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#1
Old 11-09-2004, 05:15 PM
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Why do so many deer get hit by cars?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I understood that deer have realtively sharp senses and quick reflexes compared to humans. Don't they see these big things are making noises and charging at them? Why don't they run away? Wouldn't that be their response to a charging predator?

Of course I have nearly clobbered crazy-ass squirrels which pull stuff like running 3/4 of the way across the road and then spinning and running back the other way.

Personally, while I've seen deer next to or crossing roads, I've never come close to hitting any. So tell me more about their behavior, please.
#2
Old 11-09-2004, 05:22 PM
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Becuase it's much easier to read vanity plates when they're coming AT you...
#3
Old 11-09-2004, 05:30 PM
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I can't be too sure, but I have a couple ideas (read WAGs ):

1) Deer may be trying to get onto the surface where they can move with the greatest speed to escape a predator. The road is usually smooth, flat, and has no large bushes or trees growing on it, so they may think it offers them the best opportunity to escape.

2) Deer may be trying to run across a predator's path in order to confuse it. By first appearing to get closer (and then be more easily caught), then crossing the path of the predator, they might force it to turn and lose valuable time in its attempt to catch them.

3) The deer are really confused by all the bright light, noise, and speed of the car, so what they're doing doesn't make a heck of a lot of sense.

In (1) and (2), I've assumed that the deer percieves the car as a predator... this might be a horribly mistaken assumption, and should be taken with the appropriate grain of the condiment of your choice.
#4
Old 11-09-2004, 05:35 PM
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Deer are stupid, so are squirrels. The subject was covered before, either in a staff report or an article by the Perfect Master. The animals can't comprehend how fast cars go, and their escape route would probably be ok if cars were only as fast as a wolf, mountain lion or other predator.
#5
Old 11-09-2004, 05:35 PM
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Q. Why did the chicken cross the road?

A. To show the deer it could be done.

"Habitat fragmentation is when large areas of wildlife habitat are broken
up into smaller areas by some topographic feature. Keep in mind that deer
are large, very mobile animals that need large areas of land to survive.
When habitats in which deer live are broken up by roads, the deer are
forced to cross the roads on a regular basis and this inevitably causes
accidents."

<snip>

Along the same lines, deer are also attracted to roadsides and shoulders
because these areas are often planted with plants that deer find highly
attractive to eat. In cold areas of the country, deer are also attracted
to roadways by the salt that is put down to de-ice the roads.

can't take credit from here
http://madsci.org/posts/archives...0168.Zo.r.html
#6
Old 11-09-2004, 05:50 PM
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probably they are dazzled by the headlights at night and freeze. Poachers lamp and shoot them the same way.
#7
Old 11-09-2004, 05:50 PM
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Deer also tend to freeze and stand completely still when first startled. (Hence the term "like a deer in the headlights"). They'll freeze for a second or two, and after discerning the threat, they generally start running quickly.

I'm guessing it's a survival instinct. The human eye automatically tends to lock on to movment, and I'd assume (no cite, sorry) this trait is true for other predator species as well. If the deer stands stock-still, the predator might not see it. Unfortunately, this technique doesn't work so well when faced with a car approaching at 90+ feet per second. Pausing even for 1 second can mean the difference between life and death for the deer.
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#8
Old 11-09-2004, 06:20 PM
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also, I think there's this

There would be no reason for deer to consider cars to be "predators." Such judgements, if you were to call them that, are built in over millions of years of survival. Cars have posed a danger to deer for the last 100 years, maybe. They may be skittish about loud car noises, but may also learn to tolerate those noises living in forests where roads are. Seeing a car on the roadway wouldn't register in a deer's brain the same way a mountain lion would. They certainly don't have built in fight or flight behaviors for Buicks. Ergo...venison.
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#9
Old 11-09-2004, 06:55 PM
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A deers habitat is usually figured as within one square mile of it’s birth. A fawn, born in an area that has automobile traffic, will never fear that sound. It grows used to the sight. Notice next time when you see them grazing along side of the road, they don’t even bother to look up as you pass. Your auto is not perceived as a threat. White tail deer are big time creatures of habit. The doe will follow the path of her mother, as her fawns will follow her. Forever. No amount of land development will change that to any degree. The deer you see walking across your open yard, are the ancestors of the deer that walked there years ago when the woods were thick. Next time you see a ‘DEER CROSSING’ highway sign, yes, it means that numerous deer have been hit by cars in that area, and the reason being, as I stated above..creatures of habit. A man made road just means that on the other side of that road, is the continuation of the path their ancestors walked, and they aren’t about to change that. It’s the deer law. I’ve hunted deer for 40 years. When the bullets start flying in November, THAT causes a change in direction. Come a few weeks after the season, and they are right back on their trails.
#10
Old 11-09-2004, 07:01 PM
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There are two useful techniques deer use for avoiding predators (wolves) that don't work very well for cars:

1. Evade a fast-moving predator by crossing its path at a right angle. Just about all prey do this, including birds. Dogfighters also do this.

