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View Full Version : Illinois!!! Starts with an "I" dammit!


Man With a Cat
02-11-2010, 11:39 AM
Do you go to the doctor when you feel "ell"?

On your desk, is there an "en-box"?

No? Know why? Because those words start with the letter "I".

As does Illkinois.



Sincerely,

MBG, whose heard Ellinois one too many times today

Leaffan
02-11-2010, 11:42 AM
Yeah, and it doesn't end in an "S!" As I've heard around here a number of times in my life.

HongKongFooey
02-11-2010, 11:42 AM
Pfft, if the spelling mattered you wouldn't have an 's' at the end. :p



ETA: Curse my fellow Maple Leaf fanatic. :shakes fist:

tdn
02-11-2010, 11:43 AM
E know, et's a pain. Maybe you should move to Eowa.

Duke
02-11-2010, 11:44 AM
But the real question is, is there a "k" in Illkinois?

williamweigand
02-11-2010, 11:45 AM
Well, it's not spelled with a "k" either. (Or did you do that as a joke?)

williamweigand
02-11-2010, 11:51 AM
Hmm...I tried editing to acknowledge Duke beating me to the punch, but I'll just clarify that my remark was intended for the OP, although it could be read as a reply to Duke's post.

Man With a Cat
02-11-2010, 11:53 AM
The "k" is silent. ;)

Except downstate, and they say everything funny down there, so they don't count.

Examples:

Vienna, IL Pronounced locally as "vy-ana"

Cairo, IL Pronounced like the syrup - "kay-ro"

That big fault line down there? You know the New Madrid Fault Line? Pronounced with the accent on the first syllable. New MADrid.

tdn
02-11-2010, 12:00 PM
That big fault line down there? You know the New Madrid Fault Line? Pronounced with the accent on the first syllable. New MADrid.

That's how it's pronounced in New Mexeco as well. Damn foreigners.

Drunky Smurf
02-11-2010, 12:19 PM
But is it pronounced ILL-inois or EYE-llinois?

Ferret Herder
02-11-2010, 12:22 PM
But is it pronounced ILL-inois or EYE-llinois?
ILL. Just like the first vowel sound in the word "Italian", and I will smack the next person I hear calling someone "an EYE-talian" or talking about "EYE-talian dressing."

Spiff
02-11-2010, 12:23 PM
And Wisconsin is not pronounced Wesconsin, dammit, you know-nothing FIBers!

Ferret Herder
02-11-2010, 12:27 PM
And Wisconsin is not pronounced Wesconsin, dammit, you know-nothing FIBers!
I'm a Cheesehead expatriate, moved south of the Cheese Curtain to live with the Illinoisian that I love. Imagine my annoyance at getting ragged on for how I pronounce the "o" in "Wisconsin" and hearing that other, wrong! pronunciation as "Wesconsin" when they do it. :smack:

Drunky Smurf
02-11-2010, 12:30 PM
ILL. Just like the first vowel sound in the word "Italian", and I will smack the next person I hear calling someone "an EYE-talian" or talking about "EYE-talian dressing."

Gotcha.

Now I need to go do some research for my trip to EYE-taly. :p

Ferret Herder
02-11-2010, 12:31 PM
Now I need to go do some research for my trip to EYE-taly. :p
*headdesk*

Ellen Cherry
02-11-2010, 12:34 PM
Ah, come to Kentucky, where you can visit Louisville (LOU-a-vull), Versailles (Ver-SALES), Garrard (GARE-uhd) County, McCreary (Muh-Queery) County, and Cadiz (KAY-dees).

Shot From Guns
02-11-2010, 12:36 PM
Do you go to the doctor when you feel "ell"?

On your desk, is there an "en-box"?

No? Know why? Because those words start with the letter "I".

BRB, writing a letter to every linguist on the face of the planet to let them know that they're 100% wrong about how language works, because some random guy on a message board told me that spelling determines pronunciation and the only valid dialect is the one he speaks.

This may take a while.

statsman1982
02-11-2010, 12:45 PM
BRB, writing a letter to every linguist on the face of the planet to let them know that they're 100% wrong about how language works, because some random guy on a message board told me that spelling determines pronunciation and the only valid dialect is the one he speaks.

This may take a while.

I get your point that spelling and pronunciation are very subjective and accents vary, but isn't there some room for standard pronunciation?

