Thread Tools
Old 07-15-2004, 03:00 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Uber Alles, CA
Posts: 3,613
Difference between a fungi and animals?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos
A multicellular organism that undergoes photosyntesis is a plant, while one which does not is an animal or a fungus (I won't go into the difference between animals and fungi here).
OK, here's a new place. :-) What *is* the difference between fungi and animals? How they process their food source?
Old 07-15-2004, 03:17 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 2,114
Actually, the difference (in terms of definitions) isn't as obvious as you'd think.

Fungi are:

*mostly multicellular (notable exceptions are yeasts)-so are animals (exclusively)
*heterotrophic (they don't generate their own nutrition like plants) - so are animals
*eukaryotic (their cells contain membrane bound sub-structures) - so are animals

The main differences are:

* cell walls - fungi have them, animals don't
* sense organs (or tissues) - animals have them, fungi don't
* method of nutrient intake - fungi: absorption; animal: ingestion
* movement - animals move by cilia, flagella, or muscular structures/organs; fungi
don't move under their own power.
Old 07-15-2004, 03:39 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 1999
Posts: 24,944
Quote:
Originally Posted by jk1245
* movement - animals move by cilia, flagella, or muscular structures/organs; fungi
don't move under their own power.
Slime molds do (if slime molds are still considered fungi. I think there's some debate over that.)
Old 07-15-2004, 03:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 2,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Amazing
Slime molds do (if slime molds are still considered fungi. I think there's some debate over that.)

Crap. A slime mold fan has foiled my nice, orderly classification. Hopefully the sponge freaks won't show up anytime soon.

I believe that the slime molds are now classified in Protista. They may have been moved lately though, I haven't been a working biologist in ~10 years.

You're right though, in that they do seem to overlap a couple of kingdoms.
Old 07-15-2004, 03:54 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Writing desk :: Raven: ?
Posts: 499
A fungi has lots of amusing stories, always brings a couple six packs of good beer, and offers to help clean up.

An animal brings a case of Natty Bo, drinks it all himself, and throws up on your carpet after making a toga out of your spare linens.
Old 07-15-2004, 03:54 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: St. Simon's Island, GA
Posts: 6,783
In addition too what has already been posted, the three kingdoms* can be distinguished by their structural proteins. Plants use cellulose, animals use keratin and collagen, and fungi use chitin. In almost all organisms, the structural proteins are the most common proteins (usually about 30% by mass if I remember right)

There are five kingdoms total, but I decided to only mention these three as discussing the bacterial and archae kingdoms would probably lead to a major highjack
__________________
Cheeze it! It's the cops!
Old 07-15-2004, 04:01 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 1999
Location: at the right hand of cool
Posts: 36,813
My understanding is that, while the creatures in the middle of each kingdom are pretty different from one another, the exact place to draw the boundaries between the kingdoms is somewhat arbitrary. Given that evolution has occurred from one kingdom to another, there are bound to be in-between critters like slime molds.

Daniel
Old 07-15-2004, 05:33 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Monkey With a Gun

There are five kingdoms total, but I decided to only mention these three as discussing the bacterial and archae kingdoms would probably lead to a major highjack
Psst. Don't you mean protista instead of archae, the latter being the nominal sixth kingdom?
Old 07-15-2004, 06:29 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: KCMO
Posts: 11,123
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Monkey With a Gun
Plants use cellulose, animals use keratin and collagen, and fungi use chitin.
Animals use chitin. Perhaps vertebrates use only keratin and collagen, but arthropods certainly use chitin.
Old 07-15-2004, 06:41 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Eastern SF Bay Area
Posts: 4,212
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Monkey With a Gun
There are five kingdoms total, but I decided to only mention these three as discussing the bacterial and archae kingdoms would probably lead to a major highjack
As with many classifications, this all depends on who you ask. The current thinking is more along the lines of three Domains and umpteen Kingdoms (assuming one bothers with Kingdoms at all).

As for the OP, here is what the Tree of Life page on fungi has to say:

Quote:
Fungi are characterized by non-motile bodies (thalli) constructed of apically elongating walled filaments (hyphae), a life cycle with sexual and asexual reproduction, usually from a common thallus, haploid thalli resulting from zygotic meiosis, and heterotrophic nutrition. Spindle pole bodies, not centrioles, usually are associated with the nuclear envelope during cell division. The characteristic wall components are chitin (beta-1,4-linked homopolymers of N-acetylglucosamine in microcrystalline state) and glucans primarily alpha-glucans (alpha-1,3- and alpha-1,6- linkages).

