Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 12-12-2002, 03:04 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: near Austin, Texas, USA
Posts: 378
What causes water out of the exhaust pipe?

I have a friend whose car is spitting some water out of the exhaust. Someone told him he has a bad head gasket, but I'm skeptical. I'm no mechanic, but I've seen plenty of cars do this. Can they all have blown head gaskets??

Thanks, Lee
#2
Old 12-12-2002, 03:24 AM
BANNED
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Sydney
Posts: 5,539
Gasoline is made up of carbon and hydrogen. When you burn it, it combines with oxygen to form carbon dioxide and water. In the combustion chamber, that water is a gas (steam). If the exhaust system is cold, some of the water will condense to form liquid water, and that's what you see coming from the exhaust.
#3
Old 12-12-2002, 03:44 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: A Yank in New Zealand
Posts: 121
This condensation is also why short trips are tough on cars. Moisture in the exhaust system will evaporate once the whole thing is up to operating temperature (~15 minutes) but if it never warms up fully, the system rusts from the inside out. Usually the farthest bits back are the first to go.

Note that this condensation also happens inside the engine, with the same negative result, although on a somewhat more expensive scale. If you've ever opened your oil filler and seen a white sludge, it's most likely caused by short trips or the engine not warming up.

All that said, if you are seeing steam or white smoke coming out of the tailpipe after the car is warmed up, start saving (and hurry) for a new head gasket.

HTH,
Capn
#4
Old 12-12-2002, 03:50 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Sydney
Posts: 2,265
What Desmostylus said, and

C8H18 + 12.5O2 ---> 8CO2 + 9H2O
#5
Old 12-12-2002, 07:00 AM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Home
Posts: 1,392
When cold, water condensation on the tailpipe is a pretty good indication of an efficient engine.

Right?
#6
Old 12-12-2002, 07:48 AM
BANNED
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Sydney
Posts: 5,539
Quote:
Originally posted by gouda
When cold, water condensation on the tailpipe is a pretty good indication of an efficient engine.

Right?
When cold, water condensation on the tailpipe is a pretty good indication that the engine is in fact running.

Or, I could be missing your point entirely. What do you mean?
#7
Old 12-12-2002, 11:05 AM
BANNED
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Pacific Grove, Calif
Posts: 17,493
Is it water or is it steam?
#8
Old 12-12-2002, 11:45 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: near Austin, Texas, USA
Posts: 378
Thanks. I told 'em what I learned here and of course we had a big argument. Several people said their cars never do this. My theory is that the shape of some exhaust systems traps water and it just burns off when the piupe gets hot. Am I all wet?
#9
Old 12-12-2002, 11:51 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: See Above
Posts: 98
Several people have apparently spent untold hours wandering back to their car's tailpipes to ensure that they never suffer from condensation drip. I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess that they've also never parked on a hill or some incline or started their car when it was particularly cold outside.

Your theory seems valid.
#10
Old 12-12-2002, 12:17 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Playground of the Damned
Posts: 6,027
Blown head gasket symptoms.

Other symptoms.

It seems like these days you're far more likely to get exhaust gasses in your coolant than coolant in your oil. Either way, it tastes expensive!
#11
Old 12-12-2002, 01:12 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: KCMO
Posts: 11,148
Quote:
Originally posted by 1kBR Kid
Thanks. I told 'em what I learned here and of course we had a big argument. Several people said their cars never do this. My theory is that the shape of some exhaust systems traps water and it just burns off when the piupe gets hot. Am I all wet?
No, some cars drip and some don't. In cold weather, it's not uncommon to see moderate amounts of water vapor coming out of tailpipes, but again the amount varies from car to car.

In terms of what comes out the tailpipe, the archetypal symptom of a blown head gasket is great billowy clouds of white (not bluish or grayish or black) "smoke" (it's actually water vapor). It's in significantly greater volume than normal exhaust moisture, and usually has a "hot anitfreeze" odor. And there has to be a corresponding loss of liquid from the cooling system. If the levels in the radiator AND the overflow jar (gotta check 'em both) are not declining, the water coming out the tailpipe is not from a head gasket problem.
#12
Old 12-12-2002, 01:46 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 3,437
Both?

Gary, I always thought if the overflow jug was OK the radiator level was OK. Have I just learned somthing new?
#13
Old 12-12-2002, 04:54 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: KCMO
Posts: 11,148
Yes, Jake. The level in the overflow jug is a good indicator if the system has no leaks. But if there is leakage, it's not a reliable indicator. Some leaks will cause the overflow level to go down when the system sucks coolant out of it to replace what leaked out, but some leaks instead suck air in through the leak, which can leave a low level in the radiator and the engine, while the level in the overflow appears OK. If you want to be sure the system is full, you need to check inside the radiator (cold engine only, of course).
#14
Old 12-12-2002, 05:01 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: KCMO
Posts: 11,148
One point of clarification: my above post applies to systems with a reservoir external to the pressure cap (which is usually, but not always, on the radiator). Reservoirs open to atmospheric pressure are properly called overflow jugs.

