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View Full Version : Songs everyone will recognize, but no one know the name of.


Muad'Dib
05-24-2003, 04:08 PM
Just the other day I hear Celestial Soda Pop by Ray Lynch. It is a great little song that I guarantee most of you have heard before, but never knew the title of.

What are some other examples of this? I think that O'Fortuna could fall under this category.

J String
05-24-2003, 04:24 PM
For a helluva long time I didn't know the name or even the artist of a really cool (in my opinion) song. Turned out to be Peter Gabriel's Solsbury Hill.

Wolfian
05-24-2003, 04:56 PM
That song that Michael Jordan used to come out to. I have no clue what it is called.

That Whoo Hoo! song from Starship Troopers. That one I do know Song #2 by someone.

Muad'Dib
05-24-2003, 05:04 PM
That would be Woo Hoo by Blur.

TWDuke
05-24-2003, 05:10 PM
Don't know about "everyone" and "no one", but a lot of people think Space Oddity (http://teenagewildlife.com/Albums/SO/SO.html) is called Major Tom (http://home.jps.net/~khoyt/peter/l-mj.html). I guess anytime you give a pop song a title that's not in the lyrics, you're asking for trouble.

Originally posted by J String
For a helluva long time I didn't know the name or even the artist of a really cool (in my opinion) song. Turned out to be Peter Gabriel's Solsbury Hill.
Definitely cool.

{i}Muad'Dib[i]
...I think that O'Fortuna could fall under this category.
Is that the penny whistle version of "O Fortuna"?

TWDuke
05-24-2003, 05:12 PM
Nice italicizing, TW.

Marley23
05-24-2003, 05:17 PM
The "Woo Hoo" song is actually called Song 2. What Michael Jordan song are we talking about?

stolichnaya
05-24-2003, 05:34 PM
The Chicago Bulls player intro song, which I think is Sirius, by the Alan Parsons Project. At least it used to be. It fits the topic well.

I think Green Onions by Booker T and the MG's would fit in here. I had to actively seek it out.

Loneraven
05-24-2003, 06:24 PM
There's Perpetuum Mobile by the Penguin Café Orchestra. A really great song that everyone's heard but no-one knows the name of.

bordelond
05-24-2003, 06:36 PM
For those who listen to 70s radio stations, there's the 1970 song "Tighter, Tighter" by the one-hit wonder Alive & Kicking. It the one that goes like this:

Hold on
Just a little bit tighter now, baby
I love you so much and
I can`t let go, no no no
Hold on, a just a little bit
Tighter now, baby


...

Another one from around the same era was the Ides of March tune "Vehicle". Almost everyone recognizes the song, but most everyone who hears the song a) doesn't know the title, and b) thinks it's Blood, Sweat and Tears -- it's a pretty close sound-alike:

I`m your vehicle, baby
I`ll take you anywhere you wanna go
I`m your vehicle, woman
By now, I`m sure you know

That I love you (love you)
I need you (need you)
I want you, got to have you, child
Great God in heaven
You know I love you

bordelond
05-24-2003, 06:44 PM
Thought of another one ... Greg Kihn's first top-10 hit. No ... not "Jeopardy", but this driving rocker with a twinge of surf-influenced rhythm guitar:

We had broken up for good
Just an hour before
Uh uh uh uh uh uh uh uh
And now I`m staring at the bodies
As they`re dancing cross the floor
Uh uh uh uh uh uh uh uh

And then the band
Slowed the tempo and
The music gets you down
Uh uh uh uh uh uh uh uh
It was the same old song
With a melancholy sound
Uh uh uh uh uh uh uh uh

They don`t write em
Like that anymore
They just don`t write em
Like that anymore


What's the title? The tune is familiar to classic-rock fans, but the artist and title usually are not. It's "The Breakup Song (They Don`t Write `Em)".

capacitor
05-24-2003, 07:30 PM
The prelude to Act 3 of Longerin by Wagner. Used as heroic rescue music today, it was the prelude to what happened below.

"The Bridal Chorus" in the same opera was written for the bridal chamber scene in which intrigues were revealed.

Are you familiar with the Who song with the famous synthesizer play at he beginning? No not "Won't be Fooled Again", the one with the much better opening riff, with "It's Only Teenage Wasteland" in the chorus. Yep, that's "Baba O'Reily".

Wolfian
05-24-2003, 08:29 PM
Okay, I always thought that the Ides of March recorded "Vechile," then Blood, Sweat, and Tears covered it. That cover is the one we're all familar with or so I thought. Are you sure BST didn't record a version, bordelond, I swear the lead singer of the version I'm thinking of is David-Clayton Jones (isn't that his last name? I'm drawing a blank).

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
05-24-2003, 08:35 PM
Originally posted by Wolfian
Okay, I always thought that the Ides of March recorded "Vechile," then Blood, Sweat, and Tears covered it. That cover is the one we're all familar with or so I thought. Are you sure BST didn't record a version, bordelond, I swear the lead singer of the version I'm thinking of is David-Clayton Jones (isn't that his last name? I'm drawing a blank).
It's David Clayton Thomas, and as far as I know, BST never covered "Vehicle."

Walloon
05-24-2003, 08:47 PM
The Bob Dylan song with the refrain "Everybody must get stoned" is actually titled Rainy Day Woman #12 & 35.

What most people call "the Charlie Brown music" is titled Linus and Lucy.

I can't believe that's butter!
05-24-2003, 09:18 PM
Spanish Flea by Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass. It's most often referred to as "The Dating Game theme".

Lisa-go-Blind
05-24-2003, 09:26 PM
"Classical Gas." I'd heard it dozens of times, but I didn't know the name of it until I saw an infomercial for "best instrumentals." Same with "Run, Don't Walk."

