#1
Old 10-16-2006, 07:13 PM
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Pet names in other languages

Names for animals, not people. Like in English, we name dogs Rover and Spot. I'm looking for what the common names are in other languages. I'm looking for something like this:
English:
Spot - dog with a spot or with spots.
Mittens - cat with markings that look like mittens on its paws.
Tiger - cat with stripes
Fluffy - dog or cat with lots of fur
Nemo - dog or cat named after popular Disney character.
Can anybody help me out?
#2
Old 10-17-2006, 02:39 AM
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It seems strange to me, but Bulgarian pets are usually given English names. I've met dogs named Jerry, Simon, Roxanne, and Michael.
#3
Old 10-17-2006, 04:59 AM
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I know at least 3 Spanish dogs, outside of the regions that speak Catalan, which are called Gos (dog in Catalan). Two of them are Catalan Shepherds.

My canary was yellow and from Catalonia, so I named him Groc (yellow in Catalan).

Linda (pretty, my SiL's she-dog), Enano (dwarf, for little dogs), Perro (for a stray dog they didn't want to name), Lucero or Lucera for dogs (lucero=star; the morning star and evening star are el lucero de la mañana and el lucero del anochecer), Bicho (bug or "misbehaved one", this one was actually a cat), Jacetana called Tana (she was from Jaca), Neska (Basque for girl, the daughter of Tana), Tarzán (a huge mastiff), Colorado (a reddish horse), Lagun (Basque for friend or helper, a German shepherd), Jaun (lord in Basque, a boxer).
#4
Old 10-17-2006, 06:15 AM
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In Japan, dogs are supposedly called Pochi and cats Tama, but I have never actually met a dog or cat with those names. Lots of dogs and cats are called Kuro (Blackie) and I have met a couple called Mame (Bean) because they were little. Lots of people want to name their pets with an English name and they get some of them wildly wrong. (I know a dog called Victoria....)
#5
Old 10-17-2006, 06:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hokkaido Brit
<snippage>Lots of people want to name their pets with an English name and they get some of them wildly wrong. (I know a dog called Victoria....)
What's wrong with naming a dog Victoria?
#6
Old 10-17-2006, 06:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra Indigo
What's wrong with naming a dog Victoria?
Apparently Hokkaido Brit was not amused by this.
#7
Old 10-17-2006, 07:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twickster
Apparently Hokkaido Brit was not amused by this.
No, we weren't!

Actually maybe this illustrates the cultural differences nicely - I think that it's an oddly human name, and within that, a rather formal name in itself. So for me, it seems to be an awkward fit with a dog.

People in my area of England seem to name dogs with a short name such as Pip, or a name connected to the dog, like a shaggy dog being Scruffy, or one with bright eyes being Buttons for example. I think if a dog was to be called Victoria it would be the one giving you the orders, and it would be something like a Borzoi or some other regal type dog! (Come to think of it, Victoria isn't a bad name for a cat...)
#8
Old 10-17-2006, 07:38 AM
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Fair enough. I guess I've always just had pets named whatever we felt like at the time, so "Victoria" doesn't seem that much out of spec for me...

My list:

Hilda - Rhodesian Ridgeback/Labrador/Boxer Mutt cross (Mum's)
Zoe (Actually Pinjar Dane Zoe) - Purebred German Great Dane (Mum's)
Thor - Purebred German Shepherd (Mum's)
Capone - Staffy Terrior Cross (Ours)
Honey - Calico cat (Ours, formerly grandma's)
Tuk-Tuk - Tortishell (Mum's)
Gizmo - Mackrel Tabby (Mum's)
Diablo - Black Tom Cat (Mum's)
Tuppence (Tuppy) - German Shepherd/Collie cross (Grandma's)
Shekel - As above
Cindy - German Shepherd Cross (Grandma's)
Ricky - White farmhouse Tom (Grandma's)
Gadget - Russian Blue cross (Dad's)
Connor - Mutt (Hubby's old dog back in England)

My family doesn't go in much for traditional pet names.
#9
Old 10-17-2006, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hokkaido Brit
In Japan, dogs are supposedly called Pochi and cats Tama, but I have never actually met a dog or cat with those names. Lots of dogs and cats are called Kuro (Blackie) and I have met a couple called Mame (Bean) because they were little. Lots of people want to name their pets with an English name and they get some of them wildly wrong. (I know a dog called Victoria....)
Are you sure they were naming the dog in English?

Victoria means Victory in Italian and Spanish. Maybe their favourite team had won whatever or it was a show dog.
#10
Old 10-17-2006, 08:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hokkaido Brit
Actually maybe this illustrates the cultural differences nicely - I think that it's an oddly human name, and within that, a rather formal name in itself. So for me, it seems to be an awkward fit with a dog.
The formal human name thing happens in the US, too. I've known plenty of dogs and cats with impressive names, as well as animals named after famous people. I knew a cat named Gershwin, for example. And, of course, I named my pug Edith Wharton. She's happy with the name, and a big fan of the writer :-)
#11
Old 10-17-2006, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nava
Are you sure they were naming the dog in English?

