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Cubsfan
12-01-2009, 03:14 AM
So I got the new Stephen King book Under the Dome and it's just over 1000pgs. I'm curious how long it takes most people to finish a book this large.

Assuming that it's a book that you are enjoying, though maybe not rabidly loving. It's fiction and not incredibly heavy reading (assume its a Stephen King book).

How many pgs/hr do you read?

How many hours would you normally devote to a book in a day?

How many days would it take you to finish a book this size?

I tend to read about 40 pgs/hour. I'm a slow reader. I figure it's going to take me a month to finish this book as I can only devote a couple hours a day to it.

Spectralist
12-01-2009, 03:17 AM
I've never attempted to measure my speed per word or page or anything. But the first hundredish pages of a 1k page book would probably take about 2-5 days. Then, were it interesting enough, I'd read the rest In a day or so. It generally takes a while for me to "get into" a book. But once I'm into it I can't put it down.

Declan
12-01-2009, 03:22 AM
Depends on the book and author.

Just finished reading Torch of Freedom by David Weber, took about three and a half hours.

Declan

Nava
12-01-2009, 03:46 AM
Depends on what else I'm doing; currently, I pretty much only read for fun while cooking or traveling. The last Pratchett I got, I read almost in one sitting (with breaks due to things like having class, having to stop because I was laughing too hard and refueling), it took me some four hours. It's 496 pages.

So it looks like the case proposed in the OP would take about 8 hours.

Lynn Bodoni
12-01-2009, 04:09 AM
If I'm just reading, that is, if I'm not currently engaged in any other leisure activity, and I like the book, it'll take me about half a day. Usually I do several different leisure activities each day, such as reading this board, computer/video games, reading or re-reading a book for pleasure, as opposed to reading for education, some needlework, etc.

Cubsfan
12-01-2009, 04:18 AM
Holy shit! 8 hours? Half a day? To read 1000+ pages!!

Damn. I'm much slower than I thought.

(Really? A half day for 1000 pages???)

Lynn Bodoni
12-01-2009, 04:25 AM
I've always been a very, very fast reader.

When I was on bed rest, I was going through 3-5 novels a day. This was back in the late 70s, when novels (especially science fiction novels) were much shorter, but I read both newspapers daily, and I believe that I was also reading two newsmagazines (Time and US News and World Report, I believe) and several other SF magazines every month, as well. Again, this was back in the late 70s, and at the time we only had broadcast TV, and I'm not much of a TV watcher anyway.

HazelNutCoffee
12-01-2009, 05:12 AM
It takes me about 5-6 hours to finish a thick fantasy novel if I'm really into it. (700-800 pages? I'm not sure.) On long flights I forcibly slow my pace down so I don't go through all my books too quickly.

I think I read The Stand in 2-3 days. I don't have time nowdays to sit for hours and hours just to read.

aruvqan
12-01-2009, 05:44 AM
Some people are slow readers, my brother never managed to beat his dyslexia and reads something like 10 words per minute. Others read in a more normal range, 40-90 words per minute, I tested in 6th grade at 800 words per minute. I could do one of the old SRA reading comprehension (https://sraonline.com/products.html?tid=4) folders in under a minute. Only think that kept me from finishing the entire box in a day was having to share with the rest of the class.

I can speed read [deliberately reading as fast as possible, not for entertainment] at 2500 words per minute at 80% comprehension as tested when I was in college. I prefer not to read that fast.

I carry my library of electronic books on my phone, previously I carried it in a palm PDA. I could finish the new King novel in about 4 or 5 hours.

Isamu
12-01-2009, 05:59 AM
I'm pretty sure I've never read a novel in a single sitting. Unless I'm stuck somewhere with nothing else to do, I usually read only about 40 to 50 pages in a shot, i.e., I'm reading in those small parcels of time when I don't have to do anything else. So it's difficult to calculate how long it would take.

Also, I'm a pretty slow reader, often suffering from the 'read the same paragraph 4 or 5 times' curse, because something in the paragraph takes me on a different train of thought and although I'm reading the words on the page, my mind is elsewhere.

Guestimating, I would say, for a 1000 page book that I really enjoyed, it would take me about three weeks to finish, but for a 1000 page book that I wasn't enjoying so much, maybe 6 weeks.

gladtobeblazed
12-01-2009, 07:02 AM
I like to go through the dialogue as naturally as possible, as though I were reading a play. I like to sort of play a movie in my mind as I go through a novel. I figure about 10-20 pages per hour.

This is also how I tend to read threads here; as though the posters were actually speaking to one another.

PunditLisa
12-01-2009, 07:47 AM
The newest 900 page Diana Gabaldon novel took me about 5 days to read, in between work and life. Some days I can read quickly, other days I fall asleep the second my eyes rest on the page.

Desert Nomad
12-01-2009, 08:07 AM
I'm a fast reader. I read a 400+ page John Grisham novel in about 6 hours... that's a guess as it was on a 13-hour-long flight last week. Started it over Newfoundland and finished over the Black Sea with time for a meal and a nap.

otternell
12-01-2009, 08:43 AM
Stephen King - I can't put his books down ever (well except Hearts in Atlantis) so I could totally wrap that up in a day or two. Depends on the distractions, thought with SK, I am pretty resistant to distraction.

silenus
12-01-2009, 08:52 AM
If it's fiction, I'll burn through it in no time. I generally read for entertainment at a little better than 800 wpm. Of course, it helps if you know the author and style before starting. Tom Clancy just flies, because I know when to skip paragraphs (hell, pages!) of description and dive in again when the plot resurfaces. Gabriel Garcia Marquez, OTOH, I tend to read more slowly. It also depends on how well I like the story. New Terry Pratchett tends to get read in one or two intense evenings.

Malleus, Incus, Stapes!
12-01-2009, 09:05 AM
I'm an extremely fast reader. So... depending on how much free time I had, probably one or two days.

If I have no work to do and a lot of medium-sized books around, I can do three a day, but I only really have time for that on weekends.

It's funny how these things go in the family. My brother can read nearly as fast as I can, but my mother is average and my father is r e a l l y slow.

Zsofia
12-01-2009, 09:23 AM
If I've got all day, like I'm sick or whatever, and I'm into it like a good Stephen King book (not, say, The Tommyknockers) I'll take it down in a day. I'm just a fast reader, is all, and when I'm really into it I don't put it down. I've been burning through those little JD Robb mysteries lately and read three in two days so far - if it's a pageturner, I read fast. If I don't have a lot of time, maybe a week.

elbows
12-01-2009, 09:38 AM
Yeah, I'm a fast reader too! Depending on the writing and my interest in it, if I had no distractions and found it compelling I could read it in a day, no worries.

