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robby
05-25-2001, 11:40 PM
I didn't see an answer to this in the archives, so here goes...

If you pull into a metered parking space, remaining in the car, do you need to put money into the meter?

My wife and I had a big argument over this. She ran into a store for 3 minutes while I stayed in the car with the engine idling. She insists that the police could issue me a citation.

I say that if the driver is in the car, he is "safe." I see it as similar to standing in any "no parking zone," airport drop-off, or loading zone.

Who's right (in your average jurisdiction)?

Kalt
05-25-2001, 11:59 PM
it really depends on the cop (and what mood he's in). It is understood that if you are in the car, that you are just waiting a minute or two for someone. However, if you sit there for 10 minutes, and he sees you sitting there for 10 minutes... the cop sure can write you a ticket.

Unless he was a prick, he'd probably tell you to pay or leave (or else get a ticket). Most cops are not that mean. But... it could happen. Parking w/out paying = ticket. Parking = car is purposely not moving, and in a designated spot.

Now, it IS illegal for a towtruck to TOW you while someone is in the car.

mangeorge
05-26-2001, 12:55 AM
I was once told by a parking enforcement officer ( ;) ) to move or feed the meter. Guess that counts as the voice of authority.
Slight hijack;
A lot of people believe that if you have your emergency flashers on you can't be ticketed for parking in a no parking zone. Doesn't sound right to me, but I'm not sure.
Anybody know?
Peace,
mangeorge

Monty
05-26-2001, 06:37 AM
Well, just be glad that your town hasn't adopted Tokyo's nifty parking meter.

That thing actually starts timing you as soon as you pull into the parking spot. So, if you decide, "Hey, I can wait until I see the meter-checker coming before I feed the parking meter" you're not going to get any more time for your cash than had you fed the meter at the outset. The meter also goes back to zero on the clock once you pull out of the parking spot, which means nobody gets to pull in and get to park for free.

And to make the meter-checker's life easier, if you're car's still in the spot when the time runs out, a little light on top of the meter starts flashing.

Mousseduck
05-26-2001, 06:41 AM
Here, parking has a nice easy definition. If the car is running and you are less than 3 metres away, you are not parked. Therefore, you don't have to pay.
I don't know if anyone has bothered to tell the parking indpectors that, though.

Autumn Wind Chick
05-26-2001, 08:35 AM
The thing about parking violations is - there's usually an unwritten set of rules that the parking enforcers follow. These rules are in many ways more important than the whatever the parking code says, since fighting a parking ticket is often more trouble than it's worth.

When I was in Manhattan a few years ago, the police generally wouldn't ticket you if you were in the car. This was true even if you were parked at a fire hydrant or in violation of the street cleaning schedule.

IIRC, a different set of rules applied south of 96th street.

kanicbird
05-26-2001, 09:26 AM
Can you get away with this?
If the meters are spaced so far apart that you could park 2 compact cars in the space of 1 meter's area w/o getting ticketed? and if not which car would get the ticket?

This happened to me but I didn't see the meter until I got out, I thought about it and decided to move as the person who paid might not like me squeasing in on his dime.

handy
05-26-2001, 09:50 AM
If you are parking in a parking space & which requires payment for parking, why should it matter if you are in the car or not? Unless you do that in a loading zone, in that case no ticket.

yabob
05-26-2001, 10:57 AM
Originally posted by k2dave
Can you get away with this?
If the meters are spaced so far apart that you could park 2 compact cars in the space of 1 meter's area w/o getting ticketed? and if not which car would get the ticket?

This happened to me but I didn't see the meter until I got out, I thought about it and decided to move as the person who paid might not like me squeasing in on his dime.
I lived in Denver at the same time I was taking the MSF (Motorcycle Safety Foundation) course. At that time, there was a flap concerning multiple motorcycles parked in one space. According to the cops, the one nearest the meter "owned" the space, the others got tickets. The guy teaching the class told us to be sure to park right next to the meter, and contemplated organizing a "protest" with his students - he was going to have everybody go downtown half an hour before the spaces started filling up, and put 1 bike, dead center, in each one, just to make a point.

wooba
05-26-2001, 12:02 PM
Originally posted by robby
[B]I didn't see an answer to this in the archives, so here goes...

If you pull into a metered parking space, remaining in the car, do you need to put money into the meter?



This may depend on where you live.. but here in Toronto it was an item in the media within the last couple of years.. somebody took a ticket to court and it was ruled that you cannot use money left in there by a previous user.


I say that if the driver is in the car, he is "safe." I see it as similar to standing in any "no parking zone," airport drop-off, or loading zone.


My dad once asked a police office or parking officer about this.. the definition was that parking means being stopped somewhere for any length of time.. I would assume this means that even with the driver inside, you could get a ticket.. although I'm sure if you're in the car and you see an officer coming, you're gonna move before he/she gets there..

barbitu8
05-26-2001, 01:24 PM
As the posts have said, technically most local laws will allow an officer to give you a ticket if you are parked at a meter which has no time left, whether or not you're in it, out of it, or on top of it. Practically, the officer won't if you're nearby and intend to move it, of if he sees you dashing for it. Depends upon the officer.

