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SanibelMan
10-13-2008, 08:31 PM
Is it "SHURE-bet", "SHURE-bert" or "SOR-bay"?

FoieGrasIsEvil
10-13-2008, 08:37 PM
I use sher-bert. But I suppose "sher-bet" is also appropriate. Tomato tuhmato I suppose.

An Gadaí
10-13-2008, 08:38 PM
Sherbert as in "Ernie do you know where my pants are?", "Sure, Bert!"

FilmGeek
10-13-2008, 08:38 PM
I used to say Sher-Bert but I'm training myself to say Sherbet.

Sorbet is SOR-bay to me.

pulykamell
10-13-2008, 08:39 PM
"Sherbet" is "SURE-bit."
"Sherbert" is "SURE-bert."
"Sorbet" is "sor-BAY."

To be honest, while I've only seen the "sherbet" spelling on packages of the stuff, I have only heard people refer to it as "SURE-bert."

commasense
10-13-2008, 08:42 PM
Sher-bet. (Not "shure" which I would pronounce as "shoor.")

Sher-bert is a error based on confusion with the name Herbert (IMHO).

Sor-bay is how you pronounce sorbet, which is originally a French word, and is apparently similar to, but not exactly the same as, sherbet.

3acresandatruck
10-13-2008, 08:42 PM
Sher-bert. Heck, we even spelled it that way. As in: Dad used to make some great pineapple sherbert in the freezer with canned pineapple and buttermilk. It probably wasn't "real sorbet", but it was sure yummy. If it's good, I'll pronounce it any way you want.

Don't fight the hypothetical
10-13-2008, 08:44 PM
Shirr bet.

Idle Thoughts
10-13-2008, 08:47 PM
I've always said "sure bert".

ZenBeam
10-13-2008, 08:53 PM
I used to say Sher-Bert but I'm training myself to say Sherbet.

Sorbet is SOR-bay to me.This, except my training period is over.

John DiFool
10-13-2008, 08:53 PM
Sheriff.

Or at least that's how I pronounced it when I was 4 years old. :p

Harmonious Discord
10-13-2008, 09:08 PM
sore bay

Rhythmdvl
10-13-2008, 09:17 PM
Sher-wish-I-had-some-ice-cream






(just kidding. I like cherbeart just fine, but if you're a kid and someone hands you a dish of tschertbeirt, it just doesn't cut it.)

freckafree
10-13-2008, 09:28 PM
When I was growing up, my dad sometimes said, "Shoot the sherbert to me, Herbert!" I have no memory whatsover of the context for that remark. However, as a result, I grew up calling it "SHURE-bert."

I now call it "SHURE-bit." (The vowel sound in the last syllable should be a schwa.)

SanibelMan
10-13-2008, 09:34 PM
I realized, shortly after posting this, that I could just go to dictionary.com and hear it pronounced "SHUR-bit" (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/sherbet). So I asked a mod to move this to IMHO where you can all be wrong in peace. :p

Gfactor
10-13-2008, 09:34 PM
Moved from General Questions to In My Humble Opinion.

Gfactor
General Questions Moderator

Harmonious Discord
10-13-2008, 09:36 PM
I realized, shortly after posting this, that I could just go to dictionary.com and hear it pronounced "SHUR-bit" (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/sherbet). So I asked a mod to move this to IMHO where you can all be wrong in peace. :p

I thought this was a poll, not what is correct.

lobotomyboy63
10-13-2008, 09:43 PM
Sher-bet. (Not "shure" which I would pronounce as "shoor.")

Sher-bert is a error based on confusion with the name Herbert (IMHO).

Sor-bay is how you pronounce sorbet, which is originally a French word, and is apparently similar to, but not exactly the same as, sherbet.

Underlining mine: agree.

I think "Sher bert" is a brain fart of sorts, though I couldn't say it's related to Herbert. I hail from Illinois where we used to "warsh" our clothes.

Toy boat toy boat toy boat...try saying that aloud. Carry over and commingle the sounds?

SHER bit is how I'd pronounce it.

Ponch8
10-13-2008, 09:45 PM
I pronounce it the right way (i.e., shure-bet). You see, the word "sherbet" only has one R in it. Therefore, I pronounce it with one R.

Ace309
10-13-2008, 09:46 PM
SHERb't.

Sorbet (sorBAY) is something different.

lobotomyboy63
10-13-2008, 09:58 PM
I pronounce it the right way (i.e., shure-bet). You see, the word "sherbet" only has one R in it. Therefore, I pronounce it with one R.


