Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 11-25-2001, 07:04 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 7
Whenever I hear an Ohio State University alum speak about their alma mater, they always refer to it as "The Ohio State University". Is there a reason behind this? Is this some secret buckeye tradition, that the rest of the world has been left out of?
#2
Old 11-25-2001, 07:22 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 18,806
Why is it "The Bronx"? (actually I know why ). But I've never heard (Can't recall hearing) Ohio State used w/ the "the".
#3
Old 11-25-2001, 07:46 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Mansfield, OH
Posts: 610
Quote:
Originally posted by upbhavan
Whenever I hear an Ohio State University alum speak about their alma mater, they always refer to it as "The Ohio State University". Is there a reason behind this? Is this some secret buckeye tradition, that the rest of the world has been left out of?
Maybe 'cause there's only "the" one? Or maybe to distinguish OSU from Ohio University, that bunch of hedonists down in Athens?

BTW, welcome to the Straight Dope!
#4
Old 11-25-2001, 10:13 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Flying over your house
Posts: 135
Because they think they're better than us. But they're not...oh no...they're not...
#5
Old 11-25-2001, 11:31 AM
dqa dqa is offline
Guest
Join Date: Sep 1999
Posts: 964
Quote:
Originally posted by TBone2
Maybe 'cause there's only "the" one?
Actually there are thirteen state universities in Ohio, if you are referring to four-year public colleges and universities. I agree with Triton, it's simply arrogance.

In the same way, The University of Texas likes to include and capitalize the article. For this reason, many Aggies(A&M) mock UT by calling it TU, for "The University".
#6
Old 11-25-2001, 12:43 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2001
Location: In another castle
Posts: 18,988
Quote:
Originally posted by dqa
In the same way, The University of Texas likes to include and capitalize the article. For this reason, many Aggies(A&M) mock UT by calling it TU, for "The University".
Of course, my university (UVA) refers to itself as "The University". Us arrogant? Nah...
#7
Old 11-25-2001, 12:46 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: The Great Valley
Posts: 1,220
Out here in CA we have 20 or 23 or whatever state universities and another bunch that don't have the dreaded word state in them. Those are the University of California at _______ and there are 6 or 7 or so of them. The state ones felt shamed a few years ago and decided to call them all UNIVERSITIES so as to reclaim their pride, so to speak.

I've attended, graduated and worked at them, and they're still ivory towers. Haven't a clue as to what's really going on in the world. So I think it's only a matter of arrogance, as if anyone else cares.
#8
Old 11-25-2001, 01:39 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: The Golden State
Posts: 10,565
Actually the University of California, which has 9 campuses, calls 8 of the 9 University of California, City Name. The exception is the University of California at Berkeley.

But people there sometimes just refer to the school as UC. You never see UCB.

The headquarters of the University of California system used to be in Berkeley, but it is now in Oakland.

UCLA hates to be referred to by any name other than its initials.

UC Santa Barbara prefers its initials: UCSB. But most of the other schools are usually referred to by the city name "Davis", "Irvine", "Santa Cruz", "Riverside"

As for the OP, I believe that Ohio State and Ohio U are in a bit of a spat over trademarks. That may explain why "The" is becoming prominent. It's a branding issue.

The OSU band spells out "Ohio" and not "OSU". Of course, it's hard to dot anything in OSU.
#9
Old 11-25-2001, 01:54 PM
dqa dqa is offline
Guest
Join Date: Sep 1999
Posts: 964
Quote:
Originally posted by BobT
As for the OP, I believe that Ohio State and Ohio U are in a bit of a spat over trademarks. That may explain why "The" is becoming prominent. It's a branding issue.
Maybe. But I believe the trademark dispute has only become an issue in the past decade. I know that TOSU was emphasizing the article in the mid-80s, and probably for years before that.
#10
Old 11-25-2001, 04:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Central PA
Posts: 240
I'm pretty sure that my tuition checks are made out to "The Pennsylvania State University." My (unsubstantiated) guess is that it has something to do with being the state's designated land-grant university. i.e., if you read it as, "The Pennsylvania (Ohio, Texas, etc.) Land-Grant University" it makes more sense, there only being one land-grant university in each state. And maybe it comes from back before there was a college in every town with more than 5000 people in it...Just my two cents.
#11
Old 11-25-2001, 06:23 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: The Golden State
Posts: 10,565
You are correct about Penn State

http://psu.edu/ur/about/history/historyshort.html

Ohio State grabbed http://osu.edu before Oregon State and Oklahoma State also.
#12
Old 11-25-2001, 06:46 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 7
THE Ohio State

I understand about the historical factors, but more specifically I speak of how the alumni go out of their way to say THE Ohio State University.

