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Gary Robson
08-27-2007, 02:26 PM
I have gone through life assuming that one day, I would be grandpa. Now that my daughter is close to making me a grandfather, I discover to my horror that her in-laws are already using the names "grandma" and "grandpa" in their family. I don't want to confuse the poor little one by being one of two people named grandpa, so I'm looking for a different title.

Young folks -- what do you call your grandfathers?

Grandfathers -- what do your grandchildren call you?

Anaamika
08-27-2007, 02:28 PM
This is why - though I love English - sometimes I think it's stupid. Hindi has names for almost every relationship, and you know instantly who I am referring to and which side of the family they're on.

Nana = mother's father
Nani = mother's mother

Dada = father's father
Dadi = father's mother

I know this probably isn't much help, but I wish we had stuff like this more in English. Good luck in your hunt.

Sampiro
08-27-2007, 02:31 PM
In my family grandfathers are Papa (though my maternal grandfather preferred his personal nickname of Mustang, so you might want to consider Wombat).

Spoke
08-27-2007, 02:36 PM
Papaw in my family.

Scarlett67
08-27-2007, 02:37 PM
FWIW, all of my grandparents were "Grandma" and "Grandpa." If we had to distinguish them in conversation, they were "Grandma Firstname" (maternal) and "Grandma Lastname" (paternal; she was more formal). (I should clarify that these designations were not assigned by the grandparents in question; they were just what we used.) And there were also two elderly couples who lived on our block who we also came to call "Grandma" and "Grandpa."

I don't recall ever being confused. You can have multiple brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, and cousins -- why not grandparents?

Beware of Doug
08-27-2007, 02:39 PM
In Italian, Nonno (no-no) and Nanni (nonny).

A guy I know just lost his gf and delivered a moving eulogy to "Pops."

Drain Bead
08-27-2007, 02:46 PM
Papa, pronounced "puppa."

Solfy
08-27-2007, 02:54 PM
I grew up with a Pap-pap, later changed to Grandpap (at my father's request - he said Pap-pap was too juvenile) and Pops (but even his kids call him Pops).
My daughters have Pap-pap, Pappy George, and Granpap (also known as Daddy's daddy, since they don't see him much and they're easily confused).

For grandmothers they have Grammy and Mimi. Mimi was designated such by my nephew and it stuck. We find it a handy differentiation.

JKellyMap
08-27-2007, 02:58 PM
Some first names are amenable to being blended with "grandpa" (or some variant) into a single word. For example, my cousins' other grandfather was named Dan, so he was known by all as "Grandan".

Missy2U
08-27-2007, 03:04 PM
Me:

Nana (Dad's Mom)
Papa (Dad's Dad)
Mormor (Mother's Mother)
Morfor (Mother's Father)

My son:

Gramma (My mom)
Grampa (My dad)
Grama Thora (Husband's Mom)

beowulff
08-27-2007, 03:09 PM
Mine were "bubbie and zadie"

Tool of the Conspiracy
08-27-2007, 03:19 PM
When I was little, my grandparents were just Grandma & Grandpa, because my paternal grandparents were already dead when I was born. I had two living great-grandmothers: Grandma Ruth (first name) and Grandma Waughtal (last name).

My kids call their grandparents Grandma & Grandpa on my side, Nana & Poppi on my wife's side. My grandparents are still also Grandma & Grandpa... My kids haven't met their great-grandparents on my wife's side since they've been able to talk, so I don't know what we'll call them when we visit them in Hawaii next month.
We solve any ambiguity by adding a first name, e.g. Grandpa Joe.

Of course, "Grandma" and "Grandpa" are always pronounced "gramma" and "grampaw".

TroubleAgain
08-27-2007, 03:20 PM
I had a Granny and Grampa, and a Grandmother--the other grandfather, who I wasn't close to was Grandpa Lastname. There's always Papa, Pop, Pop-pop, Papaw, Paw-paw, Gramps, Grandpa Firstname, Abuelo (Spanish), etc.

Micro Dot
08-27-2007, 03:26 PM
My kid's grandfathers: one is Grampa John, and the other no title just the name, Leon
When I grew up the form was Grampa Smith and Grampa Jones

Mona Lisa Simpson
08-27-2007, 03:46 PM
Me:

Nana (Dad's Mom)
Papa (Dad's Dad)
Mormor (Mother's Mother)
Morfor (Mother's Father)



I see you're mother's family is Danish. My son has a Farmor, my ex mother in law revels in being called that. (The once a year we see her) I absolutely love the separate titles for different sides of the family convention.

