Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 08-11-2006, 02:17 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 12,311
Anybody else tasked with carrying on the family name?

I'm the last male of my family line that is likely to have children. I'm my father's only son, and his brothers had girls.

So that actually puts a little pressure on me to have a son. My family isn't actually pressuring me, but I am just aware of the fact that it would be nice if I produced a son.

Me, I'm 30-something, married once, I love my daughter but she's starting middle school and I don't really want to be tied down another 20 years. I'm more interested in raising her right and then roaming the world.

Anybody else in the position of being the only one to carry on the family name?
#2
Old 08-11-2006, 02:33 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Chattanooga
Posts: 14,037
I'm one of two that I'm aware of (my dad's family is splintered) and my cousin's wife has already said their daughter is all they're going to have so I may as well be the only one and I don't intend to have kids at all and it doesn't bother me as it's just a name and would have been completely different if my mom and dad had not married anyway.
#3
Old 08-11-2006, 02:34 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 6,151
Why on earth can't your daughter carry on the name? If she has children, they can take her surname.

You can help by encouraging her to marry someone named "Smith" or "Jones."
#4
Old 08-11-2006, 02:40 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: 地球
Posts: 28,405
My brother and I both had "the burden" to have a male child who will carry on the name.

He had a baby boy in February so I'm off the hook.
#5
Old 08-11-2006, 02:42 PM
I'm nice, dammit!
Charter Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Southern Merrylande
Posts: 39,328
My brother was the only son of an only son of the only of 2 brothers to marry and have kids. Sadly, my brother's wife decided she didn't really mean that whole "till death do us part" thing, and she left before they had kids.

I say "sadly" because my brother would have been a great dad - he's always been wonderful with kids. But he's 50 now, so I doubt very much that he'll give me a nephew. And our last name, while supposedly rather common in the area of Poland where my grandfather came from, is extremely rare in the States. In Maryland, only my mom, my brother, and my youngest sister still carry the name.

My husband's (and now my) last name is much more common, but alas, from three sons, only one produced a child, and she's not a boy. (My nephew, while a doll, is adopted, so he'll carry the name, but not the bloodline.)

Since there are no grand estates to be passed down, I don't suppose it matters in the grand scheme of things, but it does make me rather sad to think that of the three brothers in my husband's family, and the five sibs in my family, only 3 offspring were produced. We didn't even replace ourselves, but I guess we're doing our part to fight overpopulation.
#6
Old 08-11-2006, 02:50 PM
KP KP is offline
Guest
Join Date: Sep 1999
Posts: 1,789
I was so "tasked". It was brought to my attention when I was a kid that I was not just my paternal grandfather's only grandson (lots of grandaughters) but the only greatgrandson of *his* father ... and no one seemed really 100% if there was another great-great-grandson in my great-great-granson's line. In our Old Country, it wasn't --and isn't-- an option for daughters to carry the name, even if it is the 21st century.

Of course, back then, the lineage was big enough (there were quite a few other males of my father's generation-- my uncle, cousins of varying descriptions, etc.) that it wasn't a big worry (though I rather liked the idea of being the One Hope). Another male could show up at any time.

None did.

Of course my son turned out to be every bit his own reward, and it occurs to me that I've never told him that the family name rests on his shoulders. I don't think I will.
#7
Old 08-11-2006, 02:52 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Near Baroni&Kelly's Jail.
Posts: 13,668
Youngest son here. My parents had plenty of grand kids, girls & boys, before I got married. Still, there was a lot of pressure, especially when my brother had all girls. But it turns out I had nothing to worry about: evidently, I only make 'boys' via my babymaking contribution.

Part of that's a bad thing though, because there is/was a whole lot of deep-seated hatred/jealousy towards my sons from my siblings.
#8
Old 08-11-2006, 02:58 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: in my own head
Posts: 4,136
My husband is - he's the last in a line of a very unusual German name (I'm sure others exist, but not in his family's line). His family couldn't care less whether or not it's carried on, though. We are having a baby boy any day now, so it'll be carried on, but they didn't think it was a big deal before getting pregnant or before knowing the baby's sex.