For example, I'm pretty sure you would pronounce your username as: "shawt frum guhns", not "shot froom goons", just as I would. Somehow, we've come to a decision that the word "guns" has a standard pronunciation, and others are deviations from the standard.

Couldn't that be what the OP is trying to say?

engineer_comp_geek
02-11-2010, 12:45 PM
Kansas and Arkansas can't even agree on how the common parts of their state names are pronounced, and Connecticut has an extra C in the middle that no one seems to be aware of. And while we're at it, where's that S sound at the end of Illinois? It should be ill-in-oh-iss. So you're pronouncing it wrong too. Don't be complaining about how people pronounce the front part when you don't pronounce all of the letters in the back part.

:p

(for the record I do pronounce it ill- and not ell-).

Ferret Herder
02-11-2010, 12:50 PM
And while we're at it, where's that S sound at the end of Illinois? It should be ill-in-oh-iss. So you're pronouncing it wrong too. Don't be complaining about how people pronounce the front part when you don't pronounce all of the letters in the back part.

:p
Bah, at least the state is sort of holding to that small part of the French pronunciation. They've mangled places like DuPage and Desplaines into Americanized pronunciations, though at least logically done.

And don't try to use the French pronunciation of Armitage Avenue in Chicago. Saying "Ar-mih-tahzhe" will get you pegged as not from around here - it's "Ar-mih-tidge."

Shoeless
02-11-2010, 12:55 PM
Kansas and Arkansas can't even agree on how the common parts of their state names are pronounced

Not only that, but Arkansas is pronounced differently depending on if you mean the state ("AR-kan-saw") or the river ("Ar-KAN-sas"). So there you go.

DMark
02-11-2010, 01:01 PM
Lest anyone forget Marseilles, Illinois (pronounced locally as "Mar-sales")

Count me also as one who thinks Chicago should be pronounced (Sha-caw-go) and not (She-kaaah-go).

Polycarp
02-11-2010, 01:01 PM
The "S" in Illinois is pronounced exactly like the "S" in the name of the state of Arkansas.

Alan Smithee
02-11-2010, 01:10 PM
Not only that, but Arkansas is pronounced differently depending on if you mean the state ("AR-kan-saw") or the river ("Ar-KAN-sas"). So there you go.

What? No they aren't I've lived in two states through which the Arkansas River runs, Arkansas, where I grew up, and Colorado, where I live now. In both places, it is pronounced "AR-kan-saw." I've heard that in Kansas they pronounce it to rhyme with their own state, but I've never heard it actually said that way.

tdn
02-11-2010, 01:18 PM
BRB, writing a letter to every linguist on the face of the planet to let them know that they're 100% wrong about how language works, because some random guy on a message board told me that spelling determines pronunciation and the only valid dialect is the one he speaks.

This may take a while.

There are regional dialects and such, sure, but that doesn't apply to proper nouns. If someone named Jorge pronounced his name "jorj", it would be rude to say "Dude, you're supposed to pronounce it 'hor-hay.' Don't you even know how to pronounce your own name?" Sorry, no. Your regional variation doesn't fly. Jorge knows his own name.

Similarly, place names have a standard pronunciation. The S in Illinois is silent not only because it's a French name, but because that's how it's pronounced, period.

Man With a Cat
02-11-2010, 01:24 PM
BRB, writing a letter to every linguist on the face of the planet to let them know that they're 100% wrong about how language works, because some random guy on a message board told me that spelling determines pronunciation and the only valid dialect is the one he speaks.

This may take a while.


Other random guys on the internet:

Wiki (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Pronunciation_of_Illinois)

Dictionary.com (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/illinois)

Some other place (http://inogolo.com/pronunciation/Illinois)

Merriam-Webster (http://merriam-webster.com/dictionary/illinois)

Tell the linguists hi from me, if they want to reach me, I'll be on my Eye-talian vacation!

Skywatcher
02-11-2010, 02:19 PM
BRB, writing a letter to every linguist on the face of the planet to let them know that they're 100% wrong about how language works, because some random guy on a message board told me that spelling determines pronunciation and the only valid dialect is the one he speaks.

