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#1
Old 02-08-2006, 05:06 PM
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Do Americans eat cold Chinese food?

Always on tv and in movies, Americans eat chinese takeaway out of those white cartons. they dont seem to be insulated in any way. How does the food stay hot? here, chinese takeaway comes in foil cartons, so the food stays piping hot. Not only that, but I've seen characters on tv take chinese food containers out of the fridge and happily tuck in. I ssen that on Seinfeld tonight. Also, remember that episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm where Larry's food got mixed up with another guy? back and forth he went to the restaurant until he got the right food, then went home and preceded to tuck into what at this stage had to be cold food. Man, if my salt 'n pepper crispy chicken and noodles isnt sizzling off the plate with heat, then it just doesnt get eaten!
#2
Old 02-08-2006, 05:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubastis
How does the food stay hot?
The food doesn't have a chance to cool off. There are so many Chinese take-out places in the USA - approximately 237 establishments per square mile - you usually get the food home within 82 seconds.
#3
Old 02-08-2006, 05:21 PM
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Some people (myself included) do often eat leftovers cold.
#4
Old 02-08-2006, 05:26 PM
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I eat cold leftovers quite often. I think chicken (either Chinese-style or American-style) tastes better cold than hot, so I never reheat my sweet and sour chicken after it's been in the fridge awhile.
#5
Old 02-08-2006, 05:28 PM
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I think eating cold leftovers is just sadistic. This goes doubly for Chinese food - cold, hard, crunchy rice? ACK! That's like eating tic-tacking corn.

Not Chinese food (or simply "food" for the Chinamen among us). Most people seem to have no problem with cold pizza (sometimes even frozen ... I just don't get that) but I have never, ever seen anyone I know not reheat Chinese food.
#6
Old 02-08-2006, 05:34 PM
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I don't always reheat -- reheating makes the meat tough, IMHO -- but I usually let it get to room temperature. Noodle dishes -- those are even better cold.
#7
Old 02-08-2006, 05:36 PM
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I'll eat cold Chinese food. It all depends on what it is. Some stuff tastes better that way, but I'd say that most Chinese food that I get does taste better reheated.
#8
Old 02-08-2006, 05:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorgon Heap
cold, hard, crunchy rice? ACK!
You misspelled "Mmmmm...."

I love the hard crunchy rice (though I usually do reheat it). You should send me your hard crunchy rice.

And some people don't like their food sizzling hot. I don't. I like it warm, but not hot enough to burn my mouth.

You'd probably have been more likely to see Americans eating cold Chinese food (and cold pizza) in the days before microwaves became common. A lot of those paper boxes are microwave-safe these days.
#9
Old 02-08-2006, 05:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorgon Heap
I think eating cold leftovers is just sadistic. This goes doubly for Chinese food - cold, hard, crunchy rice? ACK! That's like eating tic-tacking corn.

Not Chinese food (or simply "food" for the Chinamen among us). Most people seem to have no problem with cold pizza (sometimes even frozen ... I just don't get that) but I have never, ever seen anyone I know not reheat Chinese food.

Dude, chinaman is not the prefered nomenclature... asian american, please.
#10
Old 02-08-2006, 05:48 PM
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I like room temperature food. But I'll eat leftovers without warming if I'm in the mood.

My husband, on the other hand, heats everything. He's the weird one.
#11
Old 02-08-2006, 06:02 PM
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When we get Chinese take-out, we usually pick it up within minutes of final preparation, take it home, and eat it immediately. It's still quite hot at the time.

We also have a device called a Microwave Oven. In the event that the Chinese food is cold (either because there is some kind of delay in getting the food from the restaurant to the house, or because we have chosen not to consume the entire portion in one sitting, and leftovers are put into the "refrigerator" to wait for later consumption), we use the Microwave Oven to turn Cold Food into Hot Food (temperature-wise, at least) in a matter of seconds.

Of course, you do have to remove the metal handle from the Chinese take-out food containers, before using them in the Microwave Oven.

