PM
Porn.

(Depending on what country your friends are going to.)

Leifsmama
07-22-2002, 12:15 AM
When I went to France I took maple syrup to the family I stayed with. They poured it over ice cream.

Sivalensis
07-22-2002, 01:19 PM
i lived in france and was actually able to find one brand of maple syrup (the real stuff) and peanut butter in the store (in a backwater town). things i couldn't find were:

orange soda (the minute maid kind, the stuff that looks like toxis orange sludge. they have plenty of orangina type)

-root beer
-decent salsa
-decent tortilla chips
-popcorn (except in movie theaters)
-decent cookies (though the other pastries are good)
-pepper flakes (for anyone who wants to make red beans and rice)
-pumpkin pie mix
-stuff with mint in it

i found lots of candy over there. they have candy bars and such, though not as much as sugar candy (there are really good peach gummies). don't you dare bring chocolate like hershey's...the chocolate from chocolatiers (shops) is miles above anything made over here or in britain (sorry guys), though cadbury is good and sold year round there *grin*

Canyon Surfer
07-22-2002, 02:42 PM
I already posted this link (http://nytimes.com/2002/01/24/international/europe/24MARM.html) today in the thread about salad cream. It's an article in the NY Times (registration may be required) about Marmite. This should answer this question:
Originally posted by divemaster
Ok, you guys.

WHAT THE F*** IS 'MARMITE'??!!


Specifically,
Marmite is a brownish vegetable extract with a toxic odor, saline taste and an axle grease consistency that has somehow captivated the British.

and
Marmite is exported to 30 countries, but all of it is aimed at expatriates, and there are no plans to try to acquaint the non-British world with its delights

Hamish
07-22-2002, 03:05 PM
An American ex-boyfriend of mine insisted that our chocolate bar/candy selection was different here than down there.

He claimed to have never seen "Smarties" -- which look like M&M's or Reese's Pieces but with sweet chocolate inside. He said they had something called "Smarties," but they were more like tangy candies wrapped up in plastic.

I was in shock.

Munch
07-22-2002, 03:26 PM
Originally posted by Crusoe
Pickled onion flavour Monster Munch.

Everybody else's guess is as good as mine.

Charlie Tan
07-22-2002, 04:06 PM
would imagine that corn on the cob, butternut squash, acorn squash, rutabaga, watermelon, tangerines, and possibly blueberries (?) would be hard to find if you weren't in the US.

Ya, vee svedes only eat pickled herring, gravlax and reeyyndeer meat. :eek:

Corn on the cob? Watermelon? Tangerines? Blueberries? Truly, only in America, huh?
I should f*cking invite you to the pit for your geocentric ignorant ways.

Back to the OP:

Countries with a stronger domestic food cuture might lack fodd that's 'Americana', notably France, Italy and Greece. All Scandinavian countries, Holland, Belgium and Germany will have most of the stuff you're used to from the US. Sometimes I need to go a little of my way. Skippy is found in any well stocked grocery store, but the crunchy type is a little harder to find. Root Beer is only found in the larger cities. Their website (http://grays.se/grays/) seems to be a little slow, but there is a chain of foodstroes in Sweden, specialising in American stuff. Paul Newman Dressing, anyone?


Something you can't get here is Entenmann's Ch. Chip Cookies, since they're always sold fresh. Oreo's and what have you is no problem. We're also void of what American's call coffee, and for a good reason too.
Most American candies are available here, sometimes under another brandname.

Remember: Because of trade wars between US and EU, imported Goods from the US tend to be pricey. I pay around $3 for a small pack of 8 oreo cookies.

Kal
07-22-2002, 04:11 PM
Monster Munch (http://taquitos.net/snacks/detail/index.php?snack_code=394)

booklover
07-22-2002, 04:17 PM
Originally posted by Hamish
An American ex-boyfriend of mine insisted that our chocolate bar/candy selection was different here than down there.

He claimed to have never seen "Smarties" -- which look like M&M's or Reese's Pieces but with sweet chocolate inside. He said they had something called "Smarties," but they were more like tangy candies wrapped up in plastic.

I was in shock.

Yes, Smarties in the US are wrapped in clear plastic rolls about 1" long and are small, circular tart fruit-flavored candies...same concept as SweeTarts, only smaller.