I actually went through a phase where I was bored with regular sized books as they were over and done so quickly. I was hooked on great big books for a time in my youth. I found 'The Alexandria Quartet' and was in heaven, y'know, for a week or so!

Zsofia
12-01-2009, 10:38 AM
Of course, if it was non-fiction or complex prose it would take me quite a bit longer.

Oredigger77
12-01-2009, 10:50 AM
I thought I was a fast reader but some of you guys are nuts.

I typically read at about a page a minute. I can read faster but my comprehension slips and I typically don't want to miss anything. If I'm enjoying the book 1000 pages typically takes me a day but that is a day where I don't do anything else except have a TV or music on in the background. With work, TV shows I want to watch, working out, and surfing the internet I only have about 2 hours a day to read and then it still has to a real good book to get that much time.

Enderw24
12-01-2009, 11:02 AM
I'm a slow reader. I mean, I consider myself to be smart and, ya know, fluent in this here English language. But my reading clocks in at around a page every 2-3 minutes. I could read a bit faster than that, but I start losing all comprehension of what I'm reading.
I'm reading a 1000 page book right now (Gai-Jin) and I've got at most the bus ride to and from work to read during the day. It's taken me, like, two months to kill that sucker.

My wife, at a conservative estimate, reads at around 4x the speed I do. I have no clue how she does it. And it drives me absolutely bonkers when she decides to read the same book I'm reading during the same time period I am.

Projammer
12-01-2009, 11:08 AM
I also estimate my time at a page a minute for leisure reading. I can read faster or slower depending on my goals and reasons for reading the materiel.

bup
12-01-2009, 11:11 AM
Of course it really depends on the book. Infinite Jest took me about a month - 1000 pages, not particularly large type, stream-of-consciousness.

Bill Clinton's My Life, about 3 weeks.

Harry Potter and the 900-page adventure, about 3 days.

Peg Leg
12-01-2009, 11:20 AM
Um, I read David Copperfield (1200ish) and that took me like 3 weeks. I'd read like 80 pages in like 2hrs.

Crying of Lot 49 took me 4hrs.

I'm very slow when i'm trying to read a story. Newspapers and stuff I breeze through.

rhubarbarin
12-01-2009, 11:21 AM
When reading novels I have a rate of 3-4 pages per minute. King is a quicker read so we'll say 4ppm.

I don't have a ton of time to devote to reading any more, though, so it might take me a few days.

Really Not All That Bright
12-01-2009, 11:25 AM
I just read a 600-page paperback in three nights (I usually just read before going to sleep, and sometimes before getting out of bed on weekends).

I read much more slowly if I've already read the book.

ivylass
12-01-2009, 12:06 PM
It probably took me a week and a half, but then, I didn't read it straight through.

mnemosyne
12-01-2009, 01:02 PM
I've never actually timed myself, but I know that I read the first 5 Harry Potter books in about 6 days of 9-5ish reading (I was unemployed and I'd stop reading when my husband came home from work). I read Christopher Moore's Fool in less than 4 hours on a plane, with breaks for meals.

Dung Beetle
12-01-2009, 01:27 PM
I used Under The Dome to estimate my speed just recently, so I could figure out how many days to take off from work (a new SK book is a holiday as far as I’m concerned). It was approximately 100 pages per hour.

I did take a day off and burned through most of it in one sitting. However, my usual time allotment for reading is about half an hour per day, and on some sad days, I don’t get to read at all. So it takes me around a week to get through the average book.

Redwing
12-01-2009, 01:34 PM
It varies, I read novels very quickly, and if I'm rereading something it's even faster. Last time I was ill, I reread all of Prachett's Guard novels, and a pile of Tamora Pierce that my wife had lying around, in a single day. Non-fiction depends a great deal on subject matter and era it was written in, but is always vastly slower than fiction.

I'm wierd though; I learned to read much later than most people (between second and thrid grade) due to an ugly combo of dyslexia and adhd. Part of that process was being taught how to visualize a story as I'm reading it, so I experince many books almost as movies.

Snowboarder Bo
12-01-2009, 01:36 PM
I'd say 8-10 hours depending on how good the book is. I read fast. I typically go thru 20-30 books a month.

luv2draw
12-01-2009, 02:48 PM
Hey, don't worry about how fast. Slow down enough to enjoy it.

I remember I read a Stephen King book (might have been The Stand) and was so into it that I spent the ENTIRE weekend reading it. And I mean entire. I sat down after work on Friday night and except for eating, bathroom and sleeping, I never put the book down until I went to sleep on Sunday night and got up Monday a.m. for work. And I still wasn't finished.......

Like is a little more complicated now and I just couldn't find a block of time like that again. Too bad.

Snowboarder Bo
12-01-2009, 03:42 PM
Heh. Fortunately I keep my daily schedule pretty open. I don't make much money, but I spend a lot of time reading/playing guitar/playing video games/hiking/kayaking/etc.

I loves me some free time!

Ponch8
12-01-2009, 03:56 PM
It takes me about 2-3 minutes to read a page. The most I ever read in one sitting is probably 100-150 pages, so if I were really ambitious, I might be able to read it in a week. In real life, it takes me about a month to read a book that size.

Quartz
12-01-2009, 05:06 PM
I read such books quite fast - 150+ pages an hour, faster if it's a larger print - but works like the Mitrokhin Archive rather more slowly. But I'm well aware that I do miss subtleties. So, if I've enjoyed the book, I'll re-read it.

Cat Whisperer
12-01-2009, 07:39 PM
I have never timed myself, but it looks like I'm in good company here as a faster-than-average reader. I like my books good and thick - those thin little books are just a snack now. :)

HISSNLISSN
12-01-2009, 08:18 PM
I read Infinite Jest in two weeks.

I'm still slogging through Robert Fisk's The Great War for Civilization: The Conquest of the Middle East. First cracked it open months ago.

It depends.

Sateryn76
12-01-2009, 09:42 PM
If it sucks me in, really fast. I just did Under the Dome last weekend, and I started it on Friday night, and finished on Saturday in the late afternoon.

It's one of those things - when I would take a break, and the house was quiet, I had to remind myself that I was not stuck under a dome in Maine. Am I the only one that happens to?

robby
12-01-2009, 09:43 PM
Back during summer vacation when I was 13 years old, I read The Hobbit in a single sitting one day.

That same summer, I also read James Michener's The Source in a single sitting one day. IIRC, the paperback edition that I read was 1,088 pages long. That's likely a record for me.