Victoria means Victory in Italian and Spanish. Maybe their favourite team had won whatever or it was a show dog.
Nah, they just thought it was a nice English name! But come to think of it, my husband's cousin has a dog called Sena, named after the racing driver. (Don't know the spelling, sorry, it's not my thing - and come to think of it, that doesn't suit the dog who is a Siberian Husky. He should have been a greyhound!)
#12
Old 10-17-2006, 09:02 AM
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any syllable x2

blu blu, la la, na na, hokk hokk, si si, etc etc
#13
Old 10-17-2006, 09:34 AM
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I thought you meant pet names for a sweetie and was going to nominate ma petite chou chou.
#14
Old 10-17-2006, 11:32 AM
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Fofo - soft in Portuguese, given to a Husky in Brazil
Miu - meow - given to the cat

My own cats have titles: Mr. Fez and Marquesa Gabi.
#15
Old 10-17-2006, 12:35 PM
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My exchange dog's name in Germany was Golo. He was a Schnauzer mix, but I don't believe the name was that common. I think they said they named him after a historian or philosopher or something.
#16
Old 10-17-2006, 04:14 PM
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It happens in America, too - My parents named their cockatiel Dexter. He looks kinda like a Dexter, too.

I name my animals after *stuff*, usually food. I had a black molly I named Noodles (rest in peace), and a black labradore named Baloney. Baloney's mother's name was Blackie (black lab, not racial slur), and his brother was named Squeaker. We had a cat named Muffin and another named Ashes (ashes was so named because he loved sleeping in fireplace ashes, and went from pure white to sooty grey in a matter of moments). We also had a mutt named Brandy, after the booze. When I lived in PA, my roomie and I had a cat named Miranda, but I had no play in the naming of her, or else she'd have been named something like "Pepperoni."

And then there's my friend in Rhode Island who named her cat "Mouse." Mouse's boyfriend is named "Fatty."

~Tasha
#17
Old 10-17-2006, 05:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shijinn
any syllable x2

blu blu, la la, na na, hokk hokk, si si, etc etc
Neat! What language is this?

I'm still hoping for some more languages, although I also like knowing some of the British ways of naming pets.

What is a popular dog name in Mexico? Lapland? Madagascar?

I'm also interested in places where people don't have dogs or cats for pets, but maybe have insects or lizards. What do you name them?

Are there other places like Bulgaria where they give pets English names?

Isn't that interesting that Nava knew a Spanish cat named Tana and that Tana is a stereotypical name for a cat in Japan?

I knew a guy who named his dog Cobber because he had recently visited Australia and people called their buddies 'Cobber' there, but I don't know if it was a dog name in Australia or not.

I know Hitler's German Shepherd was called Blondi.
#18
Old 10-17-2006, 06:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hokkaido Brit
I think if a dog was to be called Victoria it would be the one giving you the orders, and it would be something like a Borzoi or some other regal type dog! (Come to think of it, Victoria isn't a bad name for a cat...)
My dog is named after Kelsey Grammer. He's an insufferable, pretentious jerk who has a different trophy girlfriend every week--or at least he plays one on TV. Bastard dog.
#19
Old 10-17-2006, 08:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hokkaido Brit
In Japan, dogs are supposedly called Pochi and cats Tama, but I have never actually met a dog or cat with those names. Lots of dogs and cats are called Kuro (Blackie) and I have met a couple called Mame (Bean) because they were little. Lots of people want to name their pets with an English name and they get some of them wildly wrong. (I know a dog called Victoria....)
I thought you were going to say it was because he should have been called Victor.

That reminds me of an anime I saw once where the male lead character (named Tamahome) bristles when the female lead shortened his name to Tama, saying "That's what you call a cat!" Sure enough, a few episodes later, a supporting character was introduced with a pet cat named Tama.

Does it mean something, or is it just a cute name like Pooky Snookums?
#20
Old 10-17-2006, 08:21 PM
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Generic Korean cat name: Nabi. (It means butterfly. Go figure.)

Generic Korean dog name: Baek-kku. This would be for white dogs only. It means white dog.
#21
Old 10-17-2006, 08:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HazelNutCoffee
Generic Korean cat name: Nabi. (It means butterfly. Go figure.)

