Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 01-09-2006, 06:38 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Trenton, NJ
Posts: 4,647
What hymn is the "Old Hundred" from Tom Sawyer?

(Most likely CS material though there should be a factual answer)
You remember the scene . . . Tom and Huck and Joe had disappeared, off playing pirates on their island. The town thought they were dead. They snuck into the church while their own funeral was in progress, to the amazement of the townspeople
and...
Quote:
Suddenly the minister shouted at the top of his voice: "Praise God from whom all blessings flow -- SING! -- and put your hearts in it!"

And they did. Old Hundred swelled up with a triumphant burst, and while it shook the rafters Tom Sawyer the Pirate looked around upon the envying juveniles about him and confessed in his heart that this was the proudest moment of his life.

As the "sold" congregation trooped out they said they would almost be willing to be made ridiculous again to hear Old Hundred sung like that once more.
The minister's words makes it sound like they are talking about the traditional Doxology hymn, but it could be that they sang the Doxology and then sang this unknown "Old Hundred"

Anyone know what one that would be?
#2
Old 01-09-2006, 06:51 AM
BANNED
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: In Transit
Posts: 3,351
Old Hundred
#3
Old 01-09-2006, 08:05 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: The Jersey Shore
Posts: 1,220
Actually, this is the Old Hundredth referred to in Huck Finn, sung to the words 'Praise God from whom all blessings flow..", not what Athelas cited.

Warning - the link above plays a midi file.

In the Episcopal Church this is commonly The Doxology. I believe the Lutheren and Methodist Churches also use it as well.
#4
Old 01-09-2006, 08:08 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: oklahoma city
Posts: 7,886
I think that it's called that because it was on page 100 as a rule of thumb in hymnals.
No cite, can't even remember where I heard it.
hh
#5
Old 01-09-2006, 09:19 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
Posts: 11,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by handsomeharry
I think that it's called that because it was on page 100 as a rule of thumb in hymnals.
I thought it was because it was a setting of the words of Psalm 100.
#6
Old 01-09-2006, 09:37 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 1,886
Quote:
Originally Posted by handsomeharry
I think that it's called that because it was on page 100 as a rule of thumb in hymnals.
No cite, can't even remember where I heard it.
hh
Actually, it's called that because the English words originally set to the tune (in approximately 1551) were paraphrased from Psalm 100 by William Kethe in the 1500s. It's the "Old" Hundredth because a New Version of the English Psalter was published in 1696, with Psalm 100 set to a different tune. Technically, it's the music that's referred to by "Old Hundred". Any number of hymns have been set to this music through the years, most famously Bishop Thomas Ken's "Arise My Soul and With The Sun", of which the last verse is commonly sung by Protestant congregations as the Doxology,:
Quote:
Praise God from whom all blessings flow;
Praise God, all creatures here below;
Praise God above, ye heavenly host,
Praise Father, Son and Holy Ghost.
FWIW, it's Hymn No. 95 in the standard Methodist Hymnal.

The Old Hundredth is almost without a doubt the best-known and most-frequently played piece of Protestant liturgical music in the English-speaking world; anyone who grew up attending a Protestant church, particularly Episcopalian, Presbyterian, Methodist, or similar denominations, would instantly recognize it. I'm Jewish now and it still provokes a visceral reaction in me.
#7
Old 01-10-2006, 12:11 AM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,486
Quote:
Originally Posted by athelas
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBCD
Actually, this is the Old Hundredth referred to in Huck Finn, sung to the words 'Praise God from whom all blessings flow..", not what Athelas cited.
Take a look at the 3rd line (tenor) in what athelas cited. It's the same melody as the midi file, though the rhythm (which even today varies among denominations) is a bit different.