E.
#9
Old 08-11-2006, 03:03 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: state of confusion
Posts: 3,652
Mr. Armadillo is the Last Male [Lastname]. Out of 8 boys in his father's family, his father is the only one of the 8 that had any boys--and Mr. Armadillo is it. Furthermore, if (when) we have kids, and if they are boys, he not only gets the last name, but demands the middle name as well to carry on a one-generation family tradition, since he is the Last Male [Lastname].
#10
Old 08-11-2006, 03:06 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Santa Barbara, California
Posts: 15,425
I am the last in my line. I am 42, don't have kids and will never have kids. Boo hoo.
#11
Old 08-11-2006, 03:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Hollywood
Posts: 6,263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Drake
You can help by encouraging her to marry someone named "Smith" or "Jones."
Yeah, but it will probably just be an alias.


My dad had plenty of brothers who had sons, so no burden on me.
#12
Old 08-11-2006, 05:24 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 1999
Posts: 23,453
Yes. I was the only male, the only one left to carry on the family name, etc., etc.

Of course, then I found out my grandfather picked the family name out of thin air while he was on the boat coming to America. Not only that, he did it so no one from the old country could track him down.

So if anyone wants to change their name to kunilou it'll be just as legitimate a way of carrying on the family name as the way we got the family name in the first place.
#13
Old 08-11-2006, 05:37 PM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: In flight
Posts: 4,089
It would fall to me, and it was in the back of my mind for a while, until I realized that my Dad changed his name when he came to the US, so nobody really cares.
#14
Old 08-11-2006, 07:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Suburbs of Chicagoland
Posts: 22,337
My father-in-law had one boy and five girls, so he considers my husband to be charged to carry on the name. (Never mind that he had a brother who had a number of sons; that doesn't count since his brother was a failure in business, etc.) Every time I think he's finally accepted that we don't want kids, he'll surprise us by bringing it up again several months later.
#15
Old 10-28-2015, 09:22 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1
I was the only male grandchild produced in my family. My great uncles only produced daughters and in turn his daughters produced daughters. My uncle had daughters and my father fortunately helped produce me. It was pumped into my head since I was a small child about the importance of family and our line. Luckily, my wife and I had three sons, so thankfully that pressure is now off my shoulders.��

Last edited by Priestley; 10-28-2015 at 09:27 AM.
#16
Old 10-28-2015, 09:29 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 26,800
Quote:
Originally Posted by control-z View Post
Anybody else in the position of being the only one to carry on the family name?
Well, for starters, mom and dad only had daughters so that sort of took it off the table.

Also, as a woman I was pressured NOT to keep the family name when I married.

Third - we didn't even have a surname until the family came to the US around 1900, so it's not like there's any sort of real history attached to it,
#17
Old 10-28-2015, 09:45 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 47,726
While I didn't have children, all the males in my family have the middle name of Howard. The same Howard family as the politicos.

Both of my brothers had the middle name of Howard. The felt obligated to give their sons the middle name of Howard. And my oldest brother's only son gave his son the middle name of Howard. Said son's wife is now pregnant with "William (her father's name) Howard."

I wish this nonsense would stop.
#18
Old 10-28-2015, 09:54 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Centreville, VA
Posts: 6,127
I don't have this exactly, as my last name is at least likely going to be carried on by my nephew (way to young to really consider at this point). But I don't really understand this. What's in a name, especially a last name? I know the name is kind of important to my dad and his generation, but so what? I didn't choose that name, he didn't choose that name. No one alive knew anyone who might have had a hand in choosing our name and there's apparently disagreement on exactly what it means. Even the famous people we're related to don't share our last name. With modern technology and genealogy, it's not like anyone will be forgotten because of the lack of the name, they'll be forgotten because our line dies out, or they're just so far in the past no one cares anymore.

