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View Full Version : "Collectibles" that are never going to be worth anything


Mr Buttons
11-05-2009, 10:07 AM
I've got a bunch of early 90's comic books, lots of #1 issues and stuff. Of course, this was the era where every publisher decided to start running 10 million prints and devalued them all to nothing. I think the highest value on any of the ones I own is a "Spiderman 2099" w/ a really cool cover, that I recently found is selling for $5-9 on Ebay.

Got me to thinking about other collectibles that have panned out to have been very bad investments. Two that pop into mind are maybe Pogs & Beanie Babies (hell, maybe they are still worth something for all I know.)

So let's get listing! :p

garygnu
11-05-2009, 10:10 AM
I've got the same Spiderman 2099 #1 foil cover, too (somewhere).
I also have a mint-in-package Star Wars Episode I Monopoly game.

Giles
11-05-2009, 10:14 AM
Mint postage stamps. Far too many people have been buying and putting away the current mint postage stamps in the US as an investment over the last 50 to 60 years, so that you can now buy them on eBay in bulk at below face value. Yes, you can buy $100 worth of 4 cent postage stamps that are 50 years old for a bit less than $100. (4 cents was the base rate for a letter back then, and it's more than 10 times that now, so if they had held their relative value, those stamps should be worth $1,000).

Death of Rats
11-05-2009, 10:15 AM
Anything produced by the Franklin Mint.

UncleRojelio
11-05-2009, 10:29 AM
My bicentennial quarter collection. Ditto for the state quarters I've dutifully collected.

WordMan
11-05-2009, 10:44 AM
I love the ones that have a brief moment in time, then flare out in obscurity.

There is a category of first edition book called "hyper moderns" - basically, buzz books. In other words, some famous author is publishing a surefire bestseller, the first printing is over 1 million copies, but some folks just *have* to get a first edition right when it comes out and are willing to pay a premium for it. But if anyone thinks that the newest Stephen King, Patricia Cornwall, or even James freakin' Patterson will ever have any real collectible value is sadly misinformed. Note that I am discussing the Trade Hardcover first; it is a safe bet that those top authors will have limited edition runs up front, too - either to serve the hardcore fan base, or an even smaller vanity run, where they will produce 26 specially bound and individually-lettered copies for the author to distribute as they see fit. Those will have value.

The other type of hypermodern is the out-of-nowhere bestseller. When the Bridges of Madison County blew up, firsts were going for as high as $400. Now you can't give them away. Same with Cold Mountain, Snow Falling on Cedar, The Lovely Bones, The Corrections (which had added buzz because of the Oprah Book Club kerfuffle and an error in printing which led true firsts to have an errata sheet tipped into the book) - there is always the next hype machine. They go for huge bucks for about a month or two then settle back down - usually way down...

On the guitar front, well, it is a different phenomenon - how do certain "Collectibles" actually maintain their value? Gibson and Fender produce the equivalent of Franklin Mint collectibles - buy an *exact* replica of Clapton's Strat "Blackie" or Eddie Van Halen's "Frankenstein" Parts-o-caster than he built (which includes an original 1971 quarter, just like Eddie used to tweak the bridge he installed!! Wow!). Anyway, some of these suckers go for $25,000 - $30,000!! and please note that Blackie was assembled from 3 Strats that Clapton bought for $100 apiece in the early 70's and EVH built his guitar for about the same $300 amount and it is a junkyard dog of a guitar (cool as hell, but still...).

But these Franklin Mint guitars are holding their value. Each cost maybe $1,000 or a bit more to make - the only thing being sold is their limited edition collectibility - and Boomers are buying them up....I don' get it.

badbadrubberpiggy
11-05-2009, 10:49 AM
<snip>
Beanie Babies (hell, maybe they are still worth something for all I know.)



Nope, not really! A lot of them get donated to the hospital I work at - they're one of the few stuffed animal items we'll accept used, since people take really good care of them - they often still have the tags attached. But we usually only value them at around $5 each. Sometimes the donor will value them at a higher price - usually around $10, but never more than that.

Labtrash
11-05-2009, 10:52 AM
I keep telling my wife that the 2 State Quarters Collections we are keeping will someday net us $12.50 each.

Musky Moon
11-05-2009, 10:52 AM
Desert Storm trading cards.

HeyHomie
11-05-2009, 10:53 AM
I hear that the market for baseball cards has completely bottomed out.

HeyHomie
11-05-2009, 10:54 AM
I keep telling my wife that the 2 State Quarters Collections we are keeping will someday net us $12.50 each.

Actually, I think it'll be closer to $13.75 each, as I've seen quarters for Puerto Rico and American Samoa, and I imagine they're going to do Guam, the USVI, etc.

RealityChuck
11-05-2009, 10:57 AM
Baseball cards after 1975. Prior to that, cards were valuable because your mother threw them all out. After that, everyone "knew" the cards were valuable, so no one threw them out. It was made even worse after 1981, when Donruss and Fleer started making cards -- there were just too many cards and the law of supply and demand took over.

Even earlier cards seem to be dropping slowly in value, as people forget the players involved.

But all this is typical of any collecting bubble. Often, a certain item (baseball cards, Beanie Babies, comics, home mortgages, tulip bulbs, etc.) become collectable and people jump in and start speculating, buying them because they are increasing in value. Eventually, the bubble bursts and the value drops to nothing.

Polycarp
11-05-2009, 11:01 AM
Anything produced by the Franklin Mint.

Well, to be completely fair, unlike most of its competitors, the Franklin Mint did produce some legal tender issues for small nations under contract with their governments. But with that exception, "almost anything produced by the Franklin Mint" is probably a good answer.

Icerigger
11-05-2009, 11:42 AM
Anything produced by the Franklin Mint.

Yeah, like my $200 pewter Starship Enterprise, I can't believe I did that.

kaylasdad99
11-05-2009, 11:42 AM
Anything at all produced for the expressed purpose of being a collectible.

FordTaurusSHO94
11-05-2009, 12:01 PM
I've got a lot of comics and die-cast racecars from the 90's. The only thing that managed to become valuable was a comic I bought for around $2.50 that was up to about $60 the last time I checked.

Skywatcher
11-05-2009, 12:08 PM
From this month's Reader's Digest (http://rd.com/advice-and-know-how/9-vintage-items-that-may-be-worth-money/article167331.html):ALBUMS

Big hodgepodge collections like the one Grandpa has, with a little Sinatra, a little Elvis, and a lot of classical and opera.

A real album from The Monkees, an arguably knockoff group.

ANTIQUE JEWELRY

Something somebody's grandmother had; she's 85 and tells the granddaughter, "I'm leaving you this ring. It's worth a lot of money." And a couple hundred dollars is "a lot of money".

BOOKS

First editions of recently published books. Recent bestsellers may bring big bucks for authors, but readers trying to offload a copy get less—even for first editions.

COINS

Old silver dollars. It's not the age of the coin, it's the number of them that were made and the condition. A silver dollar minted in large quantities can be worth only its weight in metal: about $13.

COMIC BOOKS

Any comics from the past 20 years. Also, DC's oversize Famous First Edition comic books, reprints of first-appearance comics that are often mistaken by sellers for originals.

FURNITURE

1920s and 1930s dining sets that are reproductions of pieces from the 16th and 17th centuries.

POTTERY AND PORCELAIN

Just about everything that's not a European figurine.*

SPORTS TRADING CARDS

Anything from the oversaturation era of the 1990s.

*Especially not "limited edition" plates (or anything else, really) that are produced in multiple runs.

Justin_Bailey
11-05-2009, 12:21 PM
Baseball cards after 1975. Prior to that, cards were valuable because your mother threw them all out. After that, everyone "knew" the cards were valuable, so no one threw them out. It was made even worse after 1981, when Donruss and Fleer started making cards -- there were just too many cards and the law of supply and demand took over.

Completely untrue. Go to http://beckett.com and start looking up some recent cards, while they won't match the $25,000 someone could pull down for a 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle, to say they're worth nothing is ridiculous.

WordMan
11-05-2009, 12:29 PM
Anything at all produced for the expressed purpose of being a collectible.

I wish it were true, but see my comment about limited-edition Replica guitars above...

Malthus
11-05-2009, 12:36 PM
What makes something valuable is generally "anything legions of moms threw out as garbage, but which the kids will want again when they are old, have jobs, and wax nostalgic". ;)

Stuff that was recognized or produced as a collectable when it was made is unlikely to ever be worth anything much, because too many people didn't throw it out.