For instance, I saw Eddie George (former Ohio State Running Back) on MTV giving a tour of his home. He points to his Heisman Trophy saying "I won this at The Ohio State University".

I have never heard a Penn State Alum referring to it as "The Penn State", or almost any other school for that matter. However, OSU's biggest rival The University of Michigan students do it to get under OSU's skin.
#13
Old 11-25-2001, 07:40 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Bangkok/52/Male
Posts: 8,870
It's got to be a grammar thing

Have you ever had the chicken pox? What about the clap? The flu? The plague?

All of those sound okay, right? Now consider:

Have you ever had the malaria? How about the tetanus? The diptheria? What about the meningitis or the tuberculosis?

That last group doesn't sound quite right with "the" in front of the object, so It's got to be one of those goofy grammar things.

It also bugs me when buildings put names on their façade such as "The Carelton" or "The Bastille" (you'd think just "Carelton" would be sufficient, and people would automatically put "the" in front when talking about it), but restaurants don't do it ("The Wendy's" or "The Pizza Hut").

Just had to get that off my chest.
#14
Old 11-25-2001, 07:43 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: royal oak, mi
Posts: 2,024
I think its nothing but arrogance. Whenever I see former OSU players give there introductions on Monday night football, they always emphasize the word "the" to the point of sounding ridiculous.

Of course, I went to Michigan so I'm a little biased.
#15
Old 11-25-2001, 08:36 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: The Golden State
Posts: 10,565
I really think it's just a matter of style. The newest arena in Los Angeles is called Staples Center. No "the" in front of it and the LA Times almost destroyed itself over this issue. (Which is a long story unrelated to this issue).

Toronto has SkyDome, not The SkyDome.
#16
Old 11-25-2001, 09:39 PM
dqa dqa is offline
Guest
Join Date: Sep 1999
Posts: 964
Quote:
Originally posted by Spiratu
My (unsubstantiated) guess is that it has something to do with being the state's designated land-grant university. i.e., if you read it as, "The Pennsylvania (Ohio, Texas, etc.) Land-Grant University" it makes more sense, there only being one land-grant university in each state.
There may be something to this. Seems to apply as regards Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Texas is another story, for A&M is the land grant school, not UT.

Also, many states have more than one land grant school, but this seems to be due to the addition of a number of traditionally black colleges. I don't think that's the case for MIT and UMass, go figure.

Land grant institutions
#17
Old 11-25-2001, 09:48 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: On the run from JohnnyLaw
Posts: 1,851
Quote:
Originally posted by ultrafilter
Of course, my university (UVA) refers to itself as "The University". Us arrogant? Nah...
Arrogant? I don't know, maybe. Pretentious? Definitely! Don't let anyone there catch you referring to "The Grounds" as "campus." You folks sure do take that seriously.
#18
Old 11-25-2001, 11:04 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Greenbelt, Maryland
Posts: 13,936
I went to Ohio State and, except in official announcements, nobody there ever referred to it as *The* Ohio State University. Incidentally, I can remember as far back as 1970, and even then in official announcements it was often referred to as *The* Ohio State University.
#19
Old 11-25-2001, 11:34 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: The Great Valley
Posts: 1,220
Quote:
Originally posted by BobT
UCLA hates to be referred to by any name other than its initials.

UCLA also hates to be beaten by SC, but it happens.
#20
Old 11-26-2001, 12:12 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Alta California
Posts: 1,081
Quote:
Originally posted by PhiloVance

UCLA also hates to be beaten by SC, but it happens.
Oh, shut up. I was almost over that. But we'll get you in basketball, and the other 30 sports.


We Bruins have a lot of chips on our shoulders. We call the UC campus in the East Bay "UC Berkeley", NEVER the "University of California". Hey, I too went to the University of California, specifically the Los Angeles campus.
#21
Old 11-26-2001, 01:04 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: The Golden State
Posts: 10,565
The University of Southern California doesn't mind USC or SC, but, for unknown reasons, flips out when you say "Southern Cal."

