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View Full Version : Are breast bouyant?


WILLASS
01-25-2004, 07:11 PM
Simple question, are breasts bouyant at all? My colleague at work claims his large breasted wifes breasts are bouyant and I wasn't sure why they would be. Anyone know?

Achernar
01-25-2004, 07:23 PM
I don't have any special knowledge, but why would that be surprising? People are buoyant.

Fear Itself
01-25-2004, 07:23 PM
Depends on the breasts, but since most are high in fatty tissue, they are less dense than water; ergo, they float.

scr4
01-25-2004, 07:36 PM
Everything is buoyant, in the sense that they weighs less in water than in air. So everything sags less. Doesn't necessarily mean it's lighter than water.

Indefatigable
01-25-2004, 07:37 PM
I don't think I've ever noticed them to be particularly buoyant. I own a pair, and I can say that when I stand in a swimming pool they don't feel particularly more lifty-uppy as compared to the rest of my body. The whole body is really a bit more supported and floaty when in water.

Fat isn't very dense, but by that logic a beer gut should float too. Any takers?

Achernar
01-25-2004, 07:44 PM
Everything is buoyant, in the sense that they weighs less in water than in air.If everything qualifies for that sense of the word, it's not a very useful sense, is it? :)

WILLASS
01-25-2004, 07:50 PM
He made the claim that they float up under her chin 'like water wings'. I can't see why breasts would be anymore bouyant than say an ass cheek or a beer belly. Her breasts are real by the way so its nothing to do with that.

Q.E.D.
01-25-2004, 08:53 PM
If everything qualifies for that sense of the word, it's not a very useful sense, is it? :)
Yes, it is. The precise definition of buoyancy is the mass of the object in air minus the mass of the water the object displaces. So, even though a hunk of steel sinks in water, it is nevertheless lighter by the mass of the water it displaces.

Achernar
01-25-2004, 09:06 PM
Yes, it is. The precise definition of buoyancy is the mass of the object in air minus the mass of the water the object displaces. So, even though a hunk of steel sinks in water, it is nevertheless lighter by the mass of the water it displaces.I knew that of course. But, for instance, in classical physics, everything has a mass, so technically everything is "massive". But that's not a useful sense of the word "massive", and that's not what people mean when they use it. They mean having a large mass. So it is with "buoyant". The OP was clearly not asking about anything being buoyant in scr4's sense of the word, but rather in the sense that most people use it, "able to remain afloat in a liquid." (Dictionary.com)

Q.E.D.
01-25-2004, 09:15 PM
Now you're just being silly, Achernar. Just because most people don't understand the correct usage of a term doesn't making doing so "useless". The correct definition of "buoyant" is perfectly useful. Proper usage is only useless to the ignorant.

elfbabe
01-25-2004, 09:25 PM
I needed to adjust my swimsuit top in the hot tub back at stately Mercotan Manor once, and since I was alone and it was dark, I just popped it off quickly. There was noticeable floating. Kind of cool, actually.

WILLASS
01-25-2004, 09:27 PM
I'm sure you know what I mean by bouyant.....do tits float? Any clearer?

Achernar
01-25-2004, 09:30 PM
Q.E.D., I will be quite surprised if you can find any sort of reference that uses the term "buoyant", referring to an object, to mean "displacing a positive mass of fluid". Nobody uses the adjective like that, even people who use "buoyancy" to mean what you consider the correct usage. Everyone who talks of a buoyant object means an object which floats.

scr4
01-25-2004, 09:38 PM
Sorry for my sloppy choice of words. What I wanted to say is: I don't know if the actual breat tissue is heavier or lighter than water, but even if they are heavier, they will weigh much less in water than in air. So when you step into a hot tub, they will rise up higher. Same will happen to a flaccid penis.

Achernar
01-25-2004, 09:42 PM
:smack: Ack, I'm sorry. That makes sense. I thought you were trying to make a silly semantic point. Nevermind me.

Fish
01-25-2004, 09:44 PM
Of course breasts aren't boyant. They're girlyant. Duh. :cool:

Q.E.D.
01-25-2004, 09:55 PM
Q.E.D., I will be quite surprised if you can find any sort of reference that uses the term "buoyant", referring to an object, to mean "displacing a positive mass of fluid". Nobody uses the adjective like that, even people who use "buoyancy" to mean what you consider the correct usage. Everyone who talks of a buoyant object means an object which floats. I can find hundreds. But, don't take my word for it. Google the phrases "positively buoyant", "negatively buoyant" and "neutrally buoyant" and you'll find a whole bunch of hits all using the term "buoyant" in just exactly the sense I was talking about.