By "valuable' I mean of course "really worth a lot of money more than it cost when sold". Stuff that is intrinsically expensive may well remain expensive. What is "valuable' to my mind is something like a 10 cent comic book that sells for $20,000.

G0sp3l
11-05-2009, 12:54 PM
??? but I have all four covers of Youngblood #1. The foil covers! Authenticated by Dynamic Forces.

Bryan Ekers
11-05-2009, 12:56 PM
I got five Gretzky rookie cards I'm saving for my retirement. Fingers crossed.

simster
11-05-2009, 12:56 PM
2 things come to mind as a cause for this -

1.) The idea that 'everything' is a collectable - thanks to this marketing ploy - we even have limited edition cookies in collectable tins.

2.) The advent of the Internet and E-bay - thanks to ebay - its now much easier to find/get things that used to require specialty shops and flea markets. What used to be scarce is now much easier to find.

Price guides (like Becketts) are amazing - they're great when you want to feel good about something ' hey, the dealer has it less than beckets!' - because while the idea of a price guide is good, you have to look long and hard to find people actually buying some of the items for the prices listed.

hajario
11-05-2009, 01:05 PM
I got five Gretzky rookie cards I'm saving for my retirement. Fingers crossed.

An interesting bit of trivia is that Gretzky will never sign one of his rookie cards for a fan. He only ever signed five of them, one for each of his kids. Those cards will be extremely valuable.

Bryan Ekers
11-05-2009, 01:09 PM
Well, then, I better collect his kids. I wonder how much they'd be worth and how much personal security they have.

Lips_Obsession
11-05-2009, 01:10 PM
Mint postage stamps. Far too many people have been buying and putting away the current mint postage stamps in the US as an investment over the last 50 to 60 years, so that you can now buy them on eBay in bulk at below face value. Yes, you can buy $100 worth of 4 cent postage stamps that are 50 years old for a bit less than $100. (4 cents was the base rate for a letter back then, and it's more than 10 times that now, so if they had held their relative value, those stamps should be worth $1,000).

So are you suggesting you can buy postage (to use) on eBay for under face value?

hajario
11-05-2009, 01:34 PM
So are you suggesting you can buy postage (to use) on eBay for under face value?

I wouldn't be surprised. In the case mentioned by the OP, it's going to be a shit ton of 4 cent stamps so you'd have to put eleven of them on a single letter so it's probably not worth it.

A friend of mine is a stamp collector. He told me that stamp dealers get families coming to them all the time with stamps that they've inherited. They'll have full sheets of various collectible stamps with famous actors or hundredth anniversary of historical events on them. Stamp stores will buy them for 50 cents on the dollar. When my friend would get a stamp catalog mailed to him it would be plastered with the craziest stamps like from the 1968 Olympics and such.

Giles
11-05-2009, 01:40 PM
So are you suggesting you can buy postage (to use) on eBay for under face value?
Yes. I haven't looked for a while, but I don't things have changed much in that field. I have a shoebox full of unused stamps that I've bought for under face, and that I use for postage. Some came from a friend who was a coin dealer in Australia, and they were even cheaper because some sheets were stuck together. (But when you soak them in water and separate them they are still valid for postage: you just need a little glue.)

HubZilla
11-05-2009, 01:48 PM
Sad story about the baseball cards my brother & I collected religiously one year. It was the 1987 Topps baseball cards with a wood-grain pattern. We carefully cataloged and preserved them in plastic sheets. We got the entire set (and enough extras for a third set, probably). If only Mom hadn’t thrown away those 22-year-old cards, we’d be zillionaires right now.

Or not.

eBay has the complete set of 792 cards offered for $8.95

So much for that money-making scheme.

There were 17 cards in a pack for 40 cents each. 792 divided by 17 equals 46 packs minimum to get the whole set (assuming no duplicates, which is totally unrealistic).

Those 46 packs from 7-Eleven would’ve cost us $18.40 in 1987. :smack:

Yllaria
11-05-2009, 01:51 PM
. . . 1.) The idea that 'everything' is a collectable - thanks to this marketing ploy - we even have limited edition cookies in collectable tins. . .

You think collectable cookies are bad. I have an anniversary tin of spam, in a collectable tin. The idea tickled me and, hey, if the apocalypse ever comes, I'll have spam.

The anniversary tin is a replica of the original tin, so I'd guess that it's not as valuable as the original.

As to the Monkee album, the Reader's Digest article linked said that it was not valuable. It was only worth $19. That's about $18.50 more than I was expecting.

DocCathode
11-05-2009, 01:55 PM
As the son of an antique and collectible dealer and a sometime toy dealer myself, I agree with everything that has been said so far.

Right now, I'm expecting to see a wave of Phillies world series 'collectibles' all of which will be worth nothing.

There are, OTTOMH, two big exceptions to the nothing produced to be collectible ever is rule

Hess trucks- AFAIK, these still go up in value

Hallmark Keepsake Ornaments- Especially the Star Trek ones. They are manufactured to be collectible, but they are low in cost and often used on trees and get worn.

Re Comics

After the polybagged holofoil chrome 90's, the market took a serious hit. I expect that someday, things will return to normal. That the majority of people buying comics will be doing so for enjoyment- if the industry survives the next twenty years.

Re Beanie Babies

Anybody have the first bat? The black one? I collect bats.

Re The Franklin Mint

Sheesh. This goes for the Bradford Exchange too.

DocCathode
11-05-2009, 01:59 PM
You think collectable cookies are bad. I have an anniversary tin of spam, in a collectable tin. The idea tickled me and, hey, if the apocalypse ever comes, I'll have spam.

The anniversary tin is a replica of the original tin, so I'd guess that it's not as valuable as the original.

I have a tin of Spamalot spam. It just seemed to me that most people would laugh at the label then eat and dispose of it. My gut told me that tin would be worth money one day (even if that day is decades away). I have learned to listen to my gut on these things.

vivalostwages
11-05-2009, 02:31 PM
My friend's mother kept every cork she could get her hands on and told us they would be worth a lot of money someday. I still have no idea what she was talking about.

NDP
11-05-2009, 02:37 PM
Sad story about the baseball cards my brother & I collected religiously one year. It was the 1987 Topps baseball cards with a wood-grain pattern. We carefully cataloged and preserved them in plastic sheets. We got the entire set (and enough extras for a third set, probably). If only Mom hadn’t thrown away those 22-year-old cards, we’d be zillionaires right now.

Or not.

eBay has the complete set of 792 cards offered for $8.95

So much for that money-making scheme.

There were 17 cards in a pack for 40 cents each. 792 divided by 17 equals 46 packs minimum to get the whole set (assuming no duplicates, which is totally unrealistic).

Those 46 packs from 7-Eleven would’ve cost us $18.40 in 1987. :smack:

As stated previously, you weren't the only one who did that. That's why so many 1987 Topps are still around and why nobody wants them.

Overproduction of cards in the late 80's and 90's are the reason why they're barely worth the cost of the cardboard they're printed on today. What really killed the hobby (at least for me) was the rare insert card fad in the 90's. Collectors would just buy packs for the inserts and throw away the rest--even the superstar and rookie cards. It was too much like gambling and just wasn't as fun anymore.

(Incidentally, I have a collection of about 40,000+ cards. I have a fair number of notable cards from the 50's and 60's but most are from the 70's and 80's. I stopped collecting years ago and am contemplating selling the whole thing if I get a good offer.)

Lamar Mundane
11-05-2009, 02:42 PM
Well, then, I better collect his kids. I wonder how much they'd be worth and how much personal security they have.

I've got dibs on this one (http://mikeresponts.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/gretzkygirlbig.jpg).

kaylasdad99
11-05-2009, 02:53 PM
I wish it were true, but see my comment about limited-edition Replica guitars above...Then let me amend that to "Anything at all produced with the expressed purpose of being a collectible, and sold as such in Parade Magazine."

Icerigger
11-05-2009, 02:59 PM
All of my mom's LPs some day they will be worth a fortune! Sadly all her Ray Coniff's and Andy Williams are only worth about $5.00 each. Even the Whipped Cream & Other Delights is only going for $10.00.

Lantern
11-05-2009, 03:00 PM
I would imagine rising home ownership in the US is a part of the story. 60 years ago people were more likely to rent an apartment and throw out stuff when they moved. Today it's much easier for people to keep stuff in their home basement for decades.