I would also agree with Airblairxxx about the University of California. I earned degrees at UCLA and Berkeley and both are labelled as coming from "The University of California".
#22
Old 11-26-2001, 09:06 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 1999
Posts: 25,091
Then sometimes things go the other way. The University I got my Master's degree at used to be named "The American University", and recently changed its name to "American University".
#23
Old 11-26-2001, 11:07 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Florida
Posts: 6,062
DISCLAIMER: I am a graduate of Ohio University. Therefore, my comments are biased.

Why "THE" Ohio State University?

* To separate themselves from OU. The trademark issue means: OU gets to use "Ohio" to identity-stamp the school. OSU gets to use "The," as if there isn't another Ohio school. OU's band (The Marching 110) does not do the script Ohio, nor do we dot the "i" with a tuba player. OSU bought that right. OU tends toward more dance/performance type of halftime shows, and it's interesting to note that for OU, (a MAC school), The Marching 110 is the ONLY reason to attend a football game. At OSU, you actually go for the football (Damn Big 10 schools...)
* OU was the first land grant school in Ohio, in fact, it was the first higher education institution in the Northwest Territory, which was written in 1787. OU was founded in 1804 -- only a year after the territory became a state. (WE WERE HERE FIRST, DAMMIT!)
* OSU has the largest enrollment of any state school in the country, near 50,000 students. Even though that means ANY idiot can get into OSU, they still think they're better than we hedonists down in Athens, Ohio. They think they can party, but only if they beat Michigan. OU has elevated "party school" to an art form, thank you very much.

I'm going to start telling people I was graduated from The Ohio University. That ought to muck things up a bit.
#24
Old 11-26-2001, 11:39 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Wash DC
Posts: 166
Just got back from my eye doctor's office and noticed his diploma reads "The Ohio State University". Which leads me to believe "The" is part of the legal/official name.
#25
Old 11-26-2001, 11:50 AM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Asheville, NC
Posts: 2,777
For those of you who don't think this is just pretentention, I urge you to watch Monday Night Football tonight. At least watch the first quarter. At some point in the game they will show tape of all the starters introducing tehmselves, stating their position, and naming there college.

Should Robert Holcombe happen to start for the Rams (there is no chance of this), he would say something like, "Robert Holcombe, Running Back, Illinois." The name of his college is officially "The University of Illinois", but there is no way he say that whole thing.

Now pay attention to what Orlando Pace says (and possibly Ryan Pickett may start). Pace will most likely say, "Orlando Pace, Left Tackle, THE Ohio State University." It is unmistakably a put-down, but I'm not exactly sure who is being put down.

Please make an effort to observe this behavior, before posting theories about grammar and official name and whatnot. At some point in the past athletes from OSU would say they were from OSU. Now they say THE Ohio State University. I think the OP would like to know why and when this happened.
#26
Old 11-16-2013, 01:15 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 1
I'm an Ohio University alumnus so I know a bit about this situation. Ohio students and alumni have always hated the fact that Ohio State likes to think of themselves as "Ohio's school" somehow just because they're good at football- on a side note, it's amazing how supportive OSU fans are of Ohio as they are always saying "go Ohio" and the band even spells out our school name before every football game. Ohio was the first university in Ohio (and in fact the entire Northwest territory-and public nonetheless) and was traditionally a much better school academically( this has changed a bit in the last ten to fifteen years when OSU decided to start caring about academics- they had open enrollment until about 15 years ago). So, because of this Ohio students took to calling Ohio University, "Ohio..The State University". This prompted OSU fans to refer to their school as "THE Ohio State University" emphasizing the THE. I'd like to also remind any OSU fans out there reading that while Ohio University was founded as Ohio University in 1804 as the first university in Ohio (public nonetheless), OSU was founded as Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College seventy years later as the ninth university in Ohio.
#27
Old 11-16-2013, 01:32 PM
Robot Mod in Beta Testing
Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 21,568
Welcome to the SDMB, bobcat46.

Please note that the thread you are replying to dates back to 2001. We tend to refer to old threads that have been revived like this as zombies, so don't be too surprised if you see a few zombie jokes. We do allow zombies around here, but we do ask that you only revive such old threads when you have something new or significant to contribute to it.