If there are two cars in one parking space which has no time left, both cars can get tickets.

mmmiiikkkeee
05-26-2001, 07:46 PM
I was waiting in a metered spot once sans time on it, under the impression that being in the car meant that you weren't parked, just waiting. The meter cop guy came by and mentioned to me that the meter was empty (nice guy) - I asked him about my assumption, and he started giving me an explanation that involved codes/sections/numbers, (which I've since forgotten) that basically meant you COULD be ticketed (in Calgary anyways) as long as your vehicle is in the space.
Makes sense, since a paying customer can't get in there hence you ARE occupying that spot. It's not like they're likely to double park and hold up traffic while asking you to move, to which you'd probly state "call a cop, this is legal" anyways. I think it's one of those things that is technically illegal like jay-walking but which you can usually get away with if the cops are in a good mood - just don't do it too often.

Monty
05-26-2001, 08:53 PM
Please be so kind as to mentally edit my post above to say "...your car's..." instead of "...you're car's..." Thank you.

PosterChild
05-27-2001, 01:23 AM
Originally posted by barbitu8 & others
As the posts have said, technically most local laws will allow an officer to give you a ticket if you are parked at a meter which has no time left, whether or not you're in it, out of it, or on top of itSo what's the difference between the "No Parking" signs and the "No Standing" signs. I always thought "standing" was stopping while staying in your car, and parking was stopping and leaving your car.

mangeorge
05-27-2001, 02:03 AM
Standing, I assume, means just that. I usually see these signs on a median, or an island. Meaning you can't stand there. On foot, that is.
Correct me if I'm wrong. ;)
Peace,
mangeorge

mangeorge
05-27-2001, 02:12 AM
Or, it could refer to this;
(Warning, stupid reply below.)
http://restrooms.org/standing.html
Told ya.
Peace,
mangeorge

passerby
05-27-2001, 02:32 AM
On those metered spaces that say "limit 2 hours" or something similar, is it legal to return after 2 hours and put more coins in? Or do you have to move your car after the limit is reached?

I got a ticket in Boston once, apparently because I stayed in the same spot over the limit, even though I'd fed more coins into the meter.


In Ottawa there used to be an unposted law that said you couldn't park anywhere at the side of a city street for longer than 4 hours. I'm not sure if it's still in effect.

When I was in Amsterdam about ten years ago, I noticed that the meter-guys were always accompanied by a policeman with a gun. I was told that the meter-guys kept getting beaten up, so now they always go out with a policeman. You'd think they'll just give a gun to the meter-guy, or get the guy with the gun to write the tickets.

In the same city, this funny real estate agent had the following advice: If you're going to park in a street with a no parking sign, make sure you park your car completely on the sidewalk. Cause if you leave two wheels on the street, you'll get two tickets: one for parking on the sidewalk, and one for parking in a no-parking zone. But if you follow her advice, you only get one ticket for parking on the sidewalk.

PosterChild
05-27-2001, 04:03 PM
Throughout Manhattan, in front of places where really don't want cars to be, there are signs that say "No Standing." Such as in front of fire stations.

In California, and New York (IIRC), it is not legal to stay in a parking space longer thant the posted limit, even if you pay. You can leave the space and come back again, but you can't just stay in it. This also works for broken meters. You can park for the allowed time, but then you're supposed to leave.

The reason most people don't is it's rarely caught. But at places where they chalk your tires to see how long you've been there you should at least roll the car forward or back to hide the mark. ;)

PC

barbitu8
05-27-2001, 04:43 PM
From the SC Motor Code:

SECTION 56-5-600. "Stop;" "stopping;" "standing."

"Stop," "stopping" or "standing," when prohibited, means any stopping or standing of a vehicle whether occupied or not, except when necessary to avoid conflict with other traffic or in compliance with the directions of a police officer or traffic-control sign or signal.

SECTION 56-5-610. Park.

To "park," when prohibited, means the standing of a vehicle, whether occupied or not, otherwise than temporarily for the purpose of and while actually engaged in loading or unloading.

mangeorge
05-27-2001, 07:53 PM
Section 14.52.060 Unlawful to extend time beyond limit.

It is unlawful and a violation of the provisions of this chapter for any person to follow the operational procedure or any part of the operational procedure for the purpose of increasing or extending the parking time of any vehicle beyond the legal parking time which has been established for the parking space adjacent to which said parking meter is placed. (Ord. 3262-NS 13.5, 1952)

Section 14.04.130 Park.

To stand or leave standing any vehicle, whether occupied or not, otherwise than temporarily for the purpose of and while actually engaged in loading or unloading of passengers or materials. (Ord. 3262-NS 1.13, 1952)

Looks like my town and barbitu8's agree on these questions.
Makes sense, if you think about it.
Peace,
mangeorge

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