So, I really don't care about the family name living on at all. That said, I DO care about our bloodline carrying on, and to a certain extent that I have cousins with kids and a brother with kids, I'm have little doubt our family will carry on past my lifetime. But at the same time, there's still a part of me that wants to have kids of my own. As far as that goes, I don't feel a compelling need to have a son, other than the fact I'd like to have one for his own sake, just like I'd like to have a daughter for her own sake. But I don't even care much at all if they have my last name or not; hell, I've even toyed with the idea that maybe they should get a new last name.

Really, the idea of carrying on a family name, as opposed to the family line, dates back to times when inheritance was a big deal and when knowing people lineages was really only doable through name. Other than tradition, what purpose does it still serve in today's society?
#19
Old 10-28-2015, 09:55 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Somewhere in the Potomac
Posts: 32,870
My last three nephews have the family name as their middle name. It's not our original family name, anyway. Changed when great grandfather immigrated in 1887.
#20
Old 10-28-2015, 09:57 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 3,092
My dad had two siblings, neither of whom had children. His parents had come over from Germany after WWI, so I was the only child of my generation on my dad's side. Clearly I couldn't pass on the family name by any regular sort of means. My husband had been a foundling, literally a baby abandoned in a church. He had been adopted and carried the name of his adoptive family. When we were making our wedding plans, he generously offered to change HIS last name to mine so that we could continue the family name. It was highly unusual, but not illegal, so that's what we did. Happily, my two sons are now carrying my family name forward for yet another generation, as my oldest son recently had a son of his own.
#21
Old 10-28-2015, 10:07 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Toon Town
Posts: 10,574
My sister and BIL had four girls. None of my BIL's brothers had kids. When one of my nieces married, her husband took her last name so the name wouldn't die out. They don't seem to be in any hurry to procreate, however, so that may be a dead end.

StG
#22
Old 10-28-2015, 10:10 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Raiderville, TX
Posts: 10,663
Well, let's see, my grandfather came to the US in 1921. Near as I can tell, his last name was unique, because Google searches only bring up stuff about me and my family.

My dad was born in 1937. He has a brother, still living, who never married. I think he's a long shot. He also has two sisters who took different names when they married.

My dad's been married twice, so I had a half-brother from his first marriage. He died a while back, childless. Then he had my brother and me.

My brother has four kids. The eldest son is deeply and profoundly autistic, and cannot care for himself. The triplets were two girls and a boy. They're in high school now.

I have two girls. The littlest Torqueling probably already feels strange enough being a Chinese girl in America with a Czechoslovakian last name, so I'm not sure how she'll feel about keeping it. The elder Torqueling might be talked into it.

So, if everything goes traditional, it's all riding on my brother's son, or else the family name dies out. It would be a shame, because I find that it's pretty good identity theft protection; no one will steal it, because no one can spell it.
#23
Old 10-28-2015, 10:31 AM
Charter Member
Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: The Land of Cleves
Posts: 77,448
I thought so, as a kid, and was very relieved when one of my uncles adopted a son, because I didn't want that burden on me.

I eventually found out, though, as an adult, that while my last name is fairly uncommon, there were a bunch of other branches of the family that my father had cut ties with and didn't acknowledge unless pressed about it, and that they have plenty of sons. Plus, of course, the root of the family tree back in Germany.

Which is irrelevant, because by that point, I had ceased to care about the continuation of the name, anyway.
#24
Old 10-28-2015, 10:52 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 18,810
I'm in the same boat, but I've already failed. I have a very unusual (and IMHO, very cool) last name, and it's pretty much just me and my brother now. We have no living male cousins on that side of the family. There are more people out there with the name, but the relation is so distant that we wouldn't consider ourselves to be in the same family.

