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#1
Old 03-22-2005, 12:16 AM
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Would it hurt to have my foot ran over?

Any ol' car will do..am I going to crawl away with "flat feet" or is it just going to be a hardly-noticeable bump? Let's start small and go big. At first say, a Fiat Cinquecento, then an a-typical soccer-mom minivan, and then how about a 1-ton pickup truck? A semi? A loaded cement truck? At what point does my foot just squirt out of my shoe? While i'm on the subject, how would you describe my condition using medical terms if I were ran over by a steam-roller ala Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

I've always wondered this stuff.
#2
Old 03-22-2005, 12:26 AM
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My mom once (accidentally) ran over my foot in a Buick Century. It was just the toes - not the arch. It hurt a lot, but nothing was broken.
#3
Old 03-22-2005, 12:30 AM
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The technical term would be "squashed."
#4
Old 03-22-2005, 12:34 AM
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I aobut 11 years ago I fell off a truck and broke my heel, and they when I fell over the top of my now broken, and planted foot. All the little bones and such in the top of the foot got all streached out and tweked. (technical medical term)
Anyway in the long run those little bones on the top of the foot hurt way worse than the heel did during physical therapy.
YYMV of course, but I shudder to think of an injury like that.
#5
Old 03-22-2005, 12:55 AM
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When I was teenager I cleverly stuck my foot under a moving car to settle an argument about whether it would crush my foot. Luckily the "it won't do any harm" brigade were right. It hurt less than having my foot trodden on in football games. I had been sure it would not harm me because one of my family's cats had been run over twice with only minor ill effects.
#6
Old 03-22-2005, 12:57 AM
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When I was a kid, my mom was moving slowly, so I decided to stick my foot in front of the wheel, just for the heck of it. Rolled over my foot, but didn't feel anything more than someone normally stepping on it by applying some pressure (i.e. no big deal). Car was a small Mazda hatchback.
#7
Old 03-22-2005, 01:00 AM
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What is the sound of a single foot being run over?
#8
Old 03-22-2005, 02:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by don't ask
When I was teenager I cleverly stuck my foot under a moving car to settle an argument about whether it would crush my foot. Luckily the "it won't do any harm" brigade were right. It hurt less than having my foot trodden on in football games. I had been sure it would not harm me because one of my family's cats had been run over twice with only minor ill effects.

Hah! Me too, though I was 21 at the time.

I was wearing shoes, and it was on a gravel driveway, which both could be significant. I was telling this story recently and a friend asked if it was the front or rear of the car, and I honestly don't remember, and that certainly would play a factor.
#9
Old 03-22-2005, 04:55 AM
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- - - I know a local cop who got his foot run over by a motorist who waited until he was at the window to flee. That was at least five years ago when he was in his late-20's, and he is still a cop, he can run and do all the physical aspects of it but still has a limp to this day. He had surgery on it several times within the first couple years.
....
So yea--if you mean, havig the arch of your foot driven over--it's bad.
~
#10
Old 03-22-2005, 05:11 AM
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I was once moving a patient in a bed, (granted, it was a special type of hospital bed, weighing just over a ton) with the help of several other people. It wasn't moving as fast as I wanted it to so I gave it a good shove. It rolled over the foot of one of the docs helping.. he fainted. The bed had solid rubber wheels on concrete.
On a hard surface, your foot would probably be broken. If the surface is gravel you would probably be luckier, since the tire and the surface would give, along with your foot.
But don't wait, as you age, the bones in your foot will be more brittle. The likelyhood of injury increases with age.
#11
Old 03-22-2005, 05:50 AM
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Penn and Teller did a fine trick where a heavily laden lorry ran over Teller.
DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME!

I had a smallish elephant stand on my foot when I was a kid. Because elephant feet are so large, the weight was spread and it didn't hurt. (I think the elephant came off worse, because my Mum was very cross with it!)
#12
Old 03-22-2005, 06:55 AM
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YAY. Time to tell your tale of being an Idiot!! Where do I sign?

Lets see, Id say about 12-15 years old, after getting back from a week-long boy scout summer camp trip. So glad to see the parents, .....



but yeah at low speeds Id say the pain of having your foot stepped on is about on par with pain.
#13
Old 03-22-2005, 07:12 AM
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Yeah I managed to run over my own foot... I had a breakdown in a jeep wrangler and was trying to push on the door frame while steering the car around a curve. The back tire caught my foot and ran right over it, but slowly. I should point out too that it was the bad way, as in my toes were 'stacked' in a verticle line.

