Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 07-01-2004, 10:24 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Wisconsin, Untied States
Posts: 7,281
Um..., do 'flat' chested women have difficulty breast feeding?

I'd be glad to hear annecdotal evidence as either a first hander or a person close to someone who has experienced this.
Not sure what constitutes flat. Maybe anything less than a B cup?
I shall re-word the question in a more proper manner.
Do women of A cuppedness have a problem keeping up with nursing or do such smaller women make up for their smallish breasts by producing at a higher rate, whereas a larger woman could store more and would not have to go into production mode as often?
I may as well state the reason for my inquiry. A self admittedly smallish breasted co-worker has become pregnant and she expressed some concern over the matter when asked if she would breast feed the newborn.
A proxy thanks to those who respond. I intend to summarize the responses and forward them to her in a verbal manner.
#2
Old 07-01-2004, 10:29 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: NC
Posts: 4,857
I am by no means an expert at women's health issues, but I recall being taught in medical school that the milk producing equipment is essentially the same from woman to woman and the size of the breast is more dependent on the extraneous fat that accounts for a majority of the size of a [non-lactating] breast. The milk producing equipment being the nipple, lactiferous ducts, etc.

I was trying to think of a good analogy to another part of anatomy... I suppose one could say that human brains are all about the same size, but head size can vary greatly. Let me see if I can go find a cite for either of these conjectures.
#3
Old 07-01-2004, 10:35 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: NC
Posts: 4,857
Ooops, what am I thinking? This is IMHO...although it actually could be GQ since there is a factual answer.

From Zembo CT - Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am - 01-MAR-2002; 29(1): 51-76

Quote:
Assure patient that breast size does not affect milk production. Amount of adipose tissue determines breast size
#4
Old 07-01-2004, 10:40 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: NC
Posts: 4,857
While I'm at it here's the other one...

From: Bartholomeusz HH - Neuropediatrics - 01-OCT-2002; 33(5): 239-41


Quote:
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To quantify the relationship between brain volume and head circumference from early childhood to adulthood, and quantify how this relationship changes with age. METHODS: Whole-brain volume and head circumference measures were obtained from MR images of 76 healthy normal males aged 1.7 to 42 years. RESULTS: Across early childhood, brain volume and head circumference both increase, but from adolescence onward brain volume decreases while head circumference does not. Because of such changing relationships between brain volume and head circumference with age, a given head circumference was associated with a wide range of brain volumes. However, when grouped appropriately by age, head circumference was shown to accurately predict brain volume. Head circumference was an excellent prediction of brain volume in 1.7 to 6 years old children (r = 0.93), but only an adequate predictor in 7 to 42 year olds. CONCLUSIONS: To use head circumference as an accurate indication of abnormal brain volume in the clinic or research setting, the patient's age must be taken into account. With knowledge of age-dependent head circumference-to-brain volume relationship, head circumference (particularly in young children) can be an accurate, rapid, and inexpensive indication of normalcy of brain size and growth in a clinical setting.
Emphasis mine

I was wrong about brain volumes being fairly consistent, but the fact remains that head size is not necessarily indicative of brain size in adults.
#5
Old 07-01-2004, 10:42 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 7,596
Well, my best friend is an A cup and she had no problems breast feeding. I'm a D-DD cup and also had no problems. We both breast fed our kids (born 3 wks apart) about 6 mos with no problems.

OTOH, my cousin's wife, a D cup, had a terrible time breast feeding. It just didn't work for her. It was sad becuase stupid people would come up to her and ask why she wasn't breast feeding since she was "so well equipped".

I'm pretty sure size has nothing to do with it.
#6
Old 07-01-2004, 10:43 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 594
My sister is an A cup and a copious milk producer.
#7
Old 07-01-2004, 10:44 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Wisconsin, Untied States
Posts: 7,281
Cool, so far so good. Do smaller women need to produce at a more constant rate than larger women who can store more in their tissue? Or does it not get stored in tissue?
IOW, is the milk fed directly to the baby from the producing ducts and not stored in the tissue? I was under the impression that storage was possible in larger women and it might be used as a buffer between production cycles.
#8
Old 07-01-2004, 10:55 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 179
A/B cup before pregnancy here; D cup while lactating. Milk is produced on demand, not stored in the breasts. Your system gets used to producing and if the baby does not nurse when you are ready it gets quite painful surprisingly quickly. Even when I was engorged, my son would empty that out within the first ten minutes, but continue nursing for up to forty-five minutes. Look at our cousins the great apes, who have truly flat chests but manage to feed their babies just fine.
#9
Old 07-01-2004, 11:11 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Beautiful Central NewYork
Posts: 548
Another barely B cup anecdotal...no problems with sustained lactation for 4.5 years now. Both my sons were exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months despite my lack of endowment. In fact, my only real problems with nursing were oversupply issues.