Exceptions to this characterization of fungi are well known, and include the following: Most species of Chytridiomycota have cells with a single, smooth, posteriorly inserted flagellum at some stage in the life cycle, and centrioles are associated with nuclear division. The life cycles of most Chytridiomycota are poorly studied, but some (Blastocladiales) are known to have zygotic meiosis (therefore, alternation between haploid and diploid generations). Certain members of Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota may lack hyphal growth during part or all of their life cycles, and, instead, produce budding yeast cells. Most fungal species with yeast growth forms contain only minute amounts of chitin in the walls of the yeast cells. A few species of Ascomycota (Ophiostomataceae) have cellulose in their walls, and certain members of Chytridiomycota (Coelomomycetales) lack walls.
Old 07-15-2004, 07:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: right behind....YOUR EAR!
Posts: 1,665
So a mushroom walks into a bar........
Old 07-15-2004, 07:54 PM
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 37,554
Quote:
Originally Posted by jk1245
Crap. A slime mold fan has foiled my nice, orderly classification. Hopefully the sponge freaks won't show up anytime soon.

I believe that the slime molds are now classified in Protista. They may have been moved lately though, I haven't been a working biologist in ~10 years.

You're right though, in that they do seem to overlap a couple of kingdoms.
The "Five Kingdom" system was originally devised in response to the fact that organisms don't fit neatly into the traditional "Two Kingdom" system of Plants (which included Fungi) and Animals. The problem is, slime molds don't fit all that well into a Five Kingdom System either.

As Darwin's Finch says, the most recent view is that there are Three Domains (a level higher than Kingdom), and, for those who still cling to the concept, dozens of Kingdoms just among the Eucaryotes.

The usual "Five Kingdoms" are Monera, including the procaryotic bacteria and blue-green "algae," the Protista (or Protoctista) including unicellular eucaryotes; and the multicellular eucaryotes Fungi, Plants, and Animals.

A couple of recent findings have led to revisions to this system. For one thing, certain procaryotes called Archaea that were formerly considered bacteria turn out to be vastly different from them genetically, in fact at least as different as the eucaryotes are. This led to the proposal to recognize three Domains of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucaryota.

Secondly, the Protista is a highly artificial category that includes some members that are closer to the Plants, some to the Fungi, and some to the Animals. Also, many of the groups among the Protista are at least as different from each other genetically as Plants and Animals are. Therefore, if you consider Plants and Animals to be separate Kingdoms, to be consistent you have to set up Kingdoms for each of the separate lineages of Protists, which leads to maybe 20 or so Kingdoms in all.

With regard to slime molds, there are actually two rather different kinds that are not closely related. Although they traditionally have been considered Fungi, they have also been considered Protists, but they should probably be in separate Kingdoms of their own (or perhaps together with some related unicellular forms).
Old 07-15-2004, 09:42 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Yes
Posts: 20,327
That "Tree of life" quote gives rather short shrift to the zygomycetes. Being coencytic, these fungi consist of a single mass of protoplasm replete with thousands of embedded nuclei. The cytoplasm only differentiates into mononucleate cells when it's time to make spores.
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:12 AM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: fitzpatrick's war woodstock from peanuts rosarito mexico safe visual voyaging raunchiest romance novels lucifers hammer movie soda bottle size popsicle in plastic hornet suit eight guage shotgun 96.6 temp midas tire prices dog run flooring ballad of serenity australian kmart hey papa smurf is 22 lethal benner tea company ss boat define opposable thumbs kissing bicep military bows kirk green tunic longest pregnancy ever jicama replacement gotjunk pricing monty hall mythbusters creole vs french asian pink nipples swallow pill wrong fag british animal control gloves donkey show beastiality bumming cigarettes jarts for sale draino in toilet how does a self inflating sleeping pad work how to reheat wingstop why is anime so expensive why do i cry when i pee wet floor in spanish samantha bee is not funny do hindus drink milk cash register and credit card systems how much does a frog weigh milk of magnesia bad for skin do i need a wireless adapter carmax make a payment what does haldol do to a normal person the big bang theory the romance resonance how long does it take for stomach to empty what's it like being drunk in n out burger stickers best body wash for hard water do you write lyrics or music first ll bean tall mens clothing where buy boric acid why does it hurt to pee after sex rain rain go away isaac asimov batteries stuck in apple wireless keyboard uses for mexican crema animals that eat poison ivy child custody support groups comcast x1 ir extender overflow drain cover for bathtub rosary in spanish for deceased did fred and wilma sleep in the same bed how to dematt a cat dove in the pool how much does it cost to replace a subfloor songs like i will follow you into the dark