Marley23
05-24-2003, 09:35 PM
"Everybody must get stoned"
Not only does nobody know the real name of the song, everybody hears that line and goes "Huh huhuh, stoned. He's talking about pot!" :p

Eats_Crayons
05-24-2003, 10:19 PM
Suicide Is Painless.

Yes, there are people who know that the theme music to M*A*S*H is actually a song, but those who know (or heck, those who can sing it) seem to be a minority.

Through early morning fog I see
Visions of the things to be...

Delly
05-24-2003, 10:41 PM
O fortuna?
The music from from the omen??
if so then its by Carl Orff, and is from a piece of music called Carmina Burana.... I think anyway.

Marathon
05-24-2003, 10:59 PM
It took me forever to figure out that the Buffalo Springfield song I really liked was called "For What It's Worth" - (Stop, hey, what's that sound?)

Walloon
05-24-2003, 11:26 PM
Jerry Goldsmith's Oscar-winning score to The Omen, especially its "Ave Satani" chorus, was very likely influenced by Carl Orff's Carmina Burana, but none of the latter work is present.

Fear Itself
05-24-2003, 11:38 PM
That song by The Who that many people call "Teenage Wasteland" is really named Baba O'Riley (http://leoslyrics.com/listlyrics.php?id=81508).

While we're here, does anybody know the name of the piano piece used in the chase scenes of The Keystone Kops movies? You know, duntaladunt-duntaladunt-duntala-duntala-duntala-dunt.

Marley23
05-24-2003, 11:40 PM
Everyone has heard "The Entertainer," but I don't think a lot of people know the name - I didn't until fairly recently. I forget the author - Scott Joplin, maybe?

Is that the song you were thinking of, Fear Itself? Agh, how do I ask that? ;)

Marley23
05-24-2003, 11:41 PM
Oh, and another song nobody knows the name of is The Powerhouse, which appears in every cartoon where a character in a factory gets smushed and compressed into a little box (or anything of the sort).

Llama Llogophile
05-24-2003, 11:41 PM
When my gee-tar is handy, I often play a few bars of Alice's Restaurant (without lyrics) and challenge people to name that tune. Everyone recognizes it, but not a lot can name it until I start singing.

etv78
05-25-2003, 12:15 AM
Barrytown: I needed to see VH1's top 100 countdown to know that one!

Kamino Neko
05-25-2003, 12:25 AM
Originally posted by Eats_Crayons
Suicide Is Painless.

Yes, there are people who know that the theme music to M*A*S*H is actually a song, but those who know (or heck, those who can sing it) seem to be a minority.

I can sing it. I also feel the need to point out two things related to this.

a) Even if its only existance was as the theme of MASH the TV series (a logical impossibility, though I'll address that in my second point), it's still, by definition, 'actually a song'.

b) It was written by Robert Altman's then 14-year old son, Mike (and Johnny Mandel) FOR the movie which is why it was used as the theme of the TV series. (I include the note that Mike Mandel was only 14 when he wrote it for no reason other than it's a fairly neat little fact. Most 14-year olds music/poetry about suicide ain't this good, folks. :p)

Kamino Neko
05-25-2003, 12:27 AM
Originally posted by Tengu
Mike Mandel

ACK! Mike Altman! Damn brain!

Walloon
05-25-2003, 01:19 AM
Scott Joplin wrote "The Entertainer", and the movie The Sting made it famous, but it's not chase scene music, and it doesn't fit the rhythm pattern Fear Itself gives above.

racinchikki
05-25-2003, 01:44 AM
Originally posted by Marley23
Oh, and another song nobody knows the name of is The Powerhouse, which appears in every cartoon where a character in a factory gets smushed and compressed into a little box (or anything of the sort).

I came into this thread specifically to post that. There's no "the," though. It's Powerhouse, by Raymond Scott, and believe it or not it was never intended for use in a cartoon. He was an experimental musician who was trying to make real music that is evocative of a specific place or experience, and damn did he accomplish that - it's a pity he's not better-known. Several of his pieces have been used in cartoons from Looney Tunes on.

Marley23
05-25-2003, 01:44 AM
I didn't think so, but I don't know my Keystone Kops. Hmm...

Marley23
05-25-2003, 01:53 AM
Wow! Okay, this BARELY fits the topic... but if there are any Monty Python fans out there, I just learned something interesting. There's a song they sing in a couple of sketches, I'd always wondered what it was. It's in the Mattress sketch, for one.
Well, as I was searching for something else (for the "Lyrics that Make You Cringe" thread), I found it! It's called Jerusalem, and it's by Emerson, Lake and Palmer.
It starts "And did those feet in ancient time,
Walk upon England's mountains green?
And was the Holy Lamb of God
on England's pleasant pastures seen?"

I thought it was either a hymn or an original song (because I though the first line was "And did those teeth..." :p

capacitor
05-25-2003, 02:34 AM
Alice's Restaurant--the melody was used at the '8' song on Sesame Street.

Muad'Dib
05-25-2003, 03:08 AM
Originally posted by Loneraven
There's Perpetuum Mobile by the Penguin Café Orchestra. A really great song that everyone's heard but no-one knows the name of.

Good Call! :cool: This is exactly the sort of song I was thinking of when I started this thread. I have heard this song dozens of times yet have never known, or even given thought to, the title.

Muad'Dib
05-25-2003, 03:26 AM
Originally posted by Marley23
Not only does nobody know the real name of the song, everybody hears that line and goes "Huh huhuh, stoned. He's talking about pot!" :p

Actually, I always thought that he was singing about people getting hit with rocks. I thought that it was about remaining good-natured and upbeat when you are forced to go through life troubles and tribulations.

Kamino Neko
05-25-2003, 05:47 AM
Originally posted by Muad'Dib
Actually, I always thought that he was singing about people getting hit with rocks. I thought that it was about remaining good-natured and upbeat when you are forced to go through life troubles and tribulations.