I don't know if it's apocryphal but the story I heard goes like this....

Woman: I just realized that "sugar" is the only word in the English language where the "s" is pronounced "sh."

George Bernard Shaw: Are you sure?

lunar elf
10-13-2008, 10:04 PM
On a kid's show (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_and_Ruby-_Season_1#2._Max.27s_Bath), one of the main character said SHER-Bit. I thought it was kind of odd.

Otherwise, Sher-bert

Nars Glinley
10-13-2008, 10:28 PM
I say SURE-bit but only because a girl I had a crush on in high school (who worked at an ice cream store) pointed out that SURE-bit was the proper pronunciation. Everyone I know says SURE-bert.

Ruby
10-14-2008, 12:12 AM
It's a SHURE-BET that it's SHURE-bert here in the midwest. SorBAY. pffft.

Roland Orzabal
10-14-2008, 12:50 AM
Sher-bit. When I was a little kid, most of my family pronounced it "sher-bert", which was a complete :confused: for me because there was clearly only one 'R' in the word. Don't know why I stuck to my guns on that one while conceding on February and the like, but I did. Glad to see I'm not alone.

Sorbet, on the other hand, is a whole different animal in spelling, pronunciation (sor-bay), and substance.

Gary T
10-14-2008, 01:02 AM
"SHURE-bet" is correct, and how my family always said it.

"SHURE-bert" is easier to say quickly than "SHURE-bet" because the tongue and jaw have to move to get from the "bert" position to the "bet" position. It's fairly common, but it's still a mispronunciation.

"sor-BAY" (note the stress is on the second syllable) is one pronunciation of sorbet; the other is "SOR-bit," which obviously is quite similar to "SHURE-bet" and can contribute to some confusion (note that sherbet and sorbet are similar products, but are not the same). But are you seriously suggesting that people see the written word sherbet and pronounce it "SOR-bay?" That boggles my mind. [ETA:] Unless it's on the British sitcom "Keeping up Appearances.":)

Kaio
10-14-2008, 01:16 AM
*nods*

Sherbet does not equal sorbet. Two different things.

My family always pronounced it "sher-bert," so I did too, until I actually saw it written and realized there was no second R.

I pronounce it correctly now, which is to say, exactly how it's spelled. Sher-bet.

panache45
10-14-2008, 01:55 AM
SHURE-bet.

(And NUKE-lee-ur. And NUP-sh'l.);)

Spoons
10-14-2008, 02:10 AM
Woman: I just realized that "sugar" is the only word in the English language where the "s" is pronounced "sh."

George Bernard Shaw: Are you sure?My Grade 5 teacher told us this one, but wasn't amused when one kid popped up his hand and reminded the teacher that "surety" was another such word. Apparently, the kid's father was a surety underwriter for the construction industry, and the kid had seen the word often enough on papers and whatnot his Dad brought home from work.

Anyway, I pronounce it "SHER-bit." Unless it's spelled sorbet; in which case, I pronounce it "SOR-bay."

maggenpye
10-14-2008, 04:11 AM
Another vote for SHER-bit, and I learned it from my mum, who learned it on the mean streets of Glasgow - or at least she learned it at the Tallies in Glasgow and they were very nice, even if they didn't give credit for sweeties.

Crusoe
10-14-2008, 04:26 AM
SHERb't.

Yeah, that's how I pronounce the word as well.

corkboard
10-14-2008, 08:55 AM
Sher-bit.

Colophon
10-15-2008, 09:17 AM
Do people really pronounce the first syllable as "Sure"/"Shore", i.e. to rhyme with "your"? That seems odd - the vowel is an "e", and I've only every heard it pronounced to rhyme with "her".

I say "SHER-buht", with a schwa in the second syllable.

I was going to say, sherbet and sorbet are totally different things, but on looking in my dictionary I see that "sherbet" is also an American name for what we in the UK call sorbet (i.e. water ice, usually fruit-flavoured). Over here, sherbet is white fizzy powder, or a drink or sweet made with said powder.

One thing I did not know is that both words are related and originally come from the Turkish word şerbet - but sorbet comes via French and so gets the "SOR-bay" pronunciation.

jimpatro
10-15-2008, 09:27 AM
Sher-bit. I also come from a family that pronounced it Sher-bert. :smack:

CookingWithGas
10-15-2008, 10:13 AM
SHER-bet.

