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#1
Old 09-03-2007, 10:20 AM
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Describe Yorkshire Pudding

It is obviously nothing like what Americans call pudding (something which is sweet, jiggly and creamy). It looks more like some kind of bread. Could an American with no concept of it make it from a recipe?
#2
Old 09-03-2007, 10:24 AM
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My Grandma makes it sometimes, and I've tried but I can't seem to quite get it.

It is a sort of bread, crispy on the outside and basically nothing in the middle, it's supposed to have lots of air in it and puff up so you can poke a hole in it and pour the gravy on.

mm yum.. maybe I should try and make it again.. a good roast and yorkshire pudding..

Last edited by Flutterby; 09-03-2007 at 10:25 AM.
#3
Old 09-03-2007, 10:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KRM
It is obviously nothing like what Americans call pudding (something which is sweet, jiggly and creamy). It looks more like some kind of bread. Could an American with no concept of it make it from a recipe?
Yes, absolutely.

It's very, very good, and helps to stretch a meal. My mom makes it in muffin tins rather than one large pan, which I prefer.

Canadian Sue has an awesome recipe. I don't have it handy and she's no longer a member, but if you really want it I can probably get it.
#4
Old 09-03-2007, 10:29 AM
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It's baked batter.

Sure, you can make it from a recipe. Once you've got it working, try baking some sausages in the pan first, then when they're half-cooked, pour in the batter and bake until crispy - and you've got toad in the hole.
#5
Old 09-03-2007, 10:30 AM
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The American equivalents are called popovers. The recipe is quite easy; there are only four ingredients. The preparation and baking technique are the keys to making the them well. Here is the basic recipe taken step-by-step, and here are some useful tips to making them rise better. Enjoy!

Last edited by Q.E.D.; 09-03-2007 at 10:31 AM.
#6
Old 09-03-2007, 10:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangetout
It's baked batter.
First time I had it I commented on how it'd be good with syrup. Everyone looked at me funny. But seriously I see cooked batter I think pancakes even if they are crispy.

Note: This was one without beef and anything else added yet I'm not crazy.

Last edited by Darkhold; 09-03-2007 at 10:37 AM.
#7
Old 09-03-2007, 10:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkhold
First time I had it I commented on how it'd be good with syrup. Everyone looked at me funny. But seriously I see cooked batter I think pancakes even if they are crispy.

Note: This was one without beef and anything else added yet I'm not crazy.
You had to say that.

Now I want to try it! *ponders* I've got the makings downstairs.. and some maple syrup..
#8
Old 09-03-2007, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KRM
Could an American with no concept of it make it from a recipe?
You find milk and I'll find flour
And we'll have pudding in half an hour


Yes, it's easy. A cup of milk, a cup of flour, a couple of eggs, and some salt. I make mine in the roasting pan (rather than a muffin tin) so it gets all of the meaty goodness.
#9
Old 09-03-2007, 11:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GingerOfTheNorth
It's very, very good, and helps to stretch a meal.
As a native of Yorkshire, let me say this.

Legend has it that Yorkshire folk of yore would serve the pudding as a first course (with gravy and sugar) in order to fill up the guests who, in consequence, would then require fewer slices of roast beef.

This legend is completely untrue, probably.
#10
Old 09-03-2007, 12:32 PM
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By all means try it. It's one of the easiest things to make, and looks elegant in a ramekin, served with your prime rib roast.
#11
Old 09-03-2007, 12:40 PM
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Yellowish-brownish-white, crispy-puffy-tender, beef drippin's delivery platform. Cook in pan with roast. Eat to extremes.
#12
Old 09-03-2007, 01:36 PM
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There is a great book called "Lobscouse & Spotted Dog... which is a Gastononimic companionm to the Aubrey/Maturin Novels" by A. Grossman.

It does not contain a specific recipe for the Yorkshire, but it has an entire section on puddings and how to make them. "Spotted Dog" is a pudding, btw.

Last edited by DrDeth; 09-03-2007 at 01:36 PM.
#13
Old 09-03-2007, 03:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Q.E.D.
The American equivalents are called popovers. The recipe is quite easy; there are only four ingredients. The preparation and baking technique are the keys to making the them well. Here is the basic recipe taken step-by-step, and here are some useful tips to making them rise better. Enjoy!
The difference being that Yorkshire pudding is cooked with meat drippings.
#14
Old 09-03-2007, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDeth
There is a great book called "Lobscouse & Spotted Dog... which is a Gastononimic companionm to the Aubrey/Maturin Novels" by A. Grossman.