Also, please note that since this thread is 12 years old, many of its original participants may not be around to read or respond to your reply.
#28
Old 11-16-2013, 02:05 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 6,727
Perhaps they refer to it as "The Ohio State University" so people won't think they're referring to Oklahoma State University. Same thing with "Ohio University" instead of OU.
#29
Old 11-16-2013, 05:11 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 1,400
Quote:
Originally Posted by dqa View Post
Actually there are thirteen state universities in Ohio, if you are referring to four-year public colleges and universities. I agree with Triton, it's simply arrogance.

In the same way, The University of Texas likes to include and capitalize the article. For this reason, many Aggies(A&M) mock UT by calling it TU, for "The University".
I am aware of the zombieness here. Aggies refer to it as t.u. no caps.
#30
Old 11-16-2013, 05:18 PM
Charter Member
Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 77,448
Quote:
Quoth dqu:

Actually there are thirteen state universities in Ohio, if you are referring to four-year public colleges and universities.
I think this might be the reason, actually. Cleveland State University (for instance) is an Ohio state university, as is Kent State University, or Bowling Green State University, etc. But they're not the Ohio State University.

I don't know how this is handled in other states with multiple state universities.
#31
Old 11-16-2013, 06:56 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 77,325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
I don't know how this is handled in other states with multiple state universities.
New York has its SUNY system. There are sixty-four different campuses spread out through the state. A person would say, for example, they went to Plattsburgh or SUNY Plattsburgh (pronounced soony) rather than the State University of New York.

There is a New York University but it's a private school.

Last edited by Little Nemo; 11-16-2013 at 07:00 PM.
#32
Old 11-17-2013, 10:24 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Woodhaven,Queens, NY
Posts: 5,639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
New York has its SUNY system. There are sixty-four different campuses spread out through the state. A person would say, for example, they went to Plattsburgh or SUNY Plattsburgh (pronounced soony) rather than the State University of New York.
Yes, but SUNY is a single university with multiple campuses. NY doesn't have two separate state universities- but California has both the University of California and California State University. Here are a couple of quotes from the latter's website.

Quote:
The CSU is a leader in high-quality, accessible
Quote:
The CSU is committed to recognizing stories of excellence, particularly those that honor its faculty, staff and students.
I have never seen "the" used before SUNY ( or CUNY, for that matter) in a similar context. One would say " The State University of New York has sixty-four campuses", but never " The SUNY has sixty-four campuses".

But those quotes above are from an official website . It might be style ( like having "the flu" vs having "malaria") or it might be "we're the state university, you're only a state university" that leads to " The Ohio State University" being used in contexts where "OSU" would make sense. I'm guessing it's not a style issue.
#33
Old 11-18-2013, 09:13 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: West of Wauwatosa
Posts: 8,331
I think it's absurd that the University of Kansas is abbreviated "KU". A friend teaches there, and no one's had a good explanation. There is no Kansas University, though sometimes we call KU "Kansas U.", but none of his colleagues smile.
#34
Old 11-18-2013, 09:41 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Florida
Posts: 6,062
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobcat46 View Post
I'm an Ohio University alumnus so I know a bit about this situation. Ohio students and alumni have always hated the fact that Ohio State likes to think of themselves as "Ohio's school" somehow just because they're good at football- on a side note, it's amazing how supportive OSU fans are of Ohio as they are always saying "go Ohio" and the band even spells out our school name before every football game. Ohio was the first university in Ohio (and in fact the entire Northwest territory-and public nonetheless) and was traditionally a much better school academically( this has changed a bit in the last ten to fifteen years when OSU decided to start caring about academics- they had open enrollment until about 15 years ago). So, because of this Ohio students took to calling Ohio University, "Ohio..The State University". This prompted OSU fans to refer to their school as "THE Ohio State University" emphasizing the THE. I'd like to also remind any OSU fans out there reading that while Ohio University was founded as Ohio University in 1804 as the first university in Ohio (public nonetheless), OSU was founded as Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College seventy years later as the ninth university in Ohio.
See also: Post #23.