In the singing tradition Twain's writing about, the tenor part carries the melody. "Praise God from whom all blessings flow" was one of the verses of "Old Hundred," but not necessarily the first.
#8
Old 01-10-2006, 09:46 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: IN USA
Posts: 13,246
We sang The Doxology (tune "Old Hundredth") every Sunday when I was in the Christian & Missionary Alliance Church. We sing it rarely in my Assembly of God church.
#9
Old 01-10-2006, 03:08 PM
SDSAB
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: my Herkimer Battle Jitney
Posts: 76,518
Quote:
Originally Posted by rackensack
... I'm Jewish now and it still provokes a visceral reaction in me.
Um... dare I ask what kind of visceral reaction? Does it evoke bad memories of the religion of your upbringing? Hope not - I've always liked it. We often sing it - in church (I'm Episcopalian), at big family meals, etc. We sang it at our wedding rehearsal dinner, come to think of it.
#10
Old 01-10-2006, 05:44 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Up in Rottenchester
Posts: 6,264
I'm confused now. I thought Psalm 100 was:

Quote:
Shout joyfully to the LORD, all the earth.
Serve the LORD with gladness;
Come before Him with joyful singing.
Know that the LORD Himself is God;
It is He who has made us, and not we ourselves;
We are His people and the sheep of His pasture.
Enter His gates with thanksgiving,
And His courts with praise.
Give thanks to Him; bless His name.
For the LORD is good;
His lovingkindness is everlasting,
And His faithfulness to all generations.
So the "praise God" is in there, but not much else. No heavenly host. No Father, Son and Holy Ghost. I'm no biblical scholar, but I am pretty sure the Trinity is a specifically Christian concept, so it wouldn't be mentioned in the OT.
#11
Old 01-10-2006, 06:15 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: England
Posts: 2,779
The setting of Psalm 100 which most Anglicans would recognise is:-

All people that on earth do dwell,
Sing to the Lord with cheerful voice.
Him serve with fear, His praise forth tell;
Come ye before Him and rejoice.

The Lord, ye know, is God indeed;
Without our aid He did us make;
We are His folk, He doth us feed,
And for His sheep He doth us take.

O enter then His gates with praise;
Approach with joy His courts unto;
Praise, laud, and bless His Name always,
For it is seemly so to do.

For why? the Lord our God is good;
His mercy is for ever sure;
His truth at all times firmly stood,
And shall from age to age endure.

To Father, Son and Holy Ghost,
The God Whom Heaven and earth adore,
From men and from the angel host
Be praise and glory evermore.

The tune is the 'Old One Hundreth' mentioned by previous contributors
#12
Old 01-10-2006, 07:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Up in Rottenchester
Posts: 6,264
Okay, let me see:

Revised Standard
Quote:
0: A Psalm for the thank offering.
1: Make a joyful noise to the LORD, all the lands!
2: Serve the LORD with gladness! Come into his presence with singing!
3: Know that the LORD is God! It is he that made us, and we are his; we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.
4: Enter his gates with thanksgiving, and his courts with praise! Give thanks to him, bless his name!
5: For the LORD is good; his steadfast love endures for ever, and his faithfulness to all generations.
King James

Quote:
1: Make a joyful noise unto the LORD, all ye lands.
2: Serve the LORD with gladness: come before his presence with singing.
3: Know ye that the LORD he is God: it is he that hath made us, and not we ourselves; we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.
4: Enter into his gates with thanksgiving, and into his courts with praise: be thankful unto him, and bless his name.
5: For the LORD is good; his mercy is everlasting; and his truth endureth to all generations.
I don't get what you posted in either of these, or the Catholic. Again, I don't believe anything that mentions the Trinity can be attributed to the Old Testament.
#13
Old 01-10-2006, 07:19 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Up in Rottenchester
Posts: 6,264
Crap.

