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chowder
07-31-2009, 12:51 PM
Is it Connecteecut?

Or Conneteecut?

KneadToKnow
07-31-2009, 12:53 PM
The latter, according to m-w (http://merriam-webster.com/dictionary/connecticut).

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
07-31-2009, 12:54 PM
The middle "c" is silent, similar to the initial "c" in "crap music."

Gary T
07-31-2009, 12:57 PM
I don't pronounce the C just before the T, have never heard anyone do so (except jokingly), and do not see it as an alternate pronunciation in my dictionary. It's pronounced kuh-NET-tuh-cut (all schwas except in the stressed syllable) rather than kuh-NET-tee-cut.

Troy McClure SF
07-31-2009, 01:00 PM
The middle "c" is silent, similar to the initial "c" in "crap music."

Seriously?

chowder
07-31-2009, 01:12 PM
So why the middle "C"?

Some years ago my friends took me to Mackinac Island, seems that this is pronounced Mackinaw, right?.

Then there's Kansas and Arkansaw.

And you merkins call us Britons for the way we mangle words :D

Gary T
07-31-2009, 01:20 PM
Seriously?It's a jibe at rap music, along the lines of this: Jean Harlow was at a dinner party and kept on addressing Margot Asquith (wife of British prime minister Herbert Asquith) as MargoT (pronouncing the 'T'). Margot finally had enough and said to her "No Jean, the T is silent, as in Harlow."

Gary T
07-31-2009, 01:23 PM
So why the middle "C"?

Some years ago my friends took me to Mackinac Island, seems that this is pronounced Mackinaw, right?.

Then there's Kansas and Arkansaw.

And you merkins call us Britons for the way we mangle words :DHey, at least we can spell "Chumley" without using 87 letters. :p

Actually, I imagine the middle C was pronounced originally, but lost to elision like the MONDE in Cholmondeley.

leandroc76
07-31-2009, 01:27 PM
I'm from CT.

We pronounce it kuh-NET-teh-Kit

Siam Sam
07-31-2009, 01:29 PM
I frequently admonish Thais that the middle C is silent. Same with the S in Illinois.

Early in the movie The Ice Storm (1997), the Toby Maguire character, who goes to school in New York, is going for a visit to his family in Connecticut, and the train conductor clearly pronounces the middle C. Apparently, it was just to be a clown, but it did make me wonder for a while if I'd been wrong all along by treating it as silent.

JonathanTheRed
07-31-2009, 01:29 PM
And you merkins call us Britons for the way we mangle words :D

I spent a haypenny to buy some Woostershire sauce from Mr. Fanshaw. Yeah, don't you Brits go hasslin' us 'bout no silent letters.

Hello Again
07-31-2009, 01:29 PM
connet-eh-cut

if you say "connect-eh-cut" people will laugh at you, or more charitably, assume you are joking.

The name "Connecticut" comes from a name given to the area by the Mohegan tribe, Quinnitukqut, which if you can make your way through it, actually sounds a lot like the way "Connecticut" is pronounced today. (kinnit-ukut) As you'll note there is no middle "c" in the original name.

The reasons for so many weird spellings, is borrowed native words, and not all of them had a written language, or if they did there were unfamiliar sounds, so the person who wrote it down, tried the best the could with what they had to work with.

Markxxx
07-31-2009, 02:04 PM
I have a bad habit of pronouncing the "C" because when I was in school we had to learn to spell the states and unless I said it, I couldn't pronounce it.

So I say "Connecticut" as Con-neCT-ti-cut.

It may be wrong but it's always spelled right :)

glowacks
07-31-2009, 02:09 PM
Some years ago my friends took me to Mackinac Island, seems that this is pronounced Mackinaw, right?

Even more annoying is the fact that there's Mackinaw City on the mainland and Mackinac Island offshore.