Personally, I think Dylan had both meanings in mind when he wrote the song.

nineiron
05-25-2003, 06:09 AM
I only found out recently that "The Benny Hill Music" is called "Yackety Sax."

Fear Itself, going by your spelling, I'm thinking that it's the same classically-influenced intro that starts the band Extreme's "Play With Me." Does that help anyone identify it?

screech-owl
05-25-2003, 07:17 AM
Originally posted by Marley23
Wow! Okay, this BARELY fits the topic... but if there are any Monty Python fans out there, I just learned something interesting. There's a song they sing in a couple of sketches, I'd always wondered what it was. It's in the Mattress sketch, for one.
Well, as I was searching for something else (for the "Lyrics that Make You Cringe" thread), I found it! It's called Jerusalem, and it's by Emerson, Lake and Palmer.
It starts "And did those feet in ancient time,
Walk upon England's mountains green?
And was the Holy Lamb of God
on England's pleasant pastures seen?"

I thought it was either a hymn or an original song (because I though the first line was "And did those teeth..." :p

Actually, it is originally a poem (ca 1804) by William Blake (http://redflag.org.uk/frontline/six/06blake.html), melody added later (1916) by Charles Parry. ELP covered it on their album "Brain Salad Surgery".

William Blake - Rather an (http://geocities.com/nisetar/blake.html) interesting person (http://socialistworker.co.uk/1725/sw172520.htm).

Lyrics and really tinny melody (http://cyberhymnal.org/htm/a/n/anddidtf.htm)

ninevah
05-25-2003, 07:54 AM
And do many realise that the theme from 2001: A Space Odyssey is actually called "Also Sprach Zarathustra", by Richard Strauss, and not "Theme from 2001: A Space Odyssey" ?!?!

screech-owl
05-25-2003, 09:19 AM
And there is quite a bit more to it ("TSZ") than just the opening chords and the tympani.

Baker
05-25-2003, 09:43 AM
Originally posted by Marley23
Wow! Okay, this BARELY fits the topic... but if there are any Monty Python fans out there, I just learned something interesting. There's a song they sing in a couple of sketches, I'd always wondered what it was. It's in the Mattress sketch, for one.
Well, as I was searching for something else (for the "Lyrics that Make You Cringe" thread), I found it! It's called Jerusalem, and it's by Emerson, Lake and Palmer.
It starts "And did those feet in ancient time,
Walk upon England's mountains green?
And was the Holy Lamb of God
on England's pleasant pastures seen?"

I thought it was either a hymn or an original song (because I though the first line was "And did those teeth..." :p

I remember hearing this in one sketch about the "Church police"


Originally posted by screech-owl
Actually, it is originally a poem (ca 1804) by William Blake (http://redflag.org.uk/frontline/six/06blake.html), melody added later (1916) by Charles Parry. ELP covered it on their album "Brain Salad Surgery".

William Blake - Rather an (http://geocities.com/nisetar/blake.html) interesting person (http://socialistworker.co.uk/1725/sw172520.htm).

Lyrics and really tinny melody (http://cyberhymnal.org/htm/a/n/anddidtf.htm)

Here is a slightly better sounding version:And did those feet (http://oremus.org/hymnal/a/a262.html)

This hymn/poem provided the title for the movie "Chariots of Fire", one of my all time favorites. It's the hymn the congregation sings at the end of the memorial service, in the closing moments of the film.

RobuSensei
05-25-2003, 10:38 AM
How about the theme to The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy? Turns out it's an Eagles tune, Journey of the Sorcerer, which I was happy to be able to get from the iTunes music store.

In the book of Hitchhiker's radio scripts, Douglas Adams mentions that many people wrote to the BBC, wondering what that theme music was, and were surprised to learn that they already had it in their record collections.

Wumpus
05-25-2003, 11:27 AM
Anyone who grew up watching old Warner Brothers cartoons is familiar with a whole repertoire of classical music, even if they don't realize it. (How many people know the "early morning music" in those cartoons is from Grieg's Peer Gynt, for example?)

It's been in a million commercials over the last five years, so just about everyone recognizes Benny Goodman's "Sing Sing Sing," even if they only know it as "that swing song with the drum solo."

Sticking to the same era, everyone recognizes Glenn Miller's "In the Mood." And most folks have heard "Mood Indigo" and "Take the A Train" by Duke Ellington in some commercial/TV show/movie or another.

bordelond
05-25-2003, 12:30 PM
Originally posted by Biffy the Elephant Shrew
It's David Clayton Thomas, and as far as I know, BST never covered "Vehicle."

Allmusic.com confirms it (http://allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&uid=MISS70305241828&sql=H1355690) -- BST never recorded "Vehicle". The David Clayton Thomas sound-alike on "Vehicle" is a young Jim Peterik, who later fronted the '80s rock group Survivor.

Tansu
05-25-2003, 12:38 PM
Jerusalem is practically a second National Anthem for many in England. It's sung at the Last Night of the Proms, at political party annual conferences as well as at church.

bordelond
05-25-2003, 01:01 PM
Originally posted by Wumpus
Sticking to the same era, everyone recognizes Glenn Miller's "In the Mood." And most folks have heard "Mood Indigo" and "Take the A Train" by Duke Ellington in some commercial/TV show/movie or another.
Names of a bunch of instrumentals people have heard, but may not know the names of:

"Nel Blu Dipinto di Blu" - Domenico Modugno, better known as "Volare". "Volare" later became the de facto title of the song.
"Theme from 'A Summer Place'" - Percy Faith
"Theme from 'Summer of '54" - Peter Nero
"Fire on High" - ELO
"I Robot" - [Dr. Evil air-quotes]The Alan Parsons Project[/Dr. Evil air-quotes]
"Frankenstein" - Edgar Winter Group
"La Grange" - ZZ Top (has some lyrics)
"Bouree" - Jethro Tull
"Rise" - Herb Alpert

...