There are similar-looking reservoirs that are under cooling system pressure, in fact all the ones I can think of have the pressure cap on the reservoir. While it seems that everyone calls them overflow jugs (which they resemble), that is not the correct term for them. Reservoirs that contain system pressure are surge tanks. Since the surge tank is in effect an extension of the radiator, the coolant level in it is a reliable indicator of system level.
#15
Old 01-26-2014, 01:03 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Condensation in exhaust

My understanding is once the car had been driven, the exhaust cools, then mositure in the air will condensate inside the exhaust leaving small droplets at the top of the exhaust box inside, this will drip off or run down and collect and becasue the box is warmer inside even once engine is cool, moisture in air will still condensate inside causing the white steam in the morning.

If you live in an area with alot of moisture in the air or high humidity, this will always happen and especially if you are parking outside and not in a enclosed garage.

Why dont you just plug the tail piece after you parked, this will prevent moisture from been attracted ino the tail box while its cooling and no more rotting exhaust boxes for a long time, well much longer than if you didnt block it?

Or buy a stainless steel exhaust box to solve it properly.


wherever you get heat, you will get moisture.
#16
Old 01-26-2014, 01:10 PM
Mostly harmless
Charter Member
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: The VunderLair
Posts: 15,370
n/m

Last edited by VunderBob; 01-26-2014 at 01:11 PM.
#17
Old 01-26-2014, 01:12 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 15,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomad1979 View Post
My understanding is once the car had been driven, the exhaust cools, then mositure in the air will condensate inside the exhaust leaving small droplets at the top of the exhaust box inside, this will drip off or run down and collect and becasue the box is warmer inside even once engine is cool, moisture in air will still condensate inside causing the white steam in the morning.

If you live in an area with alot of moisture in the air or high humidity, this will always happen and especially if you are parking outside and not in a enclosed garage.

Why dont you just plug the tail piece after you parked, this will prevent moisture from been attracted ino the tail box while its cooling and no more rotting exhaust boxes for a long time, well much longer than if you didnt block it?

Or buy a stainless steel exhaust box to solve it properly.


wherever you get heat, you will get moisture.
This is an ancient thread, but since you came here to post bogus information, I just thought I'd correct you.

Read all the previous posts - they have the right answer. The water comes from exhaust stream, due to combustion products.
#18
Old 01-26-2014, 01:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Read my first line, to my understanding.!
Im not forcing my thoughts or theory on you or anyone.
And a stainless steel exhaust system wont rot!
#19
Old 01-26-2014, 01:56 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Im going to block off my tail piece after a drive and parked cos i get moisture every morning out exhaust, just gonna try for the hell of it and see if the steam is less in the morning or goes away. What the hell, just try it even if its fruitless and doesnt work.
#20
Old 01-26-2014, 02:08 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: The side of a hill.
Posts: 832
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomad1979 View Post
Im going to block off my tail piece after a drive and parked cos i get moisture every morning out exhaust, just gonna try for the hell of it and see if the steam is less in the morning or goes away. What the hell, just try it even if its fruitless and doesnt work.
A potato is perfect for blocking the exhaust pipe.
#21
Old 01-26-2014, 02:34 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Las Cruces
Posts: 4,959
But a potato has water in it. Packing the exhaust pipe with uncooked rice is the way to go.
#22
Old 01-27-2014, 12:05 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Nowhere, South Carolina
Posts: 704
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomad1979 View Post

wherever you get heat, you will get moisture.
No, not true. Heating something up over ambient temperature will drive the moisture off. Cooling something down below ambient temperature will allow atmospheric moisture to condense on the cooler surface.

You are probably thinking of the amount of moisture air can hold, when it is warm, it can hold more water per unit volume then when it is cold.

Last edited by Khendrask; 01-27-2014 at 12:07 PM.
Reply


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:15 AM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: laptop glue walgreens detox thc pistachios poisonous tylenol 222 diamond katana sword asgardian marvel poe public domain military promotion spy code phrases spam government se7en movie sloth hdpe gasoline opie andy norco overdose amount my ruthschris situ pronunciation are sloths violent gymnastics wedgies walnut substitute cheerleader without spankies 1.3 megapixel resolution botox lips blowjob cry when angry obesity people eating aye aye sir cobalt bombs trashy girls names geordi visor ftm fad hair trapped cable box card mail carrier shoes demesne too big donut makers matriculated animatrix how much does 12 ounces of beer weigh send money to paypal without account i bought a car with no title 1060 w addison st chicago il video game map size comparisons answer to what's up can i send mail from my apartment mailbox hidden compartment in car illegal lightning rod on house is it illegal to destroy coins can monkeys eat chocolate how much do trash men make federal delinquent taxpayer list cat climbs screen door how to serve limoncello liqueur ac units for crank out windows printing personal checks at home make up to look old ultimate x men 41 see you later alligator can you eat seagulls hydrogen peroxide 100 percent see you later alligator rhymes does gas go bad? what does smegma taste like amazon proof of purchase name a food you rarely cook at home gas like smell in house lost in space ending how to warm a pool fast battery backup power supply sump pump