2. Confuse a predator by not moving. Wolves, the primary predator of deer, have a difficult time attacking a stationary deer, because the deer is more formidable, and wolves' eyesight works much better on moving objects. There are rich tactics here -- deer will face off a single wolf, while the wolf calls to the pack. As the pack arrives, they will try to taunt the deer into running, while the deer tries to kick the wolves. At some point the deer will bolt, and try to jump to a more defensible position. Only when the wolves numbers become too large will the deer run all out.
#11
Old 11-09-2004, 07:01 PM
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[QUOTE=cornflakes]Deer are stupid, so are squirrels.QUOTE]

Actually, deer are quite smart. Have you ever been bow hunting? A little technique they do can screw your shot if you move. If they think they see something moving up in the tree, they will stare at you for quite a while. Then they move their head down, which can make you think it doesn't know your there and you move, but then it will fling its head right back up to see if you are moving. Then run away. That is a pretty smart move if you ask me.

As for squirrels, well ya, they are stupid.
#12
Old 11-09-2004, 09:04 PM
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jweb is correct.

How an animal responds after being startled depends on the type of animal. A coyote, for example, will run. That’s why you never see a dead coyote lying on the side of the road. A deer will freeze. Hence deer are very vulnerable to being hit by cars; when a deer sees a car coming, it will instinctively freeze.

In each case (coyote and deer), the response after being startled is rooted in survivalism.
#13
Old 11-09-2004, 09:26 PM
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Perhaps one could rephrase the question as:

Why do so many cars hit deer?
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#14
Old 11-09-2004, 09:28 PM
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It's the placement of the deer crossings. Too many deer are hit near them. They should be moved.
#15
Old 11-09-2004, 09:40 PM
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Have you ever seen signs in wildlife preserves that give stern warnings NOT to feed the deer? Feeding wild animals eases their natural fear of humans and cars (because they're often fed from the window of a car).

Assateague Island State Park Ponies:

Quote:
Feeding the horses causes them to hang around roads and several are hit and killed every year.
#16
Old 11-09-2004, 09:42 PM
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Suicide

Yes, sad but true.
#17
Old 11-09-2004, 09:47 PM
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I've almost hit 2 deer in as many months. As far as I can tell they are as dumb as a post.


Cheers to my scientific observation
#18
Old 11-09-2004, 09:52 PM
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#19
Old 11-09-2004, 10:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by me paso
Quote:
Originally Posted by cornflakes
Deer are stupid, so are squirrels.
Actually, deer are quite smart. Have you ever been bow hunting? A little technique they do can screw your shot if you move. If they think they see something moving up in the tree, they will stare at you for quite a while. Then they move their head down, which can make you think it doesn't know your there and you move, but then it will fling its head right back up to see if you are moving. Then run away. That is a pretty smart move if you ask me.

As for squirrels, well ya, they are stupid.
Maybe I shouldn't have said "stupid." I should have said "not quite smart enough to know that the best way to avoid a car is to not run straight into a quarter panel." I never got around to carrying tags in the last car I owned, but I should have.

You're right, deer are fairly smart. They are skittish though, and they do lack the ability to comprehend that something as big as a car can move that fast.
#20
Old 11-09-2004, 11:02 PM
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Deer travel in herds. Rudolf crosses the road, Joe Driver's head turns to watch Rudolf, meanwhile Blitzen is following Rudolf and runs in front of Joe Driver's car. It's not so much the deer you see that get hit, it's the ones you don't see.
#21
Old 11-09-2004, 11:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crafter_Man
That’s why you never see a dead coyote lying on the side of the road.
I saw a dead coyote in the road last weekend. Of course, in the last month I've probably seen two dozen dead deer in the road, but you just can't say "never."
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#22
Old 11-09-2004, 11:36 PM
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Now I'm starting to think about which animals you DON't see dead on the highway.