Speaking of Ellington ... you know that song "You Can Feel It All Over" by Stevie Wonder? It's actually titled "Sir Duke".

How about Marvin Gaye's "Got to Give it Up, Pt. 1"? I heard that song forever before I knew the title. The title appears in the song, but not until the end of the song, and it is sung fairly indistinctly on a backing vocal track.

Here's another good one I'm surprised hasn't been mentioned yet -- "Valotte" by Julian (not John) Lennon, heard frequently on light-rock stations:

Sitting on a pebble by the river playing guitar
Wond'ring if we're really ever gonna get that far
Do you know there's something wrong?
'Cause I've felt it all along

Chronos
05-25-2003, 03:04 PM
Another one from around the same era was the Ides of March tune "Vehicle". Almost everyone recognizes the song, but most everyone who hears the song a) doesn't know the title, and b) thinks it's Blood, Sweat and Tears -- it's a pretty close sound-alike:I've gotta take exception to this one. Anyone who's ever been in a high scool or college marching band recognizes the tune of "Vehicle", even if we don't know the words.

Eats_Crayons
05-25-2003, 03:12 PM
Originally posted by Tengu
b) It was written by Robert Altman's then 14-year old son, Mike (and Johnny Mandel) FOR the movie which is why it was used as the theme of the TV series. (I include the note that Mike Mandel was only 14 when he wrote it for no reason other than it's a fairly neat little fact. Most 14-year olds music/poetry about suicide ain't this good, folks. :p) I knew that it was written for the movie -- most people who know it's a song are people who heard it in the movie first (gah! I've met a lot of people who thought the words came later!).

That it was written by a 14-yr-old is news to me... Sounds like the kid had a real fun time in highschool.

Rapunzel
05-25-2003, 04:22 PM
Todd Rundgren - I Saw The Light (people often think it's called In Your Eyes)

Kiki Dee - Amoureuse (not keen on the song but it fits this thread)

Allman Bros - Jessica (known in the UK as 'the music from that car programme')

bordelond
05-25-2003, 04:42 PM
Originally posted by bordelond
Names of a bunch of instrumentals people have heard, but may not know the names of:

"Nel Blu Dipinto di Blu" - Domenico Modugno, better known as "Volare". "Volare" later became the de facto title of the song.

:smack:

"Volare" is not an instrumental ... I know, I know.

bordelond
05-25-2003, 04:45 PM
Originally posted by Chronos
I've gotta take exception to this one. Anyone who's ever been in a high scool or college marching band recognizes the tune of "Vehicle", even if we don't know the words.

That's the point of the OP -- people hear the song, either on an oldies station, classic rock radio, or in a marching band ... so the song has high familiarity. But few know the name of the song. Marching band members presumably know from looking at their sheet music, but other people ... I don't know.

I know I heard that song for years and didn't know the name of it.

bordelond
05-25-2003, 04:47 PM
Originally posted by bordelond
Names of a bunch of instrumentals people have heard, but may not know the names of:

"Theme from 'Summer of '54" - Peter Nero


Damn! I'm on a roll!

:smack:

That would be "Summer of '42", Bob.

Marley23
05-25-2003, 04:49 PM
Allman Bros - Jessica (known in the UK as 'the music from that car programme'
What program(me)? ;)

Loneraven
05-25-2003, 06:12 PM
Originally posted by RobuSensei
How about the theme to The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy? Turns out it's an Eagles tune, Journey of the Sorcerer, which I was happy to be able to get from the iTunes music store.

In the book of Hitchhiker's radio scripts, Douglas Adams mentions that many people wrote to the BBC, wondering what that theme music was, and were surprised to learn that they already had it in their record collections.

Thanks! I was meaning to start a thread to ask what this music was!

av8rmike
05-25-2003, 10:06 PM
That "circus music" is actually called Entry of the Gladiators (http://shop.store.yahoo.com/computergear/147.html), by Julius Fucik, which is also the most carefully-spelled name in history.

The "Keystone Cops music" is probably the Sabre Dance (http://shop.store.yahoo.com/computergear/156.html), by Aram Khatchaturian, which is nearly impossible to spell

Scarlett67
05-25-2003, 10:18 PM
Cheap Trick, "The Flame" (Wherever you go . . .)

The Temptations (I think), "Can't Help Myself" (Sugar pie honey bunch . . .)

Tygr
05-25-2003, 11:45 PM
I always liked that song "Light of the Love That I Found"...

Turns out it's actually called Fool in the Rain (http://angelfire.com/nm/zeppelin/f.html), by Led Zeppelin.

I ain't gonna take the time to do the research right now, but I gots a feeling there's more than a few Zeppelin tunes that this OP applies to...

Actually, of the top of my head, I know D'yer Mak'er would qualify — "Oh, oh-oh-oh-oh-oh, you don't have to go-oh, oh-oh-oh-oh". Hell, most DJs don't even pronounce the song title right. (Should sound like "Jamaica" - it's a play on words!)

And that one called Immigrant Song :confused: —Hmph. Bloody Vikings...

Originally posted by racinchikki
It's Powerhouse, by Raymond Scott, and believe it or not it was never intended for use in a cartoon.Thanks loads for this info. If I'm thinking of the right music, f'r instance, it plays in that cartoon where all Porky's chickens get caught up listening to "FRANKIE!" It plays at the beginning, when all the hens are being conveyor-belted through the egg factory, right? Heh, I've got a set of "Looney Tunes" sound effects for my OS, & this music plays whenever I manually run the vertical scroll bars up & down. Hilarious enough that I never get tired of it.:)

Oh, and the Looney Tunes theme music is actually called The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down.;)

LilyoftheValley
05-26-2003, 12:03 AM
Originally posted by Tygr

Actually, of the top of my head, I know D'yer Mak'er would qualify — "Oh, oh-oh-oh-oh-oh, you don't have to go-oh, oh-oh-oh-oh". Hell, most DJs don't even pronounce the song title right. (Should sound like "Jamaica" - it's a play on words!)