Mavis Topholese
11-05-2009, 03:25 PM
If you want a quick and dirty look at what's collectible (meaning, what's worth money) and what isn't, visit your local thrift store, where you can get Herb Alpert's entire catalog for $1 or $2 each, including "Whipped Cream And Other Delights". EVERY THRIFT STORE IN NORTH AMERICA has at least one copy of "Whipped Cream And Other Delights". What is the deal with that? Was Herb just handing them out on street corners?

What I love is seeing beat-up old Charlton comics (Charlton was the cheapest low-rent comic book publisher ever) that Grandma tells us "books for $8". What book would that be, Grandma? The Crazy Grandma Comic Book Price Guide? (http://misterkitty.org/extras/stupidcovers/stupidcomics43.html) That's right, "Devil Kids Starring Hot Stuff" # 37 is worth thirty dollars, sure it is, you read all about it in that article in the free weekly about how all those old comics in your attic are worth big bucks. Well, they are worth about a dollar each if they're particularly stupid and I happen to be in a stupid comic buyin' mood that day, Grandma.

RealityChuck
11-05-2009, 03:31 PM
Completely untrue. Go to http://beckett.com and start looking up some recent cards, while they won't match the $25,000 someone could pull down for a 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle, to say they're worth nothing is ridiculous.I never said they were worth nothing, just that their value doesn't match that of older cards.

And, really, Beckett? That's wishful thinking. To see what cards are really selling for, look at eBay. The 1967 Brooks Robinson -- a card that was selling for $800 in its heyday -- it can be had for $77 right now. Even the Buy it Now crowd isn't going over $300.

Meanwhile, a 2000 Pedro Martinez can be bid on for under a buck. His rookie card is going for less than $20. When he gets into the Hall of Fame, the rookie card might go up to $50, then start dropping back, just like the older cards.

If you buy the cards in packs and keep them, you may make something selling them, but if you buy them on eBay or -- worse -- pay Beckett's prices, you're throwing your money away.

Justin_Bailey
11-05-2009, 03:59 PM
I never said they were worth nothing, just that their value doesn't match that of older cards.

Well yeah, but that's like complaining that this Leonardo Da Vinci is worth a crapton more than my nephew's fingerpainting.

They're both paintings, but one is rarer and in a lot more demand.

Spoke
11-05-2009, 04:07 PM
Anything at all produced for the expressed purpose of being a collectible.

Well, not anything. Some of the comic books marketed in the 70s as "Limited Collector's Editions" are actually collectible now.

sqweels
11-05-2009, 04:57 PM
I can't believe no one has mentioned Billy Beer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Beer) yet.

blondebear
11-05-2009, 05:02 PM
Heh. On a recent road trip I saw cans of Billy Beer on display in 2 different local history museums. (Laws Railroad Museum & Mono Basin Historical Museum)

Enderw24
11-05-2009, 05:13 PM
Anything at all produced for the expressed purpose of being a collectible.

Well, not entirely. Magic: The Gathering (A collectible card game) came out in 1992. I think there were a lot of people even in the mid '90s who expected the prices to match that of Beanie Babies. Damned if the good cards from the early days don't keep going up in value every single year.

kaylasdad99
11-05-2009, 05:19 PM
I offer post # 36 in my defense.

iamthewalrus(:3=
11-05-2009, 06:16 PM
Well, not entirely. Magic: The Gathering (A collectible card game) came out in 1992. I think there were a lot of people even in the mid '90s who expected the prices to match that of Beanie Babies. Damned if the good cards from the early days don't keep going up in value every single year.I was about to say that, but Magic gets a slight pass, since it wasn't only produced as a collectible, it was produced as a game, and that game continues to increase in popularity. A substantial portion of the value of the older cards is related to the fact that they offer powerful effects in the game that are generally not duplicated by other cards.

That sets it apart from things like baseball cards in my mind, which, as I understand, you just sort of "have".

rolandgunslinger
11-05-2009, 06:59 PM
My Generation X #1 and my complete run of the Age of Apocalypse is gonna be worth enough for me to retire on. Just you watch...

dropzone
11-05-2009, 07:31 PM
EVERY THRIFT STORE IN NORTH AMERICA has at least one copy of "Whipped Cream And Other Delights". What is the deal with that? Was Herb just handing them out on street corners?No, but a significant fraction of the population bought it. And who could blame them? (http://ugo.com/music/best-album-covers/images/entries/Whipped-cream-and-other-delights.jpg) I mean, except for the music.

Erdosain
11-05-2009, 07:42 PM
I can't believe no one has mentioned Billy Beer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Beer) yet.

We elected the wrong Carter. [/Homer Simpson]

Death of Rats
11-05-2009, 07:46 PM
You think collectable cookies are bad. I have an anniversary tin of spam, in a collectable tin. The idea tickled me and, hey, if the apocalypse ever comes, I'll have spam.

The anniversary tin is a replica of the original tin, so I'd guess that it's not as valuable as the original.

As to the Monkee album, the Reader's Digest article linked said that it was not valuable. It was only worth $19. That's about $18.50 more than I was expecting.

The downside bieng, of course, that after the apocylypse comes you will have Spam.

dropzone
11-05-2009, 07:51 PM
A company I worked for built the "trading center" shown in some Franklin Mint ads, where "traders" spend their days monitoring the constant rise in value of Currier & Ives Christmas plates of the 70s. It was in their HQ. I never got to go and see if the traders really used their monitors to monitor their soaps.

thirdname
11-05-2009, 08:11 PM
All of my mom's LPs some day they will be worth a fortune! Sadly all her Ray Coniff's and Andy Williams are only worth about $5.00 each. Even the Whipped Cream & Other Delights is only going for $10.00.
What I've done is I put an ad on Craigslist offering some family members' old records for free in exchange for digital recordings of them. I've gotten a couple of replies so far, from an audiophile/engineer and a hiphop artist. I haven't given them away yet though, I'm still waiting to schedule it.

I might be making a mistake in not charging for them, but I don't really know the condition of them and all, so I figured I wouldn't make much money on 100 random LPs. I did find the audiophile guy has an ad apparently offering to buy people's records AND do transfers, but I already tipped my hand.

Runs With Scissors
11-05-2009, 08:35 PM
Anything produced by the Franklin Mint.

Yeah, but they usually have a limited run of 10,000,000.

Chronos
11-05-2009, 08:36 PM
On the topic of Magic cards, some of them are valuable because they really do have a significant impact in the game. Black Lotus, for instance, is worth thousands of dollars, because it'll significantly improve pretty much any deck it's put into, and it hasn't been printed in decades. On the other end of the scale, though, they also made foil editions of some cards, explicitly for the sake of making them collectibles. Unfortunately, though, most of these foils are things like basic lands, which are the backbone of every deck, are produced in greater quantities than any other card, and will always continue to be printed for as long as the game exists. So a foil edition of a forest might be worth ten cents, instead of the five cents a regular forest would be worth.

Superhal
11-05-2009, 08:42 PM
re: sports cards: actually, the market right now is crazy about "inserts," limited run cards with a known scarcity (e.g. 5 total sets made, 1 total set made, etc.) "Common" cards that aren't part of a special run are pretty much worthless all the way back to 1985, assuming by "worthless" you mean less than $5 each. The last decent card I saw was ~$20 for an '85 Roger Clemens rookie, but the '84 Donruss Mattingly is going for $600 on ebay.

The inserts have stacking bonuses as well, for example: Red Refractor Chrome Autograph Jersey Rookie Card.

I just busted open 2 boxes of 2008 Bowman Chrome, and the commons were worthless (at most maybe $6), the basic Chromes Rookie cards were ~$.25-.75, the jersey inserts were ~$1, the basic autographs were ~$1, and the inserts were around ~$10 for the commons(!).

The "holy grail" of card collecting right now are the Red Refractors and the Superfractors, which have a limited run of 1-5 sets in the world.

Kamino Neko
11-05-2009, 09:00 PM
Black Lotus, for instance, is worth thousands of dollars, because it'll significantly improve pretty much any deck it's put into, and it hasn't been printed in decades.

Nitpick: 16 years. The game was only created in 1993, and the last printing of the Lotus was in 1994.

Another reason M:tG cards can gain value is...they're used to play a game.

And few people, if any, played with them in card protectors, at least into the late 90s (I haven't played since '98 or '99, since I haven't had anyone to play WITH.).