I don't think I've ever seen a run over rabbit. Or crow. Actally, pretty much any bird.

I've seen a lot more cats run over than dogs. But maybe the dogs are bigger so get shoveled off the roads faster? Probably not, I don't recall seeing any loose dogs in my neighborhood, but quite a few free-roaming cate.
#23
Old 11-09-2004, 11:44 PM
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I live in a suburban neighborhood where there is a lot of traffic nearby. The posted speed limits are about 35 to 45 miles an hour and yet there are several wooded lots and lots of deer. If the deer is fleeing from one predator, she or he is not likely to look both ways before darting across the street.

I had the top down on the convertible and two grandchildren in the backseat when I came within a microsecond of hitting a buck a few years back. There would have been nothing I could have done if he had been a step slower or I had been a mile faster.

I've seen five deer in my grandchildren's backyard and nine in my mother's when she still lived in a house in a small town. I am two blocks from one of the busiest intersections in Tennessee and I've also had a deer come through my yard.

We are in their territory.
#24
Old 11-10-2004, 08:13 AM
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Another reason is that there are a lot of deer out there. With the decrease in predators and increase in fields and pastures there are actually more deer in Minnesota (and probably elsewhere in the US, possibly Canada too) than there were in pre-Columbus times. Figures for Minnesota estimate there are 800,000 deer in the state and 15,000 killed by cars annually (1997 figures).
#25
Old 11-10-2004, 08:26 AM
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They run out right in front of you. A deer frozen in the headlights is pretty easy to deal with because it's in your headlights and right in front of you. All the deer-car accidents I've heard of involved the deer jumping out from behind cover so that the driver either can't avoid the beast or would risk a more severe accident by trying to avoid the deer.

My thinking is that deer haven't evolved to understand cars & roads. They see something coming and react, and because predictable=dead, they have to have some probability of running right in front of the danger. (The first time I saw a wild turkey fly was when it was off the road, but along a curve. Since I was going straight at it, it started flying out of my path and almost got itself creamed when I followed the road directly underneith the bird.)

Other times they may not even see the car coming. If they're running in a column, you'll see several deer cross a road in succession (sp?). The deer near the back have to decide between trying to beat the oncoming thing and following the leader or getting split off from the group.

When I had my deer-car accident, the deer jumped out so quickly that I literally didn't even have time to hit the brakes!
#26
Old 11-10-2004, 10:43 AM
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Yeah, the typical pattern is not that the deer is standing in the road and you run into it. A more typical accident is the deer standing at the side of the road. As you approach the deer decides to run...and runs in front of the car. Or a group of deer start to run, the first few run across the road and others follow, even if it means running in front of the car.

I've never actually seen a deer standing in the road. When they are on the road they are always running to the other side. They do seem to like standing and browsing on the side of the road, I imagine because of all the new growth there makes better food.
#27
Old 11-10-2004, 11:24 AM
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Deer are usually only hit in the fall during their rutting season. Their minds are on one thing, and they pay no attention to anything else.
#28
Old 11-10-2004, 12:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyo Jim
Now I'm starting to think about which animals you DON't see dead on the highway.

I don't think I've ever seen a run over rabbit. Or crow. Actally, pretty much any bird.
I hit a rabbit the other day while driving. I swerved to the right, and it looked like the rabbit was going to make, but at the last second the suicidal bunny suddenly reversed directions, and ran straight under my left front tire.
#29
Old 11-10-2004, 12:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ouryL
Suicide

Yes, sad but true.
That explains all that sad, depressing poetry found on oak leaves.

Won't somebody think of the fawns??!
#30
Old 11-10-2004, 12:41 PM
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I almost hit not one, not two, but three deer this morning as I took the kids to school.

[hijack]

How come the plural of deer is not deers?

[/hijack]
#31
Old 11-10-2004, 08:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by js_africanus
They run out right in front of you. A deer frozen in the headlights is pretty easy to deal with because it's in your headlights and right in front of you. All the deer-car accidents I've heard of involved the deer jumping out from behind cover so that the driver either can't avoid the beast or would risk a more severe accident by trying to avoid the deer.

Other times they may not even see the car coming. If they're running in a column, you'll see several deer cross a road in succession (sp?). The deer near the back have to decide between trying to beat the oncoming thing and following the leader or getting split off from the group.