I had two sets of Granda and Grandpas, and I only distinuguished between them by their last names. My great grandmother was Nanny. My son, despite me saying "Grandma and Grandpa" had a hearing impairment when he was learning to talk, and spontaneously started calling my mom Nana and my dad Papa. Not what I would ever have picked, but it works for everyone. My grandmothers who are both still living are called "Papamommy" and "Nanamommy" and this way he understands who these people are and why we visit them.

Gary Robson
08-27-2007, 04:16 PM
In my family grandfathers are Papa (though my maternal grandfather preferred his personal nickname of Mustang, so you might want to consider Wombat).Grandpa Wombat. I love it! Everybody else might think I was off my rocker, though.

I've thought about "Grandpa" followed by my first or last name, but it just doesn't sound right. Any Scots or Germans in the thread? My dad's family was Scottish and my mom's was German. I don't know what they called grandparents because they were using Grandma, Grandpa, Nana, and Pap-pap by the time I came along. I thought about Pap-pap, but that's what my kids called my father, and it just seems wrong for me to take his name. "Pap-pap" will always be him.

koeeoaddi
08-27-2007, 04:25 PM
My grandfather and grandmother were Granny & Boo (though he preferred Mr. Boo).

Kiddoeeaddi calls her grandmothers 'Grandma First Name.' She calls her grandfather Zayda.

dynamitedave
08-27-2007, 04:25 PM
My Dad's Dad was called Pop-a (spelt Poppa?)

Ukulele Ike
08-27-2007, 04:27 PM
"Alter Kaker."

GillianBoardman
08-27-2007, 04:34 PM
My grandparents were Grandmom & Grandpop. I don't see anyone else coming up with that. We used the last initial to differentiate when necessary.

vix
08-27-2007, 04:37 PM
My maternal grandparents were/are Grandma and Grandpa.

My father insisted that we call his parents by the Italian names for grandparents, Nonno and Nonna. I'm pretty sure that wasn't my grandparents' choice, though. My older cousins called our grandparents Mama and Papa, which is what my sisters and I called our parents.

My son calls my parents Grandma and Nonno. They chose what they'd be called, and I don't care that they don't "match," though my mother did worry about that a bit.

My son's paternal grandparents are Grandmom and Pop-Pop.

Frosted Glass
08-27-2007, 04:38 PM
I called my maternal grandfather Grandy and my paternal Grandmother Mama (firstname).

cmkeller
08-27-2007, 05:05 PM
Both my grandmothers were "Bobby" (an accent variation of Beowulf's "Bubbie") and both my grandfathers were "Zaidy". We appended their last names if there was the potential for confusion in a conversation. Both my father and my father-in-law are Zaidy to my children as well, and no one's overly confused.

Be Grandpa if you want. There's no reason to fear the kids can't deal with two similarly-"named" relatives.

Eliahna
08-27-2007, 05:23 PM
My maternal grandfather was Pop or Poppy. My maternal grandmother is Nan or Nanny. One of my cousins calls her Nanna.

Scarlett67
08-27-2007, 05:25 PM
Any Scots or Germans in the thread?
Well, the German forms are Opa and Oma.

HillKat
08-27-2007, 06:02 PM
Well, as recent (and very proud) Grandparents, we were so anxious to be called ANYTHING that we ended up with Nanna and Poppa, since PreciousGranddaughter could pronounce those sooner than Grandma and Grandpa.

We love it!

foxymoron
08-27-2007, 06:11 PM
My son's got six grandparents:
Grandpa Ben & Grandma (my dad and his wife)
Nani & Grandpa Alan (my mom and her husband)
and
Nana & Grandpop (my in-laws)

Hockey Monkey
08-27-2007, 06:32 PM
On my mother's side - Granny and Granddaddy

On my father's side - Papa and Mama

Paintcharge
08-27-2007, 06:48 PM
My Grandparents were Grammie and Grampie, with last name initials following. Interestingly, my parents are now GG and Uncle Dad to my niece and nephew. I have no idea where Uncle Dad came from, but I kind of like it.

