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#1
Old 07-12-2006, 12:49 PM
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Is there a name for that Indian War Cry thing?

You know, the stereotypical noise where you hoot and cover then uncover your mouth? Sounds like "woo-woo-woo-woo"? I just David Lee Roth do it on a YouTube video & am trying to describe it accurately. Just in case you're curious, click that. Around 2:00, 2:15. Unforgivably terrible.
#2
Old 07-12-2006, 12:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Birdmonster
You know, the stereotypical noise where you hoot and cover then uncover your mouth? Sounds like "woo-woo-woo-woo"? I just David Lee Roth do it on a YouTube video & am trying to describe it accurately. Just in case you're curious, click that. Around 2:00, 2:15. Unforgivably terrible.
Yes. It's called stereotypical bullshit.
#3
Old 07-12-2006, 12:58 PM
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As noted in the OP. I knew someone would get bent out of shape.
#4
Old 07-12-2006, 01:33 PM
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Ululation?

The dictionary definition for that is "a howl or wail, as if with grief", which oddly enough is actually what that sound is in Native American terms, if you believe this. (See "We did not whoop").

"War whoop" would probably be as good an informal term as any, though.
#5
Old 07-12-2006, 03:35 PM
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War whoop is what I've always heard.
#6
Old 07-12-2006, 05:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon
Ululation?

The dictionary definition for that is "a howl or wail, as if with grief", which oddly enough is actually what that sound is in Native American terms, if you believe this
I'd call that strident wailing "keening"; a more throaty howl that varies in pitch is ululating.
#7
Old 07-12-2006, 05:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaffan
Yes. It's called stereotypical bullshit.
Except that Indians (Southern tribes, at least) really did use "war whoops" to terrify enemies (a technique later appropriated by Confederates as the Rebel Yell).

Quote:
The Cherokee and mountaineers, however, quickly and quietly moved into positions on the peaks overlooking the city. When word came that the men had reached their destinations, Col. Thomas gave the order to build hundreds of fires around the town and made it look like thousands of Confederates were mustering in the hills above the city. To add to the scene, the Cherokee started the war dances and filled the night air with drumbeats, war whoops, and rebel yells.
Cite
#8
Old 07-12-2006, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by spoke-
Except that Indians (Southern tribes, at least) really did use "war whoops" to terrify enemies (a technique later appropriated by Confederates as the Rebel Yell).



Cite
However, the link I gave above says that yes, the Indians did use war whoops, but they were not the same as the stereotypical sound that we know, which in fact was the sound that women used.
#9
Old 07-12-2006, 06:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon
However, the link I gave above says that yes, the Indians did use war whoops, but they were not the same as the stereotypical sound that we know, which in fact was the sound that women used.
Perhaps not the same "ululating" quality as the hand-over-the-mouth sound, but still a high-pitched shriek. There are plenty of contemporary sources describing the sound, and from those descriptions, the war whoop sounds like what we know as the Rebel yell.
#10
Old 07-12-2006, 10:50 PM
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However, the link I gave above says that yes, the Indians did use war whoops, but they were not the same as the stereotypical sound that we know, which in fact was the sound that women used.
Plus, I have a strong suspicion that there was no Pan-American consensus spanning from the Skokomish to the Seminole on the proper noise to make when attacking a foe.
#11
Old 07-13-2006, 04:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lama Pacos
Plus, I have a strong suspicion that there was no Pan-American consensus spanning from the Skokomish to the Seminole on the proper noise to make when attacking a foe.
"Screw the Lakota - we're gonna stridulate!"
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