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Old 03-18-2003, 04:10 PM
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Why is "Chuy" the nickname for "Jesus?"

Couldn't find the answer on Search or Google.
Old 03-18-2003, 04:29 PM
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Diminutive name forms are often derived from baby talk, i.e. small children's inability to correctly pronounce the names. Jesús is Chucho, and I suppose it was then further diminutized to Chuy.
Old 03-18-2003, 04:31 PM
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I can't fully explain it, I can only point out that MANY common Spanish nicknames are formed by combing "Ch" with a syllable or syllables of the full name. "Chuy" is just one example.

A girl named Isabel is often nicknamed "Chavela." A guy named Ernesto is often called "Che" (it wasn't just Senor Guevara!). That's just a pattern within Spanish.

To ask "why" is like asking "why do so many English nicknames seem to be rhymes for shortened versions of the full name
("Bob" for Rob/ert," "Bill" for Will/iam, "Ted" for Ed/ward, etc.)?" The reason is... there IS no reason. Things just evolved that way.
Old 03-18-2003, 04:41 PM
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I'm gonna name my kid Tedward.
Old 03-18-2003, 04:51 PM
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Squidward?
Old 03-18-2003, 05:22 PM
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I thought "Ted" was short for "Theodore".
Old 03-18-2003, 06:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jpeg Jones
I thought "Ted" was short for "Theodore".
Sometimes. My father once bought a one-volume encyclopedia which asserted, in all seriousness, that the Kennedy brothers were named Joseph Jr., John, Robert, and Theodore.
Old 03-18-2003, 06:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jpeg Jones
I thought "Ted" was short for "Theodore".
Ted can be short for either Edward or Theodore.
Old 03-18-2003, 06:29 PM
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I'm a José and I have been referred to as Che, Cheo or Cheíto. My brother is also a José and HIS nick is "Pepe" which is the most common variation for José.

Jesús, in PR, is Chucho, just plain Chu, or Chuíto(diminutive)

BTW, astorian, "Che" is used in Argentina as a generic way of addressing someone casually -- sort of like some English-speakers will use "Mac" or "Buddy" -- which would make it a sensible "handle" for him among fellow revolutionaries in Cuba, Central America and Bolivia, sorta calling him Ernest "the Argie" Guevara.
Old 03-18-2003, 06:32 PM
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Oh, and Enrique (Henry) becomes "Quique" (pron: Kee-KEH), which at some point between 1960 and 1990 suffered a written metamorphosis to (I'm not making this up) "Kike" (still pron. Kee-KEH)
Old 03-18-2003, 06:39 PM
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I'ma name my son Bobert.


I'll call him "Rob."





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Old 03-18-2003, 08:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Speaker for the Dead
I'm gonna name my kid Tedward.
hijack ahead:
Ned Flanders in the Simpsons is actually named 'Nedward Flanders." They said it in an episode.
Old 03-18-2003, 11:31 PM
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Spanish speaking young children often also have difficulty pronouncing Jorgé correctly, at least initially. It oftentimes comes out as "Co-kay."
Old 03-18-2003, 11:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by astorian
To ask "why" is like asking "why do so many English nicknames seem to be rhymes for shortened versions of the full name
("Bob" for Rob/ert," "Bill" for Will/iam, "Ted" for Ed/ward, etc.)?" The reason is... there IS no reason. Things just evolved that way.
There's some information on the origins of rhyming English nicknames in Dex's Staff Report What came first, Dick or "dick"?
Old 03-19-2003, 04:40 AM
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I asked a Jesús at University why he was called Chuy.

He said that because there were so many boys called Jesús, they had to use a nickname to tell them apart, and the nickname they all used was Chuy.

Russell
Old 03-19-2003, 06:32 AM
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FWIW, since you're in Oakland, it may be the influence of KMEL/Wild 107/CMC DJ Chuy Gomez (middle), who bears a slight resemblance to Jesus Christ. I know he's referred to himself as "the guy who looks like Jesus Christ" on-air.
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Old 03-19-2003, 06:59 AM
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I thought Chuy was short was Chubacca?
Old 03-19-2003, 07:52 AM
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how do you pronounce Chuy?

sorry, my spanish is not so hot.
Old 03-19-2003, 08:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by JRDelirious
Oh, and Enrique (Henry) becomes "Quique" (pron: Kee-KEH), which at some point between 1960 and 1990 suffered a written metamorphosis to (I'm not making this up) "Kike" (still pron. Kee-KEH)
Not just Enrique. When I read this post, I was immediately reminded of retired 16-term Texas congressman Eligio "Kika" de la Garza, II.
Old 03-19-2003, 09:36 AM
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irishgirl It's pronounced like chewey
Old 03-19-2003, 09:51 AM
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Well, "ch" seems to work its way into a lot of Spanish nicknames, and not just at the beginning. Ignacio often becomes "Nacho," Pablo often becomes "Pancho," etc. Then there are all-purpose nicknames like "Chico."
Old 03-19-2003, 10:11 AM
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If Peggy can be short for Margret without anyone complaining, I don't see the problem.
Old 03-19-2003, 10:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by JRDelirious
My brother is also a José and HIS nick is "Pepe" which is the most common variation for José.
I have heard that this peculiar nickname is derived from padre putativo (p.p., pronounced "pay-pay"), referring to the fact that Joseph (José) was the putative (alleged) father of Jesus.
Old 03-19-2003, 11:19 AM
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My favorite Spanish nickname is "Lalo" for Eduardo.