Oh, and go Cats.
#35
Old 11-18-2013, 12:03 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Los 'Kamala'ngeles
Posts: 6,628
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogzilla View Post
* OU was the first land grant school in Ohio, in fact, it was the first higher education institution in the Northwest Territory, which was written in 1787. OU was founded in 1804 -- only a year after the territory became a state. (WE WERE HERE FIRST, DAMMIT!)
I believe Ohio State is the only land grant college in Ohio. Certainly Ohio is not, with a big clue being that it was founded in 1804 (with Miami right after them (and they have a naming feud of their own)). Land grant colleges were initially founded in the Civil War era.

Disclaimer, I am a graduate of Ohio State. When I was there (in the 20th century) the only time people used "The" was ironically. Mostly as thumbing our noses at the university administration. Note that the "The" is an official part of the name. Using it is not arrogant, it's pedantic (or ironic ).

Something else I've heard but can't verify: Originally, OSU was open enrollment. That is, if you met the requirements, you could enroll. The university could not refuse you. Thus the cancerous growth of the main campus and then auxiliary campuses (they didn't have to place you on main campus).

To fix the problems of open enrollment, OSU wanted to merge all the state universities into one big system (a la University of California). As you can expect, the other schools were very much against this, and they got enough political support to stop the plan. As a sop, OSU got to end open enrollment and add a "The" to their official name.
#36
Old 11-18-2013, 04:39 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Far Northeast Iowa
Posts: 3,658
I look up on the wall of my office to see my law school diploma and see that it says "The University of Iowa." So Ohio State is not unique in the use of the singular article.

That said, in my childhood when my fondest hope was to go down to Columbus and play football for the Buckeyes (a hope crushed when the word got out that the boys at the Horseshoe weren't even going to talk to any interior line people who weighted less that 225 lbs. their senior year of high school) I can't think of anyone, including my father (Kenyon-BS,'27, Western Reserve-MD,30), who called the factory at Columbus anything other than Ohio State, without the "The."
#37
Old 11-18-2013, 05:59 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Florida
Posts: 67,630
Got a huge zombie shock when I saw a reference to Orlando Pace starting for the Rams on Monday Night Football "tonight".
#38
Old 11-18-2013, 06:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 5,683
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pleonast View Post
Something else I've heard but can't verify: Originally, OSU was open enrollment. That is, if you met the requirements, you could enroll. The university could not refuse you. Thus the cancerous growth of the main campus and then auxiliary campuses (they didn't have to place you on main campus).
The regional campuses actually still have open enrollment. I think that was one of the conditions for ending it at the main campus.

Last edited by Lord Feldon; 11-18-2013 at 06:12 PM.
#39
Old 11-19-2013, 11:34 AM
Charter Member
Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 77,448
Are there any other states which have a school called "<state name> State University", and which also have other schools in their system called "<other name> State University"?
#40
Old 11-19-2013, 11:56 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: NY (Manhattan) NY USA
Posts: 19,775
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Are there any other states which have a school called "<state name> State University", and which also have other schools in their system called "<other name> State University"?

Georgia has a Georgia State University and also a Valdosta State University down in the far-southern town of Valdosta.
#41
Old 11-19-2013, 12:05 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Florida
Posts: 67,630
Florida has FSU, East Florida State College and Florida State College at Jacksonville.
#42
Old 11-19-2013, 12:06 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Oh-hiya-Maude
Posts: 4,359
My theory -- "The Ohio State University" is the legal name of the university for whatever reason that's lost to history, and thus that's the officially trademarked name. The official logo includes the T - H - E. So that's the name, no big deal. But the official logo hardly shows up anywhere, especially outside of campus. Mostly you see the "block O," which just says "Ohio State."

As a freshman entering campus in the late '90s, I didn't give 2 shits what the university was called outside of OSU or Ohio State. Then douchebags started asking me why we always insisted on calling it THE Ohio State University. Well how the fuck should I know, I've been there 3 months and I've never heard anyone call it that.

After a couple years of everyone asking me, I eventually started calling it THE Ohio State University, because people seemed to love the joke, or rather they loved being able to make fun of us for being such trademark snobs or something. And the only time I ever heard any other students or alums make a big deal about it was for essentially the same reason -- because we were told that we make a big deal about it, so I guess we should just to make everyone happy.