I believe the word the doctor used was 'massive soft tissue contusion'. When I asked what that meant, he said bascially everything in there that wasn't bone was a big 'ol mess.
#14
Old 03-22-2005, 07:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlippyFly
Yeah I managed to run over my own foot... I had a breakdown in a jeep wrangler and was trying to push on the door frame while steering the car around a curve. The back tire caught my foot and ran right over it, but slowly. I should point out too that it was the bad way, as in my toes were 'stacked' in a verticle line.

I believe the word the doctor used was 'massive soft tissue contusion'. When I asked what that meant, he said bascially everything in there that wasn't bone was a big 'ol mess.
And I guess I should point out, it hurt like HELL and I spent the next month in a very stylish medical boot... I guess the moral of the story is that there is a right way and a wrong way to run over the foot.
#15
Old 03-22-2005, 07:20 AM
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The 2 times when i had my foot ran over (run over?) i was in a bit of pain. Accidentally the first time and purposely the 2nd time b/c i knew it could live thru it. It was an "ouch" pain, but more of an "ooooooh maaaaaan" pain. It was a tremendous amount of weigh, even the rear of the car where there is no engine!

A semi or a concrete mixer? Every bone in your foot would be crushed--easily.
#16
Old 03-22-2005, 08:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SlickRoenick
A semi or a concrete mixer? Every bone in your foot would be crushed--easily.
Are you sure about that?

The reason semis have a lot of tires and concrete mixers have such big ones is to distribute the weight of the load they're carrying over a greater area. It's not immediately obvious to me that having one go over your toes would be such a disaster--especially the conrete mixers. Those things have HUGE tires, and you see them driving on crappy dirt roads (which can't support weight like concrete or asphalt) to get to construction sites all the time.
#17
Old 03-22-2005, 08:58 AM
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Quote:
A semi or a concrete mixer? Every bone in your foot would be crushed--easily.
I have some doubts about that. The key figure isn't the weight of the vehicle, it's the pressure-- roughly, the weight of the vehicle divided by the area of all of the tires. For instance, you can lie down and get run over by a 40-ton tank without harm, because the weight is spread out over large tracks.

I bet an unloaded semi-trailer (with eight large wheels in back) would have less pressure than a typical auto. Not sure about concrete mixers, though. But a bulldozer would probably be fine.
#18
Old 03-22-2005, 08:59 AM
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As a teenager my dad once drove over my foot as I got out of a car. Rear wheel of a station wagon-- I was wearing soccer cleats. Despite my yells of pain, my dad refused to believe he had actually run over my foot, since he figured my foot would be broken and I'd be unable to even limp, let alone walk. Dad obviously failed to realize that it takes a lot of punishment to break bones in the Barbarian family...
#19
Old 03-22-2005, 09:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quercus
I have some doubts about that. The key figure isn't the weight of the vehicle, it's the pressure-- roughly, the weight of the vehicle divided by the area of all of the tires. For instance, you can lie down and get run over by a 40-ton tank without harm, because the weight is spread out over large tracks.

I bet an unloaded semi-trailer (with eight large wheels in back) would have less pressure than a typical auto. Not sure about concrete mixers, though. But a bulldozer would probably be fine.


Whoosh or no, the B.S. quotient in this thread has broken all existing records. This thread screams for some solid mathematics. Since no one qualified seems near, I'll do my best to get the ball rolling. Forgive my inevitable mistakes.

Figure an American SUV weighs 4,000 lbs. Figure maybe 3,000 lbs on the front tires, or 1,500 lbs per front tire. Figure a realistic tire surface area of maybe 6 x 10 inches max, or 60 square inches per front tire. That means, each front tire is exerting about 25 lbs/square inch, which ain't much. Figure it rolls over a 3 x 5 inch section of your toes/arch--translating into 15 square inches of territory--meaning you have 375 lbs of SUV rolling over your Nike's. Don't know about you, but I don't want 375 lbs rolling over my foot, unless green Kryptonite makes me ill.

Problem is, the tire isn't placed directly atop your foot--not all at once. It rolls up onto your foot, introducing physical and physiological variables I'm not competent to assess.