I came to this thread to post just that song, but Tygr beat me to it.

When I read the post that Tygr wrote/it made me mad mad mad ;)

MacSpon
05-26-2003, 12:30 AM
I was quite surprised to learn that John Lennon's "So this is Christmas" is actually named "Happy Christmas (war is over)".

don't ask
05-26-2003, 12:41 AM
Sleepwalk by Santo and Johnny. It's in every film set in the '50s or '60s and has its own website (http://sleep-walk.com/) but hardly anyone can name it.

racinchikki
05-26-2003, 12:59 AM
Tygr, Powerhouse has a couple of distinct movements; one of them is used for factory scenes, which is what the piece was meant to evoke, and another is used when someone is sneaking up on someone else. You can hear clips from this piece and others at the official website, here (http://raymondscott.com/MENsndf.html). Each of the pieces available for listening to have been used in Warner Brothers cartoons - there's a page on that site that lists all of 'em, too. I love Raymond Scott, and force his instrumentals into the ears of anyone who rides in my car. :D

Treviathan
05-26-2003, 01:00 AM
Suzanne Vega's song "Tom's Diner," usually known as "that song that goes doo-doo-doo-doo, doo-doo-doo-doo, doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo."

tracer
05-26-2003, 01:10 AM
Originally posted by Tygr
Oh, and the Looney Tunes theme music is actually called The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down.;)
Ah, but what's the opening theme music to a Bugs Bunny cartoon called?

You know, the one that starts with some weird glissando, then immediately launches into trumpets going "DAH, da da da DA DA DA da da da da da, DAH, da da da DA DA DA da da da da da," then has the cello section play a counter melody, then has a REAL quick descending scale on a piano, then has a xylophone play the first half of the opening trumpet theme again, then closes with trumpets going, "Da da da dah, dah DAAAAAAA!"

Walloon
05-26-2003, 01:55 AM
The Merrie Melodies (http://toonzone.net/early-years/titles/) theme from 1936 onward was "Merrily We Roll Along" by Charles Tobias, Murray Mencher, and Eddie Cantor.

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
05-26-2003, 09:35 AM
Originally posted by Scarlett67
The Temptations (I think), "Can't Help Myself" (Sugar pie honey bunch . . .)
That was the Four Tops.

Mr. Blue Sky
05-26-2003, 09:56 AM
"Be Thankful for What You've Got" - William DeVaughn

The only line I can recall:

"Diamond in the back, sunroof top
Makin' the scene with a gangster lean..."

Swede Hollow
05-27-2003, 08:16 PM
Several pieces by Leroy Anderson were used in many different cartoons: The Typewriter Song, The Syncopated Clock, Sandpaper Ballet. Also, The Rakes of Mallow (and the similar The Irish Washerwoman) is familiar to anyone that saw The Quiet Man.

tracer
05-27-2003, 08:39 PM
How 'bout that sailor-ish tune they often play on a xylophone in Popeye, when he's not eating his spinach?

bordelond
05-28-2003, 12:05 AM
Thought of another one that stumped me for a good while.

"Please Tell Me Who I Am" by Supertramp ...

is actually titled "The Logical Song".

...

How about also "Fanfare for the Common Man" by Emerson, Lake and Palmer? That's an instrumental frequently heard on classic-rock stations that give play to '70s art rock.

...

Here's a personal stumper -- what's that "Ey! Oh! Let's Go!" song? It's kind of punk-sounding, and is used a lot in commercials (including a current one I can't remember very well ... just saw it today):

Ey! Oh! Let's Go!

Ey! Oh! Let's Go!"

???

Walloon
05-28-2003, 12:34 AM
Originally posted by tracer
How 'bout that sailor-ish tune they often play on a xylophone in Popeye, when he's not eating his spinach? "Sailor's Hornpipe", and here's (http://wilstar.net/midi/sailpipe.htm) a charming MIDI file of it.

t-keela
05-28-2003, 12:42 AM
What's the name of that Jimmy Buffet song?

You know..."Wasted away again in Margaritaville...searchin for my lost shaker of salt...some people claim that there's a woman to blame..."

Everyone can sing it (well for the most part anyway, I never met a drunk that wouldn't try :D )

But, few know the title.

Fear Itself
05-28-2003, 01:01 AM
Originally posted by racinchikki
Tygr, Powerhouse has a couple of distinct movements; one of them is used for factory scenes, which is what the piece was meant to evoke, and another is used when someone is sneaking up on someone else. You can hear clips from this piece and others at the official website, here (http://raymondscott.com/MENsndf.html). Each of the pieces available for listening to have been used in Warner Brothers cartoons - there's a page on that site that lists all of 'em, too. I love Raymond Scott, and force his instrumentals into the ears of anyone who rides in my car. :D There is a nice MIDI rendition of the Powerhouse B theme on this page (http://members.tripod.com/~FunCreator/FC_MIDI.htm); it's titled machine.mid.

LilyoftheValley
05-28-2003, 01:18 AM
Originally posted by t-keela
What's the name of that Jimmy Buffet song?

You know..."Wasted away again in Margaritaville...searchin for my lost shaker of salt...some people claim that there's a woman to blame..."

Everyone can sing it (well for the most part anyway, I never met a drunk that wouldn't try :D )

But, few know the title.