When I was 10 years old, my 5th grade teacher spent weeks reading Where the Red Fern Grows to the class. When he stopped the day's reading one Friday near the climax, I begged to borrow the book for the weekend because I couldn't wait to see what happened next. I ended up reading the whole book from the beginning that night by flashlight in my room, under the covers. Even at that age, it only took me a few hours.

Nowadays, it takes me so long to finish a book, I usually lose interest before I finish it. That's mainly because I have a lot more distractions in my life now. Plus, I read a lot more non-fiction now, so it's not like I'm actually following a story.

Nzinga, Seated
12-01-2009, 09:50 PM
I won't read Under the Dome, as I have traumatized myself with Stephen King as a kid, and now am scared to read his stuff.

That said, it takes me forever to read a 1000 page book. Especially when there are certain paragraphs I have to repeat for comprehension.

Rigamarole
12-01-2009, 09:56 PM
Some of you people are nuts. I mean it's one thing to recognize all the words you're looking at and get the gist, but how can you really digest so much text in so short a time? When I am reading I am also trying to visualize what I'm reading and that means going at a fairly slow pace. I haven't really timed myself, but I sure as hell can't read an 800 page book in 5-6 hours as some people have claimed in here. Not even close.

dalej42
12-01-2009, 11:04 PM
If there were no other distractions, I'd say 2 days. Now, that isn't likely to happen in real life, unless I'm sick in bed. As an adult, I'd see it would take me about a week. I try to take an hour in the morning to read as well as some time before bed.

Cat Whisperer
12-01-2009, 11:48 PM
If it sucks me in, really fast. I just did Under the Dome last weekend, and I started it on Friday night, and finished on Saturday in the late afternoon.

It's one of those things - when I would take a break, and the house was quiet, I had to remind myself that I was not stuck under a dome in Maine. Am I the only one that happens to?
Nope - when I really get into a book, I look around me sometimes and my real life seems unreal.

Rigamarole, I can read novels quickly (and I'm totally in the story, and visualizing all of it), but when it comes to non-fiction, my reading speed slows way down. Novels are an easy read.

Cubsfan
12-01-2009, 11:49 PM
When reading novels I have a rate of 3-4 pages per minute. King is a quicker read so we'll say 4ppm.

I don't have a ton of time to devote to reading any more, though, so it might take me a few days.

I just don't see how people can actually absorb that many pages of text that fast. If I just read the words as fast as I could without regard for comprhension I don't think I could cut through 4 pages a minute.

Do you visualize what you're reading or is it just words? Books tend to play like movies when I read. What is it like for you?

Nava
12-02-2009, 12:14 AM
Holy shit! 8 hours? Half a day? To read 1000+ pages!!

Damn. I'm much slower than I thought.

(Really? A half day for 1000 pages???)

Sorry, I just happen to be a fast reader. Lousy hand to eye coordination, though.

Do you like RPGs? There are many in which, when you create a character, you have to choose some sort of "talents" (the name changes by game); these are things which will not make that person show up in any Mutie Detector or enormously change the course of History, but which can sometimes come in real handy. They are also things which those who have them tend to take for granted, whereas those who don't can't figure out "how the bloody blazes does he do that?!?!" in a million years.

I happen to have the "can read maps" talent, the "fast reader" talent, the "can't really tell time except if it happens to be Time To Eat NOW" and the "can't toss a balled-up piece of paper into the trash can from a distance greater than minus half an inch" antitalent. Also the "can't run worth shite" and the "swims like a spastic frog" antitalents. No merit of mine on the positive ones, no blame on the others.

ETA: to answer your last question, if the book really grabs me, I visualize and hear the voices (which can be a problem if someone makes a movie), but I don't make an effort to do this, it just happens. If it's not happening by itself, I can't cause it to happen.

susan
12-02-2009, 12:30 AM
About 8-16 hours over 2-3 days, depending on how important nuance seemed to be. For King, closer to 8 hours.

Nava
12-02-2009, 12:31 AM
When I was in 11th grade, my school offered this special "study methods" training. Of course it wasn't the bad students who got signed up for it: it was those of us who were actually good students but whose parents would not have been satisfied if their child was a cross of the best qualities of Albert Einstein, Marie Curie and Charles Barkley.

About half of the program was spent on "learning to read faster;" according to the teacher, people who read following the text with a finger or vocalizing read at about 40 words per minute, those who don't at 70 words per minute; that is, normal readers read at about the same speed at which people speak. That's with perfect comprehension. Logically, a text that's difficult (vocabulary, typos, text composition, bad grammar) gets read more slowly. Text composition makes more of a difference for fast readers than for slow or normal readers (I read whole lines on books, one-third lines on the SDMB because the lines are too wide to process them as a single chunk; unjustified texts drive me bonkers).

Containing Iron
12-02-2009, 01:17 AM
Depends on the book and author.

Just finished reading Torch of Freedom by David Weber, took about three and a half hours.

Declan

Thank you for informing me it's out!

and now something on topic:

I used to read a lot when I was (supposed to be) studying (I think I once clocked myself on 100 pages per hour, but that was a Pratchett, on something a bit more technical I am a lot slower).
Since joining the work force this has petered out somewhat, so I think now it'll take me about 2 or 3 weeks to read a 1000 page book (I think I steal read as fast as I used to, but I generally just spend less time reading) and only if I like it and am not reading a bunch of other books at the same time.

Lynn Bodoni
12-02-2009, 01:20 AM
Some of you people are nuts. I mean it's one thing to recognize all the words you're looking at and get the gist, but how can you really digest so much text in so short a time? When I am reading I am also trying to visualize what I'm reading and that means going at a fairly slow pace. I haven't really timed myself, but I sure as hell can't read an 800 page book in 5-6 hours as some people have claimed in here. Not even close. I probably don't visualize as much as you do. In some cases, I try NOT to visualize, in fact, and I fail at this, and then I stay up when I should be sleeping because the clowns are, in fact, going to eat me. I remember reading part of one Stephen King novel, noting that it was time to go to bed, and then being too scared to turn off the lights until I'd made a little cross out of two bobby pins. And I'm an atheist!

Having said that, Stephen King books are EXTREMELY fast reads. They don't require a lot of mental effort on my part. I know that he'll probably set the story in rural New England, and that he'll have mostly sympathetic characters who are just so cute and folksy that I'm gonna want to throw up. A book by Vernor Vinge will take me much longer to get through, because he'll throw much more complicated concepts my way, and once I UNDERSTAND that the aliens are actually not individuals in one body, but each individual consists of several bodies, and an individual will change when its bodies die off and get replaced, I'll have to go back to the beginning of the book and re-read it with my new knowledge. Since Vinge might throw several of these concepts at his readers in one novel, I usually need to start over a couple of times. He'll usually have a brand new setting for each story, or so much time has passed between stories that the setting is almost the same as new. I swear, next time I'm taking notes when I start one of his new novels!