So cards tend to wear, so the majority of extant copies of a particular card will have battered edged, and other signs of use...so the ones that don't...will be worth a lot more due to the rarity.

davey77
11-05-2009, 09:56 PM
the '84 Donruss Mattingly is going for $600 on ebay.



If this is true, then Tony Gywnn rookie cards from the same year should sell for around $300,000.

kenobi 65
11-05-2009, 10:05 PM
Nitpick: 16 years. The game was only created in 1993, and the last printing of the Lotus was in 1994.

Yeah...the Magic cards which really got to ridiculous prices (such as Black Lotus and the Mox cards) were ones that WotC realized, fairly early on, were "broken" in the game, and were taken out very early on. Thus, they printed relatively few of them.

I started playing Magic in the spring of '94, when Revised was the "current" base set, and those big broken cards had already been taken out of the set. A few months after I started playing, I saw a set of the five Mox cards in a card shop, for sale at $15 each. I thought, "that's *absurd*...who would ever pay that much for cards??" Ohh, had I only known!! (Within a year or two, they were selling for well over a hundred dollars each....I have no idea what the current price for them is.)

I'd also note that "collectible", in the case of Magic, was never really meant to be "keep these for a long time, and they'll appreciate in value". The idea behind the game was that you would buy packs with random assortments of cards, build a "collection" of cards, and then use cards from your collection to build your deck for game play.

elmwood
11-05-2009, 10:06 PM
What about ... Richie Rich and other Harvey-published comics? There's a ton of 'em -- 1960s and 1970s -- in the basement at Dad's house, in quite good condition. I'm thinking it'll be a couple more generations before they're worth more than the paper they're printed on, because they're not superhero comics. Maybe they'll be valuable in 2050 or so, because so many were tossed due to lack of collector value at the time, and most who were involved in the production and consumption chain would be dead by then.

A few other things I'm wondering about:

* Collectible spoons, thimbles, and other series of knick-knacks that were marketed towards women.
* Giveaways by fast food chains; e.g. glasses from Burger King, Happy Meal prizes, and the like.
* Aren't McDonalds spoon-shaped coffee stirrers from the 1970s and 1980s worth some outrageous amount?

kenobi 65
11-05-2009, 10:09 PM
* Aren't McDonalds spoon-shaped coffee stirrers from the 1970s and 1980s worth some outrageous amount?

I don't know about that...allegedly, they stopped making them because they were popularly used for snorting cocaine. No idea if that's true.

DocCathode
11-05-2009, 10:10 PM
* Giveaways by fast food chains; e.g. glasses from Burger King, Happy Meal prizes, and the like.


I'm drawing a blank on the most I've seen a happy meal toy go for. The average happy meal toy is worth from $1-5.

Old cereal prizes are often worth serious money.

joebuck20
11-05-2009, 10:31 PM
All of my mom's LPs some day they will be worth a fortune! Sadly all her Ray Coniff's and Andy Williams are only worth about $5.00 each. Even the Whipped Cream & Other Delights is only going for $10.00.

I'm stunned to read they're even worth that much. I usually see those albums in the dollar bins at the flea market.

joebuck20
11-05-2009, 10:36 PM
If you want a quick and dirty look at what's collectible (meaning, what's worth money) and what isn't, visit your local thrift store, where you can get Herb Alpert's entire catalog for $1 or $2 each, including "Whipped Cream And Other Delights". EVERY THRIFT STORE IN NORTH AMERICA has at least one copy of "Whipped Cream And Other Delights". What is the deal with that? Was Herb just handing them out on street corners?


I think it must be a rule that every thrift store and flea market vinyl vendor have on hand a bunch of Herb Alpert records, as well as a shitload of Barbara Streisand, Barry Manilow and Mantovani albums.

Hilarity N. Suze
11-05-2009, 10:42 PM
I don't think anything advertised as a "collectible" is ever going to be worth much.

On the other hand my mother collected Hummel figurines, and my aunt seemed to think I could sell them. I gave them to my aunt instead. Hated those things.

The "hypermoderns" are weird. I sold a Patricia Cornwell on eBay and it was amazing--I had it for $5. The price went up, and up, and up, and somebody ended up paying $39 for it, plus shipping. Why? It was in the bookstores 10 days after I sold it, for $29. They paid more to get it ... 10 days before the drop date? It was not even an embargoed novel. There were plenty of copies around. (This gave me a very distorted view of eBay book sales BTW. But I got over it.)

Lacunae Matata
11-05-2009, 11:22 PM
No, but a significant fraction of the population bought it. And who could blame them? (http://ugo.com/music/best-album-covers/images/entries/Whipped-cream-and-other-delights.jpg) I mean, except for the music.

You mean my father didn't buy that one for the music?!? :confused:

But I really do wish that someone would tell my mother that her albums are worth a price somewhere between "bupkus" and "nil." I'm tired of moving umpteen tons of vinyl during the Great Semi-Annual "Mom's Gonna Clean Out the Storage Building" Spasm. I even gifted her with a device a couple of years ago, with which she could (with the help of her trusty, tech-savvy 12-year-old grandson) transfer her vinyl to disc or MP3, along with a collectible records price guide. The deal was supposed to be that she'd save the music she wanted, and then get rid of the crap that retails for less than $1.98.

Anyone want to guess who still owns the entire Barry Sadler album featuring "Ballad of the Green Beret?" ;)

What about ... Richie Rich and other Harvey-published comics? There's a ton of 'em -- 1960s and 1970s -- in the basement at Dad's house, in quite good condition.

If I learned anything during my first marriage (other than "never marry an only child, especially one with a comic book collection,"*) it's that the average consumer's idea of "in quite good condition" has almost no relationship to condition grades in the comic book and trading card market. Is there a white mark on the spine where a kid read the stupid thing? Downgrade by at least two levels. Is there a microscopic fold on one (or Og forbid) TWO of the corners of the covers? Might as well dig through the trash bin for another one just like it. A puzzlement to me!

*I kid, I kid.**

**Sort of...

Koxinga
11-05-2009, 11:58 PM
It's been a long time since I was really interested in collecting coins, but I retain enough of that numismatic feeling that this thing (http://cgi.ebay.com/2000-Painted-Walking-Liberty-Silver-Eagle-Dollar_W0QQitemZ270480935929QQcmdZViewItemQQptZCoins_US_Individual?hash=item3ef9eb8bf9) makes me grit my teeth every time I see it. (A modern silver bullion coin that has Lady Liberty *painted* in Red-White'n-Blue!) And of course, given my former interest in coins, well meaning relatives have given me a couple of just these things as a valuable gift!

MickNickMaggies
11-06-2009, 01:06 AM
my gramma insists that 'a collector' in the papers in looking for movie posters and would die for my Pulp Fiction poster.

Not even the people that come and buy people's things for well below what they're worth (and that's what 'the collector' in the paper is ) want a foam core video store poster, they want the theatre one-sheet posters.

But she also claims 16 year old shoes are the latest style because they are high heels. Just wait until she gets me to drag them to the resale shop. And the car ride home where she screams at me because they won't take them.

Harvey The Heavy
11-06-2009, 04:58 AM
"Collector's Edition" DVD's. They've got to be joking.

I think the most valuable collectibles are things that are rare on accident, like error cards and mis-struck coins.

CalMeacham
11-06-2009, 07:35 AM
Hmmmm...


Adfter reading this, I'm curious about the value of two packs of Magic, The Gathering cards I have. I have two completely unopened packs from the first year. They're in the original unbroken plastic wrappings (so obviously, I have no idea what's inside). A friend gave them to me, and I was never even curious enough to open them.


What do you think they'd be worth?

Recliner
11-06-2009, 07:54 AM
Baseball cards after 1975. Prior to that, cards were valuable because your mother threw them all out. After that, everyone "knew" the cards were valuable, so no one threw them out. It was made even worse after 1981, when Donruss and Fleer started making cards -- there were just too many cards and the law of supply and demand took over.

Even earlier cards seem to be dropping slowly in value, as people forget the players involved.

But all this is typical of any collecting bubble. Often, a certain item (baseball cards, Beanie Babies, comics, home mortgages, tulip bulbs, etc.) become collectable and people jump in and start speculating, buying them because they are increasing in value. Eventually, the bubble bursts and the value drops to nothing.

