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Argent Towers
08-13-2011, 09:38 PM
It seems to me that full beards were pretty much out of style in the World War II era. Even mustaches seem pretty damn rare (I know, except for THAT guy). Were there any notable people of the time - important political. cultural or military figures - who wore full beards? Link to a picture if you have one.

Don't be a wiseass and link to a bunch of pictures of rabbis. I'll exclude rabbis or anyone else who had to wear a beard for religious reasons.

automagic
08-13-2011, 09:54 PM
Charlie Chaplin had some facial hair

anson2995
08-13-2011, 09:56 PM
We tackled this once before (http://boards.academicpursuits.us/sdmb/showthread.php?t=563638). The thread listed a number of people who wore beards during the era (Ernest Hemmingway, Burl Ives, Orson Wells), but according to wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beard):

From the 1920s to the early 1960s, beards were virtually nonexistent in mainstream America. The few men who wore the beard or portions of the beard during this period were frequently either old, Central Europeans; members of a religious sect that required it; in academia; or part of the counterculture, such as the "beatniks".

Little Nemo
08-13-2011, 10:01 PM
Igor Kurchatov, the head of the Soviet atomic bomb program had one heckuva beard (http://russiapedia.rt.com/files/prominent-russians/science-and-technology/igor-kurchatov/igor-kurchatov_6-t.jpg). However, I've also seen pictures of him where he's clean shaven so I don't know if he had the beard during the war or grew it later.

Little Nemo
08-13-2011, 10:12 PM
Several u-boat commanders had beards. This website (http://uboat.net/men/commanders/) lists the commanders with pictures. If you go through, you'll see about a quarter of them were bearded. (Interestingly, virtually all the rest were clean-shaven. I only came across one who had a moustache without a beard.)

John DiFool
08-13-2011, 10:20 PM
Most u-boat crewmen grew them while on patrol-some, but not all, shaved them off when back in port. The US Navy allowed beards back then too.

Elendil's Heir
08-13-2011, 10:30 PM
American GIs were also known to grow beards when out in the field for weeks if not months on end, as memorialized by cartoonist Bill Mauldin: http://warrelics.eu/forum/military_photos/docs-paper-items-photos-propaganda/99766d1272139323-new-us-44-cent-stamp-wonderful-tribute-willie-joe44stamp.jpg

A famous photo of U.S. soldiers getting their first hot meal in weeks; shaving was not a priority: http://home.scarlet.be/~tsc94696/images/gavin/gavin9.jpg

Captain Amazing
08-14-2011, 12:38 AM
Meet Orde Wingate (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8d/Ordecharleswingate.jpg), who's probably most famous in Israel for his Christian Zionism and training of the Haganah, but who was a British General in World War II, and created the Chindits, British and Gurhka troops in the Army of India who fought behind Japanese lines in Burma.

Alessan
08-14-2011, 12:49 AM
General Orde Wingate. (http://corbisimages.com/stock-photo/rights-managed/BE037832/orde-wingateleader-of-the-chindits)

Of course, he was probably insane.

DrDeth
08-14-2011, 12:51 AM
"Doc" of Cannery Row fame was noted for having a beard.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Ricketts

Little Nemo
08-14-2011, 02:12 AM
King Haile Selassie (http://27.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lhbwjnD7CN1qgfbgio1_400.jpg) of Ethiopia had a beard.

Terminus Est
08-14-2011, 03:17 AM
Even mustaches seem pretty damn rare (I know, except for THAT guy)
Who? This guy? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:StalinPortrait.jpg) Or this guy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hideki_Tojo.jpg)? What about this guy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hirohito_wartime.jpg)?

Shakester
08-14-2011, 03:37 AM
Moustaches were common in the 1940s, particularly on British and Commonwealth officers. The "RAF moustache" was a meme at the time.

Beards were rare, moustaches were common.

Hari Seldon
08-14-2011, 04:20 AM
The very first ordinary person I ever saw with a beard was a grad student at Columbia in 1962 and I was astonished. Actually, I saw him a week ago and he still had it. I had a mustache for a while in 1960 or so. Then I shaved it. Mustaches were not common but not unknown in the 50s. Then in the early 60s (a bit before the beatnik era, actually) a few academics allowed their beards to grow. In 1964, I met someone who shaved every weekend, head and face, with a razor set to about 1/4 inch. Over Christmas vacation, 1964-65 I stopped shaving and have never shaved since. But for the first year or so when I walked down the street of the small town in southern NJ where my wife was from, I got stared at incessantly. By the late 60s it was no longer so uncommon.

Jim's Son
08-14-2011, 04:45 AM
Here's a story from last October in the "Wall Street Journal" about the lack of facial hair on politicians the last 100 years.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704380504575530393190488942.html


I don't have a cite but my understanding is beards because a fashion statement in the mid19th century because of the Crimean war. British soldiers were allowed to grow beards for warmth and when they returned home, it started a fashion trend.