There's also Sheboygan, WI and Cheboygan, MI, the latter pronounced like the former is spelled and thus I'm fairly sure they're pronounced the same. They aren't even all that close to each other, one being in the middle of the western shore and Lake Michigan and the other being on the southern shore and northern Lake Huron.

There's also Bellefontaine, OH which is locally pronounced Bell-fountain, and nearby Versailles, OH which is pronounced Ver-sales.

Chessic Sense
07-31-2009, 02:15 PM
What's with all you guys ending it in "cut"? It's "kit". Well, a schwa, but still. "Cut" looks wrong.

Sigmagirl
07-31-2009, 02:18 PM
There's also Bellefontaine, OH which is locally pronounced Bell-fountain, and nearby Versailles, OH which is pronounced Ver-sales.

Don't forget Wapakoneta, pronounced Wopkon.

lieu
07-31-2009, 02:19 PM
Silly English Con-necticuts!

psycat90
07-31-2009, 02:20 PM
I'm from CT.

We pronounce it kuh-NET-teh-Kit


This is exactly how I pronounce it.

Troy McClure SF
07-31-2009, 02:23 PM
It's a jibe at rap music

Oh, I know, I was just wondering why a tired joke at the expense of a music form that's been around for like 30 years now was at all useful in a thread about saying "Connecticut."

Jamaika a jamaikaiaké
07-31-2009, 02:26 PM
I generally say

"C-nektikit" (pronouncing the first syllable "see")

or

"Cunettikizzy"

I'm pretty sure no one else does, though...

c_goat
07-31-2009, 02:39 PM
I'm from CT.

We pronounce it kuh-NET-teh-Kit

I'm from Long Island

We pronounce it kuh-NET-uh-cut

;)

panache45
07-31-2009, 02:45 PM
Try living in Cuyahoga County; even people who've lived here their entire lives can't agree on its pronunciation.

Gary T
07-31-2009, 03:01 PM
Oh, I know, I was just wondering why a tired joke at the expense of a music form that's been around for like 30 years now was at all useful in a thread about saying "Connecticut."Well, it gave me entree for one of my favorite quotes. :)

Nava
07-31-2009, 03:17 PM
koNEteekah (I think I got that right in English phonics). Or, in Spanish phonics, konética

Kimmy_Gibbler
07-31-2009, 03:22 PM
/kə.ˈnɛt.ə.ˌkɪt/

aruvqan
07-31-2009, 03:38 PM
connet-eh-cut

if you say "connect-eh-cut" people will laugh at you, or more charitably, assume you are joking.

The name "Connecticut" comes from a name given to the area by the Mohegan tribe, Quinnitukqut, which if you can make your way through it, actually sounds a lot like the way "Connecticut" is pronounced today. (kinnit-ukut) As you'll note there is no middle "c" in the original name.

The reasons for so many weird spellings, is borrowed native words, and not all of them had a written language, or if they did there were unfamiliar sounds, so the person who wrote it down, tried the best the could with what they had to work with.
And pity the poor colonists who lived in quiquichtiqok. Thank god they renamed it Mystic :D

dracoi
07-31-2009, 03:38 PM
Was the Connecticut spelling originally from an English-speaking person? I know that many of the early colonies were inhabited or influenced by French, Dutch and German immigrants. I tried doing a search on the etymology, but no one goes any further than citing the Algonquin origin. I love to blame the French for these kinds of things; maybe it was an English adoption of a French spelling for an Algonquin word?

MikeS
07-31-2009, 03:54 PM
Early in the movie The Ice Storm (1997), the Toby Maguire character, who goes to school in New York, is going for a visit to his family in Connecticut, and the train conductor clearly pronounces the middle C. Apparently, it was just to be a clown, but it did make me wonder for a while if I'd been wrong all along by treating it as silent.I came in here to mention this very movie. It's the only time I've ever heard the middle C pronounced.