Remember how many people in your town thought they could turn this into a *retail* business? Mostly the baseball-card shops and the comic book stores which popped up like mushrooms in the...what, late 80s early 90s? And, while not quite brick and mortar, someone in town ran a Beanie Baby store out of their garage (for a month or so -- pretty sure that violated zoning). I'm actually amazed a few of these places stuck around...there were at least ten collectible stores riding the baseball-cum-comics-cum-magicthegathering wave.

ralph124c
11-06-2009, 08:05 AM
I will go out of my way for an old car show-I enjoy looking at cars from the 1930's-60's. What amazes me-the guys who own these heaps seem to think that their beloved car is made of gold-and that a "restoration" consists of slapping some parts from JC Whitney on, with a $199.00 MAACO paint job. Most of these cars are worthless (except to another such "collector"). The only old cars that fetch huge prices are unique, limited production cars, or oddballs (like the Tucker). So the old geezer who has a rusting old 1958 Edsel in his back yard-and thinks it's worth a million is deluding himself. You do hear(from time to time), of a bunch o valuable old cars found in a barn somewhere-but those instances are pretty rare.:D

Recliner
11-06-2009, 08:06 AM
I can't believe no one has mentioned Billy Beer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Beer) yet.

Beat me to it. Billy Beer is possibly THE supreme faux-collectible. I'm almost tempted to assemble a case of the stuff sometime.

Recliner
11-06-2009, 08:10 AM
No, but a significant fraction of the population bought it. And who could blame them? (http://ugo.com/music/best-album-covers/images/entries/Whipped-cream-and-other-delights.jpg) I mean, except for the music.

I was gonna say, did someone say $10 for a copy of this? I seriously can't think of an album i trip over more often. Maybe the Eagles Greatest Hits.

Icerigger
11-06-2009, 08:53 AM
A friend of mine spent hundreds of dollars on Xena cards, $300 for one card alone. I have not checked the Xena market lately but I would bet his "collection" is now worth about $20.

Skywatcher
11-06-2009, 09:01 AM
What I've done is I put an ad on Craigslist offering some family members' old records for free in exchange for digital recordings of them. I've gotten a couple of replies so far, from an audiophile/engineer and a hiphop artist. I haven't given them away yet though, I'm still waiting to schedule it.

I might be making a mistake in not charging for them, but I don't really know the condition of them and all, so I figured I wouldn't make much money on 100 random LPs. I did find the audiophile guy has an ad apparently offering to buy people's records AND do transfers, but I already tipped my hand.You could get a $70 USB turntable and do it yourself.

Skywatcher
11-06-2009, 09:11 AM
my mother collected Hummel figurines, and my aunt seemed to think I could sell them.Yeah, for anywhere between $30 and $1600, depending on the figurine and condition.

Recliner
11-06-2009, 09:18 AM
On the topic of Magic cards, some of them are valuable because they really do have a significant impact in the game. Black Lotus, for instance, is worth thousands of dollars, because it'll significantly improve pretty much any deck it's put into, and it hasn't been printed in decades. On the other end of the scale, though, they also made foil editions of some cards, explicitly for the sake of making them collectibles. Unfortunately, though, most of these foils are things like basic lands, which are the backbone of every deck, are produced in greater quantities than any other card, and will always continue to be printed for as long as the game exists. So a foil edition of a forest might be worth ten cents, instead of the five cents a regular forest would be worth.

I haven't played Magic in years, but if I recall pretty much any card that gets deemed an unfair "buyable" advantage (or simply any card that can unbalance the game) gets banned from tournaments. The Black Lotus is a specific one I recall (and I remember when everyone had their own bootleg copy, heh).

Peter Morris
11-06-2009, 09:23 AM
Hmmmm...


Adfter reading this, I'm curious about the value of two packs of Magic, The Gathering cards I have. I have two completely unopened packs from the first year. They're in the original unbroken plastic wrappings (so obviously, I have no idea what's inside). A friend gave them to me, and I was never even curious enough to open them.


What do you think they'd be worth?


Not much. There's practically no market for the unopened packs, they could be full of really crappy cards.I could pay you five bucks each for them if you want, and you won't get a better offer.

;)

Enderw24
11-06-2009, 09:24 AM
Hmmmm...


Adfter reading this, I'm curious about the value of two packs of Magic, The Gathering cards I have. I have two completely unopened packs from the first year. They're in the original unbroken plastic wrappings (so obviously, I have no idea what's inside). A friend gave them to me, and I was never even curious enough to open them.


What do you think they'd be worth?


Tell me what it looks like. Is it like the first pack in this link: http://wizards.com/magic/images/mtgcom/arcana1000/ask071008.jpg

If so, it's probably Alpha. It's possible it could be Beta as well. Check to see if it has "Unlimited Edition" or "Revised Edision" across the middle of it.

If it's one of the first two, it's quite likely you could get around $300-$400 apiece for them.

CalMeacham
11-06-2009, 09:29 AM
Tell me what it looks like. Is it like the first pack in this link:

It doesn't look like any of those. It's not a "Booster Pack". I think it's what's now called a "Starter Set". It's in a cardboard box sealed with plastic wrap; it's not sealed in an aluminized mylar pouch.

kenobi 65
11-06-2009, 09:40 AM
It doesn't look like any of those. It's not a "Booster Pack". I think it's what's now called a "Starter Set". It's in a cardboard box sealed with plastic wrap; it's not sealed in an aluminized mylar pouch.

Then, as Ender alludes to, it likely comes down to whether the packs are from a *very* early print run (Alpha or Beta), or are from the Unlimited or Revised sets. If they're from Alpha or Beta, there's a chance they'll have one or more of the "broken" cards, and that's what'd make them worth something.

I haven't played Magic in years, but if I recall pretty much any card that gets deemed an unfair "buyable" advantage (or simply any card that can unbalance the game) gets banned from tournaments. The Black Lotus is a specific one I recall (and I remember when everyone had their own bootleg copy, heh).

At least back when I played, there were some tournament types that allowed pretty much everything (though, those weren't common). And, there was always the brag-value of having a Black Lotus or a Mox.

Enderw24
11-06-2009, 09:46 AM
Gotcha. It's harder to tell then. The colors between Alpha, Beta, Revised, Unlimited and even 4th edition are pretty similar but still quite distinguishable if you know what you're looking for. Unlimited, Revised, and beyond will all display their set name.

If you can verify that it's Alpha or Beta, it can be worth significantly more than a booster pack. Possibly around $1200-1500.

Or...er...I'll beat Peter Morris's offer by an additional $5, but only because I'm feeling generous.

CalMeacham
11-06-2009, 09:49 AM
If you can verify that it's Alpha or Beta

How can I tell? I doubt if it's "Unlimited" -- these packs are from when MtG just started being widely distributed, and nobody knew what the heck they were. They're not later reproductions -- I know, because I received them then.

gonzomax
11-06-2009, 09:59 AM
Do Royal Dalton figures fall into this category? My wife has a few of those. She also has her original Barbie Dolls. She has a few Franklin Chairs also.

salinqmind
11-06-2009, 10:04 AM
Well, there goes my retirement fund. (sitting on pile of beanie babies, sobbing). I have some Warren Kimble country-animal folk art plates that I'm sure are worth squat, but I loved them when I bought them. I have a glass curio case in an out of the way corner filled with various resin tchotchkes and a few Lenox porcelain princesses, also worth squat, but they sure are purdy! and....I have a handful of Marvel comics from the 60's or 70's (Fantastic Four, X-Men) - Comic Book Store Guy would just laugh at them, though, they're pretty beat up....What's that Bible quote about not storing up treasures on earth?

Enderw24
11-06-2009, 10:14 AM
How can I tell? I doubt if it's "Unlimited" -- these packs are from when MtG just started being widely distributed, and nobody knew what the heck they were. They're not later reproductions -- I know, because I received them then.

Well one way is to post a clear picture up here for us to look at. Another is to go into a collectible card shop and let them take a look. A third way is to just sit on them for another 20-25 years. Chances are that at that point, they'll be worth about the price you paid for them. But who knows?

Skywatcher
11-06-2009, 10:22 AM
Do Royal Dalton figures fall into this category?Do you mean Royal Doulton? If so, they're European and have a value along the lines of Hummel.

kenobi 65
11-06-2009, 10:32 AM
We've got a number of Department 56 Christmas Village buildings. When we first started getting them, about 15 years ago, we were told to make sure we saved all the original packaging that came with them, because they were collectibles, and having all the packaging was important.