Anyway, I had two daughters. My brother also has two daughters. My wife and I are done; not sure about my brother. That's pretty much it for us. I think it's sad, but not sad enough to seriously consider trying to fix it.
#25
Old 10-28-2015, 12:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 8,337
My father had all girls. His younger brother has all girls. His older brother had two boys but they have girls.
So the name would die out.
I was unmarried when I got pregnant and I hear a few family members were upset that I gave my son his father's last name instead of mine. However, I got let off the hook when a younger unmarried cousin got pregnant and she did give her son the family name.
Now the name carries on.
Not that it matters to me.
#26
Old 10-28-2015, 12:26 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Home of the haggis
Posts: 28,716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Torque View Post
So, if everything goes traditional, it's all riding on my brother's son, or else the family name dies out. It would be a shame, because I find that it's pretty good identity theft protection; no one will steal it, because no one can spell it.
That's actually a pretty neat reason.
#27
Old 10-28-2015, 01:02 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Santa Barbara
Posts: 2,284
Distantly, as in my great great grandfather's level of the family tree, there are I think other male offspring carrying on the family name. It's an uncommon name, and only after I moved last year have I started running across people who are familiar with the name. There was a prominent local philanthropist that shares my last name, and I believe is a distant relative.

What I screwed up is the tradition from my great grandfather. He, my grandfather, my father and myself are all Richard Randommiddlename Lastname. There will be no fifth Richard in a row as my wife and I are happy with our dog.
#28
Old 10-28-2015, 01:40 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,679
Just finished reading The Walking Dead thread and now I see this zombie from 2006.

I've known since I was a little kid myself that I would never want children, therefore when I'm gone my mom's side of the family is pretty much over. I'm an only child, female, and my mom is an only child. My Nana's siblings are all gone but she has 2 nieces, and one has a son but they live far away and we don't know them.

My dad has siblings but he disowned them many years ago. They have children & grandchildren so I guess that line carries on, but his sisters took their husband's last names (one passed many years ago with no children) and his brother only had daughters who also took their husband's last names.

Now that I think about it, when I got married in 2011 and took my husband's last name that was the end of our family name. Wow.
#29
Old 10-28-2015, 02:02 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,679
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Torque View Post
Well, let's see, my grandfather came to the US in 1921. Near as I can tell, his last name was unique, because Google searches only bring up stuff about me and my family.
Is it possible that he American-ized his last name when he got here? I think that happened quite often with immigrants.

When I was in Grade 4 a family came from Poland to Canada and the daughter's name was Barbara in class, but at her house her mom called her "Basia" (pronounced "Basha"), which I thought was way prettier and more exotic than plain ole Barbara. I couldn't understand why they'd change something as basic as her first name. But this was in 1982.
#30
Old 10-28-2015, 02:02 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Here
Posts: 4,302
In my generation, I have 16 cousins... only one male. He, luckily, has two sons, so my dad's family name will live on through him.

In my mother's family, there has been a Joseph/Josephine as a first name for at least 9 generations. I'm the youngest of my generation, so had "Jo" slapped on to my first name to keep up the tradition. Unless my daughter ever has a child and continues it, it ends with my nephew.
#31
Old 10-28-2015, 02:11 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,603
Heh - if you're Irish you might call your first born son your maiden name, and your sisters might too.
#32
Old 10-28-2015, 03:12 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 11,633
My husband's grandfather has no siblings in this country (some in Canada probably have descendants but we don't have contact with them).

Grandfather had two sons.

Of the two sons: one has two daughters. The other has two sons and a daughter (my husband and my brother in law).

The BIL has 2 daughters. The SIL has no kids and short of adoption, is past the age of that being a concern.

We have a son ("Dweezil" when we mention him on the boards) and daughter ("Moon Unit"). So it would seem to come to Dweezil to carry on the family name - or, I suppose, Moon Unit to have a child out of wedlock.

Of course, Dweezil is mildly autistic, Moon Unit has her own issues, and we're thinking these genetics don't need to be carried on to another generation .

Last edited by Mama Zappa; 10-28-2015 at 03:13 PM.
#33
Old 10-28-2015, 03:15 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: SEC
Posts: 13,876
My grandfather ended up with 22 grandchildren, but only two males with his last name. I'm one of them, and I'm out of the picture. The other one does have a son, though.
#34
Old 10-28-2015, 03:21 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Falls Church, Va.
Posts: 13,703
It's been nine years -- do we know if control-z ever had a son?
#35
Old 10-28-2015, 03:26 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Trantor
Posts: 11,769
Why should I care? My father changed the name about when I was born (1937) and my name is not even on my birth certificate. And where did the original name come from anyway? It meant something like estate manager.