This may take a while.Isn't this supposed to be the hugs 'n' unicorn sparkles forum? :D

Shot From Guns
02-11-2010, 03:17 PM
I get your point that spelling and pronunciation are very subjective and accents vary, but isn't there some room for standard pronunciation?

No. From an objective linguistic standpoint, there is no such thing as a "standard" pronunciation. There may be the most common pronunciation, but that doesn't mean that another dialect's is necessarily less valid.

The S in Illinois is silent not only because it's a French name, but because that's how it's pronounced, period.

We're talking about the first vowel, not the last consonant. Please do try to keep up. Were this a discussion of whether or not the s is silent, I'd absolutely agree with you. But this is a case of an actual vowel shift, not some guy who's only seen "Illinois" written down and just took a stab at how to say it.

Other random guys on the internet:

Until you realize that dictionaries only provide the most common mainstream pronunciation(s), you have no business discussing linguistics.

Isn't this supposed to be the hugs 'n' unicorn sparkles forum? :D

You'll notice that I didn't once call anyone a naughty name. :D

Tom Tildrum
02-11-2010, 03:48 PM
Could be worse; y'all could be living in Missourah.

tdn
02-11-2010, 03:56 PM
Could be worse; y'all could be living in Missourah.

Or Ioway.

cards
02-11-2010, 04:11 PM
The "k" is silent. ;)

Except downstate, and they say everything funny down there, so they don't count.

Examples:

Vienna, IL Pronounced locally as "vy-ana"

Cairo, IL Pronounced like the syrup - "kay-ro"

That big fault line down there? You know the New Madrid Fault Line? Pronounced with the accent on the first syllable. New MADrid.

Well, I always thought the Chicago part of the state had a funny accent because they are busy sucking all the tax dollars out of us downstaters. You know, all that hoovering interfers with the vocal chords. That, and being a Cubs fans.

Man With a Cat
02-11-2010, 07:57 PM
cubby fans stink. No silent "s" included, Sox fan here.

Also, us 7-county people consider anyone west of 39, and south of 80 to be 'downstate'. All y'all dress funny and stuff.


Shot From Guns, I'm sorry for not being a leengwist and only being dumb enough to live in the state, and seeing it spelled out on a written page. I will stop trying to correct peepul and be as much of a reegunal pronunceeator as I can in the fewtour.

I bow to your incredibly soupearior brayneeness.

Ferret Herder
02-11-2010, 08:58 PM
We're talking about the first vowel, not the last consonant. Please do try to keep up. Were this a discussion of whether or not the s is silent, I'd absolutely agree with you. But this is a case of an actual vowel shift, not some guy who's only seen "Illinois" written down and just took a stab at how to say it.
Posts 19, 20, and 23 were discussing the final consonant.

Visual Purple
02-11-2010, 08:58 PM
The pronunciation I hear most regularly is actually a bit between "ill" and "ell." A linguist probably could explain the sound better, but it's definitely not the sound in the name "Ellen." I think you're just objecting to a regional pronunciation tendency that also makes the word "itch" come out surprisingly close to "etch."

njtt
02-11-2010, 09:12 PM
It is easy to remember the right way to say it, because the people of the state are ill and annoying.;)

BigT
02-11-2010, 09:42 PM
The pronunciation I hear most regularly is actually a bit between "ill" and "ell." A linguist probably could explain the sound better, but it's definitely not the sound in the name "Ellen." I think you're just objecting to a regional pronunciation tendency that also makes the word "itch" come out surprisingly close to "etch."

Exactly. It's part of the accent. The /ɪ/ sound is just more open, and thus closer to /ɛ/. We have the same problem around here, where set and sit sound the same to people who aren't from around here.

Two Many Cats
02-11-2010, 09:50 PM
Wal, lookee here! (http://traditionalmusic.co.uk/song-midis/Elanoy.htm)

Read it and weep. Also hear it and weep. "She's crawfish in the swampy lands, the milk-sick and the shakes"

Skywatcher
02-11-2010, 10:15 PM
Wal, lookee here! (http://traditionalmusic.co.uk/song-midis/Elanoy.htm)Lookee at a 150-year-old folk song?

Two Many Cats
02-11-2010, 10:33 PM
Lookee at a 150-year-old folk song?

Look how the title is spelled. And also the lyrics. Chicago is well known for its honest and virtuous people??????? Phhhhhht! And 150 years ago, it was even worse than now!!

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