I've got no idea if any of them have appreciated in value, and I really don't care that much. I just set them up every Christmas. :)

FordTaurusSHO94
11-06-2009, 11:14 AM
I looked at Ebay for the prices of my comic from Archie Comics that I bought new in 1993 and it ranged from $40 to $99 with Buy It Now prices. The average was about $60. Not all comics from the 80's and 90's were worthless, just most.

FordTaurusSHO94
11-06-2009, 11:31 AM
Also, the Jack Ryan HD-DVD was recalled before it was even shipped and only a handful of copies got out. At one point, they were selling on eBay for around $800. In May of 2008, I found two copies sitting in a glass case at a Walmart in Colorado Springs for about $40 each. Since I had just hit the jackpot, I asked for both of them. They rang up as recalled and the guy put the behind the counter. No amount of bribing could convince him to hand them over.

JohnT
11-06-2009, 12:14 PM
I once spent 10-odd dollars on a Ruben Sierra rookie card! :D

(I don't collect much of anything, other than dust.) ;)

Darwin's Finch
11-06-2009, 12:36 PM
I think the most valuable collectibles are things that are rare on accident, like error cards and mis-struck coins.

Speaking of "on accident" and "Magic: The Gathering": I have 5 rares from 3rd Edition, which, in themselves, wouldn't really be worth all that much - they weren't exactly "broken" cards, like the aforementioned Moxes and Lotus. However, they are "broken", in the sense that because of a misprint, they are unplayable: the printing of the backs of each card is off by half (the upper half of the back is on the bottom, and the bottom half is on the top). I've kept them more for novelty sake; I doubt that there's much of a market for actual M:tG misprints.

Icerigger
11-06-2009, 01:24 PM
Was there not a Star Wars card misprint of some kind that is considered very rare and fetches
a good price?

Scumpup
11-06-2009, 01:29 PM
"Collectors Editions" of firearms virtually never appreciate in value at any greater rate than the standard version of the same gun. The best you can hope for with one, generally, is that you won't lose your ass on it.

DrFidelius
11-06-2009, 01:39 PM
I don't gamble, so I only collect things which I enjoy having around the house.

gigi
11-06-2009, 01:47 PM
You mean my father didn't buy that one for the music?!? :confused:

I was gonna say, even my father had it and it's not his kind of music at all!

kenobi 65
11-06-2009, 01:53 PM
Was there not a Star Wars card misprint of some kind that is considered very rare and fetches
a good price?

IIRC, there's an old Star Wars trading card on which the picture of C-3PO looks like he's got a very prominent "boy part". That might be the one you're thinking of. :)

Peter Morris
11-06-2009, 02:05 PM
According to Snopes, the version without the image is rarer.

http://snopes.com/movies/films/c3po.asp#add

sqweels
11-06-2009, 03:49 PM
Anyone want to guess who still owns the entire Barry Sadler album featuring "Ballad of the Green Beret?"
You mean besides me?

Mavis Topholese
11-06-2009, 03:52 PM
What about ... Richie Rich and other Harvey-published comics? There's a ton of 'em -- 1960s and 1970s -- in the basement at Dad's house, in quite good condition. I'm thinking it'll be a couple more generations before they're worth more than the paper they're printed on, because they're not superhero comics. Maybe they'll be valuable in 2050 or so, because so many were tossed due to lack of collector value at the time, and most who were involved in the production and consumption chain would be dead by then.



Prices on Harvey books spiked right around the time Macaley Culkin made that Richie Rich movie, and in general Richie Rich prices have been artificially high ever since. People seem to buy Hot Stuff comics for tattoo reference. Your typical Little Lotta or Little Dot can be priced anywhere from $1 to $20 depending on condition of the comic and mental condition of the seller. I find Little Audrey to be a little undervalued at times. Caspers and Wendys are fairly collectible owing to the cartoons, movies, etc., and some command respectable prices.

Yeah, I'm a grown adult who buys Harvey Comics. I draw the line at Baby Huey, though. There are limits.

Longtime Richie Rich artist Ernie Colon and writer Sid Jacobson recently released a graphic novel about 9/11. A lot of those guys are still around.

Elmwood, you ever want to clear a little space in your dad's basement, let me know.

badbadrubberpiggy
11-06-2009, 03:58 PM
Do Royal Dalton figures fall into this category? My wife has a few of those. She also has her original Barbie Dolls. She has a few Franklin Chairs also.

Regarding the Barbie dolls, vintage dolls in good shape can be worth several hundred dollars. Still in the box, about $500, again, depending on age of the doll, and how rare it was.

It depends on what she has and how well she's taken care of them. Look here (http://collectdolls.about.com/library/blgallpvinbarb.htm) for a few examples of some dolls that are worth a bit of money.

The "collecters" ones don't seem to be worth that much money - probably because everyone who ever collected Barbies got them, so there are tons of them still in their boxes.

sqweels
11-06-2009, 03:58 PM
My dad has some Spike Jones 78 rpm records ("Cocktails for Two" is autographed by Skipe Jones himself). I've often wondered what these are worth in the age of digital media.

thirdname
11-06-2009, 04:02 PM
You could get a $70 USB turntable and do it yourself.Yeah, but that costs me money, it would take my time, and it would be a very cheap turntable.

Mr Buttons
11-07-2009, 12:10 AM
Regarding the Barbie dolls...

The "collecters" ones don't seem to be worth that much money - probably because everyone who ever collected Barbies got them, so there are tons of them still in their boxes.

That's a collection my SO has, and she thinks it's worth a good amount of $$. The 5-6 I've Ebay'd showed up for $15-40 in box (which is her's condition). Alas, I lack the heart to tell her, and every damn christmas I shell out another $40-50 to buy the newest "Holiday" barbie or whatever.

Before anyone says why don't you correct her? It's a christmas present that slaps a huge smile on her face every year, and I don't wanna burst that bubble myself. I'd rather let her find out on her own.

dropzone
11-07-2009, 12:42 AM
Saw "Star Wars, Ep 4" on the first matinee and received a "May the Force Be With You" button for my efforts. It might be worth something.

Zoe
11-07-2009, 12:58 AM
I have been told that first editions of some of Stephen King's books can be valuable. One of them that she mentioned was The Stand.

First Editions of Louisa Mae Alcott's books are valuable.

In the Reader's Digest article linked to in the OP, they showed a copy of Ulysses by James Joyce. I don't think the one that they showed is the one that is most sought after: There was one edition that was very limited. An artist -- Matisse, perhaps, -- did the book jacket and signed all copies. Joyce signed maybe a third of the copies.

I made it a point of buying a copy of this novel at Shakespeare & Co. Bookstore in Paris since that is where it was originally published. Unfortunately, all they had available was a paperback!

Justin_Bailey
11-07-2009, 02:47 AM
I have been told that first editions of some of Stephen King's books can be valuable. One of them that she mentioned was The Stand.

I sold a chewed to hell and back ex-library first edition of The Stand for $40-50 a year or so ago. I can't imagine what a mint condition copy would go for.

hajario
11-07-2009, 10:18 AM
Saw "Star Wars, Ep 4" on the first matinee and received a "May the Force Be With You" button for my efforts. It might be worth something.

They have a bunch of them on ebay with buy it now prices of under $10. There are a few different designs so they may not be like yours. My guess is that they made many tens of thousands of those things and almost all of them were saved.

Spoke
11-07-2009, 02:28 PM
Remember how many people in your town thought they could turn this into a *retail* business? Mostly the baseball-card shops and the comic book stores which popped up like mushrooms in the...what, late 80s early 90s? And, while not quite brick and mortar, someone in town ran a Beanie Baby store out of their garage (for a month or so -- pretty sure that violated zoning). I'm actually amazed a few of these places stuck around...there were at least ten collectible stores riding the baseball-cum-comics-cum-magicthegathering wave.

I know of one comic book shop that I'm told is a money-laundering front for a bookie business. I can't imagine them staying in business on comic book sales alone.

ralph124c
11-07-2009, 02:43 PM
In 1957, the Bank of Boston (now long-gone) issued a little pamphlet, upon the occasion of the Mayflower II sailing from Plimoth, England, to Plymouth, MA, USA. The book is signed by Captain Alan Villiers (the captain of the Mayflower).
How would I get this item appraised?

hajario
11-07-2009, 03:25 PM
In 1957, the Bank of Boston (now long-gone) issued a little pamphlet, upon the occasion of the Mayflower II sailing from Plimoth, England, to Plymouth, MA, USA. The book is signed by Captain Alan Villiers (the captain of the Mayflower).
How would I get this item appraised?