Here's a site that explains the anatomy of a lactating breast pretty well. And at least one official answer to your question about size=storage:

Quote:
Secondarily, the research of Peter Hartmann has shown that the milk storage capacity varies a lot between women. Breast milk is produced continually and it accumulates in the milk ducts between feedings. During feeding, a baby typically empties about 70-80% of the milk in the breast. Hartmann found in his studies that some women had 3 times as big a storage capacity than others - but that all of them produced the same amount of milk over a 24-hour period. In general, bigger breasts of course would have a bigger storage but it was noted that breast size was not always a good predictor of production or storage capacity.
#10
Old 07-01-2004, 11:22 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: in a square room
Posts: 1,621
LadyVor, who was slightly smaller than a B cup before pregnancy, had to pump exclusively for the first week, due to baby health issues (which have since completely resolved themselves). She wanted to make sure and build up her supply, so she pumped every four hours without fail until the production dropped.

By the end of the 4th day, she was pumping enough out for the entire NICU. The leftover frozen "daddy bottles" lasted for 3 months. She also topped out around a DD cup, but has retreated back to a C.

-lv
#11
Old 07-01-2004, 11:24 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: in a square room
Posts: 1,621
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordVor
She wanted to make sure and build up her supply, so she pumped every four hours without fail until the production dropped.
I worded that wrong. When pumping, you can always get a few more drops out because the breast is constantly producing milk. I meant to say that she stopped the pumping session once the output was down to a couple drops.
#12
Old 07-02-2004, 01:18 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: NJ, Exit #137
Posts: 11,884
If your coworker is feeling concern over this, she should definitely go see a lactation consultant. The facts, as presented in this thread, should reassure her, but being physically examined by a lactation consultant will go even further in putting her mind at ease.

And as knowledgable as obstetricians any neonatal nurses may be, they are no match for a gen-yoo-ine lactation consultant.

I think most hospitals have one on staff. She should easily be able to get into contact with one and ask her how to get a consultation.
#13
Old 07-02-2004, 03:48 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: outside Oslo, Norway
Posts: 4,782
In addition to what's already been said, it's actually easier for a baby to get a good hold on a small-to-medium sized breast than a very large one. I swelled up to somewhere beyond D for the first few days with both of my babies, and had to make sure to position them so the poor little things could breathe!
#14
Old 07-02-2004, 07:23 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 21,530
D cup who had horrible issues with milk production. Ample breasts does not translate into "next career move will take me to the dairy barn."
#15
Old 07-02-2004, 07:46 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,781
My understanding is that Big Breasts do not equal Large Milk Storage. Apparently there's just enough stored milk to get the infant started, after which production takes over and keeps up with demand.

According to Desmond Morris, large breasts can actually interfere with nursing. As with all things Morris, I think this should be taken with caution. But he does claim that wjhat we would see as flat-chested primates have absolutely no trouble providing adequate milk. Humans are the Big Boobed Apes (among our many other attributes), and I'm on record on this Board as endorsing the view that big breasts are mainly as sex signals for males. They work that way for me, anyway.
__________________
After he finished his work on conditioning dogs, Ivan Petrovich Pavlov ambitiously tried his theories on angels, eventually training a flock of them to go and get their wings from a rack when signaled with a bell.
#16
Old 07-02-2004, 09:24 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Wilds of WV
Posts: 10,652
My SIL is completely flat-chested. She produced plenty of milk for her two sons, and could pump 8 oz. in under 10 minutes. This is awe-inspiring to me, since the most I could ever pump in 10 minutes was 2 oz. and I'm a solid C-cup.
#17
Old 07-02-2004, 09:52 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 1999
Posts: 22,471
Mrs. Kunilou was a AA cup and nursed twins without any problem.

Next question?
#18
Old 07-02-2004, 10:46 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Texas, U.S.A.
Posts: 3,448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dangerosa
D cup who had horrible issues with milk production. Ample breasts does not translate into "next career move will take me to the dairy barn."
Same here. Ample to the eye doesn't mean there won't be struggles with nursing.
#19
Old 07-02-2004, 07:03 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,640
Quote:
Originally Posted by kunilou
Mrs. Kunilou was a AA cup and nursed twins without any problem.