My wife feels a little sad because the line of her great grandmother's mitochondria has now terminated. GGM had one daughter, my wife's GM who had one child, my mother-in-law. We have one daughter who has one son and will be 49 in a couple months, so no more children.
#36
Old 10-28-2015, 03:29 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: somewhere else
Posts: 5,140
My father's siblings only have one male child with the family name and he was adopted. And the speculation is that he is unlikely to have kids as he was born with some serious developmental disabilities and struggles with some issues of daily living.

My brother passed away before having any children. So I guess that leaves it to me. I am already in my 40s and have no biological children, though may be adopting my fiancee's daughter and maybe a male cousin of hers. The daughter has asked to take my last name. Not sure what the little boy would think of this. So maybe I'll have an adopted son and it will all be on him to go forth and spread the name. Meh.
#37
Old 10-28-2015, 04:28 PM
ftg ftg is online now
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Not the PNW :-(
Posts: 16,877
The Name is potentially passing only thru me. But no grandkids yet.

It's all really stupid. My ggf left the old country with one name and landed in the USofA with another. (His father's patronym replaced his own. Siblings who came over earlier kept their own patronym, giving siblings/descendants with different last names.)

But the spelling of the name evolved for a while, becoming only stable with my father's generation.

So, what difference does it make?
#38
Old 10-28-2015, 04:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soylent Juicy View Post
When I was in Grade 4 a family came from Poland to Canada and the daughter's name was Barbara in class, but at her house her mom called her "Basia" (pronounced "Basha"), which I thought was way prettier and more exotic than plain ole Barbara. I couldn't understand why they'd change something as basic as her first name. But this was in 1982.
They didn't change her name. 'Basia' is the Polish diminutive for 'Barbara'. It's the equivalent of her mother calling her 'Barb'.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bam Boo Gut View Post
Heh - if you're Irish you might call your first born son your maiden name, and your sisters might too.
Huh? I'm Irish and I've never heard of this. The whole give-the-kid-a-surname-as-a-first-name thing is very small over here, it's very recent, and it's seen as an entirely American thing.
#39
Old 10-28-2015, 05:07 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 38,850
I have two brothers, one is useless for all things so no surprise there, the other one married a woman with about 40 nieces and nephews so they decided they didn't need their own kids. My father had a brother but he had just one daughter who now has a different last name. Me and my two sons are the only ones left to continue. One or both of them will probably have kids, but I'm in no hurry for grandkids. And if it was that great of a name to start with I'd have a lot more relatives now.
#40
Old 10-28-2015, 05:17 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,824
I guess if you do think about it not sleeping around with younger women would be irresponsible of me. Oh, the burden.
#41
Old 10-28-2015, 05:17 PM
The Central Scrutinizer
Moderator
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Pork Roll/Taylor Ham
Posts: 24,067
My brother is in his 50s and as far as anyone knows he has never even dated. Nothing is happening there. I had two daughters and no more are coming. I do have a male cousin that I think had a son so technically the family name has continued. His father (my uncle) died before I was born and I never met my cousins.
#42
Old 10-28-2015, 05:37 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Suffolk, VA
Posts: 3,948
Me. I had an uncle, whom I loved dearly, who (fortunately) died without having children. He had some ongoing mental health issues and was cared for by his parents his entire 60-year adult life; he would not have made a good father.

I'm the only son born to my two parents; I also have a younger sister. Though I'm 33 and still living with Mom (because of some extenuating circumstances), neither parent has put pressure on me to get married and have a child. Though they believe it will happen eventually. I hope so.
#43
Old 10-28-2015, 05:45 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Port Orchard, WA
Posts: 11,149
My wife's father's father had two sons and one daughter. Both the sons had three daughters each. Crazy odds.