Belgian chocolate may be good, but I don't think you can get it in the combinations that American candy bars come in.

Kal
07-22-2002, 04:17 PM
Oh yeah, here's the root beer I get at Asda: Carters Root Beer (http://root-beer.org/Brand.asp?BrandID=651)

elfkin477
07-22-2002, 04:45 PM
How about cans of Cranberry sauce? Since something like 90% of cranberries are grown in MA, I doubt there's much of it overseas. Oh, and Marshmallow Fluff. Assuming that your friends would know what that is. I explained fluffanutters to some people from the west coast, and they all seemed horrified for some reason.

Mangetout
07-22-2002, 05:13 PM
Nice one The Gaspode; you know what rutabaga is, don't you? it's that thing we call 'swede' here in the UK; made me laugh, that did.

AHunter3: sorry chum, but that really was an amusingly terrible selection (unless you're whooshing us?); I'm growing butternuts and sweetcorn on my allotment this year (the harvest will, of course, coincide with the time when it's £1 for 10 cobs by the roadside. Butternuts are pretty expensive year round though)
Blueberries are available, but expensive (probably costing about £3 per pound) but not many people here in the UK either have a taste for them or know what to do with them and they end up being used like a garnish for sundaes, pavlovas and cream desserts.

We do have bilberries though; these are the local wild relative of blueberries and they are very good (I picked two pounds of them on Saturday while out walking) - smaller than blueberries but with a more intense and tart flavour.

elfkin477; I can get fresh cranberries here in time for Christmas or frozen ones any time, ready-made cranberry sauce is available in jars, but only really sells at Christmas. Cranberry juice drinks are quite popular.

American 'Smarties' are little fizzy sherbert tablets or something like that aren't they (like Love hearts?)?

EquipoiseShe also said that strawberries aren't that big over there, but we didn't even try to bring her anyWhat? gotta be pulling your leg I would think; you mean 'big' as in popular? - I can't imagine how anybody could say "strawberries aren't popular in England" and keep a straight face.

Duckster
07-22-2002, 09:29 PM
Well if we redefine "America" for this thread to include foods of just the Western Hemisphere, two-thirds of all foods in the world are "American" in origin. :D

Source: Indian Givers: How the Indians of the Americas transformed the World.

Equipoise
07-22-2002, 09:34 PM
Originally posted by Mangetout

EquipoiseShe also said that strawberries aren't that big over there, but we didn't even try to bring her any

What? gotta be pulling your leg I would think; you mean 'big' as in popular? - I can't imagine how anybody could say "strawberries aren't popular in England" and keep a straight face.

You know, after I posted that, it nagged at me that maybe I was wrong. Since the minute she said it we knew we wouldn't be able to bring her any, I forgot about it immediately. Obviously I am misremembering. It was some fruit. Raspberries or blackberries, perhaps?

Kal, thanks for the tip about Golden Nuggets.

Eq

Flymaster
07-22-2002, 11:04 PM
Originally posted by elfkin477
How about cans of Cranberry sauce? Since something like 90% of cranberries are grown in MA, I doubt there's much of it overseas. Oh, and Marshmallow Fluff. Assuming that your friends would know what that is. I explained fluffanutters to some people from the west coast, and they all seemed horrified for some reason.

First, no longer are most cranberries grown in MA. Wisconsin passed us a few years back :(

Second, Fluff is a product of Lynn, Mass, and to my shock, isn't sold west of the Mississippi, or so. Sick, isn't it?

Neurotik
07-22-2002, 11:13 PM
Marshmallow Fluff isn't sold west of the Mississippi? You are sorely misinformed, Flymaster. I used to eat that stuff all the time when I was a kid (Fluffernutters, mmmmm). And I hail from Orange County, CA. Lots of people ate it. You can make some incredible fudge with it.

Mangetout
07-23-2002, 02:27 AM
Originally posted by Equipoise
You know, after I posted that, it nagged at me that maybe I was wrong. Since the minute she said it we knew we wouldn't be able to bring her any, I forgot about it immediately. Obviously I am misremembering. It was some fruit. Raspberries or blackberries, perhaps?
Nah, blackberries grow wild everywhere abundantly and are much loved, raspberries are slightly less common in the wild, but are widely grown, bought and consumed (although are less popular than strawberries, I think).