Too, you have to remember that people who would be interested in the Straight Dope in general, message boards in general, and the SDMB would tend to be pretty fast readers, people who read for amusement and have lots of practice at it. So I would expect that the Teeming Millions, on average, read more and faster than the average person who lives in the same area and has the same general background and education.

Crowbar of Irony +3
12-02-2009, 01:21 AM
It really depends on how engaging the plot is. I have known to devour entir 500-page novel in one night if the plot hooks me on. Yes, I be tired, I misread stuff and miss key sentences, but Iknow what happened.

Icerigger
12-02-2009, 05:09 AM
The paperback version of Shogun is 1200 pages and I read that in about 10 days, I was not trying to get through it as fast as possible.

Sateryn76
12-02-2009, 09:08 AM
I just don't see how people can actually absorb that many pages of text that fast. If I just read the words as fast as I could without regard for comprhension I don't think I could cut through 4 pages a minute.

Do you visualize what you're reading or is it just words? Books tend to play like movies when I read. What is it like for you?

This is totally how I read. As I said before, when I'm reading something, I am there. I picked up Duma Key last week, and have been reading it off and on. It's like my Tivo - I mentally hit the "play" key, and the movie is back on in my head.

This has led to many problems, with Stephen King in particular. His books are so easy to visualize that I know the exact layout of The Outlook Hotel, the jail in Shawshank Redemption and the market in The Mist. I also know how all of the characters look and how they sound. So when the movies come out, I automatically hate them because they're wrong.

Even though I have read the book 900 times, I couldn't make it through The Stand miniseries. Molly Ringwald as Frannie? That's absurd! I was actually getting mad because the dialogue wasn't exact....

I'm sure I'm in for a surprise when I get to vacation in Maine, since it will look nothing like I've imagined it ;)

Malleus, Incus, Stapes!
12-02-2009, 10:32 AM
I just don't see how people can actually absorb that many pages of text that fast. If I just read the words as fast as I could without regard for comprhension I don't think I could cut through 4 pages a minute.

Do you visualize what you're reading or is it just words? Books tend to play like movies when I read. What is it like for you?

My dad's theory is that my brother and I are so fast because we don't mentally pronounce the words, we just visualize. Whereas he needs to say every word in his head to understand what he's reading.

Zsofia
12-02-2009, 10:57 AM
Yeah, I didn't know other people heard the words in their heads until I spent at least an hour telling my boyfriend that, no, I don't hear the words in my head, who does that? He reads much more slowly than I do.

Stuffy
12-02-2009, 11:32 AM
So I got the new Stephen King book Under the Dome and it's just over 1000pgs. I'm curious how long it takes most people to finish a book this large.

Assuming that it's a book that you are enjoying, though maybe not rabidly loving. It's fiction and not incredibly heavy reading (assume its a Stephen King book).

How many pgs/hr do you read?

How many hours would you normally devote to a book in a day?

How many days would it take you to finish a book this size?

I tend to read about 40 pgs/hour. I'm a slow reader. I figure it's going to take me a month to finish this book as I can only devote a couple hours a day to it.


I'm not really sure, but I'll put it this way. I won't take a novel I'm half finised to a doctors appoinment, I don't want to get stuck reading out date magazines.

Zsofia
12-02-2009, 12:56 PM
That's part of why I bought a Kindle. Not only can you have several books on it, but you can buy them on the fly!

Spectralist
12-02-2009, 01:46 PM
Yeah, I didn't know other people heard the words in their heads until I spent at least an hour telling my boyfriend that, no, I don't hear the words in my head, who does that? He reads much more slowly than I do.

How on earth do you read with out sounding out the words? I've been trying for the last hour or so and it just doesn't work. Just glancing at a word makes me start pronouncing it automatically. Has anyone seen any studies on the way people read with regards to sounding/not sounding? I would be very interested in seeing if this is something that can be learned and how one would go about doing that.

Starving Artist
12-02-2009, 02:00 PM
I've been wondering about this as well.

And not only that, but I was taught by one of my junior high English teachers how to bring dialog to life and make it richer by infusing the characters' words with emotion appropriate to the situation--mentally sounding out the words like an actor would say them in a movie.

So I'm wondering about the quality of the reading experience if the words are only registered visually, as well as how to do it in the first place.

Sateryn76
12-02-2009, 02:04 PM
How on earth do you read with out sounding out the words? I've been trying for the last hour or so and it just doesn't work. Just glancing at a word makes me start pronouncing it automatically. Has anyone seen any studies on the way people read with regards to sounding/not sounding? I would be very interested in seeing if this is something that can be learned and how one would go about doing that.

No study, but for me personally, when I see the word, I don't see the letters or think about how it is spoken. I see what the word is supposed to represent. So, if I read "horse" in my brain, I'm not thinking "Hhhhh..orrr.sss..." I am thinking of a picture of a horse.

Then, I fill in the blanks based on the context, so if the horse is running, then the horse I see has hair blowing back, legs raised, etc. If the context describes the horse, I use that; if not, I make my own horse, say, a brown one with a white spot over his nose.

This is what makes it so tricky when they are translated for a movie. I'm also having an issue with my current read through of Duma Key - the main character is supposed to be white, but I still see him as a black guy, which is how I made him on my first read through. :smack:

Cat Whisperer
12-02-2009, 02:35 PM
You guys have got me thinking about visualizing versus sounding out the words - I would say that the words I'm reading are halfway between just looking at them and actually sounding them out in my head. Say if I was singing along with a song in my head, I would be sub-vocalizing the words. When I'm reading, it doesn't get that far - the words sort of go into my brain, create a picture, but aren't sounded out.

ETA: Fast readers don't actually look at all the words, either - we pattern match. It has happened to me more than once that I pattern-matched a word, it didn't make sense, then I had to go back and actually *look* at the word to see what was actually there. I had "seen" the word as I was reading - my brain filled in the pattern it expected.

Zsofia
12-02-2009, 03:07 PM
I don't see the horse either, I think horse. I don't see a picture of a horse, it isn't a movie, and I don't say "horse" in my mind, I just think horse.

Is it an abstract/concrete sort of divide? Do people who see movies or hear words in their heads have problems with abstraction in general?

Malleus, Incus, Stapes!
12-02-2009, 05:23 PM
How on earth do you read with out sounding out the words? I've been trying for the last hour or so and it just doesn't work. Just glancing at a word makes me start pronouncing it automatically.