English has silent letters but AFAIK does not have invisible letters. :) (However,

I think SHER-bert is simply an error that became so widespread that nobody realized it was an error.

Another example is the common use in Baltimore of the word "lozenge" to inexplicably be pronounced "lozenger."

Whether it is still an error is debatable, but I maintain the pronouncing a letter that was never there is an error.

Interestingly one online dictionary (http://etymonline.com/index.php?search=sherbet&searchmode=none) shows that the etymology is from Turkish.

jimpatro
10-15-2008, 10:19 AM
Ha ha, my wierd family also tried to infect me with lozenger .
In Texas by the way.

Anyone for a sang-gwich?

CookingWithGas
10-15-2008, 10:24 AM
(However, That should be

(However, some foreign imports might get weird treatment, like "colonel.")


And I've never had a sang-gwich but I've had a few sam-wiches. :D

CaerieD
10-15-2008, 10:28 AM
SURE-bət.

Just to be extra accurate. (And because if I pronounce the e instead of a schwa it invariably comes out "bert".)

Hampshire
10-15-2008, 10:35 AM
If you're under 10 years old I'll give you a pass and let you call it Shure-bert.
But after that you start sounding silly pronouncing it wrong.
Kind of like saying you're going to the li-berry to study.

pulykamell
10-15-2008, 11:31 AM
Do people really pronounce the first syllable as "Sure"/"Shore", i.e. to rhyme with "your"? That seems odd - the vowel is an "e", and I've only every heard it pronounced to rhyme with "her".

I don't think so. "Sure" rhymes with "her" in my dialect. And it's not an "e" sound in "sure," but rather what's called an "r-controlled vowel" in American English. Examples of the sounr. (http://pronuncian.com/sounds.aspx?sound=22+4)

Hazle Weatherfield
10-15-2008, 11:33 AM
If you're under 10 years old I'll give you a pass and let you call it Shure-bert.
But after that you start sounding silly pronouncing it wrong.
Kind of like saying you're going to the li-berry to study.

Agreed. Why would you pronounce it wrong? I understand that there are some words that are difficult to pronounce, but sherbet certainly isn't one of them.

AHunter3
10-15-2008, 11:37 AM
Sure, but

well, the "but" part is more closed & clipped off... Sure, b't

pulykamell
10-15-2008, 11:40 AM
Agreed. Why would you pronounce it wrong?

Because that's my dialect. Because that pronunciation is not "wrong" in my dialect. Because if I said "SURE-bit," everybody would look at me as if I were some kind of freak. I have never heard anyone around here say anything but "SURE-bert." It's like the word bruschetta. Depending on the situation and company, I will either pronounce it correctly, with a "k" sound, or colloquially, with the "sh" sound.

sugar and spice
10-15-2008, 11:54 AM
I had no idea until now that there is only one R in sherbet. My father always said SHER-bert, and he was the one who ate the stuff.

-shugar

Hazle Weatherfield
10-15-2008, 01:03 PM
Because that's my dialect. Because that pronunciation is not "wrong" in my dialect. Because if I said "SURE-bit," everybody would look at me as if I were some kind of freak. I have never heard anyone around here say anything but "SURE-bert." It's like the word bruschetta. Depending on the situation and company, I will either pronounce it correctly, with a "k" sound, or colloquially, with the "sh" sound.

I don't agree, though. Pronouncing "ask" as "ax" and "author" as "arthur", may very well be dialectic, but it's also absolutely wrong.

Jamaika a jamaikaiaké
10-15-2008, 01:17 PM
I don't agree, though. Pronouncing "ask" as "ax" and "author" as "arthur", may very well be dialectic, but it's also absolutely wrong.

Well, I guess you are entitled to your opinion...

Agent Foxtrot
10-15-2008, 01:44 PM
I had no idea until now that there is only one R in sherbet. My father always said SHER-bert, and he was the one who ate the stuff.Me too! Never occurred to me until this thread. Ignorance fought.

jimpatro
10-15-2008, 01:52 PM
See we all attend or have the opportunity to attend free public schools.
In the US I mean. And there we are taught to speak Standard American English.
We are not taught to say ax when we mean ask. We are not taught to say mis-chee-vee-us when we mean mis-chi-vus.

Why is it so wrong to speak as we are taught in school. I have to agree that some language is just plain wrong. Whether it's laziness, rebellion even ignorance you have to admit that inaccuracy is inaccuracy.