Okay, I'll bite...I've always heard it called Margaritaville. It seems that Jimmy Buffett (http://margaritaville.com/discography/ChangesInLatitudes.htm) would agree. Am I being whooshed? :(

racinchikki
05-28-2003, 01:39 AM
Fear Itself - but the second Powerhouse MIDI on that page (RUNNER) doesn't have percussion! When you take the drums out of Powerhouse you're screwing with Raymond Scott's holy artistic genius vision and ::head explodes::

Sorry, I get annoying with my Powerhouse.

t-keela
05-28-2003, 02:03 AM
Lily please excuse me, I have my songs mixed up. I was thinking about the Pina Colada song NOT Margaritaville...sorry, I am drinking a Margarita, maybe that's what threw me.

You know..."if you like pina coladas...gettin caught in the rain...etc. :smack:

Marley23
05-28-2003, 02:12 AM
what's that "Ey! Oh! Let's Go!" song?
Blitzkreig Bop, by the Ramones.

..."if you like pina coladas...gettin caught in the rain...etc.
Well then, keep your drinks straight! ;) It seems to be Escape (The Pina Colada Song), by Rupert Holmes.

DaveX
05-28-2003, 02:12 AM
Damn, Wumpus beat me to the Grieg reference, but most of that work (Suite No.1, Op.46) is recognisable once you hear it (not just the "Dawn" portion, but "The Death of Ase" and "In the Hall of the Mountain King" as well).

The theme song from the "King of the Hill" TV program is called "Yahoos and Triangles", and most have probably heard that.

mrunlucky
05-28-2003, 02:17 AM
What about those 1, 2, or maybe 3 ominous-sounding instrumentals that movie studios have been using in almost all 30 second action/horror/sci-fi movie trailers in recent years? I just saw a new one today, and I swore it was different, that it was a piece from the Lord of the Rings saga, but I could be wrong. Anyone?

bordelond
05-28-2003, 08:24 AM
"Dial a Line" by Simon & Garfunkel is actually titled "The Boxer".

(Baby-boomer S&G fans gasp at the blasphemous lack of fundamental musical knowledge)

Wumpus
05-28-2003, 08:41 AM
Nitpick: Fanfare for the Common Man is by Aaron Copeland. ELP just happened to cover it.

Speaking of Copeland, he's also the man behind "Rodeo" (a.k.a. the "Beef! It's what's for dinner" theme.) As well as "Tis a Gift to Be Simple," taken from an old Shaker hymn, and now used in all manner of commercials.

blanx
05-28-2003, 09:10 AM
Originally posted by bordelond

Here's a personal stumper -- what's that "Ey! Oh! Let's Go!" song? It's kind of punk-sounding, and is used a lot in commercials (including a current one I can't remember very well ... just saw it today):

Ey! Oh! Let's Go!

Ey! Oh! Let's Go!"

???


Pretty sure that's the Ramones doing "Blitzkrieg Bop"

Gabba Gabba hey.

Biggirl
05-28-2003, 10:13 AM
Instrumentals are prone to this, aren't they? Here are a few tunes that I took a lot of effort to find out the name. You've all heard them I'm sure, but I'll be buggered if I can explain them:

Baby Elephant Walk
Syncopated Clock
Take Five

Here are a few TV themes that I just happen to know the name of:
The Streetbeater (Sanford and Son)
Angela (Taxi)
The Fishin' Hole (Andy Griffith)

Now, if only someone could tell me the name of that song in the British Airway commercial-- I keep thinking Flower Drum Song but I know that's not it.

Hobie the One
05-28-2003, 10:39 AM
An oldie but a goodie "Colonel Bogey March" which is the song they whistle in The bridge on the river Kwai. You'd know the tune...

lieu
05-28-2003, 10:49 AM
Green Onion - Booker T and the MGs.

You know... dum de dum dum dum de
dum de dum dum dum de
Bwow, bwow bwow bwow de bwow
bwow bwow bwow de bwow bwow...

Fear Itself
05-28-2003, 11:00 AM
Originally posted by av8rmike
The "Keystone Cops music" is probably the Sabre Dance (http://shop.store.yahoo.com/computergear/156.html), by Aram Khatchaturian, which is nearly impossible to spell Nope, I know Sabre Dance, and that's not the one I was thinking of.

davesink
05-28-2003, 11:17 AM
Just finished "Devil in the White City" by Erik Larson about the 1892 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. (Incredible read BTW). One anicdote he relates is how one of the fair's organizers (Sol Bloom, I believe), has set up a middle eastern pavillion in which America will get it's first look at belly dancers. Since the local orchestra is unfamiliar with middle eastern music, Bloom improvises a few notes on the spot on the piano, notes which we know today as the "snake charmer" music (if you've seen any old Warner Bros. cartoons, you know the tune). Needless to say, he never received any royalties.

Walloon
05-28-2003, 12:43 PM
The claim that Sol Bloom wrote that piece of music was contradicted (http://boards.academicpursuits.us/sdmb/showthread.php?threadid=163534&highlight=Bloom+Chicago) here a few months ago.

Labdad
05-28-2003, 01:23 PM
I'd say the ultimate song that fits the OP is "Rock & Roll, Pt. 2" by Gary Glitter. Huh? you say? What if I said that song they play at every major sporting event where everyone yells "hey". If you still don't know what I'm talking about, there's an audio clip here (http://music.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?sourceid=00401402267130802071&ean=081227520120&bfdate=05-28-2003+13:21:29).

Labdad
05-28-2003, 01:38 PM
Oh, the theme from "Leave it to Beaver" is actually called "The Toy Parade." Lyrics here (http://geocities.com/tvshowthemelyrics/LeaveItToBeaverSong.html).

LilyoftheValley
05-28-2003, 04:03 PM
Originally posted by t-keela
Lily please excuse me, I have my songs mixed up. I was thinking about the Pina Colada song NOT Margaritaville...sorry, I am drinking a Margarita, maybe that's what threw me.

t-keela getting drinks mixed up! Hehehe!