When I had my deer-car accident, the deer jumped out so quickly that I literally didn't even have time to hit the brakes!
As you are the only poster who admits to having hit one, let me commiserate with you. Mine hit me while I was driving southbound at 70 mph (the legal limit) in the left lane of a 2-lane (each way) interstate on a sunny weekday afternoon in January (no snow). It had to have jumped the fence at the west edge of the highway right-of-way but the first I saw of it was when I heard a thud and saw only its white tail sticking up above the hood of my Dodge Intrepid, in front of the driver's seat. The deer had crossed the shoulder and the righthand travel lane and most of my lane when it ran into the left front corner of the car, bounced around and dented the driver-side door and fell dead in the median. It put the car out of commission and it had to be towed, with front bumper, left headlight and quarter panel destroyed. The investigating highway patroller checked to see if it was dead, if not, he would have dispatched it with his handgun, I do believe. Had the deer been larger, or if I had seen it coming and braked, with resulting nosedive, I would probably not be here. More recently, a multi-pronged buck went thru a windshield and one of its horns struck a teenage girl directly in the eye and then out the side of her forehead. The girl survived. Beware and pay attention to the Deer Xing signs, though the stupid things can come from "nowhere".

BTW, /hijack/ I hope you solved your low parking lot lightpole dilemma, js_a.
#32
Old 11-10-2004, 08:43 PM
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Deer are a traffic hazard through out the Upper Mississippi River Valley all year long but especially in this time of year. It is not the fall rut that brings on trouble (although testosterone filled bucks with only one thing on their poor little minds don’t help) it is the harvest. A corn field is a White Tail Deer’s heaven – cover, food and windbreak combined. Once the harvest starts the deer have to move from the fields to the wood lots and forests. They might not understand automobiles but they have figured out that combines are to be avoided. The field to forest thing is a major migration and a lot of it across high speed highways.
#33
Old 11-11-2004, 05:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyo Jim
Now I'm starting to think about which animals you DON't see dead on the highway.

I don't think I've ever seen a run over rabbit. Or crow. Actally, pretty much any bird.
I've seen bird road kill.

Small things like pigeons look much like the squirrel/chipmunk/kitten spectrum of squashies. You pretty much have to get out of your car to identify these things, and note, for example, that there are feathers there instead of fur. I mostly notice this when I'm on my bicycle as opposed to the car. Unless you have an intact wing flopping in the breeze, that's a bit of a tip-off.

For some reason, along route 30 we have Canada goose vs. semi-truck encounters. I think the geese are airborne but flying very low when they get nailed by the upper part of the truck. This tends to leave identifiable goose beside the road. I've also seen a mallard in similar condition.

Can't recall seeing squashed crow - but then, the corvids are among the smarter varieties of birds. They'be been known to figure out street light signals when using traffic to do things like break open walnuts for them. In general, crows seem to understand those big noisy objects are a hazard and to be respected.
#34
Old 11-11-2004, 05:47 AM
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I grew up in suburban Chicago, and saw a couple dead crows in my life there. Not many, but a couple.

My bf when I was 17 hit a deer once when I was in the car with him. Cops came, shot the deer broken-hipped deer, and let us take it home for butchering, as he'd explained his parents were avid hunters and could (and would, and did) butcher it properly, keep a portion of it, and donate the rest to their church's food bank. One of the cops even helped him field dress it for transport.

As a side note, I'm not sure if that was even legal or not for the cops to do, (meaning the legality of releasing the carcass to us...I'd be fairly surprised if it was standard OP to help with the field dressing) but it was a relatively rural area (for far NW suburban Chicago), so there's a good chance the cops didn't care and preferred to ignore some bureaucratic red tape to allowing the perfectly good meat to go to waste.
#35
Old 11-11-2004, 06:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerri
I grew up in suburban Chicago, and saw a couple dead crows in my life there. Not many, but a couple.

My bf when I was 17 hit a deer once when I was in the car with him. Cops came, shot the deer broken-hipped deer, and let us take it home for butchering, as he'd explained his parents were avid hunters and could (and would, and did) butcher it properly, keep a portion of it, and donate the rest to their church's food bank. One of the cops even helped him field dress it for transport.