Does anyone know tha standard nickname for "Jaime" (Spanish for James, pronounced "HY-meh)? That is my name is Spanish - and what the Mexican side of my family calls me. I have never heard a snappy apodo for "Jaime" in Mexican Spanish. Once a Puerto Rican started calling me "Mito" - which either is from "(Jai)mito" - or he was saying I am a compulsive liar.
Old 03-19-2003, 12:21 PM
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'tis a recurrent subject, this matter of name-shortening and how we end up with things like "Peggy" for "Margaret" and so forth.

I stick to my main thesis: it's baby talk. "Jesus" becomes "Zooey" becomes "Chooey" the same way "Margaret" gives way to "Maggie" and then "Peggy". Little kids find certain sounds harder to make than others, and shorter words easier, of course, than longer ones. I know "M" and "R" are difficult (and therefore "P" and "D", respectively, are often substituted). I would imagine the Spanish "J" sound (guttural "H") doesn't come easy either.
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Old 03-19-2003, 03:32 PM
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The fancy name for these pet names or name of endearment is hypocorism. In Spanish they are very common and as El Mariachi Loco points out, are mostly the result of baby talk or mispronunciation.

For those who speak or read Spanish here is a great site:De Alfonso a Poncho

Names like:

Jesús = Chuy
Salvador = Chava
Vicente = Chente


usually have an /s/ sounding consonant followed by a vowel. The /s/ is changed to /ch/.

And then you have :

Francisco = Pancho
Josefina = Chepina
Alfonso = Poncho


Where also the /f/ is changed to /p/.

There are many others that can be included in the baby talk form:

Antońio 0 Tońo
Dolores = Lola (ˇmi santa suegra!)
Eduardo = Lalo


Then there are others where the name is shortened at the end. (apocope).

Rafael = Rafa
Gilberto= Gil_
Teresa= Tere


Others drop the them at the beginning (apheresis):

Ernestina= Tina
Guadalupe = Lupe


And some can do either:

Guillermina = Guille or Mina
Fernando = Fer or Nando



On top of all of this diminutive suffixes can be added to the already abbreviated forms:

Pancho = Panchito
Lupe = Lupito
Lalo = Lalito


Attaching the diminutive -ito to the normal form of the name isn't found.
Old 03-19-2003, 06:27 PM
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Interesting article. Francisco can also be Paco.
Old 03-19-2003, 08:40 PM
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I thought Chuy's was the bar where the Bush girls got busted. :-)
Old 03-20-2003, 06:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by syncrolecyne
Does anyone know tha standard nickname for "Jaime" (Spanish for James, pronounced "HY-meh)? That is my name is Spanish - and what the Mexican side of my family calls me.
I've heard some Jaime's in Mexico call themselves (and be called) "Jimmy" -- granted I don't know how to spell that in Spanish; maybe "Gimi"? My father-in-law calls me Jimmy, but, well, I'm James or Jim anyway, but I certainly never, ever mentioned that I go by "Jimmy" to him, so it seems to have a certain acceptance in Mexican Spanish (central Mexico, not border-town Spanglish).
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:43 AM
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Y'shua

The name Chuy for Jesus is a derivative of the Hebrew name Yahshua, Yehoshua, Y'shua, Yeshua, Iesous, Iesus Or Jesus.
The common name or shortened name for the name Jesus is "Shua".
Which is where the name Chuy originates and is derived from.
Yeshua - "Shua"
Jesus - "Chuy"
Old 11-22-2011, 11:12 AM
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Chombie?
Old 11-22-2011, 12:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vagabond_1971 View Post
The name Chuy for Jesus is a derivative of the Hebrew name Yahshua, Yehoshua, Y'shua, Yeshua, Iesous, Iesus Or Jesus.
The common name or shortened name for the name Jesus is "Shua".
Which is where the name Chuy originates and is derived from.
Yeshua - "Shua"
Jesus - "Chuy"
Makes sense. Do you have a link that will back that up? Or other citation?
Old 11-22-2011, 12:46 PM
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The one I've never understood is "Cuca" for Refugio. Any ideas for that one?
Old 11-22-2011, 01:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Balthisar View Post
I've heard some Jaime's in Mexico call themselves (and be called) "Jimmy" -- granted I don't know how to spell that in Spanish; maybe "Gimi"? My father-in-law calls me Jimmy, but, well, I'm James or Jim anyway, but I certainly never, ever mentioned that I go by "Jimmy" to him, so it seems to have a certain acceptance in Mexican Spanish (central Mexico, not border-town Spanglish).
There's a teenaged Hispanic girl (probably 3rd- or 4th-generation Mexican-American) who works at a local fast food restaurant I frequent, and her name tag says "Yeimmy". I finally asked her how it's pronounced and she said "Jamie" (as "JAY-mee", not "HY-mee"). I'll take her word for it, of course, but it struck me as odd. I'm familiar with the Spanish "J" being pronounced like an English "Y" in certain words, but I'd never heard the reverse.