I meant to add that the Trinity appears to be a development of the Second Century, first developed into a doctrine by Tertullian.
#14
Old 01-11-2006, 12:52 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 1,886
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir
Um... dare I ask what kind of visceral reaction? Does it evoke bad memories of the religion of your upbringing? Hope not - I've always liked it. We often sing it - in church (I'm Episcopalian), at big family meals, etc. We sang it at our wedding rehearsal dinner, come to think of it.
No, it's not negative at all. It's just one of those things that I have such strong memories of, and it's such a majestic bit of music, that it evokes a whole complex of memories, associations, and emotions; don't really know how to describe it. I don't have bad memories of my childhood religion -- as late as my senior year of high school I actually considered becoming a Methodist minister. I grew away from Christtianity for a variety of reasons, and eventually found Judaism to be a much more in line with my personal beliefs, but it was never because of any negative experiences.
#15
Old 01-11-2006, 01:11 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 1,886
Quote:
Originally Posted by saoirse
I'm confused now. I thought Psalm 100 was:



So the "praise God" is in there, but not much else. No heavenly host. No Father, Son and Holy Ghost. I'm no biblical scholar, but I am pretty sure the Trinity is a specifically Christian concept, so it wouldn't be mentioned in the OT.
The words quoted by the preacher are, as mentioned earlier, the first of the final four lines of a seventeenth-century hymn by Bishop Thomas Ken. They have nothing to do with Psalm 100, except that they are frequently sung as the Doxology to the melody known as the Old Hundredth, which is called that because in the first Protestant English Psalter, it was used as the tune for a paraphrase of Psalm 100 by William Kethe.
#16
Old 01-11-2006, 05:45 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Watching the sunrise
Posts: 6,410
In the current Episcopal Hymnal, it's hymn 380. Hymns are referred to by number, not page number. In fact, the hymnal I'm looking at doesn't have page numbers. The first verse goes like this:
Quote:
From all that dwell below the skies,
Let the Creator's praise arise!
Let the Redeemer's Name be sung
Through every land, by every tongue!
The hymn is attributed to Isaac Watts who lived at the turn of the 17th century and is a paraphrase of Psalm 117. This one isn't listed in the copyright notices at the back of the hymnal.

My church still does it most Sundays between the offertory anthem and the beginning of Communion while people's offerings are being brought to the altar, and I usually sing the alto harmony line because I remember my father singing that bit of harmony.

CJ
#17
Old 01-11-2006, 10:59 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Up in Rottenchester
Posts: 6,264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siege
...The hymn is attributed to Isaac Watts who lived at the turn of the 17th century and is a paraphrase of Psalm 117...
It seems to be a paraphrase of bits of Psalm 117, bits of 103, and, as I mentioned before, a little Christain Era theology thrown in at the end.
#18
Old 01-31-2013, 07:03 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1
Old Hundred

Both the Doxology by Thomas Ken ("Praise God from whom all blessings flow") and William Kethe's rhymed version of Psalm 100 ("All people that on earth do dwell") are sung to a tune by Louis Bourgeois known as "Old Hundred." Since the funeral preacher lines out the beginning words of the Doxology, I think it's pretty clear that Twain means the congregation shook the rafters with those words to the famous "Old Hundred" tune. Kethe and Ken lived in the 16th and 17th centuries, respectively. Too bad they weren't contemporaries; they could have teamed up as "Kith and Kin."
#19
Old 01-31-2013, 08:27 AM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Houston
Posts: 9,348
I read the Brian Aldiss short story "Old Hundredth" in one of the Judith Merril anthlogies. It's a memorable bit of writing & does use the old hymn.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:22 AM.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: [email protected]

Send comments about this website to:

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: monkeys football franciscan greetings confucius beard helvetica font microsoft truss vs rafter dirty cheers asian bimbo tumblr old microwave pseudoephedrine tolerance old twins logo uncut pages braid perms what animal has the best sense of hearing pulsating vision with heartbeat cognac claude chatelier vs getting used to bifocal glasses where to buy baggies what does empty stomach mean can i substitute butter for vegetable oil type of paint for baseboards geek squad car speaker installation can a police officer ask for passengers id how to get an excused absence from school urban dictionary rim job toe kick saw lowes sheerflow gutter filter installation