Pass me a margarita, and all will be forgiven.:cool:

LilyoftheValley
05-28-2003, 04:06 PM
Originally posted by Labdad
I'd say the ultimate song that fits the OP is "Rock & Roll, Pt. 2" by Gary Glitter. Huh? you say? What if I said that song they play at every major sporting event where everyone yells "hey".

Great one, Labdad! Of course, now I will have that song stuck in my head all day. :mad:

do-DO-da-do-da-do...

Eman_Bruin
05-28-2003, 04:46 PM
Oooh, I got one!!

Some people know the song "Soul Bossa Nova"

But most people call it "The Austin Powers Song". It's that swingin' sixties-ish song at the beginning the movie that Austin dances to.

...or did you all know that already?

jackelope
05-28-2003, 05:26 PM
Originally posted by Wumpus
It's been in a million commercials over the last five years, so just about everyone recognizes Benny Goodman's "Sing Sing Sing," even if they only know it as "that swing song with the drum solo."I thought (but may be mistaken) that "Sing Sing Sing" was originally by Louis Prima (http://coversproject.com/artist.php/513)?Originally posted by tracer
Ah, but what's the opening theme music to a Bugs Bunny cartoon called?

You know, the one that starts with some weird glissando, then immediately launches into trumpets going "DAH, da da da DA DA DA da da da da da, DAH, da da da DA DA DA da da da da da," then has the cello section play a counter melody, then has a REAL quick descending scale on a piano, then has a xylophone play the first half of the opening trumpet theme again, then closes with trumpets going, "Da da da dah, dah DAAAAAAA!"I don't know what it's called, but that was an AWESOME description of it.

I've got one: You know that slow, thumping, grinding instrumental music with lots of horns that strippers always strip to in the movies? BWAA-ba-ba-BAAAA, Ba-DA-DA-DAAAA....

It's called "The Stripper."

mobo85
05-28-2003, 06:48 PM
I believe Tracer is describing the Merrie Melodies theme song, The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down.

Laughing Lagomorph
05-28-2003, 07:18 PM
How about the wistful little violin and piano tune that was the main theme music for Ken Burns The Civil War? How many people know the title is "Ashokan Farewell"?

And that it was written in 1982?

Walloon
05-28-2003, 09:14 PM
"The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down" is the Looney Tunes theme. As I said earlier in this thread, the Merrie Melodies theme from 1936 onward is a slam-bang arrangement of "Merrily We Roll Along".

bordelond
05-28-2003, 09:34 PM
Yet another one ...

It's not "Freak Out!" by Chic ... it's "Le Freak".

You guys know this disco number:

Aaah ... freak out!

(slick guitar lick)

Le Freak ... c'est chic(?)

Freak out!

Jervoise
05-28-2003, 09:57 PM
Originally posted by Biggirl
Now, if only someone could tell me the name of that song in the British Airway commercial-- I keep thinking Flower Drum Song but I know that's not it. "Aria On Air", by Malcolm McLaren.

Others:

Greenday's song "Time of Your Life", is actually named "Good Riddance".

That well-known guitar piece from the beginning of Pulp Fiction is "Miserlou".

Another song which crops up in movies, but is unknown to most is Steppenwolf's "Magic Carpet Ride". The chorus goes:Well, you don't know what we can find
Why don't you come with me little girl
On a magic carpet ride?

Sigmundex
05-29-2003, 09:42 AM
Again with the Booker T & the MG's song "Green Onions", if you've ever seen American Graffiti, I believe they played that song near the end when John Milner is racing the guy in the Chevy played by Harrison Ford. Correct me if I'm wrong, and I know you will!

Wumpus
05-29-2003, 10:32 AM
jakelope -- Prima did indeed do the original version of "Sing Sing Sing," but Goodman ended up having a bigger hit with it. It made a star out of Goodman drummer Gene Krupa, which is more than it ever did for Prima drummer Sam Weiss.

SirRay
05-29-2003, 11:11 AM
Originally posted by Labdad
Oh, the theme from "Leave it to Beaver" is actually called "The Toy Parade." Lyrics here (http://geocities.com/tvshowthemelyrics/LeaveItToBeaverSong.html).
On that topic, Leave it to Beaver plays on TVLand 'round these parts, and with that tenous connection established, TVLand has a nice instrumental theme used in several of their commercials, particular the one with Beaver saying 'Gee Dad' while Barbara Billingsly flits back and forth in the background (they also used it in an earlier 'Better living through TV' commercial) - is this just a theme written expressly for TVLand, or a song appropiated by them?

Marley23
05-29-2003, 12:37 PM
It made a star out of Goodman drummer Gene Krupa, which is more than it ever did for Prima drummer Sam Weiss.
Fortunately, Sam Weiss later secured a prominent role in the Lord of the Rings books.

bordelond
05-29-2003, 05:52 PM
Hey, most of you have heard that late-'70s blue-eyed soul hit "I Came Back to Let You Know", right? The singer was one-hit wonder Bobby Caldwell. Well, the actual title of that song is "What You Won't Do For Love". I Came Back to Let You Know is the boldly-delivered main line of the refrain, while What You Won't Do For Love is a subdued, semi-indistinct verse scattered here and there throughout the song.

Muad'Dib
05-29-2003, 06:40 PM
Originally posted by Biggirl
Instrumentals are prone to this, aren't they? Here are a few tunes that I took a lot of effort to find out the name. You've all heard them I'm sure, but I'll be buggered if I can explain them:

Baby Elephant Walk
Syncopated Clock
Take Five

Here are a few TV themes that I just happen to know the name of:
The Streetbeater (Sanford and Son)
Angela (Taxi)
The Fishin' Hole (Andy Griffith)

Now, if only someone could tell me the name of that song in the British Airway commercial-- I keep thinking Flower Drum Song but I know that's not it.