The Flying Dutchman
01-25-2004, 10:46 PM
Simple, your colleague's wife has implants.

Here's a website (http://pessimistic.com/implant/) where an engineer measured the density of an implant and found it to be .962 g/cc. It should be noted that the implant floated when he made his measurement of water displacement.

David Simmons
01-25-2004, 10:57 PM
The specific gravity of the whole body, even for the skinny, is very close to 1. When I only weight 140 lb. at 5'-8 or 9" I could float on my back in a still, indoor pool. When I inhaled I would slowly rise so that most of my face down to the chin-neck junction was out of the water. When I exhaled I would sink down until just the tip of my chin, mouth, cheeks, nose and forehead were out.

As someone said breasts contain quite a lot of fat so breasts should be somewhat less dense than muscle tissue and would probably tend to float.

Sublight
01-26-2004, 01:08 AM
An ex-girfriend who was (still is) extremely gifted (naturally so) in the breast department has reported to me on more than one occasion that her breasts float when she goes hottubbing naked.

CrazyCatLady
01-26-2004, 01:10 AM
Well, breasts are less dense than bone or muscle, so it stands to reason they'd float better than the rest of the body. As for why beer bellies and buttocks don't float, I'd say it's because of the broader area of attachment. The relatively large area of attachment for a buttock isn't going to give it much freedom of motion, and it doesn't float well enough to lift the rest of the body, so it's held below the water. Same for a beer belly. A breast, though, has a lot more unattached surface area than attached, so it has a lot more freedom of motion.

Walloon
01-26-2004, 01:21 AM
I see a new and interesting episode of David Letterman's "Will It Float?" :D

LorieSmurf
01-26-2004, 04:56 AM
Well, breasts are less dense than bone or muscle, so it stands to reason they'd float better than the rest of the body. As for why beer bellies and buttocks don't float, I'd say it's because of the broader area of attachment. The relatively large area of attachment for a buttock isn't going to give it much freedom of motion, and it doesn't float well enough to lift the rest of the body, so it's held below the water. Same for a beer belly. A breast, though, has a lot more unattached surface area than attached, so it has a lot more freedom of motion.


What Cat Lady said. BTW I have natural 38DD boobs, and they float horizontally in the water.

kanicbird
01-26-2004, 07:13 AM
Sorry I have no breats to speak of but when I was a good deal heavier (about 50 lbs) I had to use much more weight while scuba(ing), that may be partially due to a bigger wetsuit. But also I could only become negativally boyany if I exhailed all the air I could (non-scuba), now I can become negitive boyuany with about a little more air in my lungs as a normal exhale woule leave. This applies to fresh water only, salt water is more 'floaty'

Indefatigable
01-26-2004, 07:22 AM
Good point. I've never been skinnydipping. Maybe I should do this in the interest of science.

so_da_ne
01-26-2004, 07:34 AM
Skinny dipping makes all the difference....mine float when there's no bathing suit to hold them down

Mycroft Holmes
01-26-2004, 07:42 AM
Good point. I've never been skinnydipping. Maybe I should do this in the interest of science.

And this from someone who might be named after a British warship (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Indefatigable). :D

whiterabbit
01-26-2004, 09:12 AM
I used to be overly endowed, and I can testify that mine floated. Thanks to a good surgeon, they are much smaller now. They still might, but it's a lot harder to tell.

BobLibDem
01-26-2004, 09:20 AM
If the buoyancy was significant, Carol Wayne would never have drowned. I would guess the actual density of breast tissue varies according to the build of the individual.

BrotherCadfael
01-26-2004, 09:24 AM
Well, back in my single days... the phrase "She'll never drown" meant that the girl in question was more than adequately endowed...

miss smartypants
01-26-2004, 09:06 PM
My sis and I used to go skinny dipping at night. Well almost...we are not very good swimmers so we did wear life jackets :) .

And oh yeah, they do float.

Duckster
01-26-2004, 10:25 PM
The original life vest was called a Mae West.

Hasn't anyone learned from history?

:D

Jonathan Chance
01-27-2004, 05:14 AM
Nah, on this subject we prefer to be doomed to repeat it.

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