As a side note, I'm not sure if that was even legal or not for the cops to do, (meaning the legality of releasing the carcass to us...I'd be fairly surprised if it was standard OP to help with the field dressing) but it was a relatively rural area (for far NW suburban Chicago), so there's a good chance the cops didn't care and preferred to ignore some bureaucratic red tape to allowing the perfectly good meat to go to waste.
That is the SOP in WI. If you clip a deer with your car (or believe it or not, with your airplane), the meat is yours if you want it. I don't know about the cop help, though.
#36
Old 11-11-2004, 08:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ignatz
Beware and pay attention to the Deer Xing signs, though the stupid things can come from "nowhere".
I almost want to take up deer hunting again just to do my part to keep the roads safer.

Quote:
BTW, /hijack/ I hope you solved your low parking lot lightpole dilemma, js_a.
Yeah. He was talking about applicants who immediately cry foul at lower lights because they'll have to add so many more. It turns out that he wasn't making blanket statements that seemed logically flawed, but was talking about why developers' knee-jerk reactions weren't necessarily valid. It was a miscommunication problem.
#37
Old 11-12-2004, 09:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyo Jim
I don't think I've ever seen a run over rabbit. Or crow. Actally, pretty much any bird.
We see plenty of bunny roadkill around here. They dart in front of cars all the time.

We rented a motorhome for vacation one year. I pulled into a gas station after driving most of the day, and the woman in front of me got a very sick look on her face. I got out and found a dead bird embedded in my front grille. Yuck!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bewildebeest
Deer are usually only hit in the fall during their rutting season. Their minds are on one thing, and they pay no attention to anything else.
Balderdash. Cite?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerri
My bf when I was 17 hit a deer once when I was in the car with him. Cops came, shot the deer broken-hipped deer, and let us take it home for butchering...
That's illegal here. You can't pick up a dead deer from the side of the road. In fact, I hit one a couple of years ago. The impact broke its spine, but didn't kill it. I borrowed a gun from a friend who lived nearby and put the deer out of its misery. I mentioned this to the sheriff a couple of days later, and he informed me that what I did was illegal: I (a) discharged a firearm within 50 feet of a public highway, (b) shot a deer without a hunting licence, and (c) shot a deer without a valid deer tag.

He said if you take home a dead deer by the side of the road without having a hunting license and a deer tag, he would have had to confiscate the meat and fine you heavily. When we see big, fresh roadkill, we call our local nature center. They come and pick it up and use it to feed the carnivores (they have wolves, mountain lions, coyotes...).
#38
Old 11-12-2004, 09:55 AM
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Deer. Hooved rats. Vermin.

I'm a member of a motorcycle club in New York State (most of us live in New York City). We ride every Sunday, year round, mostly in areas in and around the Catskills, the Delaware River, and the Berkshires. All of these areas, especially the Catskills, are just polluted with deer. It's a big problem. Obviously, the consequences of a deer/motorcycle collision are going to be a lot worse than those of a deer/car collision (OK, I guess they're the same for a deer, but for the motorcyclist, it's going to be worse).

Several of our members have had collisions, and most of us have had very close calls.

Here are a few observations (admittedly anecdotal and not scientific):

Deer are dumb. But they do seem to have a few built-in survival mechanisms, and one is random behavior. I've observed that, when confronted with a large, frightening object, like a car or motorcycle or wolf, they first freeze, then bolt in a random direction. It's just as likely to be right at the threatening object as away from it.

Although they're not exactly herd animals, if a few are traveling in the woods together, and the lead deer crosses the road, the others will follow, no matter what's coming down the road at them.

Deer whistles do absolutely nothing.

If one hits a deer, at least on a motorcycle, they disintegrate completely, covering the (hopefully not to badly injured) rider in shit. They're basically big bags of excrement with four legs and a head. And other stuff. We were picking bits of fur out of a member's bike for weeks after he collided with a deer. He literally cut the deer in half with his bike. Miraculously, he stayed upright, but did thousands of dollars' worth of damage to his bike.
#39
Old 11-12-2004, 12:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InvisibleWombat
Balderdash. Cite?
Well I don't have a cite, but have you ever heard of anyone hitting one outside of the rutting season? I certainly haven't, nor have I seen dead ones beside the road any other time.