RickJay
08-27-2007, 08:11 PM
The Small Girl refers to my father as Papa, and Mrs. RickJay's father as Grandpa.

racer72
08-27-2007, 08:27 PM
To my step daughter's kids, my wife and I are Grandma and Grandpa. Their other grandparents are known as Grandma (first name) or Grandpa (first name), this applies even when we are with the other grandparents and it drives them crazy.

To my son's kids, I am Grandpa except to DeeDee, the middle child, I am Grandpapa. The only other grandfather type figure is my son's step father and the grandkids have only met him a few times. They call both of their grandmothers Grandma. My wife is the step grandmother and they call her by her first name.

Fatwater Fewl
08-27-2007, 08:40 PM
My siblings and I called our maternal grandfather Papa (we pronounced both a's the same as the a in nap, and both syllables received equal stress). We called our paternal grandfather Puppa Lew (pronounced as I've spelled it, with a light stress on the first syllable).

nonacetone
08-27-2007, 08:41 PM
I called my Sicilian grandfather 'Papo', and my Italian grandmother 'Noni' Our daughter called them the same.
She calls her paternal grandmother and grandfather 'Nanny' and 'Poppy'.
She calls my mom 'Grandma Sharon'.

kushiel
08-27-2007, 10:50 PM
Baba (grandma) and Guido (grandpa). Ukrainian, but I don't know the actual Romanized spelling so that's just phonetic. When I needed to differentiate, they because Mom's Baba/Guido and Dad's Baba/Guido, which would technically be my great-grandparents, but they were all deceased before I was born.

Caterpillar22
08-27-2007, 10:58 PM
Mother's side - Gramma and Grampa.

Father's side - Two Mama and Two Papa. My great grandfather was Two Daddy. I don't know how the "two" thing got started. That part of the family is southern, if that means anything.

TokyoBayer
08-27-2007, 11:17 PM
We called both sets of ours Grandma and Grandpa Last name, although I don't know what we would have done if they both had the same last name.

My older sister, 48, now has a step-granddaughter. My sister and her husband have two kids, 8 and 10, and the step-grandchild is the baby of her husband's daughter from a previous marrage. That daugher was already 17 when my sister got married, so they didn't really have a "mother-daughter" relationship.

My sister is still trying to decide what she wants to be called. Her husband is a bit older and clearly a "grandfather" age, where as my sister doesn't see herself in that role yet.

Ms. Pumpkin
08-28-2007, 01:16 AM
Pepere (pronounced peh-PAY)for my grandfather, grampy (lastname) or pepere (lastname) for my great grandfather.

missred
08-28-2007, 04:48 AM
A more formal German version would be Grospater (not sure of the spelling). I had one Grosmutter we called Grosie (soft s).

Nava
08-28-2007, 06:00 AM
The Spanish words are Abuelo and Abuela.

My dad's parents, Abuelito and Abuelita, to all their grandchildren.

Mom's parents, Avi and Yaya. Avi is Catalan, Yaya is Aragonese; the counterparts would be Avia and Yayo.

Mom is now Yaya for her own grandson; his other grandparents are Abuelo and Abuela.

I've also known Lalas and Nanas.

Marienee
08-28-2007, 06:24 AM
I had a Grandpa and a Nanny on my mother's side -- we called my great aunt "vovo"for some reason. Vovo is usually grandmother but there you are. Now that I think of it, since I have not mastered the use of accents on this keyboard, Vovo is also grandfather.

I had a Meme (pronounced "mimi") on my father's side. My paternal grandfather died when my father was a boy.

My kids have a Grandmary (My mother's name is Mary) and a Papa John on one side and an Opa and Oma on the other.

Nava
08-28-2007, 06:47 AM
Oh, Dad actually grew up with three Abuelitas in the house: the mothers of both parents, plus an unmarried great-aunt. They were all called Abuelita (Name).

IvoryTowerDenizen
08-28-2007, 06:57 AM
My kids have Gramma and Grandpa n my side and Grams and Gramps on their dad's side.

Often we refer to Grandma/Grandpa (first name) when we want to be really specific.

My niece calls both sets of grandparents Nonny and Pop

Hokkaido Brit
08-28-2007, 08:51 AM
My parents are Granny and Grampa to my children, and Nit-Nit and Papa to my brother's kids. The "nit nit" came from the song "The wheels on the bus" - the Grannies on the bus go knit knit knit. My mother has knever knitted in her life but the toddler named her and it has stuck. Papa is Grampa from the same semi-verbal toddler five years ago.