Ever hear someone say " He has such a wonderful command of the language"?
That's a very legitimate evaluation to make.
So you have to concede that it's also legitimate to say " Sheesh, how far did he get in school?" in the case of someone speaking poorly.

Bobotheoptimist
10-15-2008, 01:53 PM
Sherbert as in "Ernie do you know where my pants are?", "Sure, Bert!"Uh... yeah. Like that.

sugar and spice
10-15-2008, 02:03 PM
I don't agree, though. Pronouncing "ask" as "ax" and "author" as "arthur", may very well be dialectic, but it's also absolutely wrong.It is non-standard. Linguists generally refrain from referring to dialects as "wrong".

jimpatro
10-15-2008, 02:10 PM
That's being PC. And we don't approve of that. Do we?

pulykamell
10-15-2008, 02:23 PM
I don't agree, though. Pronouncing "ask" as "ax" and "author" as "arthur", may very well be dialectic, but it's also absolutely wrong.

Also, remember that there is a variant spelling, "sherbert." Who's to say when we say "sherbet" we're not really saying "sherbert"? Like I said, I have never in my life heard anyone say "sher-bit."

jimpatro
10-15-2008, 02:28 PM
See, that's just people spelling it the way they mispronounce it.
Like how ect. is popping up lately for etc.

pulykamell
10-15-2008, 02:33 PM
That's being PC. And we don't approve of that. Do we?

It's not being PC, it's being aware of how language differs from dialect to dialect. Do you harp on about how the Brits stick an "f" in Lieutenant, or how Americans don't pronounce the "h" in herb? And why in the heck do people want to stick an "r" in the name Goethe and make it sound like "GAIR-tuh"? My dialect (and many dialects, as this thread demonstrates) insert an extra "r" sound into "sherbet." So what? I'm not using the "correct" pronunciation because it will sound odd to people in my dialect, just like if I started pronouncing "herb" with the "h." Or when I'm telling somebody to go to Goethe Street in Chicago, I have to say "GAIR-tuh," because using the "correct" pronunciation will get blank stares from me.

jimpatro
10-15-2008, 02:37 PM
It's fine to pronounce the h in herb.
An r is sometimes inserted into Goethe because non-German speakers can't pronounce the umlaut.

Why are you so afraid to speak differently from everyone else?
Hey, isn't that how dialects are supposedly born?

pulykamell
10-15-2008, 02:46 PM
Why are you so afraid to speak differently from everyone else?

Because that's not my natural speech pattern. I speak in different registers and slightly different dialects depending on who I am speaking with, and to. Most good communicators understand this. For example, I use some Britishisms when I visit my friends in Budapests, because the local dialect there among English speakers converged to a British-American amalgam, and my natural speech patterns changed based on this. When I moved back to America, I had to consciously revert back to American English and stop using words like "lift" and phrases like "at university" which had become a natural part of my vocabulary.

Only if I am speaking in a formal register will I take care to pronounce words in their standard versions, and be careful with using "whoms" (notice, I used "who" in my second sentence, even though I know "whom" is more "correct," because I'm speaking in an informal register), subjunctives, and the such.

pulykamell
10-15-2008, 02:53 PM
It's fine to pronounce the h in herb.


The "h" pronunciation is most definitely non-standard in America.

jimpatro
10-15-2008, 02:58 PM
Good communicator here. Nope don't understand this.
Your examples, lift, at university aren't really in the same ballpark as "sherbert". Do you really think someone in your present surroundings is not going to understand what you mean if you say sher-bit or sher-but instead of sher-bert?

And is whom or who really going to confuse someone if they aren't aware of the correct usage anyway?
If I'm hanging out at a biker bar or yuppie bar or speaking in English to a Hispanic with limited English, I'm still me. And someone just might learn something.
I might adjust my vocabulary, but not my pronunciation or grammar.

pulykamell
10-15-2008, 03:03 PM
Good communicator here. Nope don't understand this.
Your examples, lift, at university aren't really in the same ballpark as "sherbert". Do you really think someone in your present surroundings is not going to understand what you mean if you say sher-bit or sher-but instead of sher-bert?

I do think people will look at me funny here if I said "shure-bit," yes, just like people would look at me funny when I say "broo-skett-uh" instead of "brooshetta," even though it's obvious what both words mean.

As I said several times, my natural speech pattern is to use the "sher-bert" pronunciation. Why should I change it just because it's not "correct," according to you? It's correct for where I am. It's how I naturally speak. Why should I affect an unnatural hypercorrect language when that's not my dialect?

jimpatro
10-15-2008, 03:07 PM
Hypercorrect? Are you serious?