Do you really think that there's a market for pamphlets commemorating publicity stunts from the 1950's? Based on what I read in Wiki, Villiers seems to be a fairly famous mariner so that adds to it, I guess. Still, in order for something to have value, there has to be demand for it. First editions of his early books have "buy it now" prices of $30 on ebay.

Guinastasia
11-07-2009, 09:02 PM
I can't believe no one has mentioned Billy Beer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Beer) yet.

What about Olde Frothingslosh (http://cordic-and-co.com/oldefrothingdex.htm)?


I have some Beanie Babies simply because I like stuffed animals (shut up). I've only left the tags on because they have the names on them. I also have some dolls and a Franklin Mint "Titanic Doll" but mostly for the sake of the clothes.



Has anyone ever watched "Pawn Stars" on The History Channel?

gonzomax
11-07-2009, 09:28 PM
What about Olde Frothingslosh (http://cordic-and-co.com/oldefrothingdex.htm)?


I have some Beanie Babies simply because I like stuffed animals (shut up). I've only left the tags on because they have the names on them. I also have some dolls and a Franklin Mint "Titanic Doll" but mostly for the sake of the clothes.



Has anyone ever watched "Pawn Stars" on The History Channel?

Sure, they buy practically anything, cannons, guns, swords, artwork, Rollexes, Cars, airplanes.

LurkMeister
11-07-2009, 10:16 PM
Has anyone ever watched "Pawn Stars" on The History Channel?

I got hooked on it a while back (btw, new episodes start airing next Saturday) and find it an interesting insight into what's collectible and what isn't. I'm also fascinated by the people who expect them to pay full "collector" value for things; don't people realize that dealers never pay full price for something because the dealer is only buying it to resell it at a profit? If you want full price, sell it directly to a collector yourself. Of course, be prepared to pay listing/auction fees, shipping, etc.

Jamicat
11-07-2009, 10:32 PM
Originally Posted by elmwood View Post
* Aren't McDonalds spoon-shaped coffee stirrers from the 1970s and 1980s worth some outrageous amount?
If you find at least one, its easy to make an injection mold for em.

I have beer cans (steel flat tops)from 1950's...and still worth nothing.
All my aluminum cans were worth more recycled. :mad:

needscoffee
11-08-2009, 12:15 AM
Thomas Kinkades will only go up in value.

Guinastasia
11-10-2009, 12:03 PM
I got hooked on it a while back (btw, new episodes start airing next Saturday) and find it an interesting insight into what's collectible and what isn't. I'm also fascinated by the people who expect them to pay full "collector" value for things; don't people realize that dealers never pay full price for something because the dealer is only buying it to resell it at a profit? If you want full price, sell it directly to a collector yourself. Of course, be prepared to pay listing/auction fees, shipping, etc.

What made me want to scream was the old guy who cleaned the gun with a wire brush. Instantly killing the value. Ugh!!! A wire brush. I was ready to puke.

Although the guys aren't always too smart themselves -- SOME of those items really should NOT be handled unless you're wearing white gloves. Old documents, and such.


Thing is, my "collectibles" are mostly family heirlooms, and while I'd be curious to know how valuable they are, I'm definitely NOT going to sell them.
(My great-great grandmother's silver hand mirror, an antique rocking chair that was the first piece of furniture my great-great grandfather bought when he came over from Ireland, his shillelagh, etc.)

badbadrubberpiggy
11-10-2009, 12:34 PM
Before anyone says why don't you correct her? It's a christmas present that slaps a huge smile on her face every year, and I don't wanna burst that bubble myself. I'd rather let her find out on her own.

If she loves them that much, she'll likely never try to sell them, anyway!

Green Bean
11-10-2009, 12:48 PM
My friend's mother kept every cork she could get her hands on and told us they would be worth a lot of money someday. I still have no idea what she was talking about.Well, what with global warming and all, people are going to be looking for nifty life raft materials.

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
11-10-2009, 12:51 PM
My bicentennial quarter collection. Ditto for the state quarters I've dutifully collected.
Your state quarter collection isn't worthless! It's worth $12.50. Enough to get a burger, fries, and shake--for two!

gang green
11-10-2009, 01:03 PM
I worked at a movie poster/comic book shop in the 90s and experienced a lot of the "collector edition", "first issue", "sixteen different foil covers" crap. Everybody in the business knew they would be worthless, but nobody is going to say that to the naifs who lined up to buy the Superman issue where he died. (We got news coverage for that. Crazy.)

I have some comics from childhood that I saved. I've made a grand total of about $6 from selling some old Little Dot issues, most of which were in dismal condition. I have some Harvey and Archie comics from the early to mid 70s, all of which are in good condition at best.

I have a couple of boxes of comics I got when I worked at the store. I doubt any of them are worth much. I have a full run of Sandman, but since they're all available in trade paper format now, the individual issues don't seem to have appreciated. I didn't buy them for their collectibility, thankfully, so I'm not really too bummed out by it all.

I sold 15 folios of old 78 rpm records recently for $15. No idea if I let them go too cheaply, but I don't really care. They had been sitting in my closet for years, and I have nothing on which to play them. I wish I'd thought to work out an arrangement to get digital versions from the buyer. There was some interesting stuff.

As for movie posters, as stated earlier, it has to be the movie version, not the video version, and having them mounted on something is generally viewed as major damage. I have a few pieces, the nicest of which is the original US 1-sheet for A Hard Day's Night. I think I paid $185 for it, and paid around $200 for a custom archival frame. I love it to pieces, and would never sell it. I would guess it would go for $350-$500 right now, because there's been so much Beatles interest lately.

I learned a lot about movie poster collecting while I worked there. Not as much about comics or trading cards, though we sold some. I think we were one of the few stores to carry the really odd cards, and the porn ones. Serial killers and Hustler cards sold quite well.

TreacherousCretin
11-10-2009, 01:05 PM
Anything at all produced for the expressed purpose of being a collectible.

On the nosey.

BubbaDog
11-10-2009, 01:18 PM
This thread prompted me to check the going price for the UHQR Pink Floyd - Dark Side of the Moon. (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&Item=190348059554&Category=306&_trkparms=algo%3DLVI%26its%3DI%26otn%3D2)

I bought a copy during the initial release for about $30.00. I can't remember my pressing number but I think its in the 3000 range. I might be able to get good money for it if I can convince a buyer that it's only been under the needle three times (true).

I have other UHQR and 1/2 speed masters that probably are worth about $5.00 more than I paid for them. Hardly worth the effort. But old Pinky paid off.

WordMan
11-10-2009, 01:25 PM
I have been told that first editions of some of Stephen King's books can be valuable. One of them that she mentioned was The Stand.

First Editions of Louisa Mae Alcott's books are valuable.

In the Reader's Digest article linked to in the OP, they showed a copy of Ulysses by James Joyce. I don't think the one that they showed is the one that is most sought after: There was one edition that was very limited. An artist -- Matisse, perhaps, -- did the book jacket and signed all copies. Joyce signed maybe a third of the copies.

I made it a point of buying a copy of this novel at Shakespeare & Co. Bookstore in Paris since that is where it was originally published. Unfortunately, all they had available was a paperback!

Stephen King: His early firsts, up through, say, The Dead Zone have value. Books like The Shining, if you can believe it, were heavily remaindered, so you find a lot of firsts with a swipe of speckled paint on the bottom edge of the pages, which is how the publisher (Doubleday?) remaindered that book. The Stand is just a big, dumbly-made book - it was "perfect bound" (a technique where they glue, not sew, the page bundles to the hardback boards); the spine collapses if you look at it funny, so a tight-spined first edition can command more $$. Beyond his initial books, his firsts quickly become valueless (IMHO) "hyper moderns" unless you are talking about limited edition runs, etc. Back in the heart of my collecting days I could find firsts of the Stand for $100 no prob, but it has gone up and appears to be in the top tier of King books from a collectibility standpoint...

Alcott - some are valuable, like Little Women. You need to check Bookfinder.com - in my experience, other books written by authors known for 1 or 2 high spots can often be worth a LOT less vs. the actual titles they are best-known for.