Generic Korean dog name: Baek-kku. This would be for white dogs only. It means white dog.
This is exactly the kind of information I'm looking for. Thanks!
#22
Old 10-17-2006, 10:02 PM
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English fido French Phydeaux
#23
Old 10-18-2006, 02:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluethree
Isn't that interesting that Nava knew a Spanish cat named Tana and that Tana is a stereotypical name for a cat in Japan?
Sorry, I realized I hadn't specified Tana and Neska's species but had already posted...

they were Mastiffs of the Pyrynees. Tarzan was Neska's pa.
#24
Old 10-18-2006, 02:45 AM
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Oh and stereotipical name for dog: Bobby. Or Fido if you've been on the internet for more than six months (we blame DIKU).

For cat: don't know any.
#25
Old 10-18-2006, 07:01 AM
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My cat is called Skumbrik (from 'skumbriya' - 'mackerel') and my Russian friends find that extremely strange. For some reason, they found Bazulya (Russian IT slang for 'database') a more acceptable cat name.
#26
Old 10-18-2006, 08:23 AM
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French Canada - the stereotype is:

Pitou (dog)
Minou (cat)
Fido (not Phydeaux. Fido, tabarnak!)(dog)
Rex (dog)
#27
Old 10-18-2006, 10:17 AM
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Saudis do not seem to name pets. They consider giving them human names someplace between weird and immoral.

My ex (from Panama) had three horse named 'Mongo,' Mongo,' and 'Mongo.' She also called both dogs 'Mongo.' The cattle she never named. She said that was silly.
#28
Old 10-18-2006, 06:43 PM
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In Finnish, the "stereotypical" dog's names seem to be along the lines of Musti ("Blackie"), Peni, Halli and Rekku; especially the first two are names which have been used for a very long time. The word "peni" is an old synonym for dog; there's a word in Finnish, "peninkulma", which denotes a distance of 10 km and is supposedly the distance that a dog's bark can be heard.

These names are instantly recognizable as "dog names", but they're not so widely used these days as the names of actual dogs (except for those used as hunting dogs, now that I Googled some pages). A "typical" name which is of more modern origin would be Ressu (Snoopy's name in Finnish), but again, I haven't met many actual dogs with that name. For German Shepherds, two would be Rex or Roi, after a character in children's books.

Mirri or Misse would be the equivalent "cat names". For example, there's a pet store chain in Finland that's called Musti ja Mirri. "The Spot and Fluffy Store."

For horses, "Polle" is the quintessential name. It's a synonym for "hevonen - horse" like "mirri" is a synonym for "kissa - cat".
#29
Old 10-19-2006, 06:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by devilsknew
My exchange dog's name in Germany was Golo. He was a Schnauzer mix, but I don't believe the name was that common. I think they said they named him after a historian or philosopher or something.
That probably would be Golo Mann, who was the son of Thomas Mann (writer of The Magic Mountain ). No, you're right, it's not really a well-known name, and also not usually used for dogs.

"Generic" dog names would be "Bello" (literally means "Barky"), "Waldi" (usually used for those little wiener dogs), "Hasso" (implies a big strong dog like a Great Dane) or "Rex" for German shepherds (after a popular TV series). And, when you google "dog name" in German, apparently "Arko", which I never heard of. Shows what I know.

A cat would be called "Mieze" or "Minka", I think, or maybe "Tiger" (my two are called "Cookie" and "Paulinsche" which is not really typical).
#30
Old 10-19-2006, 07:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluethree
Neat! What language is this?
chinese, though it's not restricted to pets.
#31
Old 10-19-2006, 07:56 AM
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I once inherited a cat with a house I bought - The German owner was moving back home from London and didn't want to take poor little Stupsi with him - Stupsi apparently means something like pussy/kitty/cute cuddly thing in German.

I know an Italian Count (ooh, get me) who gave his cat the family name of a distant relative, the Duke of Urbino. The cat was called Montefeltro. How fab is that!
#32
Old 10-19-2006, 11:16 AM
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A surreal moment in Lisbon was when I heard a young Portugesa calling to her dog: "GoooooofYYY YYY ". The evil of Disney. On the other hand, I named our cat "Viralata", which is Portuguese (Brazilian) slang for 'street person', literally translated as 'turner of cans'.
#33
Old 10-19-2006, 12:25 PM
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Reminds me of this dialogue from the fellow whose apartment I borrowed in Barcelona:

-What's your cat's name?
-Goopy.
-Goopy?
-Yes, as in Goopy Goldberg. (You must imagine this with the accent.)
#34
Old 10-19-2006, 12:27 PM
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My dog was named "Dileas" which is Gaelic for "Faithful"
Mums dog was called "Corrie" which is Gaelic for "Glen"
#35
Old 10-19-2006, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzomax
English fido French Phydeaux
This is a joke, right? "Fido" is latinate, and the only difference in French is pronunciation. ("Fee-doh.") "Phydeaux" is just phaux phrench used for a larf by anglofones, isn't it?

"Tipet" is a pretty common French cutesey-wootsey pet name.
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