Bottom line: don't place your foot underneath a car tire. And stay away from M1A1 Battle tanks and bulldozers.
#20
Old 03-22-2005, 09:22 AM
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I suspect it depends on how much of the foot is run over. If it is just the toes and perhaps a little of the foot, you will probably escape much injury, if any. If, however, the arch is run over (for those of you who HAVE arches), I would suspect that you could suffer significant damage.
#21
Old 03-22-2005, 09:31 AM
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Carnac, your analysis ignores the vehicles suspension. Wouldn't that also come into play?
#22
Old 03-22-2005, 09:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnac the Magnificent!
Figure an American SUV weighs 4,000 lbs. Figure maybe 3,000 lbs on the front tires, or 1,500 lbs per front tire. Figure a realistic tire surface area of maybe 6 x 10 inches max, or 60 square inches per front tire. That means, each front tire is exerting about 25 lbs/square inch, which ain't much. Figure it rolls over a 3 x 5 inch section of your toes/arch--translating into 15 square inches of territory--meaning you have 375 lbs of SUV rolling over your Nike's. Don't know about you, but I don't want 375 lbs rolling over my foot, unless green Kryptonite makes me ill.
Bottom line: don't place your foot underneath a car tire. And stay away from M1A1 Battle tanks and bulldozers.
First off 4000 lbs would be a damn small SUV. 6000 would be closer to the mark. Some (Hummer) are closer to 8,000.
I agree, having a car roll over your foot would be a bad thing.
#23
Old 03-22-2005, 09:37 AM
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First of all, the OP should read "Would it hurt to have my foot run over?" The car ran over your foot. Your foot was run over. I ran over your cat. My dog was run over last year.

Anyway, my mother ran over the back of my foot after dropping me at school once. The tyre kind of climbed over and up the back of my heel. That hurt a lot, but no damage really; just a bit of hopping around and swearing, then I continued with my day.

I would agree that a large truck would probably be less of a problem - due to the reasons above, and the fact that the tyres are so wide that even if they ran over your foot there would still be a large proportion of the tyre in contact with the road beyond your toes.
#24
Old 03-22-2005, 09:41 AM
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carnac'scalculations aside, I had my foot run over by by a midsized sedan full of crap (people moving) and a few toes were a little sore, but not even really all that bruised. Scuffed my shoe something wicked, though.

Variables are everywhere, tire strength, vehicle weight and distribution, speed, foot angle, ground condition, shoes, etc. My guess is that the damage to DougC's cop and FlippyFly's Wrangler experiences were because the body was moving and the foot was not (since there was a car on it) which tends to lengthen things that shouldn't lengthen.
#25
Old 03-22-2005, 09:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xbuckeye
Variables are everywhere, tire strength, vehicle weight and distribution, speed, foot angle, ground condition, shoes, etc. My guess is that the damage to DougC's cop and FlippyFly's Wrangler experiences were because the body was moving and the foot was not (since there was a car on it) which tends to lengthen things that shouldn't lengthen.
I think that the key difference with my experience was that the foot was on the side, not in a normal standing position. Once again, the toes were in a verticle column.
#26
Old 03-22-2005, 10:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick
First off 4000 lbs would be a damn small SUV. 6000 would be closer to the mark. Some (Hummer) are closer to 8,000.
I agree, having a car roll over your foot would be a bad thing.

The OP said "any car." I used the SUV example to illustrate a point and chose a smaller SUV (my Honda Pilot at 4400 lbs) to be conservative. Yes, a "deathstar SUV" certainly weighs more, but also has somewhat larger tires. Bottomline: ouch!
#27
Old 03-22-2005, 11:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon
I would agree that a large truck would probably be less of a problem - due to the reasons above, and the fact that the tyres are so wide that even if they ran over your foot there would still be a large proportion of the tyre in contact with the road beyond your toes.

If by "large truck" you are including an 18-wheel "tractor trailer" filled with cargo, then we're looking at 80,000 lbs (40 tons) of nearly dead weight, or 4,400 lbs per tire, if evenly distributed. Better eat your spinach, Popeye.

Whatever harm right tire #1 causes will pale next to what happens when right tire #5 finally transitions from flesh to asphalt. Distribute 22,000 lbs. any way you wish, the final result is apt to go squish, squish, squish.

P.S. A U.S.-made M1A2 battle tank weighs more than 65 tons and rolls on rather unforgiving steel treads.
#28
Old 03-22-2005, 11:29 AM
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My first job when I turned 16 was working as a service station attendant. We were required to wear steel-toed safety shoes in case customers drove over our feet.

Part of the initiation of new guys involved sending them accross the street to the Canadian Tire store to buy a skyhook for the mechanics, and a "safety confidence demonstration" which involved driving over your new safety shoe, foot still inside, with the tow-truck. Of course they then parked the tow truck on your foot and left you stranded for a while. Did I mention they would do this just before the canteen truck rolled in with dinner... It was hillarious...for everybody else...