My boys' other grandparents are Baachan and Jiichan (Japanese) and my brother's kids other grandparents are Nun and Taid (Welsh).

Why not let the kids name you themselves? Something will evolve that you are all happy with!

Girl From Mars
08-28-2007, 09:27 AM
My grandparents were Grandma & Grandpa, and Nanna & Pop. My Mum is now Granny to my nephews, but Dad is Paki - my sister-in-law is Greek and I think it comes from that. Boy From Mars is Italian so he has a Nonno and a Nonna.

Elendil's Heir
08-28-2007, 10:01 AM
Our kids refer to their maternal grandparents as Grandpa John and Grandma Mary (their first names), and to their paternal grandparents as Granfadder and Grandy (a family tradition; their appellations were first bestowed by their eldest grandchild, now a junior in college).

As it happens, there's a Grandy, N.C., and we made sure to get pictures of the city-limits sign when we drove through!

Missy2U
08-28-2007, 10:11 AM
I see you're mother's family is Danish. My son has a Farmor, my ex mother in law revels in being called that. (The once a year we see her) I absolutely love the separate titles for different sides of the family convention.

Swedish, actually. In Danish you all would have had a Formor and a Forfor (Mom and Dad on Dad's side) as well as a Mormor and Morfor too (Mom and Dad on Mom's side)? :D

Bobotheoptimist
08-28-2007, 10:29 AM
I'd never heard grandfathers called "papa" until after my kids had started calling me that. Confused the living heck out of them and their friends when they tried to figure out who was what. Many first generation Americans I've run into seem to believe that we are immigrants ourselves because of "papa".

Called mine grandma & grandpa and granny & granddad. My kids call theirs nana & granddad (dangrad for a while) and grandma & grandpa

delphica
08-28-2007, 10:41 AM
My maternal grandfather was Pop or Poppy. My maternal grandmother is Nan or Nanny. One of my cousins calls her Nanna.

Another one for Poppy, which is what my nieces use. They have little Southern accents, so I find it unbelievably cute when it sounds like "PAW-py."

Lissla Lissar
08-28-2007, 10:55 AM
My FIL and step-MIL have decided they want to be Molly and Angus. That works for me. All of Mr. Lissar's grandparents are still alive, so there's great-Granny and great-Grandad, g-Grandma and g-Grandpa, and my parents, who will probably be Grandma and Grandpa. And Mr. Lissar's Mum wants to be Umma. She's getting married. I have no idea what his title will be.

Napier
08-28-2007, 12:36 PM
I'm Pop-pop, origin obscure but used throughout my wife's family, made specific by appending first names.

My grandfather was Faffy, I think from before I could say "Grandfather". This is the first time I've spelled it. He died in '65. My grandmother was always "Grandmother".

>As it happens, there's a Grandy, N.C.
And the farm stands there are excellent - as they should be for all the traffic passing through for Outer Banks vacations.

Elendil's Heir
08-28-2007, 02:44 PM
...As it happens, there's a Grandy, N.C.....
And the farm stands there are excellent - as they should be for all the traffic passing through for Outer Banks vacations.

Right you are! Nice BBQ place, too - the name escapes me, but I know right where it is on the roadside.

cbawlmer
08-28-2007, 06:44 PM
My great-grandparents are Namaw and Paw-Paw, because that's what my mom called them when she was a baby. My mom's parents are Grandma (firstname) and Grandpa (firstname); my dad's parents were simply Grandma and Grandpa because we lived with them when I was a baby, and it was shorter.

When we have kids, we'll probably make our parents be Grandma (firstname) and Grandpa (firstname) on both sides.

My aunt is only two years older than I am, and now is married to one of my longtime best friends. We started calling him Uncle Dave as soon as they started dating, and now he's actually my uncle. It's a good thing we never dated!

Mona Lisa Simpson
08-28-2007, 11:04 PM
Swedish, actually. In Danish you all would have had a Formor and a Forfor (Mom and Dad on Dad's side) as well as a Mormor and Morfor too (Mom and Dad on Mom's side)? :D

Yes, but only my son's fathers side is Danish. So he's got Formor. (Forfor died a week before my son was born, although I do at Christmas show him the Nutcracker I got from ForFor.) My parents are Heinz 57 Canadian, so no I would never dream of Foolieboy calling my mother Mormor. Its Nana, and Papa, he's the first grandchild and we were thrilled he was talking.