Four of my family members have struck dear, all between mid October and early December.
#40
Old 11-12-2004, 12:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyo Jim
I don't think I've ever seen a run over rabbit. Or crow. Actally, pretty much any bird.
Not a week goes by I don't see a splattered ex-pigeon... and they're very accustomed to traffic.
#41
Old 11-12-2004, 12:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bewildebeest
Four of my family members have struck dear, all between mid October and early December.
I see them year round.
#42
Old 11-12-2004, 03:08 PM
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A buck in rut is like a teenager in a whore house. He’s not looking for one doe, he’s out to nail every one in his territory. Conversely, does in estrus will tussle with other does for the head of the line position. As I said above, concerning deer trails, when the hunting season begins..and it is purposely scheduled for the rut..all well traveled paths are out. These maniacs, bucks and does, run slipshod thru the woods, heads down, looking for the SCENT. A road with traffic? They throw caution to the wind. They smell sex on the other side of that road? YOUR problem, not theirs. When the rut ends, the bucks go one way and the does go the other, never to fraternize again, until next season. So, yes, more are hit during the rutting/hunting seasons.

..Wrote the above last night and didn't post it. I was out with the bow this AM, and watched a horny doe chase a six pointer around the trees like I was watching two kids playing. She's in estrus, and he's not reached the rut stage. Interesting to watch. (couldn't get a shot).
#43
Old 11-12-2004, 05:22 PM
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Another reason you see so many deer roadkill is that, not only are there too many deer, there would be more deer anyway - there's always a lot more herbivorous prey animals than there are of their predators and such. So you're going to see more dead deer than wolves every time, just by probability. Also, a dead deer is a big animal - you might not notice a very dead squirrel by the side of the road, but you'll see Bambi. And you might not say anything about hitting the squirrel, but hitting a deer will mess your car up - it's more of a big deal.
#44
Old 11-12-2004, 06:29 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Montana, U.S.A.
Posts: 9,452
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bewildebeest
Well I don't have a cite, but have you ever heard of anyone hitting one outside of the rutting season? I certainly haven't, nor have I seen dead ones beside the road any other time.
I don't think there's a month out of the year that I haven't seen dead deer by the side of the road. I've hit two of them. One was in November (during the rut) and the other was in June (definitely not during the rut).
#45
Old 11-12-2004, 06:59 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyo Jim
That is the SOP in WI. If you clip a deer with your car (or believe it or not, with your airplane), the meat is yours if you want it. I don't know about the cop help, though.
If the driver doesn't want it, someone else can claim it. The sheriff or deputies used to call my grandmother if the driver didn't want to claim a deer killed in an accident because they knew she'd make use of the meat.
#46
Old 11-12-2004, 08:24 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: The Beautiful Bronx
Posts: 4,152
I hit TWO little does with my car in Vermont in the middle of May. Totalled the car and scared the hell out of me. This was in downtown Rutland, around 6:00 am (leaving a campsite). Only six-lane road in VT, I was in the sixth lane, they crossed all five lanes to be hit by me!
#47
Old 11-13-2004, 06:21 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: hobgoblin of geographers
Posts: 4,246
Quote:
Originally Posted by CC
There would be no reason for deer to consider cars to be "predators." Such judgements, if you were to call them that, are built in over millions of years of survival. Cars have posed a danger to deer for the last 100 years, maybe.
Maybe I should have been more careful in what I said, but I think there's a grain of truth in there.

How about this phrasing: When a deer encounters a car, the large, noisy, bright object elicits a fear reaction probably not unlike the reactions deer exhibit when confronted by predators.
#48
Old 11-14-2004, 04:46 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Small City, Michigan
Posts: 5,162
Quote:
Originally Posted by ltfire
A road with traffic? They throw caution to the wind.
Respectfully, your argument fails to hit the mark because I see deer on the road at all times of the year, and dead along side the at all times of the year as well.
#49
Old 11-14-2004, 06:56 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Westfield, IN
Posts: 106
My anthropology teacher in college taught us that deer and rabbits had stereoscopic vision. I think a part of that definition was having eyes on either side of the head. She said that at night, with bright lights, this type of vision was a factor in their demise.

Someone can correct me here if she is completely wrong.
#50
Old 11-14-2004, 07:34 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: E 161 St. and River Ave.
Posts: 1,765
Quote:
Originally Posted by js_africanus
Respectfully, your argument fails to hit the mark because I see deer on the road at all times of the year, and dead along side the at all times of the year as well.
I agree that they die at all times of the year. The point I was trying to make was that during the rut, they are ‘blinded by passion’ if you will. Kind of like a teenage boy during puberty..his brains are in his dick.
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