Any pressure on me is relieved now that my brother just had a son.
#44
Old 10-28-2015, 09:37 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2011
Location: boise idaho
Posts: 1,800
Me personally, no, even though I did my share in that regard with two guests the younger (working on adopting a third) and my brother had a son. My FiL has only a bevie of daughters so when my now wife and I married, we agreed she would keep her maiden name and my young guestling with her carries her family name (MUCH to the relief and great pleasure of her dad)
__________________
"I find your lack of candy disturbing" Darth Desserticola
#45
Old 10-28-2015, 10:03 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 14,257
An uncle of mine had this burden. He was the last male carrying his somewhat unusual surname in the whole of his country. He had three girls then finally a son. I think it was all a bit unfortunate. I don't think either he or his wife wanted that many children. They split up soon after. I don't have sufficient inside running to be sure but I think the burden caused an otherwise poor decision to be made.
#46
Old 10-29-2015, 01:12 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
While I didn't have children, all the males in my family have the middle name of Howard. The same Howard family as the politicos.

Both of my brothers had the middle name of Howard. The felt obligated to give their sons the middle name of Howard. And my oldest brother's only son gave his son the middle name of Howard. Said son's wife is now pregnant with "William (her father's name) Howard."

I wish this nonsense would stop.
All of the men in my family have a very unique middle name. Passed down son to son, every generation. There were only girls my generation, and I was given their middle name as my first name (it sounds unisex). I was expected to pass it on, but cannot (and don't really want to) bear children. Guess it's the end of that.
#47
Old 10-29-2015, 02:23 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: New Middletown, Ohio
Posts: 5,825
The oldest male, (and for as long as we can remember, it has happened to be the first born also) gets the same first and middle name. John/Jack Michael. I don't really want to name my child John or Jack. As for my last name, I've often considered changing it if I got married, and taking my wife's name, or both of us agreeing on a new last name. I have no special attachment to my last name.
#48
Old 10-29-2015, 05:25 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 8,792
Yes, my son is the only son of an only son of an only son...so the nearest relatives with his last name are his third or fourth cousins or something (certainly no one he'll ever meet, and I think I might have met one just once, decades ago).

It's only a "burden" in a jokey way, because as others have pointed out, it's just cultural convention to honor people who happen to have testicles in this way.

What's more interesting is that his surname is quintessentially Irish (you can guess it from my Doper name), but he's only one-sixteenth Irish, and looks it.
#49
Old 10-29-2015, 05:30 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 8,792
Quote:
Originally Posted by eclectic wench View Post



Huh? I'm Irish and I've never heard of this. The whole give-the-kid-a-surname-as-a-first-name thing is very small over here, it's very recent, and it's seen as an entirely American thing.
Perhaps the poster was referring to how Americans sometimes do this with Irish-derived surnames, like Kelly, Tyrone, or Murphy.
#50
Old 10-29-2015, 04:48 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Raiderville, TX
Posts: 10,663
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soylent Juicy View Post
Is it possible that he American-ized his last name when he got here? I think that happened quite often with immigrants.
I don't think that happened in our case; I haven't traced our lineage from the old country, but my last name has a silent "J" and a -sh sound where there's only a -s, so I'm pretty sure it's a factory original. I did once turn up what appeared to be a tractor rental place owned by a guy with the same last name in Rychaltice, Czech Republic, but I can't read the language.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:08 PM.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: [email protected]

Send comments about this website to:

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: cleo threadgoode sheerflow gutter screen boxing someone's ears jelly belly vomit 16 bond paper king rat phenomenon ozai vs iroh bottom molar extraction grinding stainless steel malibu chasers weed wacker propeller chaffing penis dnr police double sided tape for car mirror what did helen hunt do to her face fedex can't customize delivery heel spurs surgery recovery time uses for old encyclopedias where did the word cum come from substitutes for curry powder how long is a catholic funeral the rifleman the visitor cast he washer not getting clothes clean does the mailman run on sundays finger in gun barrel