Anyway, of course you're entitled to speak as you wish.

pulykamell
10-15-2008, 03:10 PM
Once again, "hypercorrect" relative to the way my peers speak. And you're entitled to speak as you wish, as well. If your natural dialect is the prestige dialect, fine. Like I said, I shuffle between various different dialects subconsciously depending on who I'm communicating with. Or "with whom I'm communicating," if you prefer.

Spurious George
10-15-2008, 03:14 PM
Also, remember that there is a variant spelling, "sherbert."

No, I don't think there is. A pronunciation mistake (or dialectical difference) does not automagically create a variant spelling of the same word. That's like saying that nukular is a variant spelling of nuclear, or ax is a variant spelling of ask.

(I pronounce it sher-bit, which like many, makes me unique in my family.)

pulykamell
10-15-2008, 03:15 PM
No, I don't think there is.

Have you tried checking a dictionary?

SylverOne
10-15-2008, 03:23 PM
Heh - I opened this can of worms in one of those "things you've only realized recently' types of threads.

I made it for 32 years of life calling it sherbert, and it's only been within the last year that I noticed the spelling on the carton. So sure was I that my pronunciation was correct, I actually believed for about 10 seconds that they had mispelled it on the label. Until I looked at all the different brands. Pretty sure they didn't all spell it wrong. :smack:

Hazle Weatherfield
10-15-2008, 04:48 PM
Is there really a dialect in which sherbet is not pronounced correctly? I don't think it has anything to do with a dialect; I think it's just incorrect pronunciation like newcuelar.

Hampshire
10-15-2008, 05:01 PM
Is there really a dialect in which sherbet is not pronounced correctly? I don't think it has anything to do with a dialect; I think it's just incorrect pronunciation like newcuelar.

Maybe it's the dialect of pre-schoolers? Along with which you will find "lie-berry", "aminal", and "pasghetti".

pulykamell
10-15-2008, 07:17 PM
Is there really a dialect in which sherbet is not pronounced correctly? I don't think it has anything to do with a dialect; I think it's just incorrect pronunciation like newcuelar.

"Nucular" is also dialectical. And, yes, of course it has to do with dialect. Do you think I'm lying when I'm saying that nobody I know pronounces it "SHER-bit"? Do you think it's just coincidence that everyone in my dialectical region pronounces it wrong, or is it more reasonable to assume that, in my dialect (and, once again, many others as witnessed in this thread), "sherbert" is the pronunciation? Just like in some dialects "wash" becomes "warsh." Or are they mispronouncing, too?

pulykamell
10-15-2008, 07:21 PM
Here's an informal poll on the common pronunciation of "sherbet." (http://comeseptember.livejournal.com/152191.html)

So, yeah, while it's only the result of one poll, and I have no idea what the dialect region is, the majority of people responding to that poll pronounce it "sher-bert."

Jamaika a jamaikaiaké
10-15-2008, 10:10 PM
Is there really a dialect in which sherbet is not pronounced correctly? I don't think it has anything to do with a dialect; I think it's just incorrect pronunciation like newcuelar.

Apparently, yours! You pronounce it sher-bit? Everyone knows it's pronounced sher-bert.

jimpatro
10-15-2008, 10:23 PM
One thing I would defy anyone to do is find a food package that spells it out
S-H-E-R-B-E-R-T.

I'd bet that anyone who says warsh still knows it's spelled
W-A-S-H. And I'd bet they had every opportunity in school to learn how to pronounce it wash.

Here's a question. Can similar dialects develop many miles apart?
It would seem not if they claim to be regional.

Jamaika a jamaikaiaké
10-15-2008, 10:34 PM
http://bartleby.com/68/37/5437.html

pulykamell
10-15-2008, 11:00 PM
I'd bet that anyone who says warsh still knows it's spelled
W-A-S-H. And I'd bet they had every opportunity in school to learn how to pronounce it wash.

And I say it "sherbert," but spell it "sherbet." My first post states that technically, "sherbet" is "SURE-bet," and "sherbert" is "SURE-bert," but I've only seen the former spelling and the latter pronunciation. That reflects my usage and spelling.


Here's a question. Can similar dialects develop many miles apart?

Of course. But people who say "sherbert" instead of "sherbet" don't all necessarily belong to the same dialect. That pronunciation is found across a number of American dialects. If I had to bet, I'd venture that "sherbert" is by far the dominant pronunciation for "sherbet" in the Inland North Dialect (Chicago, Rochester, Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit) that I am a native speaker of.

jimpatro
10-16-2008, 12:03 AM
Which brings us to: Mischievous.