I think what I'm saying (I haven't really thought about this much before) is that I don't need to consciously register the sound of a word to understand it. F'rinstance, if a character has a long name, I might not notice the actual pronunciation. So I'll be halfway through the book, or even finished, and I realize that I've been thinking of the Z-character as Zurven, but he's really Zuvierin. That's another thing- I'm a bit dyslexic when it comes to long or unfamiliar words. This includes real words that I just haven't heard people pronounce. So my family made fun of me when I said "imbecile" as "imbeccable". I'd just never registered that the way I was thinking it didn't match the spelling.

I do hear your post as words now, because it's just a short post (and because I'm thinking about it). But when I'm faced with an engrossing passage I forget to listen, I guess.

I do think every word when I'm typing. It drives me crazy because I have to spend several seconds on each individual word.

Stuffy
12-02-2009, 09:34 PM
I'm a visualizer much like Sateryn76 reading for me is like, well being there, in the passage. Most longer debates here I tend to visualize being in a group of people talking, or in a lot of cases stand-up.

robby
12-03-2009, 10:31 AM
ETA: Fast readers don't actually look at all the words, either - we pattern match. It has happened to me more than once that I pattern-matched a word, it didn't make sense, then I had to go back and actually *look* at the word to see what was actually there. I had "seen" the word as I was reading - my brain filled in the pattern it expected.Exactly. I've often had the same experience.

When I'm reading non-technical material, I'm not just reading individual words, either. I read groups of words and even whole phrases essentially simultaneously.

I think what I'm saying (I haven't really thought about this much before) is that I don't need to consciously register the sound of a word to understand it. F'rinstance, if a character has a long name, I might not notice the actual pronunciation.Me, too. I noticed with many fictional books that the pronunciation I associated with unfamiliar words (especially names) often had no relation to how the words were supposed to be pronounced.

Interestingly, for me, even when reading rapidly, I'm a great proofreader. Typographical errors and misspellings jump out for me even when reading rapidly. I've often had the experience where I'm rapidly reading something, and know that something is wrong somewhere. It often takes a few seconds to actually find the misspelled word buried in a paragraph. In that time, I would not be able to tell you exactly what is wrong, but could all but guarantee that there is some misspelling or even a grammatical error somewhere in the group of words I just read. This is a consequence of digesting whole chunks of words all at once.

I used to find reading to my son (when he young) exhausting, because it was just so slow.

Cubsfan
12-04-2009, 10:39 PM
I'm on page 500 now. I've spent 2.5-3 hrs a night since I started this thread.

Since the other Dome thread certainly has spoilers in it I can't read it but I will say that the characters in this book seem like caricatures or something. Particularly Big Jim and Barbie. Those characters are damaging the book for me because it's so distracting reading their passages. Big Jim is 100% bad and Barbie is 100% good. I dont like characters like that.

Back on topic I'm halfway through now.

Superhal
12-04-2009, 11:40 PM
I never measured myself at that many pages, but I do about 1.5 small print, paperback pages per minute (maybe a bit faster on the hardcover versions), so roughly 10-11.1 hours.

Hilarity N. Suze
12-05-2009, 12:03 AM
It really depends on the book. Some books are just page-turners.

For instance, years ago I read Shogun in the bathtub, and it took me three hours. Yes, the water got cold. However, that book has a couple of places where I was reminded that I needed to add more hot water.

I don't remember if it was over 1000 pages but it was a big fat paperback.

Zsofia
12-05-2009, 01:45 PM
You mean when they cooked those guys to death? :)

Superhal
12-05-2009, 02:57 PM
Some of you people are nuts. I mean it's one thing to recognize all the words you're looking at and get the gist, but how can you really digest so much text in so short a time? When I am reading I am also trying to visualize what I'm reading and that means going at a fairly slow pace. I haven't really timed myself, but I sure as hell can't read an 800 page book in 5-6 hours as some people have claimed in here. Not even close.

The visualization should speed it up. Have you ever been doing something so interesting, you lost track of time, and suddenly, 3-5 hours passed? That's the flow effect or flow experience, and occurs when doing something called "extensive reading."

Here's something I pulled off a reading study from google:

"She (http://extensivereading.net/er/renandyavietnam.html) explains these benefits with reference to the work of Csikszentminhalyi (1991) on the Psychology of Optimal Experience, i.e., by taking part in enjoyable, self-directed, goal-oriented activities, we experience a state called flow."

The citation above: Csikszentmihalyi, M. 1991. FLOW: The psychology of optimal experience. New York: Harper.

Personally, I find that my advantage in reading speed comes from being able to enter the flow state of mind quickly and effortlessly. When I'm done reading, I usually don't remember reading text, but I have a full movie in my head of the story with nearly perfect recall.

When I'm reading something that does not have a narrative (e.g. a research paper,) my reading speed drops to something like paragraph/minute, and I get irritable and cranky. Interestingly, however, I can achieve the flow experience when working with excel spreadsheets. After talking to reading teachers, we all agree that the inability to achieve the flow effect is the biggest difference between someone who hates reading and someone who does.

cmyk
12-05-2009, 04:01 PM
I just finished Under the Dome about a week ago. I was really into it, and cracked it open to read as often as I could, given my usual busy schedule. It took me about 7 or 8 days to get through. I'll do my heaviest reading before bedtime, but in this case, it consisted of me sitting down from 10pm to 4 am for a few nights once I was past half the book. ;)

By contrast, a typical 400 pager will take me about a week or two to get through if it's not particularly compelling. But if it's King or one of my other favorite authors, I'll go on a reading binge for a couple days and just soak it up.

Ahh, I love indulgent reading.

BigT
12-06-2009, 09:36 PM
It doesn't matter how big a book is, I have a compulsion to read it all the way through, and will have to get this done in 24 hours. If I don't, I'll forget what I'm reading, and it will become pointless.

So if I want to read a complex book, it has to be rather short

ThisSpaceForRent
12-07-2009, 12:42 AM
The paperback version of Shogun is 1200 pages and I read that in about 10 days, I was not trying to get through it as fast as possible.

Read Shogun in 24 straight hours...I was at in the Navy and at sea, had a day off. There is not a lot to do on a CGN when your underway and have a day off.

Infinite Jest took me a bit longer, two weeks or so. DFW was a tad harder to keep straight.

ymmv

Cubsfan
12-07-2009, 01:36 AM
I'm at pg 750 now.

I'm at the point where I want to be done with it so I can go into the other thread and post my opinions but I don't want to risk seeing what the dome is by going in there.

So far, I can say that I wish they would have focused more on the dome and exploring its properties, trying to escape and whatnot instead of the same-ole-same-ole character exposition as every other King book. I really like exploring characters motives and stuff but most of these characters seem about as deep as puddle so far. Most of the motivation behind why these characters follow Big Jim off the cliff like Lemmings is not satisfactorily explored.