#12
Old 02-08-2006, 06:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiminy

Of course, you do have to remove the metal handle from the Chinese take-out food containers, before using them in the Microwave Oven.
No way! That's the best part!

(Around here, a few restaurants are experimenting with containers with flexible plastic handles. I don't like them. )
#13
Old 02-08-2006, 06:29 PM
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I've rarely eaten chinese food from little paper carton like in the movies. Only one place I've gotten food has done that.

Mainly, those nifty little boxes are inconvenient. Noodles fall over the side, and they're generally too full to eat from directly. I pour onto a plate or into the bowl from which I recently downed my delicious egg drop soup.
#14
Old 02-08-2006, 06:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FilmGeek
I've rarely eaten chinese food from little paper carton like in the movies. Only one place I've gotten food has done that.

Mainly, those nifty little boxes are inconvenient. Noodles fall over the side, and they're generally too full to eat from directly. I pour onto a plate or into the bowl from which I recently downed my delicious egg drop soup.
Yeah, how watertight are those paper cartons? if I were to get a beef curry (as I might) would it all slop out at the seams of the carton?

Man, I really got to visit America, it would answer a lot of these annoying little questions about things I've seen in movies and on TV.
#15
Old 02-08-2006, 06:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubastis
Yeah, how watertight are those paper cartons? if I were to get a beef curry (as I might) would it all slop out at the seams of the carton?
The boxes are more folded than seamed (I believe there might be a seam at the bottom, but not the sides) and they're coated, so they probably don't leak much. I say "probably" because I don't buy anything liquid-y. And I've never eaten cold Chinese food, either...everything I like is meat-based, and I don't eat meat without heating it.
#16
Old 02-08-2006, 06:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubastis
Yeah, how watertight are those paper cartons?
Why I was a child, I bought aquarium fish in very similair paper cartons. Perhaps they are waxed or something.
My favorite Chinese restaurant uses styrofoam boxes for take out. My second favorite uses the traditional paper cartons for take out, but styrofoam for leftovers.
Go figure.
#17
Old 02-08-2006, 06:57 PM
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The boxes seldom leak, in my experience. Also, I never see metal handles on carry-out boxes here anymore- it's been years. That's so they can go straight into the microwave!
#18
Old 02-08-2006, 06:57 PM
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I usually eat all leftovers cold including Chinese, pizza, spaghetti, macaroni and cheese, meat of all kinds, and Thanksgiving leftovers. About the only thing that I sometimes warm up are vegetables.
#19
Old 02-08-2006, 06:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by friedo
Around here, a few restaurants are experimenting with containers with flexible plastic handles.
You're more likely to see cartons without handles here. You get them in a bag.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bubastis
Yeah, how watertight are those paper cartons? if I were to get a beef curry (as I might) would it all slop out at the seams of the carton?
It might. Some of those cartons are better made than others, and some Chinese restaurants serve dishes with more viscous sauces than others. If the sauce were runny, and the container poorly made, it might slop out (this has happened to me).
#20
Old 02-08-2006, 07:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carnivorousplant
Why I was a child
Because.
#21
Old 02-08-2006, 09:39 PM
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All the Chinese restaurants around here use styrofoam boxes. The little white paper boxes are used for gravy or sauces. I've never eaten take-out where the entire meal came in one of those little white boxes.
#22
Old 02-08-2006, 09:42 PM
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Everyone's missing an important point here: Paper is a much better insulator than foil. Foil conducts heat away, and (from my understanding) would lead to colder food.

Unless I'm missing a major point in physics, our chinese food would be alot hotter.
#23
Old 02-08-2006, 09:43 PM
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I would most definitely eat cold Chinese food and I have. Sometimes it even tastes better that way. I will eat almost any leftovers cold, actually, no problem.
#24
Old 02-08-2006, 10:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorgon Heap
Most people seem to have no problem with cold pizza (sometimes even frozen ... I just don't get that)
Frozen pizza, for me, would be like the taste equivalent of nails screeching down a chalkboard. Euuuuuuuuuuugh.