It does not contain a specific recipe for the Yorkshire, but it has an entire section on puddings and how to make them. "Spotted Dog" is a pudding, btw.
I have that book. I wouldn't touch 90% of what's described in there (soused pigs's face!) but it's an entertaining read.

I've never even seen Yorkshire Pudding, but I must say that James Herriot certainly makes it sound delicious.
#15
Old 09-03-2007, 04:43 PM
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My mom makes this with roast beef for christmass every year. She doesn't use gravy though. Instead she uses drippings from the roast beef.

We then have sailor duff pudding for desert. That is a molases based bread pudding covered in a heavy cream sauce. Yum yum.
#16
Old 09-03-2007, 05:29 PM
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For those considering Yorkies with syrup - Yes. Nigella Lawson serves Yorkshire pudding with maple syrup and cream, though the pudding has been cooked in vegetable oil and not beef dripping so there's no "beefy" taste to it.

I've had to learn how to make Yorkshire puddings - hubby's from Leeds. The biggest tip I can say is to get your fat as hot as possible. Dripping is good for flavour, but has a tendency to burn at very high temps. I use vegetable oil so I can crank the oven right up to get the oil smoking hot, pour the batter in then turn it down to the requisite baking temperature.

I say if you're having a roast beef, pork or lamb, go for it. If you're wanting an even more English-y treat, you need some good pork sausages, a great big wodge of mashed potato and some onion gravy. It's one of the few times hubby will eat sausages, and it's so bad yet it feels so good.

Jesus. I've got today off work - you don't know how tempted I am to hit the supermarket after the rental inspection's over, and grab some fixin's for Yorkies.
#17
Old 09-03-2007, 06:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkhold
First time I had it I commented on how it'd be good with syrup. Everyone looked at me funny. But seriously I see cooked batter I think pancakes even if they are crispy.

Note: This was one without beef and anything else added yet I'm not crazy.
You're not crazy. My mum used to make double the amount of Yorkshire puds required (not easy, because they can be eaten in almost any quantity) and we would all retire to the kitchen after Sunday dinner and eat them with golden syrup.
(she also used to save the trimmed bacon rinds during the week and drape them all over the top of the roast potatoes on Sunday - and this was another post-dinner treat)
#18
Old 09-03-2007, 06:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra Indigo
I've had to learn how to make Yorkshire puddings - hubby's from Leeds. The biggest tip I can say is to get your fat as hot as possible. Dripping is good for flavour, but has a tendency to burn at very high temps. I use vegetable oil so I can crank the oven right up to get the oil smoking hot, pour the batter in then turn it down to the requisite baking temperature.
Thanks for the tip. That was probably my problem (mine were flat, and not very airy at all *sighs*)
#19
Old 09-03-2007, 06:28 PM
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The fat needs to be hot, but it's also important for the whole oven to be up at maximum - not just-turned-up, but unquestionably roasting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra Indigo
If you're wanting an even more English-y treat, you need some good pork sausages, a great big wodge of mashed potato and some onion gravy. It's one of the few times hubby will eat sausages, and it's so bad yet it feels so good.
Even more Englishy still...

Roast some good pork sasuages at a medium heat (no more) for half an hour, in a deepish dish. (Add a bit of vegetable oil towards the end if they haven't coated the dish.) (I'm a southerner, and think this beef-dripping thing is bollocks.) When they've started to brown, pour the batter mix all over and bake as above. The resulting sasuages inside yorkshire pudding are called 'toad in the hole', for reasons even Wikipedia does not supply. Serve with gravy.
#20
Old 09-03-2007, 06:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flutterby
It is a sort of bread, crispy on the outside and basically nothing in the middle, it's supposed to have lots of air in it and puff up so you can poke a hole in it and pour the gravy on.
IME, you don't need to POKE any hole in them. The puddings come out of the oven already nicely bowl shaped. The one time I had them that they didn't come out like that, they were heavier, and not at all Yorkshire pudding-y at all.
#21
Old 09-03-2007, 06:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flutterby
Thanks for the tip. That was probably my problem (mine were flat, and not very airy at all *sighs*)
Hubby's only attempt at making Yorkshire puddings was a bit like that - when the fat's not hot enough you end up with the puddings absorbing too much oil, which does stop them from rising.