Next question?
My A cup wife also nursed twins, as well as our other three children, with no issues.
#20
Old 07-02-2004, 07:24 PM
lee lee is offline
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cook County, IL
Posts: 4,682
My friend who had nearly A cups had enough milk. When her son was in the NICU she fed him and 2 other preemies IIRC. Her children seemed to have no trouble latching on and always seemed to get enough to eat.
#21
Old 07-02-2004, 10:03 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,940
Well, you've gotten plenty of anecdotal evidence to prove that size and production are not necessarily related.
Yoy might also direct your friend to:
lalecheleague.com
breastfeeding.com
kellymom.com
askdrsears.com
The LLL site will have links to follow to find meetings in her area (free) and all sites offer a wealth of resources if she has other questions (i.e. What medications can be taken while breastfeeding, how to tell if baby is getting enough, etc.) Much more important than the size of the, um, equipment is the amount of support and education about breastfeeding the expectant mom gets.
#22
Old 07-03-2004, 03:12 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,336
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dangerosa
D cup who had horrible issues with milk production. Ample breasts does not translate into "next career move will take me to the dairy barn."
Ditto .... not so horrible, but we supplemented with formula for a few weeks when I went back to work until I could build up to pumping out enough.

When I gave up pumping at work after 10.5 months, my suppply kinda regulated to night and morning nursing w/o too much hassle.
#23
Old 07-03-2004, 04:10 AM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: upwind of Commerce City
Posts: 510
I'm a DDD and have had terrible problems with low milk supply. Nothing I tried could make me produce more than a few ounces a day. The first time, I gave up after two weeks because the doctor thought my child was losing weight far too fast. For my three month old, he had to be supplemented right from the beginning due to hypoglycemia and was in the NICU for four days. I tried exclusive breastfeeding when he got out of NICU, but that didn't last long because we didn't want to listen to his near constant screams of hunger, as the "lactation experts" would have us do, and we "supplemented" with formula. (Really, more like supplementing the formula with breastmilk.) At six weeks, I thought it just wasn't worth it anymore for two ounces of breastmilk a day, and switched to formula exclusively.
#24
Old 07-03-2004, 10:34 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Not so North
Posts: 11,014
I was a DD when my son was born, and breast fed for about 10 days. Constantly. Although there was ample milk, there was really nothing to it and he wasn't getting enough nutrition. It was off to formula that very day. So in my case (and that of my sister, mother, my mother's 5 sisters and countless nieces), big boobs do not equal good milk. Of my generation, only one first cousin was able to nurse her children satisfactorily.
#25
Old 07-04-2004, 03:31 PM
lee lee is offline
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cook County, IL
Posts: 4,682
Just so you don't think big breasts mean little milk, I have ample breasts and ample milk. The first hour of my daughter's life, she nursed for 45 minutes. I had GD so the usual procedure is to feed the infant sugar water to get her blood glucose up. My daughter did not need that. I did have difficulties the first couple of weeks, but never had to resort to fourmula until 5 months. We supplemented with formula for that month and then went to nursing and solids.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:06 AM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: elvish curses scully queequeg cedar siding maintenance silencers revolvers 15mm cannon dog clits skrillex music type piers anthony firefly midget babies is zero finite mini chicago bean zaaz machine poster credits girls message boards glue eating butterface slut maru translation stretching wool sweaters miracle berry foods euthanize fish corner hats military batman zoloft forums bacon pics visine ingest 486 cpu domesticated crows light mayo packets illegal boxing moves bullock meaning wiper refills motorcycle pronunciation greyhound safe loretta swit measurements mirror damage jct sign sleep piss frequent toilet clogs telecheck code 3 reason 2 what is an omage how to get a straight guy can you use an internal dvd drive externally cost to ship by rail freeze credit card in ice cream or half and half crush kill destroy lost in space why is my cat chewing on cords kilo two bravo rotten tomatoes black square blue stripe the sun never sets on the british empire means toyota prius traction control is invicta a good watch brand sigma alpha epsilon meaning can't testify against spouse does poop dissolve in water the onion gallagher interview putting animals to sleep at home are shroom spores illegal can you have two drivers licenses from different states home depot christmas eve hours poop deck on a ship why would someone steal my car registration are old encyclopedias worth anything what is the end of bread called why does splitting an atom release energy the french mistake lyrics how to restore corian countertop wearing scrubs in public granulated sugar to confectioners sugar conversion chef boyardee spaghetti dinner brakes stopped working suddenly how much does it cost to get a radiator flushed