Concerning Chinese takeout--with the exception of fortune cookies, if there isn't steam rising from the food I'll give it a pass.

Another movie food cliche that bugs me: I think I can count on one hand the number of times I've seen a woman eating anything in a movie...
#25
Old 02-08-2006, 10:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kythereia
Another movie food cliche that bugs me: I think I can count on one hand the number of times I've seen a woman eating anything in a movie...
Wait...you mean...

Girls eat too? Damn. Females just get more enigmatic by the day...
#26
Old 02-08-2006, 10:49 PM
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Liquid makes those paper cartons not just leak, but actively spew sauce tens of feet in all directions staining everything in sight.

And many of us don't live in NYC and so don't have convenient Chinese delivery to our houses. It exists, but it's not very convenient. Still, it's quite plausible in a work setting for people to sit and eat out of the carton from food that either was just delivered or picked up by somebody on staff. Same for homes, although I like taking bits from several dishes too much to confine myself to just one.

As far as I can tell, though, unless the habits of New Yorkers are different than the rest of us - probably true - people don't eat cold Chinese food much. It's perfect for tv, though. It doesn't tie the actors to a table, so they can move around and talk - directors love that - and the eaters have something to do with their hands - actors love that. And you can't see the food, so they don't really have to eat - a problem when you need ten takes - and the amount of food doesn't visibly change from take to take - the continuity director loves that. And above all it's picturesque to use chopsticks. Everybody wins.
#27
Old 02-08-2006, 10:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carnivorousplant
Why I was a child . . .
Maybe you should ask your parents.

Anyway, I eat Chinese food at any temperature, but only straight out of the white box. My mother used to transfer leftovers into casserole dishes, then reheat them. I hated that; it just didn't seem like Chinese take-out anymore.
#28
Old 02-08-2006, 11:16 PM
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There is nothing better (Chinese Food wise anyway) than cold Sweet and Sour Pork over Fried Rice. Especially when the sauce has become a gelatinous blob in the shape of the white box that it was taken home in.
#29
Old 02-08-2006, 11:58 PM
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The places around here only use the paper cartons for the rice. (And, incidentally, they aren't the same as TV cartons - they got rid of the wire handle so it's microwaveable.)

For everything else they use really nice white plastic containers with clear lids. It's actually nicer than that disposable tupperware. I have a whole drawer full of them.
#30
Old 02-09-2006, 01:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubastis
here, chinese takeaway comes in foil cartons, so the food stays piping hot.
I could be wrong, but I imagine that a paper/cardboard container will hold in heat much better than foil, which has an extremely low heat capacity (thus giving off heat more easily. Ever put foil in the oven? Even at 400 degrees you can touch it with your hands).



Er, on preview, I see that Electronic Chaos has already made the same point.
#31
Old 02-09-2006, 02:23 AM
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I totally agree on the nastiness of cold fried rice, mainly because it gets to that weird half crunchy, half chewy consistancy that sticks in your teeth and "blaaaaaargh" is what I say to that.

I do, however, very much enjoy cold eggrolls, lo mein, and pretty much anything else you could cart away from a Chinese restaurant. *shrug* Just something about it, I guess. Only eaten with chopsticks straight out of the container, though.

Then again, this may have much to do with me being a lazy college student...
#32
Old 02-09-2006, 07:30 AM
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For me, the test of a good sweet and sour chicken/pork/shrimp is how it tastes straight out of the fridge around midnight. But I don't eat cold rice; I'll finish that when it's still fresh and hot, or throw it out.
#33
Old 02-09-2006, 08:12 AM
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Cold or reheated, it's all good to me!
#34
Old 02-09-2006, 11:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorgon Heap
ACK! That's like eating tic-tacking corn.
There aren't too many people on these boards who know what you meant by this.

I know, of course, because I grew up in the Mon Valley.
#35
Old 02-09-2006, 11:39 AM
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We get take-out in the little paper boxes from Szechuan Garden down the block, and despite consistantly ordering the most liquid-y, sloppy things on the menu, I can attest that they do not leak even slightly. We take it home, stuff ourselves, place leftovers in refridgerator, and remove them about two hours later to finish them off without reheating.