JonathanTheRed
07-31-2009, 04:04 PM
Even more annoying is the fact that there's Mackinaw City on the mainland and Mackinac Island offshore. There's also Sheboygan, WI and Cheboygan, MI
How can you talk about Mackinac and Cheboygan without mentioning Sault Ste. Marie? I defy anybody who hasn't been told to properly suss the pronunciation of that one.
"Soo Saint Marie"
Like most annoying things in the world, this is the fault ("foo?") of the French.

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
07-31-2009, 04:31 PM
Was the Connecticut spelling originally from an English-speaking person? WAG: You can find some early spellings with an "h" in the plact of the middle "c." My guess is that in the original Indian language, that "h" was actually a rendition of some aspiration or breathy sound before the "t," but some speakers ignored it completely. The middle "c" survived as an artifact in the formalized spelling, but the pronunciation by this time had already been established. Again, just a WAG.

Hypnagogic Jerk
07-31-2009, 05:09 PM
Like most annoying things in the world, this is the fault ("foo?") of the French.
Note that "sault" isn't pronounced "soo" in French, but rather "so".

wolfman
07-31-2009, 05:40 PM
Then there's Kansas and Arkansaw.

A lot of the old timers in Colorado call the state 'Ar-kan-saw' and the river 'Ark-ans-as'. It seems to be dying out though and settling on The state pronunciation for both.

DSYoungEsq
07-31-2009, 05:54 PM
In the movie Holiday Inn, Fred Astaire's manager attempts to find out from a concierge where Fred Astaire has gone. Told that he has said he was headed to Connecticut, the manager asks why he didn't stop Fred Astaire. The response: "How could I stop him when I do not know which way is Con-nect-ti-cut!?"


When I was in Kansas with a cousin for three weeks in the mid-70s, in a town called Larned at the junction of the Pawnee River and the Arkansas River, the residents faithfully referred to it as the Ar-kan-sas River, just as spelled. :D

panache45
07-31-2009, 08:05 PM
koNEteekah (I think I got that right in English phonics). Or, in Spanish phonics, konética

I've never heard anyone omitting the final "t."

Topologist
07-31-2009, 08:49 PM
I'm from CT.

We pronounce it kuh-NET-teh-Kit


I'm from Long Island

We pronounce it kuh-NET-uh-cut

;)


I'm originally from CT and now live on Long Island. I pronounce it kuh-NET-teh-Kit. I'm starting to pronounce the other one Lawn-Guyland. :(

Dr. Drake
07-31-2009, 09:20 PM
The medial -t- s are odd to me. If I (a Californian) were to spell my pronunciation, it would be Cunneddicut, with the final cut rhyming with put, not cut.

pulykamell
08-01-2009, 12:24 AM
I say "cuh-NET-uh-kit".

Nava
08-01-2009, 04:18 AM
I've never heard anyone omitting the final "t."

It's like the teeniest weeniest t in the world, often; if there's anything behind it, it dissapears, like the -z at the end of my real name (which gets pronounced only when it's the last word spoken or when the speaker is a foreigner). At least when I was in NH and Philadelphia; I don't think I ever needed to pronounce Connecticut while in Miami. Then again, I'm still trying to get over how can Americans mute any t at all and I discovered "tweeny" as the pronunciation for 20 in 1987.

chowder
08-01-2009, 05:52 AM
And as Gramps Simpson pronounces it:

It'll be a long time afore I recognises Missora

GuanoLad
08-01-2009, 06:08 AM
How do you prounce Connecticut?I think the real question should be: "How do you spell "pronounce"?




;)

chowder
08-01-2009, 07:03 AM
I think the real question should be: "How do you spell "pronounce"?




;)

The first "N" is silent as in Chumley;)

Kyla
08-01-2009, 08:52 AM
Oh, this thread brings me back. I grew up on Connecticut St., and yeah. It was confusing when I was learning to read and write. Not to mention this was in San Francisco. Oi, learning to spell my address correctly was unfairly difficult. (It took me awhile to figure out how to arrange the cs and ss.)