I'll confess - I use a Yorkshire pudding mix that comes in a packet. I know that the ingredients of Yorkshire puddings are dead simple, but it just makes me feel that bit more confident to make it from the pack. Plus I don't have to measure, and the instructions are right on the back so I've got all the info I need right there. And according to hubby that puts me one-up from his mum, who just buys the frozen Yorkshire puddings and heats them in the oven
#22
Old 09-03-2007, 06:45 PM
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My mom is somewhat of an expert on the Yorkshire pudding (in my opinion, anyway), but like most, uses what may be a variation on the regular recipe.
One variation that has not yet been mentioned is - she uses a dab of butter in each hole in a muffin pan, not beef drippings or vegetable oil. Melt the butter in the pan in the oven first, then add the batter to each hole. So bad for you yet so good.
Also, she's found that doubling the recipe makes for flat puddings - no idea why, maybe it's our location, we're pretty much at sea level.
Finally, room-temperature eggs and milk will help the batter to rise properly (as is called for in the recipe she uses).
#23
Old 09-03-2007, 06:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra Indigo
I'll confess - I use a Yorkshire pudding mix that comes in a packet.
My mother used to make them from scratch, until she used the kind in the packet for some reason or another and realized they came out IDENTICAL, so there wasn't really much point. (Actually, they came out identical to the ones her father made from the same recipe she used....I don't know if they came out identical to how they did when she was making them or not. This revelation came before I was born.)
#24
Old 09-03-2007, 06:49 PM
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No need to measure, I never have. Eggs, one per two people, adjust according to greed. White flour, mix in until it feels stiff when stirring with a spoon. Milk (full cream, no half-and-half nonsense!) stirred in until it coats your finger, i.e. dip it in, and on taking it out there's no part of the finger which doesn't have a translucent covering. Add some salt and you're done.

Tell hubby to tell his mum that you can cook them properly, and see what her reaction is
#25
Old 09-03-2007, 08:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra Indigo
For those considering Yorkies with syrup - Yes. Nigella Lawson serves Yorkshire pudding with maple syrup and cream, though the pudding has been cooked in vegetable oil and not beef dripping so there's no "beefy" taste to it.

I've had to learn how to make Yorkshire puddings - hubby's from Leeds. The biggest tip I can say is to get your fat as hot as possible. Dripping is good for flavour, but has a tendency to burn at very high temps. I use vegetable oil so I can crank the oven right up to get the oil smoking hot, pour the batter in then turn it down to the requisite baking temperature.

I say if you're having a roast beef, pork or lamb, go for it. If you're wanting an even more English-y treat, you need some good pork sausages, a great big wodge of mashed potato and some onion gravy. It's one of the few times hubby will eat sausages, and it's so bad yet it feels so good.

Jesus. I've got today off work - you don't know how tempted I am to hit the supermarket after the rental inspection's over, and grab some fixin's for Yorkies.
Maple syrup? I can only remember her using golden syrup in her cookbooks and shows- and once on Nigella Bites, her having to take the syrup bottle away from Bruno because he had completely drenched his pudding.

(As a sadly pudding-less American, I got the feeling that her use of any syrup at all was pretty much abnormal and one of her many food quirks. But it still looked delicious.)
#26
Old 09-03-2007, 08:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tengu
IME, you don't need to POKE any hole in them. The puddings come out of the oven already nicely bowl shaped. The one time I had them that they didn't come out like that, they were heavier, and not at all Yorkshire pudding-y at all.
Well, it's varied for me. Sometimes you need to poke a hole because the top baked crispy and didn't make a dish shape

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra Indigo
Hubby's only attempt at making Yorkshire puddings was a bit like that - when the fat's not hot enough you end up with the puddings absorbing too much oil, which does stop them from rising.
That's probably what happened then. I thought that at the time actually, but I haven't had the chance to make them since.
#27
Old 09-03-2007, 09:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leiko
Maple syrup? I can only remember her using golden syrup in her cookbooks and shows- and once on Nigella Bites, her having to take the syrup bottle away from Bruno because he had completely drenched his pudding.

(As a sadly pudding-less American, I got the feeling that her use of any syrup at all was pretty much abnormal and one of her many food quirks. But it still looked delicious.)
It could have been golden syrup. Recently on "Nigella Feasts" she's been on a very "make this american friendly" kick, which is where she's used maple syrup in things that would otherwise call for golden. I think that's where I've gotten a bit confused on it.

But still, SYRUP!

Also - dinner tonight is roast lamb (at hubby's insistence), roast potatoes and pumpkin with Yorkshire puddings and gravies. Mmmmm.
#28
Old 09-04-2007, 01:38 AM
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Bollocks to all this. Just nip to the supermarket and buy some "Aunt Bessies" Frozen Yorkshire Pudds".