It might have been blueberries or cranberries, both of which are available but neither are particularly popular (although they have grown remarkably in popularity in the last five years or so)

Charlie Tan
07-23-2002, 08:00 AM
Well if we redefine "America" for this thread to include foods of just the Western Hemisphere, two-thirds of all foods in the world are "American" in origin.

I saw the grin, but hey: Potatoes, tomatoes and maize and some peppers. Sure. Tobacco too. But that's hardly 2/3 of all the food in the world. I do believe we had, wheat, oats, pork, beef, grapes, onion and a zillion other things before 1492.

AHunter3
07-23-2002, 11:55 AM
Just coming in to blush and take my lumps. The corn on the cob and the squash thing I was specifically told about by a person whom I shall no longer regard as a reliable source.

Mangetout
07-23-2002, 04:23 PM
It may be that the person is simply waaaay out of date or something; some of those things have been available for a long long time here in the UK but squashes and pumpkins have grown in popularity a great deal in, say, the last ten years, blueberries were probably as good as unavailable that long ago.
The corn thing may have been a mixup with creamed corn/grits or something like that, which I have heard a lot about but never seen for sale here.

MannyL
07-23-2002, 06:49 PM
Could it be when she said strawberries weren't big, she meant as in size that they were small ones there not the big juicy ones we know and love?

scr4
07-23-2002, 10:28 PM
One thing I absolutely need that I can't get in Japan is a decent lab notebook. The big kind with brown covers and 1/4-inch ruled yellow paper. I get regular shipments from my relatives in the US. And I have a stock of spare Hewlett Packard calculators because RPN calculators are hard to find here. I have a colleague who hates the Japanese ballpoint pens - they're all ultra-fine point. I think he gets thick ballpoint pens from his UK colleagues, so I guess it's not a problem in Europe.

I used to miss American style cookies, but now that Starbucks has invaded Japan it's not a problem. Subway sells them too. Rhubarb pie and Reuben sandwiches are impossible to find - I used to know one "American restaurant" that had both on the menu, but they stopped making Rhubarb pies. And their Reuben sandwich doesn't use rye bread with caraway seeds. Fig Newtons are also hard to find, but I think I've seen them in a specialty store. (The same store has Spam, claiming it's a popular American delicacy.) I also miss nachos and Buffalo wings.

This is a bit obscure but no bicycle shop in Japan sells helmet- or eyeglass-mounted mirrors! I have to buy them from US mail-order shops. Actually I've bought whole bikes from the US because recumbent bikes are virtually unknown here, or was until the past year or two.

red_dragon60
07-24-2002, 01:12 AM
Hey, you Swedes can't get real M&Ms because of the colorings, right?

Eh, stick with ze lobster zat ze svedish chef makes.

Kal
07-24-2002, 01:31 AM
Originally posted by red_dragon60
Hey, you Swedes can't get real M&Ms because of the colorings, right?

That reminds me of a story I heard years ago:

A sales rep for Rowntree Mackintosh (The original manufacturer, before Nestle took them over) went to the US with several boxes full of tubes of Smarties. Customs checked them out and one of the colours was banned in the States, so the poor fella had to open each tube and take out all the red Smarties before they'd let him bring them into the country.

Mangetout
07-24-2002, 03:08 AM
Originally posted by MannyL
Could it be when she said strawberries weren't big, she meant as in size that they were small ones there not the big juicy ones we know and love? I'm not sure; strawberries do very well in our climate; the fruits offered for general sale tend to range from about 1½ inches to (occasionally)3 inches long with (although the smaller ones are better for flavour IMHO). Wild or alpine strawberries, of course, are tiny and intensely flavoured, but you rarely find these offered in the shops as they don't keep for long after picking.

Pergau
07-24-2002, 07:28 AM
Circus Peanuts are probably non existant outside of the USA, everything else that's been mentioned is somewhat available.

Charlie Tan
07-24-2002, 08:07 AM
Saw a whole pile of M&M bags, made by Mars half an hour ago in my local smallish supermarket, so I would venture to say that M&M is not contraband here.

A note: All American foodstuffs you can get here is not for Americans living here. There are some, but the market is mainly Swedes (The most travelled people on the earth) who've spent time in the US. Now why anyone would buy Macaroni&Cheese at $4 for a small standard box is beyond me....