These are great, I love the way this thread is turning out.
Ugh, don't remind me of Take Five. Brubeck went to school here at the University of the Pacific and it was recently some sort of aniversery. Anyway, the guy came down here for several concerts and Brubeck, Brubeck, brublech is all that I have heard of for weeks.

Besides, after the opening the song sucks.

BTW Wumpus I do not think that there is an e in Copland.

Muad'Dib
05-29-2003, 06:56 PM
Originally posted by Laughing Lagomorph
How about the wistful little violin and piano tune that was the main theme music for Ken Burns The Civil War? How many people know the title is "Ashokan Farewell"?

And that it was written in 1982?

Another good one. It is called Ashokan Farewell
Here (http://jayandmolly.com/ashokanfarewell.shtml) are the good folks that wrote it.

Wumpus
05-29-2003, 07:44 PM
You're absolutely correct; it's just that it looks like a Sylvester Stallone movie if I spell it correctly....

Laughing Lagomorph
05-29-2003, 08:12 PM
Originally posted by Muad'Dib
Another good one. It is called Ashokan Farewell
...

Gee, why didn't I put that in my post? ;)

Fish42
05-30-2003, 11:18 AM
Two more:

John Philip Sousa: "The Liberty Bell March" aka the Monty Python theme.
Charles Gonoud: "Funeral March of a Marionette" aka the Alfred Hitchcock theme.

rowrrbazzle
05-30-2003, 06:26 PM
"Hearts and Flowers". Go here (http://perfessorbill.com/pbmidi5.shtml) and scroll down.

Schubert's Der Erlkönig. Go here (http://classicalarchives.com/schubert.html) and scroll down.

If I ever did this song in a recital, I'd like to introduce it this way:

"My first song is one everyone knows: Schubert's Der Erlkönig. Now there are probably one or two of you in the audience who are saying 'What the heck is he talking about? I've never heard of it.' For their benefit, my accompanist will play the opening bars. [music] You see now I was right: you all know it. It's just that you didn't know what it's called."

Siege
05-30-2003, 06:57 PM
Just before this thread appeared, I was surprised to learn the title of a song I like is Life During Wartime. Having remembered the title for this thread, let's see if I can remember enough of the lyrics for you guys to know which one I mean. Ah yes, here's a bit of the chorus:
This ain't no party.
This ain't no disco.
This ain't no foolin' around.
No time for dancin'
Or [not understood]
I ain't got time for that now.

I think it might be by the Dire Straits, but I can't swear to that, either.

CJ

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
05-30-2003, 07:24 PM
Originally posted by Siege
[i]This ain't no party.
This ain't no disco.
This ain't no foolin' around.[i]

I think it might be by the Dire Straits, but I can't swear to that, either.

It's by Talking Heads.

Trigonal Planar
05-30-2003, 10:52 PM
How about Conquest of Paradise by Vangelis, used as the theme song in the movie 1492. I bet you've all heard it but have no idea what it is.

Dizzy Fingers
05-31-2003, 12:42 AM
J. S. Bach: "Presto" from Trio Sonata in G major, a. k. a. the "Delicious Dish" theme.

Lisa-go-Blind
05-31-2003, 03:16 PM
Originally posted by Siege
No time for dancin'
Or [not understood]
I ain't got time for that now.

I think it might be by the Dire Straits, but I can't swear to that, either.

CJ

Biffy's right, it's by Talking Heads, from the album Fear of Music. The lyrics in the chorus are:

No time for dancin
Or lovey-dovey
I ain't got time for that now

That section of the chorus actually changes every time it is sung. Full lyrics here (http://talking-heads.net/lyrics_fear.html)--you have to scroll down a bit.

Nimue
05-31-2003, 04:55 PM
Originally posted by tracer
Ah, but what's the opening theme music to a Bugs Bunny cartoon called?

You know, the one that starts with some weird glissando, then immediately launches into trumpets going "DAH, da da da DA DA DA da da da da da, DAH, da da da DA DA DA da da da da da," then has the cello section play a counter melody, then has a REAL quick descending scale on a piano, then has a xylophone play the first half of the opening trumpet theme again, then closes with trumpets going, "Da da da dah, dah DAAAAAAA!"
I think the one you mean is Hungarian Rhapsody by Liszt. Anyone?

Marley23
05-31-2003, 10:15 PM
I'd heard Baker Street by Gerry Rafferty a bunch of times before I knew what it was. In fact, it got to the point where I could play the theme and ask everybody what it was. :p

Walloon
06-01-2003, 12:01 AM
Originally posted by Nimue
I think the one you mean is Hungarian Rhapsody by Liszt. Anyone? Criminy, does anyone read the posts in this thread? :rolleyes:

The music tracer was looking for, the one he so vividly described, the music that served as the opening theme of the Merrie Melodies cartoons from 1936 onward is

MERRILY WE ROLL ALONG

Telemark
06-01-2003, 01:15 AM
"What's This?" written and sung by Danny Elfman from the soundtrack of The Nightmare Before Christmas. You may or may not recognize the lyrics, but the instrumental intro is used in dozens of movie trailers as a magical, wonderous, emotional mood-setter.

I see it all the time and wonder how it became the standard for that.

How about the snippet of scary piano music that is always used for some villan sneaking up on our hero or heroine:

bum Bum BUM BUM BUUUUUUUUUUM (slowly and rising)
bum bum bum bum (falling and much faster)

Trigonal Planar
06-01-2003, 11:34 PM
Telemark:

Are you sure the intro to "What's This" is the same tune you're thinking of? I know I've heard that instrumental intro many many times, but I think it predates the release of TNBC.

I think TNBC used that intro, or the two intros are slightly different.

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