Mmmm...General's Tofu.
#36
Old 02-09-2006, 11:48 AM
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Where I live, there are Chinese takeout only (and eat-in) restaurants abound, and not just in Chinatown. The overwhelming majority use the ubiquitous white carton. It's waxed and folded, and will survive a small fall without splashing its contents all over the place. A growing minority of places, especially in the suburbs, are the black plastic with clear top containers. Those are really nice for storage and reuse, but I prefer the cartons. You see these types of containers mainly in the suburbs. Every place I go to (and I go to a lot) all use the white carton for rice. I've notice the tin foil the first time I was in the UK. I thought it was an anomoly. How can you carry anything when the foil is boiling hot? I actually used it to iron my shirt one day, in attempt to have it cool off before I started eating it. Oh, and I'll gladly eat cold chinese food, just not cold rice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bubastis
Man, if my salt 'n pepper crispy chicken and noodles isnt sizzling off the plate with heat, then it just doesnt get eaten!
I wonder what the American equivalent of this is? I don't think it exists. Is this more traditional Chinese? (My first and only time in China I ate at American places because our hosts thought we would like familiar food.) Does it have peas and corn and carrots like 99% of the dishes there?
#37
Old 02-09-2006, 12:07 PM
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- I have never had a problem with the folded, waxed white boxes the food comes in. When it arrives it is hot and ready to eat.

- I love cold food - regardless of ethnicity - when it is well-prepared, so a night in the fridge means the ingredients get to blend even more. A good beef stew. Chili (mmmm, chili). Spaghetti sauce. An Indian, Thai or Vietnamese curry - it's all good good good cold.

Grew up in California - lived in SF and went to the best damn American Chinese* food place in the world for 8 years (U Lee, on Hyde and Jackson, home of the best pork dumpling potstickers you will ever have) - and now live outside NYC.

*I say "American Chinese" under the working assumption that real Chinese food might be different, just like American Pizza is different that what you find in Italy...
#38
Old 02-09-2006, 01:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mazinger_z
I wonder what the American equivalent of this is? I don't think it exists.

Seconded. I've never seen anything like this at a Chinese resturant, but it sounds great and I'd love to try some.
#39
Old 02-09-2006, 01:31 PM
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First of all: For me, when the food comes it's always warm enough to eat. The main entrees usually comes in a styrofoam container, although something like dumplings comes in a cardboard box.

Second of all: chinese food is one of those things that I'll never eat cold. Their sauces, often, have a lot of corn starch in them to give them a thicker consistency but when they're cold, that tends to become gummy and gluey. (like in lo mein, or General Tso's Chicken).

And, I don't like cold rice.

You do get chinese food in those containers sometimes, but in the movies, ALL chinese food is in those containers. It's just movie shorthand for "chinese food".
#40
Old 02-09-2006, 02:11 PM
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IME the servings are, by volume, much bigger than your average Fast Food volume. Plus, the square is a relatively well-packed shape, area-wise, as opposed to sandwich - and - fries style configurations. So the combination of the two makes the food cool slower.
#41
Old 02-09-2006, 02:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mazinger_z
I wonder what the American equivalent of this is? I don't think it exists. Is this more traditional Chinese? (My first and only time in China I ate at American places because our hosts thought we would like familiar food.) Does it have peas and corn and carrots like 99% of the dishes there?

Salt n pepper chiken is crispy chicken in a dry garlic and chilli eh, I dunno, sauce? Its not really a sauce, as the chicken arrives dry. Marinade? I cant cook. It's really delicious. Sometimes its called sweet chilli chicken. Get in my belly.

Oh, and....

Peas? Corn? Carrots? In a chinese dish?

[Bubastis runs screaming from the computer]
#42
Old 02-09-2006, 02:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cluricaun
Seconded. I've never seen anything like this at a Chinese resturant, but it sounds great and I'd love to try some.