I am full aware that most people pronounce it mis-chee-vee-us.

That doesn't make it dialect. Can you admit that it's just people looking at the word and not really paying attention to how it's spelled? Or more accurately they're thinking they're seeing what isn't really there.

I worked for a cable station called Kaleidoscope TV. While on location once a gentlemen informed his companion that we were from cuh-lie-dee-uh-scope TV. Just not seeing the word right. Everybody thought the world was flat at one time.

jimpatro
10-16-2008, 12:06 AM
Oh yeah, my point about dialects developing independent of each other was just a way to say that people tend to make the same mistakes no matter where they are. No big deal. Not saying anybody's stupid. I pronounced sandwich as sang-gwich when I was a kid. Everybody around me (Hispanics) did too. When I learned better I stopped.

Bobotheoptimist
10-16-2008, 12:43 AM
Apropos of very little (but someone else brought it up first) -

In a spontaneous survey of coworkers just last week it was discovered that none of the Colorado natives could tell the difference between nuclear and nukular. And according to the non-natives, all 3 Colorado natives pronounced it nukular without realizing it.

I also say
Salmon: "sam-men"
Almond: "ahw-men" (accent on first syllable)

But at least I can say Saguache and Buena Vista the right way (inside joke, the town is pronounced "Byoona Vista")

And coyote... Jeez I hate it when people pronounce the "E". I'll start saying "Sherbert" if everyone else stops saying "coyoteE" :D

Jamaika a jamaikaiaké
10-16-2008, 12:44 AM
I am full aware that most people pronounce it mis-chee-vee-us.

That doesn't make it dialect.

That's the definition of correct!


Can you admit that it's just people looking at the word and not really paying attention to how it's spelled? Or more accurately they're thinking they're seeing what isn't really there.


Cite? (I mean cite that spelling has fuck all to do with it.)

The Second Stone
10-16-2008, 12:54 AM
The mispronunciation is from the song: "Shoot the Sherbert to me Herbert"

http://artistdirect.com/nad/music/artist/card/0,,553501,00.html

It's been mispronounced every since.

pulykamell
10-16-2008, 01:23 AM
*nevermind*

pulykamell
10-16-2008, 01:35 AM
Can you admit that it's just people looking at the word and not really paying attention to how it's spelled? Or more accurately they're thinking they're seeing what isn't really there.

Or how about they're just speaking like the people around them speak? Plenty of words don't look like how they're spelled. I've given you several examples above. I also say "FEB-you-ary," but spell it "February." I know people who say "MON-dee" although, judging by the spelling, it should obviously be "MON-day."

A word's pronunciation is based on how a majority of people decide it should be pronounced. I mean, hell, if we can decide that "colonel" should be pronounced "kernal" and the Brits can say "lieutenant" is "leftenant" and somehow "Featherstonehaugh" becomes "Fanshaw," fuck it. "Sherbet" can be "sherbert." You want to call it a mispronunciation, go ahead. I call it a dialectical or non-standard variation. People around here don't say "sher-bit." I wouldn't be surprised if saying "sher-bit" for "sher-bert" would get rocks thrown at you in certain neighborhoods here. (Exaggerating of course, but that pronunciation would quickly identify you as someone "not from around here.") If that's not part of what constitutes dialect, I don't know what is.

Lisa-go-Blind
10-16-2008, 02:23 AM
It's fine to pronounce the h in herb.
In the U.S.? Only if you're talking about your Uncle Herb. You know, the one whose birth certificate reads "Herbert."

It always comes back to Herbert.

Snowboarder Bo
10-16-2008, 03:01 AM
I say "sher-bet" because that is how the letters are arranged.

Other words that are commonly mispronounced that bug me include: nukular, mischeeveeus, and Farv.

FFS, what is up with this family that they can't spell their own name right?

I know my name is spelled B-O, but it's pronounced "Kensington". :dubious:

Mangetout
10-16-2008, 03:35 AM
Sher-but - it's a short 'u', as in halibut.

In the UK, sherbet only means dry fizzy powder sold as candy. Sweetened ice is sorbet.

Nars Glinley
10-16-2008, 10:46 AM
In the UK, sherbet only means dry fizzy powder sold as candy. Sweetened ice is sorbet.

Like Pixy stix? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pixy_Stix)

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