I assure you nobody's going around making sure that OSU is rightly placed above OU in the Ohio public college hierarchy via the use of a single grammatical article. OU's well-deserved reputation as a dirty hippie party school in a backwards hick town does that for us.

/ducks and runs

Last edited by steronz; 11-19-2013 at 12:07 PM.
#43
Old 11-19-2013, 01:06 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 1,124
I got a chuckle out of it when a local news sports reporter in Gainesville, FL started referring to it as "AN Ohio State University" with the same heavy emphasis on the indefinite article that the players give to the definite article. This was during the period when UF beat OSU in the championship games for football and basketball in rapid succession.
#44
Old 11-19-2013, 01:08 PM
Voodoo Adult (Slight Return)
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Charlotte, NC, USA
Posts: 25,088
Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright View Post
Got a huge zombie shock when I saw a reference to Orlando Pace starting for the Rams on Monday Night Football "tonight".
Shock won't do it. You have to remove the head or destroy the brain.
#45
Old 11-19-2013, 02:05 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 15,393
Quote:
Originally Posted by dqa View Post
In the same way, The University of Texas likes to include and capitalize the article. For this reason, many Aggies(A&M) mock UT by calling it TU, for "The University".
t.u. is actually short for "Texas University", which is deliberately chosen to tweak them by getting rid of the "The", because the people in Austin are pretty snooty about using the "THE University of Texas" as if they're the only one, or the only one that counts. Plus, they're an urban, more or less liberal arts school in a pretty progressive city, while Texas A&M is predominantly an engineering, business, science and agriculture (the A&M originally stood for "Agricultural and Mechanical") school set in rural Central Texas (albeit about 100 miles from Houston and a little more to Austin). Until the mid-1960s, A&M was an all-male military school, so that combined with the academic emphasis, location and general perceived backwardness gave the UT people a lot of ammunition to be snooty and superior about.

These days, the schools are probably more similar than different- they're both huge state universities with Nobel laureates and other big-name academics on their faculties, with world-class programs at both schools. But the rivalry remains, even if the sports teams no longer play each other.
#46
Old 11-19-2013, 08:59 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: S. GA
Posts: 3,028
Chronos, there is Indiana University (IU) and Indiana State University (ISU).

I don't mind "The State University" too much. What I find pretentious is "The University OF Blah Blah Blah." That "of" bugs me.
#47
Old 11-19-2013, 10:04 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: the extreme center
Posts: 29,686
According to the OSU library website, the first rendition of "The Ohio State University" dates back to 1878, when the trustees renamed it from "Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College" (too bad, that was really catchy).

Down through the years, it apparently was called Ohio State University by most people; then the university logo got redesigned:

"In 1986, a new University logo was introduced in the hopes of moving away from the "OSU" symbol, which had been used since 1977. The change from simply "OSU" was said to "reflect the national stature of the institution." University officials wanted the institution to be known as "The Ohio State University," again, since OSU could also mean Oregon State and Oklahoma State University."

Yep, that makes a lot of sense.

Occasionally I have to address job-related correspondence to TOSU, and I always put Ohio State University in the heading, just to piss off any pretentious nitwits who are capable of being pissed off over such silliness.
#48
Old 11-20-2013, 10:02 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Within
Posts: 11,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by dqa View Post
In the same way, The University of Texas likes to include and capitalize the article. For this reason, many Aggies(A&M) mock UT by calling it TU, for "The University".
Aggies don't refer to Texas as "tu" to stand for "The University" but Texas University, just another one in the state of Texas.
#49
Old 11-20-2013, 03:49 PM
ftg ftg is offline
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Not the PNW :-(
Posts: 16,884
One of the universities I worked for covered this a college manual. They noted that the old records used both styles, with and without the "The". They basically said that they didn't care which you used. I kinda like that philosophy.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:40 AM.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: [email protected]

Send comments about this website to:

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: wetness behind ears low background steel fios vs cox beth geisel seafood bouillon profiles xt test ace slogan captain jack mccarthy light bright legos dumb facial expressions fo dizzle ornamental mushrooms how much do brakes cost at midas white grapefruit for sale derivative of e^ax^2 is paying someone else's bills a gift largest amount you can write personal check how does whiskey taste how many kava pills to get high define bury the hatchet spy game dinner out does things remembered engrave outside items