Anyway, thanks to the OP - I used to be acquainted* with an older Mexican man named "Chuy", but until now I had no idea how it was spelled or that it was a nickname for Jesus. The other Jesus's I've known all went by "Jesus".

* By "acquainted" I mean he was a regular customer of a bar I used to frequent. I only knew his name because it's what the bartender called him. I don't think he spoke any English, because he never said a word. You'd say "hello" and he would smile, nod, and lift his mug to you.
Old 11-22-2011, 01:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brainfizz View Post
I thought Chuy was short was Chubacca?
Spelled, of course, Chubaxa
Old 11-22-2011, 01:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Rik View Post
There's a teenaged Hispanic girl (probably 3rd- or 4th-generation Mexican-American) who works at a local fast food restaurant I frequent, and her name tag says "Yeimmy". I finally asked her how it's pronounced and she said "Jamie" (as "JAY-mee", not "HY-mee"). I'll take her word for it, of course, but it struck me as odd. I'm familiar with the Spanish "J" being pronounced like an English "Y" in certain words, but I'd never heard the reverse.
It's very common for firstnames copied from English, such as that "Yéimi". For a short time we got tons of Jennifers (pronounced "yenifér" more often than "yénifer"); now they directly spell it Yenifer.


Quote:
Originally Posted by hellpaso View Post
The one I've never understood is "Cuca" for Refugio. Any ideas for that one?
It's not "Cuca for Refugio"; it's a Refugio who happens to be called Cuca. Cuca means "cute one" and it's one of those multipurpose nicks which hold no relationship to their bearer's nicknames - like Chico, Nena or Chiqui.

Last edited by Nava; 11-22-2011 at 01:34 PM.
Old 11-22-2011, 02:10 PM
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Thanks--I guess it's just a coincidence that the two people I've know named Refugio were also nicknamed Cuca!
Old 11-22-2011, 02:30 PM
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Zombie Jesus rising from the dead after eight years: It's taking longer than we thought.
Old 11-23-2011, 04:21 AM
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Originally Posted by hellpaso View Post
Thanks--I guess it's just a coincidence that the two people I've know named Refugio were also nicknamed Cuca!
I know three Cucas: a María Jesús, a Camino and a Candelaria. Well, OK: María Jesús, María del Camino and María Candelaria, according to their IDs...
Old 11-23-2011, 06:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brainfizz View Post
I thought Chuy was short was Chubacca?
I worked with a Jesús Baca. He hated Chuy for some reason.
Old 11-23-2011, 09:28 AM
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They make Star Wars shirts with Chewbacca on them that say "Chuy" underneath. They also make one that has R2-D2 on it with "Arturito". We have both.

Last edited by Sister Vigilante; 11-23-2011 at 09:28 AM.
Old 09-18-2014, 10:56 AM
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Why "Chuy" is a diminutive for first name Jesus

As many other diminutives of first names in any language, they come from endearng "baby talk" spoken to little children. So, it's a "natural" to from Jesus, in Spanish it sounds Hesús, Hesoos, morphs into Hechooz, Hechooy, and from this just -chooy, Chuy. Also Hechooz-Hechoochooz-Hechoochoh-Chuchoh, another common diminutive for Jesus (Hesoos) in Latin American Spanish).
Old 09-18-2014, 11:29 AM
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The Spanish language has a plethora of semi-official nicknames for nearly every imaginable given name, often quite dissimilar to the original name:

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Append...of_given_names

There is no reason to believe that any one of them has an origin any more remarkable than any of the others. Jesus is not considered to be a remarkable name any more so than Mary or Mohammed in other cultures.

Last edited by jtur88; 09-18-2014 at 11:32 AM.
Old 09-18-2014, 11:59 AM
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Does the bible have anything about Jesus returning twice?
Old 09-18-2014, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by astorian View Post
I can't fully explain it, I can only point out that MANY common Spanish nicknames are formed by combing "Ch" with a syllable or syllables of the full name. "Chuy" is just one example.
That explains "Nacho" as a nickname for Ignacio then. Always wondered how that one came about.
Old 09-18-2014, 12:39 PM
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obligatory XKCD

http://xkcd.com/327/
Old 09-18-2014, 01:19 PM
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Sweet Zombie Jesus!
Old 09-18-2014, 03:59 PM
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The only connection I ever made between Chuy and Jesus is that Chuy's puts prayers on their utensil wrappers. Who knew that the Christ liked Mexican food.

Last edited by Skammer; 09-18-2014 at 04:00 PM.
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