Kamino Neko
08-01-2009, 09:41 AM
.... Wow. This thread is literally the first time I've ever noticed the second C in that name. I was an avid Monopoly player as a kid, I know people from CT...yet, until this thread... Funky.

hibernicus
08-01-2009, 10:00 AM
If I (a Californian) were to spell my pronunciation, it would be Cunneddicut, with the final cut rhyming with put

Really? For you, "Connecticut" rhymes with "put"? I know that's what you're saying, and I know you are well tuned-in to phonetics, but it's hard to imagine it being pronounced like that.

Kyla
08-01-2009, 10:07 AM
Really? For you, "Connecticut" rhymes with "put"? I know that's what you're saying, and I know you are well tuned-in to phonetics, but it's hard to imagine it being pronounced like that.

Is it possible that Dr. Drake meant "putt", as in the verb having to do with golf? (Which rhymes with "mutt" or "cut".) The way I say it, it does rhyme with the last syllable in Connecticut. I agree that "put" as in "I put the book on the shelf" does not rhyme with that syllable.

chela
08-01-2009, 10:08 AM
Co net i kit, right?

How abut Fucking Australia?

Phuk-ing or Foo-king?

enomaj
08-01-2009, 10:11 AM
Anybody up for a game of kuh-NET four?

Chefguy
08-01-2009, 10:15 AM
/Homer/It's pronounced "Ver-mont", Lisa./Homer/

Dr. Drake
08-01-2009, 10:41 AM
Is it possible that Dr. Drake meant "putt", as in the verb having to do with golf? (Which rhymes with "mutt" or "cut".) The way I say it, it does rhyme with the last syllable in Connecticut. I agree that "put" as in "I put the book on the shelf" does not rhyme with that syllable.No, I meant "put." Thinking about it (and saying Connecticut, Connecticut, Connecticut out loud), it's more like the oo in book, but very short. It's definitely not -it.

pulykamell
08-01-2009, 11:14 AM
Then again, I'm still trying to get over how can Americans mute any t at all and I discovered "tweeny" as the pronunciation for 20 in 1987.

I think you mean "twenny," which, as you say, is common enough for "twenty."

I don't think I've ever heard "Conencticut" without the final "t", or with a very faint one, but I could almost see it pronounced with a terminating glottal stop. I wonder if some American dialects do this.

Siam Sam
08-01-2009, 11:33 AM
Co net i kit, right?

How abut Fucking Australia?

Phuk-ing or Foo-king?

Actually, that's in Austria. I believe the "u" in this case is pronounced more like the "ou" in "would and the "g" like a "k."

But be careful how you pronounce Phuket in Thailand!

Knorf
08-01-2009, 11:40 AM
[mild hijack]My favorite Anglo-butchered place name is that of a small town in Nevada near Reno, called Verdi. The town was named for the composer Giuseppe Verdi, but it's pronounced "Vur-dye."

Aglo-butchered place names abound in the U.S.[/hijack]

Anyway, as for that state with the abbreviation "CT," I've never heard the second "c" pronounced, except as a joke.

chowder
08-01-2009, 11:43 AM
.

Another silent "N" ;)

Siam Sam
08-01-2009, 11:47 AM
And isn't Lima, Ohio pronounced like in "lima beans" and not like the capital of Peru? Because they grow them in the area? I recall hearing of some movie where they couldn't be arsed to research that, and a character said she came from "Leema, Ohio."

John Mace
08-01-2009, 02:22 PM
I think you mean "twenny," which, as you say, is common enough for "twenty."

For me, it's more like TWUH-nee. Followed by THIRdy, FORdy, FIFty, SIXty, SEvendy, etc.

John Mace
08-01-2009, 02:25 PM
It's like the teeniest weeniest t in the world, often; if there's anything behind it, it dissapears, like the -z at the end of my real name (which gets pronounced only when it's the last word spoken or when the speaker is a foreigner). At least when I was in NH and Philadelphia; I don't think I ever needed to pronounce Connecticut while in Miami.