Also available: Salt n pepper crispy prawn, salt n pepper crispy shredded beef...
All to kill for!
#43
Old 02-09-2006, 03:03 PM
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As a son of Chinese immigrants who grew up in northern California (the home of the best Asian food anywhere in the United States), this thread makes me want to run for the nearest vomitorium, screaming about the White Devils. I didn't even realize that Chinese takeout places were common until I went to college on the east coast. Of course, since then, I've acquired a certain amount of appreciation for the goopy, Cantonese-derived crapola you get from such restaurants.

But eating leftover Chinese food cold? Ye gods, people. Have you no sense of decency at all?!
#44
Old 02-09-2006, 03:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubastis
Salt n pepper chiken is crispy chicken in a dry garlic and chilli eh, I dunno, sauce? Its not really a sauce, as the chicken arrives dry. Marinade? I cant cook. It's really delicious. Sometimes its called sweet chilli chicken. Get in my belly.


Yeah, we don't have chilli anything over here in our Chinese food. And, we typically spell "chilli" like "chili." And, when we say chili, we don't think of that red pepper thing, we think of chiles, which is larger and green. (I'm sure there's a thread somewhere about it). When you say "crispy" do you mean breaded, like at Mcdonald's? How are the noodles? Are those dry and crispy, too? Broth? Or, are they like spaghetti?

Quote:
Peas? Corn? Carrots? In a chinese dish?
I was in Ireland for work late last year, and we only went to one Chinese food place and it was quite normal, well as normal as one of those late night joints in Philly.

When I was in school at Oxford in the late nineties, I had Chinese food in 5 places (England and Ireland), and all but one (my favorite place in Chinatown, near that horrid Angus steak joint in London) had peas and carrots mixed in (granted that the other four places where strictly takeout).
#45
Old 02-09-2006, 03:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarrsk
Cantonese-derived crapola you get from such restaurants.
I've often wondered it General Tsao's Chicken was invented by someone wondering, "Will those idiots actually try to eatthese peppers?"
While I enjoy Sweet & Sour Chicken, I don't think it's "real Asian" food.
#46
Old 02-09-2006, 03:51 PM
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Interestingly enough, when I visited Beijing, one of the few American-Chinese dishes I recognized was ... Sweet & Sour X, with X being whatever meat they used. Of course, that doesn't necessarily mean it's "authentic". Maybe they think it's American food!
#47
Old 02-10-2006, 03:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mazinger_z


Yeah, we don't have chilli anything over here in our Chinese food. And, we typically spell "chilli" like "chili." And, when we say chili, we don't think of that red pepper thing, we think of chiles, which is larger and green. (I'm sure there's a thread somewhere about it). When you say "crispy" do you mean breaded, like at Mcdonald's? How are the noodles? Are those dry and crispy, too? Broth? Or, are they like spaghetti?
Not breaded, more of a light crispy batter. The batter soaks up most of the juice (for want of a better word) that the dish is cooked in, leaving just sliced red chili and crushed garlic cloves. Noodles are just noodles, you can get the dish with rice but I go for the noodles as the chicken can be fairly dry, hence the soft noodles and beansprouts moisten everything up.
#48
Old 02-10-2006, 06:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarrsk
As a son of Chinese immigrants who grew up in northern California (the home of the best Asian food anywhere in the United States), this thread makes me want to run for the nearest vomitorium, screaming about the White Devils. I didn't even realize that Chinese takeout places were common until I went to college on the east coast. Of course, since then, I've acquired a certain amount of appreciation for the goopy, Cantonese-derived crapola you get from such restaurants.

But eating leftover Chinese food cold? Ye gods, people. Have you no sense of decency at all?!
Tarrsk, of course I agree with you regarding NoCal being the hotbed of great Asian food in the US. But have you been to U-Lee in San Francisco? Have you had their asparagus or snow pea chicken, then had it the next morning cold? Man oh man - wonderfulness is fully available! Their curried shrimp - O, be still my heart!
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