I'll save that for the Dome thread when I get finished. I just hope this thing gets better. before it ends.

Zsofia
12-07-2009, 09:26 AM
Oh, honey, have you never read a Stephen King book before? If it's going to get good, it isn't going to happen near the end, I promise you. I'm not sure I've ever read one that wouldn't have been at least somewhat improved by not reading the last hundred pages, at least. And since Duma Key followed this tradition admirably, I'd guess his ability to end a book well has not improved with age. (Seriously, that one really had me until it started sucking donkey balls. When he came down the stairs to find somebody in the kitchen, it was a bright and sunny 2 PM where I was and the UPS man rang the doorbell and I literally almost peed my pants. Then, I dunno, stupid shit happened at the end and I didn't really care.)

Clothahump
12-07-2009, 10:20 AM
I've never decided whether to bless or curse my father for teaching me to read at a very young age. I became a natural speed reader and I absolutely devour books at an astounding rate. My personal library probably has well over a thousand books.

A 1000 page King novel? If I sat down with it at 8:00 in the morning and had uninterrupted reading time, I'd probably finish it by noon, maybe 1:00 p.m.

Kyla
12-07-2009, 10:32 AM
Obviously, it depends on the book. If it's a Stephen King bestseller-type novel, and I don't have anything else to do, a day. No problem.

OTOH, it took me like six months to read The Brothers Karamazov. Which was a lot more than 1000 pages.

Most of what I read are academic papers for school, and those are pretty time-consuming. If I have to read 100 pages of...I don't know, security policy, that could take me four or five hours. Mostly because I'd get bored and start screwing around on the internet after the first hour or so.

Hilarity N. Suze
12-11-2009, 02:29 AM
You mean when they cooked those guys to death? :)

Exactly.

Nava
12-11-2009, 02:38 AM
How on earth do you read with out sounding out the words? I've been trying for the last hour or so and it just doesn't work. Just glancing at a word makes me start pronouncing it automatically. Has anyone seen any studies on the way people read with regards to sounding/not sounding? I would be very interested in seeing if this is something that can be learned and how one would go about doing that.

If I couldn't read without souding out, there's several books I would not have been able to read. One of the reasons I moved to reading in English was to increase my vocabulary: that implied "learning new words which, due to English notions of spelling, I had no idea how to pronounce."

There's words I heard pronounced for the first time more than ten years after first having read them.

Annie-Xmas
12-11-2009, 08:28 AM
I timed myself on reading the unedited That Stand. It took me just under 26 hours.

jifuniversal
05-06-2012, 07:52 AM
I'm sorry to bring back an old one, but maybe some of you will help me anyway ;)

I feel lost and a bit helpless as it's final exam in Psychology in 11 days. And I have just opened the first book (1 out of 2)!! I've always been kind of a last-minute-person and somehow it's worked out most of the times. Now, I'm not sure sure..:smack:

So I mentioned I've got two books. The main one is basic psychology (mind and behaviour) and is about 8-900 pages. A big one too, so approx. about 1000 in "typical book" size. The other one, the history of psychology, is "typical book" sized and has about 350 pages. The big one is in english, which is not my first language as I'm norwegian, though it seems alright and not too advanced. The other one is in norwegian, so I suppose it'll be easier to get through.

I've read this thread and I'm shocked at how incredibly fast readers some of you are! Wow. I feel slightly calmer after reading you guys use only a few days to get trough so many pages!

What do you guys think? Am I doomed? I know it's different reading this stuff vs. a story, but I do find it interesting. Do you have any tips I could use?

Sampsiceramos
05-06-2012, 08:23 AM
Depending on the material and the desired level of comprehension, my rate of reading ranges from > 1 ppm to < 5 ppm. I've sped through "A Thousand Splendid Suns" in less than 2 hours a few years ago, and the 5th Harry Potter book twice in an evening (approx. 2*800 pages, so around 200-250 pages pr. hour, IIRC). That's one end of the extreme, at which I would suppose I achieve 85% comprehension.

The other end of the spectrum, which can quite quickly devolve into drudgery, is stuff like advanced mathematics or philosophy. In the case of the former, regarding something like algebraic geometry, I read at somewhere around 0.25-0.5 ppm, while in the case of the latter, I suppose I can manage 1 ppm when reading "Phenomenology of the Spirit" - a notoriously illegible book.

On my last formal reading test, in which memorization of the text was in essence required, I scored 500 wpm at 100% comprehension, and I was being very careful. My reading style, which involves no internal vocalization (I can barely imagine how one would even do that) or even conscious thought, means that the rate at which I read is in essence only limited by the max speed at which I can process visual input.

Sampsiceramos
05-06-2012, 08:31 AM
I'm sorry to bring back an old one, but maybe some of you will help me anyway ;)

I feel lost and a bit helpless as it's final exam in Psychology in 11 days. And I have just opened the first book (1 out of 2)!! I've always been kind of a last-minute-person and somehow it's worked out most of the times. Now, I'm not sure sure..:smack:

So I mentioned I've got two books. The main one is basic psychology (mind and behaviour) and is about 8-900 pages. A big one too, so approx. about 1000 in "typical book" size. The other one, the history of psychology, is "typical book" sized and has about 350 pages. The big one is in english, which is not my first language as I'm norwegian, though it seems alright and not too advanced. The other one is in norwegian, so I suppose it'll be easier to get through.

I've read this thread and I'm shocked at how incredibly fast readers some of you are! Wow. I feel slightly calmer after reading you guys use only a few days to get trough so many pages!

What do you guys think? Am I doomed? I know it's different reading this stuff vs. a story, but I do find it interesting. Do you have any tips I could use?

(I duly apologize for the double post - didn't see this until after I had posted my first post, but wanted to help anyhow - bolding mine.)

The single best tip I can give you is to try to read in "semantic units" instead of word-for-word, in the sense that you'll read faster if you focus on what the text is trying to convey, instead of breaking it as far down as words. That, and try to train yourself to process what you read "unconsciously", so to speak.

However, you should be aware that learning to read fast is something that, in my experience, is very much akin to learning a language. Unless you start with the right method, and do so at an early age, you'll never read at first-rate speed. If you have a current ppm<1, you might be able to force it up to 1 with the correct reading strategy, but it's unlikely that you'll ever manage to read as fast as, well, the rest of us :D

jifuniversal
05-06-2012, 08:50 AM
(I duly apologize for the double post - didn't see this until after I had posted my first post, but wanted to help anyhow - bolding mine.)