I assume that "bad things" had happened before of the squashed feet sort. This company never had a safety rule that wasn't written in the blood of some previous accident.

Re Carnac's calculations, in my driver's ed course, they told us the contac patch was about 3 inches long on most cars, which, when multiplied by the width of the tire, adds up to a lot less area, thus showing Carnac's assumptions to be conservative, and the pressure to be even higher. In my mind, the major factor is the hardness of the underlying surface. In a softer surface, like gravel, the tire will sink, increasing the contact area until the pressure is low enough to be borne by the surface material, at which point the wheel stops sinking. Conversely, it the surface is hard, the contact patch is smaller.

Consider trains., The reason trains are so efficient is that they ride on hard steel wheels on hard steel rails. The contact area for a train wheel is tiny, and there is little deformation of the wheel as it turns. This is what makes the rolling resistance of a train so low, and allows a couple of locomotives to pull so much weight. But this is also what makes the pressure under a train wheel so high that it acts as a blunt scissor...
#29
Old 03-22-2005, 11:51 AM
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I'm not saying it's a good idea to put yourself underneath a tank. [KIDS: DON"T TRY THIS AT HOME!]
But it's not completely insurvivable.

To quote http://answers.com/topic/caterpillar-track-1
Quote:
the ground pressure of a car is about equal to the pressure of the air in the tires, perhaps 30 PSI (207 kPa), whereas the 70 tonne M1 Abrams has a ground pressure of just over 15 PSI (103 kPa).
For comparison, when I step on your foot, it's 180 pounds over, say a generous 3 inches by 3.3 inches, or 18 psi. (that's static, of course. If I go up for a rebound and land on your foot, the pressure is much higher).

I admit that any nasty hard and sharp metal pieces on a tank tread could be unpleasant, but the general point is that the whole system is designed for low ground pressures.
#30
Old 03-22-2005, 11:54 AM
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When I was 10, my Little League coach accidentally backed over the front of my foot with his late-60s Chevy Nova. The foot was laid flat, and the tire only covered about 3-4 inches. It hurt a lot, but there was no damage. It was on a gravel parking lot.

He would have been completely justified in bawling me out for not paying attention, but was very concerned and sympathatic, telling us that he had recently suffered a similar fate, with a much bigger car (a Riviera ).
#31
Old 03-22-2005, 12:00 PM
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[quote]...The key figure isn't the weight of the vehicle, it's the pressure-- roughly, the weight of the vehicle divided by the area of all of the tires.... [.quote]
- - - This is true--but another thing to consider about that "pressure" is that typical car/light truck tires are inflated to about 30-35 PSI, where large truck tires are often inflated to 80 PSI or more. Some truck tires are inflated to 120 PSI.
--------
- Also I am remembering a loaded cement truck to weigh about 60,000 lbs. As they have ten tires, that's (average) 6000 lbs per tire, quite a bit more than the 1500 lbs per tire of a "big" 6000-lb SUV....
~
#32
Old 03-22-2005, 12:09 PM
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This may be going against the tide of the thread but...

My niece had her foot run over be a FEDEX or UPS truck when she was about 10. I'm not sure if it rolled over or stayed on a while, but in any event there was much damage. There was significant swelling, to the point that the doctors at the hospital had to make many incisions in the flesh of her foot to release swelling pressure - something about otherwise the blood circulation would be cut off and the foot would necrify. She was in the hostpital for several days, then a period of months of recovery. One of the big concerns was if there would be damage to something called the 'growth plate' inhibiting further development.

That was several years ago and she seems to have turned out OK, thank goodness. But I am surprised there are so many reports here of little or no damage.
#33
Old 03-22-2005, 12:14 PM
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Wouldn't the key thing here be whether the wheel or tread has to lift off the ground in order to get over your foot ? This would dramatically in increase the force pressing down on your foot. If the tyre was at a low pressure or was just moving over your toes it would not have to lift up and you would be ok If it ran over the arch of your foot however, you would suddenly be supporting 1/4 the weight of the car.

A tank rolling over you it would have to lift up to get over you, removing much of the track from contact from the floor, this would likely result in you getting squished.

I'm not an engineer however so I'm probably adding to the afformentioned bullshit quotient, but the above makes sense to me.
#34
Old 03-22-2005, 01:22 PM
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If a horse qualifies as a vehicle, then I have had my foot run over. When I was about 16, my foot was stepped on by a very big horse. It hurt like hell for a day or two, but no damage was done and I still feel fine. That was 60 years ago.
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