Ulysses - you are thinking of the Limited Editions Club version what was published well after the first edition. Yes, Matisse was signed on, but he thought the illustrations were meant to be for the original Greek Ulysses / Odysseus and when he realized it was for Joyce's post-modern, experimental work, he balked or made comments about not liking it or something, which led Joyce to stop signing.

In terms of the actual first edition - I believe there were 1,000 copies published in 3 tiers - the priciest was maybe 50 copies, then next at 200 and the true "first trade" edition was something like 750 copies. The most limited, as you might imagine, commands the highest prices these days...I have a first US (published 12 years later in 1934 after the Supreme Court ruled on the obscenity charges against it...)

Icerigger
11-10-2009, 02:12 PM
As for movie posters, as stated earlier, it has to be the movie version, not the video version, and having them mounted on something is generally viewed as major damage. I have a few pieces, the nicest of which is the original US 1-sheet for A Hard Day's Night. I think I paid $185 for it, and paid around $200 for a custom archival frame. I love it to pieces, and would never sell it. I would guess it would go for $350-$500 right now, because there's been so much Beatles interest lately.

I have an 8x11 poster from the 1925 silent film The Lost World. I don't know what the poster should be called, a flyer, herald, handbill, lobby card? My grandfather who worked in a movie theater in the late 1920s just had it with some of his old papers. The poster is rubber stamped with: Admission 15 cents! I have searched for it from time to time on E-Bay or other movie sites but have never found it, I wonder if it would be worth anything?

Skywatcher
11-10-2009, 02:18 PM
I have an 8x11 poster from the 1925 silent film The Lost World. I don't know what the poster should be called, a flyer, herald, handbill, lobby card?That's standard size for a lobby card of the period. Take it to Roadshow next time they're in your area!

Guinastasia
11-10-2009, 02:31 PM
Reminds me of my grandmother always telling me, "don't take them out of the box!" whenever she'd buy me a "collectible" Barbie doll. :rolleyes:

It's not like I want them for the value -- just because I like Barbies. (I have Audrey Hepburn from Breakfast at Tiffanys, a ballerina from Swan Lake, Galadriel, etc)

gang green
11-10-2009, 02:49 PM
I have an 8x11 poster from the 1925 silent film The Lost World. I don't know what the poster should be called, a flyer, herald, handbill, lobby card? My grandfather who worked in a movie theater in the late 1920s just had it with some of his old papers. The poster is rubber stamped with: Admission 15 cents! I have searched for it from time to time on E-Bay or other movie sites but have never found it, I wonder if it would be worth anything?

I've been out of the business for some time, and I don't recall us getting any silent movie stuff. 8x11 is not a standard size for posters of a later date, and by later date, I mean in the 30's and forward, which is all I'm familiar with.

What kind of paper is it on? Most movie posters (except for the full sheets - 1, 3, 6, etc.) were printed on heavier stock, almost card stock. Lobby cards were also printed on an interesting woven linen stock - they don't age well, and can crack if not handled carefully. There's a pretty good guide about poster sizes and types here (http://practical-home-theater-guide.com/poster-sizes.html).

At any rate, I'm not really qualified to answer any questions about movie poster values. It's been about 12 years since I left that job, and I haven't kept up with it. I can usually tell if a poster is genuine, but my feel for prices is long gone.

Just to prove it, I looked up my Hard Days Night 1-sheet. It's worth more like $1200 now. Nice to know.

Mtgman
11-10-2009, 03:12 PM
Hmmmm...


Adfter reading this, I'm curious about the value of two packs of Magic, The Gathering cards I have. I have two completely unopened packs from the first year. They're in the original unbroken plastic wrappings (so obviously, I have no idea what's inside). A friend gave them to me, and I was never even curious enough to open them.


What do you think they'd be worth?
Alpha Starter, with picture for comparison (http://trollandtoad.com/p79469.html) ~$2100 If the starter deck looks like this and doesn't have a UPC code on the bottom, it's alpha.

Beta Starter, with picture for comparison (http://trollandtoad.com/p80116.html) ~$1100. If the starter deck looks like this and does have a UPC code on the bottom, it's beta.

Unlimited Starter, with pic, and "unlimited edition" printed on it (http://trollandtoad.com/p90085.html) ~$650

Revised (http://trollandtoad.com/p87558.html) and later aren't worth dealing with. The exception would be a "Summer Magic (http://reviews.ebay.com/Magic-The-Gathering-Summer-Magic-Edgar_W0QQugidZ10000000001454825)" starter, but the general consensus is that they don't exist(and they would be mid 94 instead of mid 93). If you could produce a starter deck or two of summer magic they would be worth tens of thousands each and turn the uber-collector's worlds on their ears.

Enjoy,
Steven

badbadrubberpiggy
11-10-2009, 03:44 PM
I'm stunned to read they're even worth that much. I usually see those albums in the dollar bins at the flea market.


Turn them into bowls (http://etsy.com/search_results.php?search_type=handmade&search_query=record+bowls&order=date_desc&ship_to=), and they'll be worth more!

Some of these are actually pretty awesome.

MaxTheVool
11-10-2009, 04:26 PM
My grandfather subscribed to Astounding Magazine from the late 20's/early 30's up through the 80's (at some point it changed its name to something else... maybe Analog?)

At some point I will inherit the entire collection. Anyone have any idea what it would be worth?

gang green
11-10-2009, 06:26 PM
My grandfather subscribed to Astounding Magazine from the late 20's/early 30's up through the 80's (at some point it changed its name to something else... maybe Analog?)

At some point I will inherit the entire collection. Anyone have any idea what it would be worth?

As a rule of thumb, anything like magazines, movie posters, comics, etc. that is pre-WWII will be worth significantly more than stuff that's postwar. One of the reasons for this is during the war, there were many patriotic recycling drives, and paper was one of them. Lots of disposable types of paper, i.e. stuff with no real monetary value, was destroyed at this time. This is why Golden Age comics, especially in great condition, command such high prices. Rarity is kind of built in.

As with any paper collectible, but especially in the magazine/comic market, condition is a big factor. I have no knowledge of Astounding Magazine, but apparently it was a pretty well-known rag with some big names contributing. I'd say keep it dry, cool, and in the dark, and take a few of them to a reputable dealer and see if he thinks the collection has value.

spifflog
11-14-2009, 12:03 PM
Completely untrue. Go to http://beckett.com and start looking up some recent cards, while they won't match the $25,000 someone could pull down for a 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle, to say they're worth nothing is ridiculous.

Sure the card is listed in a magazine for that. Just try SELLLING it for that. The sports card business is one way.

Trepa Mayfield
11-14-2009, 12:11 PM
I don't know about that...allegedly, they stopped making them because they were popularly used for snorting cocaine. No idea if that's true.

Heroin, actually. And the mcdonalds spoon was so popular for that purpose that black market smugglers would sell heroin in units of "Mcspoonfuls".

hajario
11-14-2009, 12:37 PM
Heroin, actually. And the mcdonalds spoon was so popular for that purpose that black market smugglers would sell heroin in units of "Mcspoonfuls".

Definitely cocaine too. Why can't it be both? I was a young teen then but I knew older kids and in Los Angeles it was commonly used for coke.

HelloKitty
11-14-2009, 01:39 PM
Speaking of Star Wars, one of my college roomates had a REVENGE of the Jedi movie poster. Always wondered what that might have been worth.

After the use of many pushpins and scotch tape on the corners, probably not as much as it could have been...

Guinastasia
11-14-2009, 06:16 PM
Isn't the most valuable baseball card Honus Wagner's? Because at the time they were sold as tobacco ads and Wagner was against the idea of tobacco use being promoted among children.

Skywatcher
11-14-2009, 06:50 PM
Isn't the most valuable baseball card Honus Wagner's?Right. Because at the time they were sold as tobacco ads and Wagner was against the idea of tobacco use being promoted among children.Close. They were sold with tobacco products, similar to cards later being sold with bubblegum, and his granddaughter did say he didn't want young fans buying tobacco products to get the card.

Justin_Bailey
11-14-2009, 07:27 PM
Sure the card is listed in a magazine for that. Just try SELLLING it for that. The sports card business is one way.

True. But that doesn't change the fact that a lot of sports cards are worth money. If you're smart about it (and a little bit lucky), you can make a killing buying and selling sports cards.

ministryman
11-17-2009, 04:12 PM
Anything produced by the Franklin Mint.


I'll drink to that....

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