The single best tip I can give you is to try to read in "semantic units" instead of word-for-word, in the sense that you'll read faster if you focus on what the text is trying to convey, instead of breaking it as far down as words. That, and try to train yourself to process what you read "unconsciously", so to speak.

However, you should be aware that learning to read fast is something that, in my experience, is very much akin to learning a language. Unless you start with the right method, and do so at an early age, you'll never read at first-rate speed. If you have a current ppm<1, you might be able to force it up to 1 with the correct reading strategy, but it's unlikely that you'll ever manage to read as fast as, well, the rest of us :D

Thanks! :)) I agree on your tip, I'm just a little afraid I'll misunderstand something if I go too fast and read a word as another similar one, but I'll definitely try it out :) I can scan a page rather quickly, but I've just done it when I know what I'm looking for, and not for learning (and remembering!) what it says.

Yeah, haha, I have no high hopes of getting to your level! I just don't wanna fail this exam..to be honest I'd be happy with an E :eek:

Khadaji
05-06-2012, 09:57 AM
I just finished a 960 page book in 5 days. I read about 1.5 hours each night. A little more some nights, a little less others.

Arabella Flynn
05-06-2012, 09:45 PM
Speed depends on what it is and what language it's in. In English, my native language, I average out to about 100 pages per hour. Some things more, some things less -- when I finally caved and bought the first three Harry Potter books in a boxed set of paperbacks, reading them was the work of a Saturday afternoon.

I actually sat down and clocked this once because when I read in French, which was the first language I was taught formally in school, I drop to about 60pph. It feels excruciatingly slow to me.

The way very quick readers do it is that they mostly don't mentally pronounce the word as their eye skates across it. They have a very large "recognition vocabulary", or set of words they can identify by general shape alone. So instead of seeing "dog" and listening to your mental voice sound out "d..o..g" and associating the sound of "dog" with the image of a dog, you see the shape of "dog" and bam! mental picture of a dog. Saves a lot of time.

The way I can normally tell when I have a large enough recognition vocabulary in a language to read stuff without keeping a dictionary nearby is when I start forgetting what language I have read said stuff in. Without the subvocalizations, the language becomes transparent, and all I store is the information.

As for your studying, I would recommend that you read until the vocabulary you need for the test becomes recognition vocabulary. That'll save you all the time you spend reading key words. ;) Seriously, though -- to a large extent, you can learn to read faster by reading more, encountering more words, and becoming so familiar with them that you recognize them by vague shape alone. Once it's part of your recognition vocabulary, then it's just a matter of how good you are at visual pattern matching.

Trinopus
05-06-2012, 11:25 PM
Took me a month to get through Plutarch.

It was on a Kindle, so it's hard to estimate page count, but I'd say the rough equivalent of 1300 pages.

flatlined
05-06-2012, 11:51 PM
Its a novel? I read it in a day, but it didn't seem that long. I read fast when its junkfood for the mind. When I need to read and retain the info, I'm much slower. Now that I'm learning Latin, I slow down a lot while rereading the Cthulhu Mythos.

When I'm reading techy stuff, it can take me an hour a page.

LouisB
05-07-2012, 03:52 AM
If I had nothing else to do and if the book was interesting, it would probably take me 2-3 days.

Chessic Sense
05-07-2012, 12:11 PM
I'm sorry to bring back an old one, but maybe some of you will help me anyway ;)

I feel lost and a bit helpless as it's final exam in Psychology in 11 days.

So you're telling us you're studying BRAAAAAIINNNSS!!?

YogSothoth
05-07-2012, 12:45 PM
The biggest book I've ever read was 1100 pages. Did that in 4 days. At a certain point, your body just needs to get up and move around. I can't stay in one position for hours and read a book, especially lying down, cause I tend to fall asleep

Hbns
05-07-2012, 01:13 PM
So I got the new Stephen King book Under the Dome and it's just over 1000pgs. I'm curious how long it takes most people to finish a book this large.


Unfair. That book I read in about 12 evenings. I could hardly put it down. Other less enjoyable stories might take me a month of evenings to get through that volume of pages.

Big_Mark
06-27-2016, 01:09 PM
If it's fiction, I'll burn through it in no time. I generally read for entertainment at a little better than 800 wpm. Of course, it helps if you know the author and style before starting. Tom Clancy just flies, because I know when to skip paragraphs (hell, pages!) of description and dive in again when the plot resurfaces. Gabriel Garcia Marquez, OTOH, I tend to read more slowly. It also depends on how well I like the story. New Terry Pratchett tends to get read in one or two intense evenings.


Wow 800 Words per minute? Sheesh lol

kayT
06-27-2016, 01:15 PM
How fast do zombies read? Second-time-around zombies?

Pantastic
06-27-2016, 02:10 PM
For me if I like the book I'll read it twice. The first time is a binge of speed reading usually over the course of 1-3 days and probably losing sleep, I think a 1000p book (especially with King's fairly straightforward writing) would fit this fine. The second time is more leisurely, and I'll spread it out over the course of weeks soaking up details and spotting things I missed in the 'find out what happened' read. If I'm not really into a book, it's not uncommon for me to read 1/3 or 1/2 way through, put it aside, then weeks or months later pick it up.

jtur88
06-27-2016, 03:20 PM
Most books I read, 3-400 pages, take me two weeks. I rarely start a book longer than about 500, and if I do, it is with the understanding that if it doesn't continue to hold me spellbound,, I will quit rather than keep plodding through it.

I'm now reading "A Little Life", which is 700.

Shodan
06-27-2016, 03:40 PM
As has been mentioned, it depends on the book and why I am reading it. Studying some subject, I read a lot more slowly than if I am just reading for entertainment.

I read about an hour and a half a day, but that includes an hour of audiobooks while walking Leet the Wonder DogTM. There I am limited to the rate at which a book can be read out loud. Reading from paper, I can generally burn thru a book in three or four nights, but they are not generally 1000 pages. I did the longer Harry Potter books in about a day and a half, but those are special cases. I read the entire Chronicles of Narnia in about a Saturday, but, again, special case.

I got a C in my speed reading course in high school, even though I was the fastest reader in the class, because I was doing all those things already and didn't improve my reading speed very much. :D

Regards,
Shodan

dracoi
06-27-2016, 03:44 PM
Here's my two cents, better late than never:

When I am reading for pleasure, I definitely take my time. I'm not just sounding out words, but I'm putting voice inflection and tone into the voice in my head. (If I started reading something in serious tone and realize it's a joke, I'll back up and re-read it using the voice inflection proper for a joke). I'm also pausing to remember similar scenes, and thinking ahead to predict or analyze. I am definitely interacting with the text. At that rate, I think I'm about 80 words per minute, or 20-30 pages per hour, though it's been a while since I really measured it. I read digitally now, which makes it hard to measure my progress by traditional means. I also do a lot of reading while walking to work, so I'm not always 100% focused on reading.