Elendil's Heir
08-29-2007, 10:09 AM
...I would never dream of Foolieboy calling my mother Mormor....

Better Mormor than Mordor.

ninevah
09-21-2007, 08:08 AM
Well, the German forms are Opa and Oma.

And they're also Dutch as well, I believe.

I'm Australian, of Anglo origin, so my maternal grandparents were Nanna and Grandpa. On my dad's side, the grandparents were known as Poppa and Ma (Ma short for Margaret, my dad's stepmother). My paternal grandmother died when my Dad was 18, and she's always been referred to by her given name.

Slypork
09-21-2007, 11:29 AM
My kids have always called their grandfathers “Poppa”. However my FIL is the most miserable, nasty tempered SOB in the world so my son started calling him “Grouchy Poppa” when he was around 3. One day he said it to his face. That actually made the rat bastard smile.

Anaglyph
09-21-2007, 12:36 PM
A more formal German version would be Grospater (not sure of the spelling). I had one Grosmutter we called Grosie (soft s).

That would be Grosvater and Grosmutter, Swiss german would be Grospapi and Grosmami oder Grosi

Suse
09-21-2007, 07:16 PM
My maternal grandmother was called Gramma (lastname) and my paternal grandparents were called Grammal and Papal (pronounced 'grammle' and 'paple'). I have no idea why.

My kids use Grandma and Grandpa; my niece called my parents Mawmaw and Pawpaw and her kids now do the same for her parents.

ENugent
09-21-2007, 08:00 PM
My parents waited until their first grandchild came up with names for them. They are now Meemom and Poopop, which all the grandchildren call them.

UncaStuart
09-21-2007, 08:19 PM
My grandparents on my father's side were Dada and Pop (Dada being the pronunciation my eldest cousin gave for Ada May).
My grandparents on my mother's side were Gammy and Gramp. Gramp was Mo-Mo for a while (from my older brother), but a family decision was made and he was Gramp by the time I was around.

My wife is Samma to our grandkids (her name is Samantha). I am just Granpa Doug, but for most of the grandkids I inevitably start out as Granpa Duck. One grandson, listening to his slightly older brother, was only able to get his mouth around "Biddaguck." So now some of the grandkids in the 8 to 10-year old range call me Biddaguck for fun.

Randy Seltzer
09-22-2007, 12:41 AM
I have six grandparents. Well, four standard-issue grandparents and two step-grandparents. (Fun sidenote: one of the two divorces happened in 1959, when divorces were a Big Deal in this country; the other divorce was in the late '90s after 49 years of miserable marriage.)

Mother's mother = Grandma Joann
Mother's father = Grandpa, or sometimes Grandpa Pat
Mother's stepmother = Grandma Lois
Mother's mother's mother = Grandma Aabel (I have no idea why my great grandmother should get her last name instead of her first name. She died a few years ago at 102 years old, her life having spanned* three centuries.)

Father's mother = Oma (dad's parents are German)
Father's father = Opa
Father's stepmother = Rosemarie, because she married my Opa long after all of both their grandkids were born.


*Fine. It didn't "span" them. 1899-2001. So sue me.

Darryl Lict
09-22-2007, 01:55 AM
My boys' other grandparents are Baachan and Jiichan (Japanese) and my brother's kids other grandparents are Nun and Taid (Welsh).
I ain't no spring chicken, but that's what I called them. This is probably nearly universal for sansei (third generation Japanese American) because the grandparents were born in Japan.

Now, this brings me to this question. My niece calls my Dad "pipon" (sp?). It's pretty much pronounced pee-pawn. Is this a typical Chinese term of endearment? To me, it sounds completely emasculating. My niece is 4th generation American on my side and 7th generation (Chinese) on her dad's side. Certainly, by the time you've been here for that friggen' long, you should be called Grampa or something like that? I always thought "Dad, grow a set of balls, don't let your granddaughter call you such a ridiculous name". This is the same niece whose diminutive coined by my somewhat naive sister is slang for vagina.

Guinastasia
09-22-2007, 01:35 PM
Both sets of grandparents:
Gramma and Pap Pap. Or sometimes just Pap.