Mangetout
07-24-2002, 08:49 AM
I eat macaroni cheese quite a lot but I always make it from scratch (well, from ingredients; I don't actually make the pasta myself); is this uncommon in the USA?

booklover
07-24-2002, 10:32 AM
Originally posted by Mangetout
I eat macaroni cheese quite a lot but I always make it from scratch (well, from ingredients; I don't actually make the pasta myself); is this uncommon in the USA?

Well, there are so many brands of mac & cheese in a box that I would venture a great many people make it this way, rather than doing it from scratch. Kraft now has "Easy Mac" which is basically microwaveable packets of macaroni & cheese. Personally, I find the cheese sauce to be artificial-tasting and prefer making it myself.

Crafter_Man
07-24-2002, 11:07 AM
As far as “organized/civilized” countries go, I believe the U.S. is the only place you can buy an assault rifle or 50 BMG with little or no government interference. I also believe we’re the only country that has gun shows.

Hugh Jass
07-24-2002, 11:26 AM
After reading threads on the English football league, the schools, and now foodstuffs, what we need is an "Ask the English guy" thread.

Any volunteers?

HPL
07-24-2002, 04:16 PM
Originally posted by Crafter_Man
As far as “organized/civilized” countries go, I believe the U.S. is the only place you can buy an assault rifle or 50 BMG with little or no government interference. I also believe we’re the only country that has gun shows.

Assualt Weapons. Assualt Rifles are select fire and require a class three permit, while Assualt Weapons are semi-auto and scary looking.

smiling bandit
07-25-2002, 06:53 AM
I think Equipoise meant the strawberries didn't grow so big.

Corn on the cob? Watermelon? Tangerines? Blueberries? Truly, only in America, huh? I should f*cking invite you to the pit for your geocentric ignorant ways.

Be Civil. 'E was wrong about the widesporeadness of foods from the "New World". No reason to get prissy, jerk. Not everyone is intimately familiar wit the supermarket contents from Bankok to Berlin.

Many American type foods are spread all over certain parts of the world now. Corn is the biggest crop on the planet, outstripping even rice (though part of it goes to animal feed). I'm not sure how well many of those fruits would grow in Europe, but I presume they make do.

Left Hand of Dorkness
07-25-2002, 08:49 AM
Grits are hard enough to find outside of the Southern US; good luck finding them in another country!

How common is American whiskey overseas? I'm curious.

Although bilberries may be smaller and tastier than domesticated blueberries, I'm guessing they're about on par with US wild blueberries, which are also small and delicious. I have two friends who despised blueberries until I fed them some of my wild blueberry pie.

Daniel

jjimm
07-25-2002, 09:11 AM
American whisky is very popular throughout the world. I've seen Jack Daniel's, Jim Beam, and to a lesser extent Wild Turkey, pretty much everywhere I've ever been on the planet.

I had grits in NYC and they were revolting. I had them in Tennessee and they were still revolting, but not quite as bad.

C3
07-25-2002, 09:37 AM
Old Bay seasoning. It's used mostly for seafood, but (since I'm a native Marylander) I use it in steak marinades, soups and all sorts of stuff. We're moving to Australia in February and I'm hoping customs will let me bring a can in.

Knowed Out
07-25-2002, 09:55 AM
Originally posted by jjimm
I had grits in NYC and they were revolting. I had them in Tennessee and they were still revolting, but not quite as bad.

They were revolting in NYC because it's not part of the south. Also, every Southerner knows that you don't eat grits by themselves. You serve them with other foods. They're like the food equivalent of glue. By themselves, they taste like wallpaper paste. But they compliment other foods so well. Cut a piece of link sausage and drag it through the grits, then eat it. Sop some up with your buttermilk biscuit. Stir in a little bit with your scrambled eggs and crumble some of the bacon on top. Or, put in some hot sauce, pepper, and LOTS of butter, or just mix in some sugar. THAT'S how you eat 'em.

Left Hand of Dorkness
07-25-2002, 11:24 AM
Yeah, don't be dissin my grits!

There's a local hifalutin' Southern restaurant called Tupelo Honey's; if you're ever in Asheville, NC, it's worth checking out. Anyway, they serve damn good grits. I think they make them with half-and-half and white pepper.

Done right, they're sublime. Just make sure that you don't get instant grits: they're from the same infernal Frankensteinian laboratory as instant mashed potatoes.

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