The final "t" is generally not voiced, as it is at the beginning of a word.

LSLGuy
08-01-2009, 03:54 PM
My MIL lived in CT from age 20-40. She's now 80+. My wife & her sister were born & grew up in CT.

MIL always used to pronounce CT the usual way, but somehow about 30 years ago after moving out West to escape the winters she decided to pronounce it CONNECT - i -Kut where the c in the middle is definitely fully pronounced and the final kut is a schwa, but more of a u-sounding schwa than an i-sounding schwa.

She's otherwise normal and of sound mind, but somehow at age ~50 she decided it sounded so much more sophisticated to include that middle c. Showing off to the rubes in wherever she's just moved to has always been important to her. Even if called on it she insists the voiced middle C is how the real CT natives pronounce it.

FTR, she's the only person I've ever heard pronounce it that way. Her daughters (unsurprisingly) pronounce it like very other American & just shake their heads at Mom's silly ways.

pulykamell
08-01-2009, 05:36 PM
The final "t" is generally not voiced, as it is at the beginning of a word.

Wouldn't a voiced "t" be a "d" sound? Or am I misunderstanding your post? I will sometimes voice "t"s in the middle of a word like "metal" and "petal" (so they may sound like "medal" and "pedal"), but I've never heard anyone voice a "t" at the beginning of a word.

hibernicus
08-01-2009, 05:40 PM
No, I meant "put." Thinking about it (and saying Connecticut, Connecticut, Connecticut out loud), it's more like the oo in book, but very short. It's definitely not -it.

You have a different vowel in "put" and "book"?

pulykamell
08-01-2009, 05:50 PM
Wouldn't a voiced "t" be a "d" sound? Or am I misunderstanding your post? I will sometimes voice "t"s in the middle of a word like "metal" and "petal" (so they may sound like "medal" and "pedal"), but I've never heard anyone voice a "t" at the beginning of a word.

Just wanted to add -- maybe you're thinking of the difference between an aspirated "t" (which often occurs at initial positions) and an unreleased "t" (which occurs at the end of words, among other places)? (edit: I should also add that the voiced "t" I describe above might be a flap "t", although in my accent it seems indistinguishable from a "d.")

Dr. Drake
08-01-2009, 07:35 PM
You have a different vowel in "put" and "book"?At this point, I don't even know. I've always been much better with consonants than vowels. I think the sound I'm going for is the upside-down capital omega in IPA: /ʊ/.

BigT
08-01-2009, 07:52 PM
At this point, I don't even know. I've always been much better with consonants than vowels. I think the sound I'm going for is the upside-down capital omega in IPA: /ʊ/.

Ah. That's how I pronounce both vowels. I have heard people pronounce Connecticut similar to that, but it's closer to the French schwa because it's so short. A lot of people use it (incorrectly) at the end of bonjour, if you aren't sure what sound I mean. (In my hillbilly dialect, it's also the u in sure, as people don't open their mouth far enough or move their tongue fast enough to get the "proper" /ʊ/.)

TBG
08-01-2009, 08:18 PM
Even more annoying is the fact that there's Mackinaw City on the mainland and Mackinac Island offshore.

Also Fort Mackinac on the island, Fort Michilimackinac on the mainland, and the Mackinac Bridge connecting the lower penninsula with Yooperland. All of them use the "naw" sound.

Siam Sam
08-01-2009, 09:16 PM
As for Ds and Ts, here's one: Denton, in Texas. Not being from near Denton, I tended to pronounce the T as a T whenever it came up. One day, a lady from there asked me why I pronounced it like that. She said it was ... well, not exactly "Dendon," but ever the softest stop before the final consonant.

dtilque
08-01-2009, 11:30 PM
How about Tucson AZ? Anyone pronounce the C in that?

Yachats OR is another name with a silent C. This name makes a good shibboleth for telling Oregonians from non-Oregonians. Not that we need another one of those -- there's plenty of others.