Speaking of fashion trends, I always associated the popularity of long hair and facial hair with the Beatles around the "Sgt Pepper" album. A few oddball beatnik freaks before that but the Beatles were pretty conventional before "Sgt Pepper". A bit longer than normal and believe it or not, the "moptop" look got ridicule circa "I want to Hold Your Hand". I have never read anything about why the Fab Four started to grow hair. Anybody know?

Shakester
08-14-2011, 05:23 AM
Speaking of fashion trends, I always associated the popularity of long hair and facial hair with the Beatles around the "Sgt Pepper" album. A few oddball beatnik freaks before that but the Beatles were pretty conventional before "Sgt Pepper". A bit longer than normal and believe it or not, the "moptop" look got ridicule circa "I want to Hold Your Hand". I have never read anything about why the Fab Four started to grow hair. Anybody know?

The moptop look came directly from their friends in Hamburg, German "existentialist" students, particularly Astrid Kirchherr (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrid_Kirchherr). Before that, the Beatles had rocker quiffs, Elvis-style, which was also longer-than-average at the time.

mac_bolan00
08-14-2011, 08:43 PM
the entire iranian army.

AK84
08-15-2011, 04:42 AM
the entire iranian army.

Not really (http://payvand.com/news/08/jul/Iran-Army-WWII-victory-parade2.jpg).

Alessan
08-15-2011, 04:45 AM
the entire iranian army.

Full beards - which are often associated with more orthodox Islam - became much more popular after the 1979 revolution.

AK84
08-15-2011, 05:00 AM
Full beards - which are often associated with more orthodox Islam - became much more popular after the 1979 revolution.

No. Iranians always have been known for beards; independent of Islam; orthodox or not.

Tom Tildrum
08-15-2011, 10:36 AM
If memory serves, when FDR was pressing his plan for reform of the Supreme Court, and New Deal supporters were criticizing the Court as reactionary, one of the targets of derision was Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes's beard (http://ebooks-library.com/images/Authors/ACEH.jpg), which marked him as yesterday's man.

sugaree
08-15-2011, 10:38 AM
Here's a story from last October in the "Wall Street Journal" about the lack of facial hair on politicians the last 100 years.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704380504575530393190488942.html


I don't have a cite but my understanding is beards because a fashion statement in the mid19th century because of the Crimean war. British soldiers were allowed to grow beards for warmth and when they returned home, it started a fashion trend.


Likewise, my impression is that the bright young things of the 1920s associated beards with their hopelessly stuffy Edwardian fathers and Victorian grandfathers, and so chin hair went more and more out of fashion. Until it was so very out of fashion that it snuck back in through the counter-culture.

Giles
08-15-2011, 11:02 AM
I first grew a beard in 1962, as soon as I finished high school and so was no longer subject to its discipline, in Australia. That was so unusual then that I got my picture in one of the Sunday papers in Sydney. Of course, these days a 17- or 18-year-old with a beard is not all that noteworthy.

AK84
08-15-2011, 11:08 AM
A 17 or 18 year old who dose not have that awful stubble OTH is a stop the presses moment.

Ruby Slippers
08-15-2011, 11:21 AM
I think you're forgetting one of the most famous bearded entities around -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Claus. He's maintained his style and popularity throughout my lifetime at least.

Elendil's Heir
08-15-2011, 11:59 AM
If memory serves, when FDR was pressing his plan for reform of the Supreme Court, and New Deal supporters were criticizing the Court as reactionary, one of the targets of derision was Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes's beard (http://ebooks-library.com/images/Authors/ACEH.jpg), which marked him as yesterday's man.

Robert Bork, nominated but not confirmed to SCOTUS, took some teasing for his scraggly mess, too: http://thebsreport.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/asset_upload_file915_12260.jpg

Here's Letterman's Top Ten list for the occasion: http://mudslide.net/TopTen/lnwdxtra.html#extra8

Max Torque
08-16-2011, 09:36 AM
These days a man with a mustache alone looks unfortunately like a 1970s porn actor. It'll take a while for that stigma to fade.

Too bad; there's something to be said for a magnificent mustache (http://youtube.com/watch?v=XFdBK4gdYcA).

Spoke
08-16-2011, 09:48 AM
I don't have a cite but my understanding is beards because a fashion statement in the mid19th century because of the Crimean war. British soldiers were allowed to grow beards for warmth and when they returned home, it started a fashion trend.

The same happened a bit later in the US during and following the Civil War.

Alessan
08-16-2011, 10:23 AM
There are several theories as to why full beards started to reappear in the mid-1800s. One is that it was a side effect of 19th Century Medievalism, which itself was a reaction to the Industrial Revolution and the Elightenment.

Elendil's Heir
08-16-2011, 10:33 AM
Chester Arthur had it goin' on!: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chester_A._Arthur_by_Ole_Peter_Hansen_Balling.JPG

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