Taters
09-22-2007, 01:45 PM
Grandpa Wombat. I love it! Everybody else might think I was off my rocker, though.

I've thought about "Grandpa" followed by my first or last name, but it just doesn't sound right. Any Scots or Germans in the thread? My dad's family was Scottish and my mom's was German. I don't know what they called grandparents because they were using Grandma, Grandpa, Nana, and Pap-pap by the time I came along. I thought about Pap-pap, but that's what my kids called my father, and it just seems wrong for me to take his name. "Pap-pap" will always be him.

My mother is from Germany, although she lives here now and has for nearly forty years.

My kids call her Oma. In your case, you would be Opa (informal grandpa in German).

My kids have a Grandma (my MIL), Nana (my step-mom), and Oma (my mom).
They call my Dad "Grandpa". My FIL passed on sometime ago, but he was Grandpa as well.

BarnOwl
09-22-2007, 02:06 PM
I'm Pop-pop, origin obscure but used throughout my wife's family, made specific by appending first names.

My grandfather was Faffy, I think from before I could say "Grandfather". This is the first time I've spelled it. He died in '65. My grandmother was always "Grandmother".

>As it happens, there's a Grandy, N.C.
And the farm stands there are excellent - as they should be for all the traffic passing through for Outer Banks vacations.

I was Pop-pop too for awhile. Then it was paPA (very French) but it didn't last long. Now I'm Pa-Pa (equal emphasis). My poor wife. The kids won't say Gramma yet. Ask them who's Gramma, and they point to her. We're thinking about going with Nana.

BTW Pa-Pa has a great magic trick. The kids don't have a garage either at home, or at their other grandparents house (He is Poppy). So recently when the kids came over here, I had a door opener in my pocket which is left over from my previous car.

I had them shout UP!! UP!! UP!! and with my hand in my pocket I clicked the button.

WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Now, whenever they visit. I must do the trick - UP!!! and DOWN!!! again and again and again.

Cub Mistress
09-22-2007, 02:24 PM
Great trick, Barn Owl!

My husband is Papa Bear to the grandkids, just like from the Goldilocks story.

BarnOwl
09-22-2007, 03:38 PM
They'll be two years old Oct 29.

Every so often, when we're watching Curious George, and something funny happens, one or the other will turn to me with an amused smile, as if to say "Did you see that, PaPa?"

I chortle just thinking about it.

Proudest Monkey
09-22-2007, 07:40 PM
My grandfather was Pasy, (pronounced Pah-zee) and my grandmother was Masy (Mah-zee, of course). I was the first grandchild on that side, and according to family lore, I named them that when I began to speak. Then they were forever known by those names. Even folks who knew my grandmother by her real name came to call her Masy for the remaining 30 years of her life. Her daughter (my aunt--Dad's much younger sister; actually closer to me in age) called her Masy. It became her name. (Paternal grandparents)

My maternal grandparents were Grammie Rand and Grampie Rand--I was one of the younger grandchildren on that side and had to go with the established names, boring as they were.

When I become a grandmother, I want to be called Bubbe or Ma or Mimi or ANYTHING but Nana or Grammie.

BarnOwl
09-22-2007, 07:55 PM
My grandfather was Pasy, (pronounced Pah-zee) and my grandmother was Masy (Mah-zee, of course). I was the first grandchild on that side, and according to family lore, I named them that when I began to speak. Then they were forever known by those names. Even folks who knew my grandmother by her real name came to call her Masy for the remaining 30 years of her life. Her daughter (my aunt--Dad's much younger sister; actually closer to me in age) called her Masy. It became her name. (Paternal grandparents)

My maternal grandparents were Grammie Rand and Grampie Rand--I was one of the younger grandchildren on that side and had to go with the established names, boring as they were.

When I become a grandmother, I want to be called Bubbe or Ma or Mimi or ANYTHING but Nana or Grammie.

What a charming story! Thanks!!

SkeptiJess
09-22-2007, 10:01 PM
My mother's father died when I was 1 year old and too young to call him anything. My father's father disliked grandpa for some reason, so we always called him Granddad or Grandaddy. Both of my grandmothers were just 'Grandma" with their last names, if necessary.

My dad has always been Grandad or Grandaddy to my kids and nieces and nephews; and my mom is just Grandma.

I plan to be Granny to my grandkids. No clue what my husband will be -- both his grandfathers were just called Grandpa.

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