(As an example of this: Terry Pratchett's has a character Teatime who has his own special pronunciation of his name. Every time I hit that name, I stumbled on who was saying it, and tried to figure out which pronunciation that character would have used. )

If I'm reading just to get through it, I read much more quickly, at least two or three times as fast without losing big-picture comprehension. At that point, I'm no longer sounding out words and I'm no longer creating scenes. I'm just doing a book-to-brain data transfer when I read like that. Nowadays, it's pretty rare that I spend time in this mode, but it helped me get through school.

standingwave
06-27-2016, 06:52 PM
How fast do zombies read? Second-time-around zombies?

I can cruise through a good zombie story at about 500 wpm. Cormac McCarthy OTOH slows me down to about 50.

JohnT
06-27-2016, 08:50 PM
As a general rule, your standard American paperback novel will average 250 words per page. This isn't true for all books, of course (the number used to be higher), but it works as a good approximation. So, for example, [b]Dracoi[/i] reads from 83-120 wpm. 4 pages a minute is about 1k wpm, etc.

I tested in the 11th grade @ 600wpm, have no idea what it is today.

spamforbrains
06-27-2016, 09:50 PM
How on earth do you read with out sounding out the words? I've been trying for the last hour or so and it just doesn't work. Just glancing at a word makes me start pronouncing it automatically. Has anyone seen any studies on the way people read with regards to sounding/not sounding? I would be very interested in seeing if this is something that can be learned and how one would go about doing that.

you actually sound out the words? I didn't think anyone did that unless it was a word they had never seen before. Most people go by the "shape" of the words, kind of like how your fingers (well, your brain) learn "patterns" of typing each word or phrase instead of hunting and pecking for individual letters. Reading/writing and talking/speaking seem to be entirely different brain processes. I can read entire pages at a glance, not in detail, but enough to get the gist and/or to locate the relevant information I am looking for. I don't read for pleasure that way but's handy when scanning through a textbook, paper, or a webpage. People tend to be really good at visually spotting patterns.

jtur88
06-27-2016, 10:25 PM
you actually sound out the words? I didn't think anyone did that unless it was a word they had never seen before. Most people go by the "shape" of the words, kind of like how your fingers (well, your brain) learn "patterns" of typing each word or phrase instead of hunting and pecking for individual letters. Reading/writing and talking/speaking seem to be entirely different brain processes. I can read entire pages at a glance, not in detail, but enough to get the gist and/or to locate the relevant information I am looking for. I don't read for pleasure that way but's handy when scanning through a textbook, paper, or a webpage. People tend to be really good at visually spotting patterns.

I read at talking seed -- reading "to myself" as if I were reading out loud to someone else. I see no point in speed reading. Many of the best-selling non-fiction books (Future Shock, Peter Principle) you can get the entire idea from the dust jacket, and reading the whole book adds nothing at all to your comprehension of the topic.

Thee was a joke about a guy who took a speed-reading course, read "Huckleberry Finn" in 45 minutes, and never laughed once.

aceplace57
06-28-2016, 10:19 AM
Some of you people are nuts. I mean it's one thing to recognize all the words you're looking at and get the gist, but how can you really digest so much text in so short a time? When I am reading I am also trying to visualize what I'm reading and that means going at a fairly slow pace. I haven't really timed myself, but I sure as hell can't read an 800 page book in 5-6 hours as some people have claimed in here. Not even close.
I'm the same way. I like to take my time reading fiction. Really absorb the story. I read about 200 pages in 4 to 5 hours. That's the longest I like to read at one sitting. 5 days to finish King's book.

I can speed read. Skim through paragraphs to get the gist of what's being said. Did it frequently with my textbooks. I always read the chapter quickly then went back to focus on the areas we covered in class.
I like to go through the dialogue as naturally as possible, as though I were reading a play. I like to sort of play a movie in my mind as I go through a novel. I figure about 10-20 pages per hour.

This is also how I tend to read threads here; as though the posters were actually speaking to one another.

Doctor Jackson
06-28-2016, 02:45 PM
For kicks and grins, here (http://staples.com/sbd/cre/marketing/technology-research-centers/ereaders/speed-reader/) is an online reading test that measures words per minute and a quick 3 question comprehension test. Going at my normal recreational reading speed I got about 500 wpm at 100% comprehension. Per that site, I could get through War and Peace (1,200-1,300 pages) in just over 22 hours of non-stop reading.

robby
06-28-2016, 03:58 PM
For kicks and grins, here (http://staples.com/sbd/cre/marketing/technology-research-centers/ereaders/speed-reader/) is an online reading test that measures words per minute and a quick 3 question comprehension test. Going at my normal recreational reading speed I got about 500 wpm at 100% comprehension. Per that site, I could get through War and Peace (1,200-1,300 pages) in just over 22 hours of non-stop reading.I took the test three times. (There seems to be three different text samples used in the test.) My average was 588 wpm with 89% comprehension. This felt like I was racing, and was faster than I felt comfortable with.

Then I took it three more times, reading at my normal reading pace. This time, I got an average of 470 wpm with 100% comprehension (which was helped by the fact that I was now reading the same three selections a second time).

So referring back to my 2009 post (http://boards.academicpursuits.us/sdmb/showpost.php?p=11839168&postcount=39)earlier in this thread, it would have only taken me about 3.5 hours to read The Hobbit (95,356 words) at a reading speed of 470 wpm. This means that reading this book in a single sitting should have been easily doable.

Reading The Source (500K words) in a single sitting is a much more daunting task. At a pace of 470 wpm, it would have taken me nearly 18 hours. This seems like a stretch, but could have happened. I remember some long summer days home by myself. For what it's worth, it was my second time reading the book.

DrCube
06-28-2016, 04:38 PM
Reading isn't a "words per minute" thing. Some writing is meant to be read quickly, like page-turner thrillers, or grocery lists. Some writing is meant to be read quite slowly and closely, like math papers and legal codes.

I could read (and have) a >1000 page Stephen King book in a couple of days. Try that with a dictionary sometime. ;)

HMS Irruncible
06-28-2016, 04:39 PM
"Atlas Shrugged" took about 2 hours because so much of it was obviously repetitive meth-addled drivel. "The Instructions" took me about 3 weeks the first time, and it'll take longer the next time.

PunditLisa
06-29-2016, 09:11 PM
I just reread the entire Harry Potter series in about a month, with just a few hours of spare time per night and one long binge-reading weekend.

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