Any more silent Cs? Would Silent Cs make a good band name?

Siam Sam
08-01-2009, 11:35 PM
How about Tucson AZ? Anyone pronounce the C in that?

A BBC weatherman did one time. :D

Which reminds me of the Bangkok Post one time spelling the state "Arisona." They tend to go with British spellings here and so went a little overboard in changing the Zs to Ss.

Colibri
08-02-2009, 12:23 AM
How about Tucson AZ? Anyone pronounce the C in that?

They do here in Panama when pronouncing the name of the Hyundai SUV. Spanish is spelled the way it sounds, so Spanish speakers will pronounce words that way. I find it a bit jarring when I hear it.

Baal Houtham
08-02-2009, 11:14 AM
And as Gramps Simpson pronounces it:

It'll be a long time afore I recognises Missora

I think the St. Louis Post-Dispatch published a survey roughly 20 years ago that had 1/3 of Missouri's population favoring the "Missour-uh" pronunciation.

We've elected governors that use it. (John Ashcroft was a Missour-uh man.)

Nunzio Tavulari
08-02-2009, 04:08 PM
Pronunciation also It also depends on where in CT you're from. There's the Yankee Northwest corner, the Boston/Rhode Island upper east, and the metro NY lower west.

I grew up in the lower corner, and have a near Long Island accent. We put chawklit on our ice cream and pronounced it Kinnetta-kit.

cjepson
08-03-2009, 11:52 AM
I don't think I've ever heard "Conencticut" without the final "t", or with a very faint one, but I could almost see it pronounced with a terminating glottal stop. I wonder if some American dialects do this.

I'm originally from Rhode Island, and I would often hear it pronounced:

K'neddiki[t]

where the [t] represents a glottal stop.

Keeve
08-03-2009, 12:10 PM
Then there are places which annoy me by being pronouced exactly as they are spelled. Take, for example, Forked River, NJ. I always thought it was one syllable: "Forkt", but no, they gotta fool ya by pronouncing it exactly as spelled: Four-kehd.

BwanaBob
08-03-2009, 02:44 PM
I'm from Long Island

We pronounce it kuh-NET-uh-cut

;)

I'm from Long Island and I've never heard anyone pronounce the last syllable as "cut". I sure as hell don't - I'm with the local CT guy - kuh Net uh kit.

We - I == some of us

Nava
08-03-2009, 04:46 PM
The final "t" is generally not voiced, as it is at the beginning of a word.

Thank you, I couldn't come up with the right term.

They do here in Panama when pronouncing the name of the Hyundai SUV. Spanish is spelled the way it sounds, so Spanish speakers will pronounce words that way. I find it a bit jarring when I hear it.

I sort'a had the opposite problem in Costa Rica. It took me several months to realize that an "arby" was an RV4 - and my Spanish coworkers didn't believe it until they'd confirmed it with the locals.

cjepson
08-04-2009, 09:52 AM
Then there are places which annoy me by being pronouced exactly as they are spelled. Take, for example, Forked River, NJ. I always thought it was one syllable: "Forkt", but no, they gotta fool ya by pronouncing it exactly as spelled: Four-kehd.

Kind of like Newark, Delaware, which is pronounced "New Ark" to distinguish it from Newark ("New'rk"), NJ.

ColdPhoenix
08-04-2009, 10:07 AM
I spent a haypenny to buy some Woostershire sauce from Mr. Fanshaw. Yeah, don't you Brits go hasslin' us 'bout no silent letters.

That's Wooster sauce.

c_goat
08-04-2009, 10:22 AM
I'm from Long Island and I've never heard anyone pronounce the last syllable as "cut". I sure as hell don't - I'm with the local CT guy - kuh Net uh kit.

We - I == some of us

I think you're right, I've been saying it out loud and I must have been forcing myself to say cut. If I say it fast it comes out like kit. The 'UH' part was what I was really trying to point out.

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