Saves a lot of pissing about, a few minutes in a hot oven and they're done

Last edited by chowder; 09-04-2007 at 01:38 AM.
#29
Old 09-04-2007, 02:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra Indigo
I'll confess - I use a Yorkshire pudding mix that comes in a packet.
What is the method of preparation? - I ask because some of the batter mixes I've seen (I think they were for pancake batter, although they might have been multi-purpose) say 'just add eggs and milk!' - which is another way of saying 'sucker! - you just bought a very expensive little bag of flour!'
#30
Old 09-04-2007, 02:58 AM
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Am I the only one who chills my batter mix in the fridge before pouring it into the hot fat?
#31
Old 09-04-2007, 04:14 AM
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I don't understand how the term "pudding" in American English has come to mean what it does, if in Britain it's something like a popover. The Spanish cognate "puddin" also has greatly varying meanings in throughout Latin America.
#32
Old 09-04-2007, 04:50 AM
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I don't know the answer to that, but 'flan' is similar - in Britain, a flan is a shallow pie with no top crust - and can be filled with just about anything - fruit, egg custard, or even savoury stuff. Elsewhere, it seems to be what we call Creme Caramel, and nothing else.
#33
Old 09-04-2007, 04:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by One And Only Wanderers
Am I the only one who chills my batter mix in the fridge before pouring it into the hot fat?
Batter should be left to rest for at least half an hour to allow the starch grains to get a proper soaking and expand - otherwise the pudding can come out flat or doughy. You're doing it right.
#34
Old 09-04-2007, 04:55 AM
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Agree that the important point is the heat of the fat. Its a fine line between getting it the right temp (nuking hot) and completely evaporating it.
I always get the fat (dripping) piping hot in the oven and then take out, place over direct heat on the hob, and then as it bubbles in your face (hideous appearance before the fat hits is advisable), pour in the batter.

Seriously though, get it bubbling up before pouring.
#35
Old 09-04-2007, 07:54 AM
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Quote:
It could have been golden syrup. Recently on "Nigella Feasts" she's been on a very "make this american friendly" kick, which is where she's used maple syrup in things that would otherwise call for golden. I think that's where I've gotten a bit confused on it.
Somebody ought to tell her that honey is a better substitute for golden syrup.
#36
Old 09-04-2007, 09:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chowder
Bollocks to all this. Just nip to the supermarket and buy some "Aunt Bessies" Frozen Yorkshire Pudds".

Saves a lot of pissing about, a few minutes in a hot oven and they're done
There speaks a true Lancastrian!

I'm surprised that nobody has put in this link yet!
#37
Old 09-04-2007, 09:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chez Guevara
As a native of Yorkshire, let me say this.

Legend has it that Yorkshire folk of yore would serve the pudding as a first course (with gravy and sugar) in order to fill up the guests who, in consequence, would then require fewer slices of roast beef.

This legend is completely untrue, probably.
My Mum's family's from Lancashire and they ate the pudding as a first course while the meat rested (no sugar, though).

My Mum stopped hoarding the drippings from joints of meat in the late 80s. She still won't eat spinach - too much like nettles, apparently.
#38
Old 09-04-2007, 11:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guizot
I don't understand how the term "pudding" in American English has come to mean what it does, if in Britain it's something like a popover.
That's just one of many meanings in Britain, some savoury, some sweet. Steak & kidney pudding (or pie). Sticky toffee pudding.
#39
Old 09-04-2007, 11:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guizot
I don't understand how the term "pudding" in American English has come to mean what it does, if in Britain it's something like a popover. The Spanish cognate "puddin" also has greatly varying meanings in throughout Latin America.
Yorkshire pudding is like a popover. We have lots of other puddings that are nothing like that. Sponge pudding is different to suet pudding is different to bread-and-butter pudding is different to rice pudding… until you get all the way out to black pudding.

I think pudding originally meant something steamed or boiled in a cloth or skin, and then (as is often the case) in different times and places the word came to encompass a number of other things that were in one way or another similar. What's interesting about the word pudding in Britain is that, instead of changing its meaning as most words do, it seems to have just kept on adding definitions. Possibly one of the hardest-working words in the language.
#40
Old 09-04-2007, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Boulter's Canary
There speaks a true Lancastrian!

I'm surprised that nobody has put in this link yet!
'ecky thump lad, tha's reet tha' knows, Lancashire through and through
#41
Old 09-04-2007, 04:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangetout
What is the method of preparation? - I ask because some of the batter mixes I've seen (I think they were for pancake batter, although they might have been multi-purpose) say 'just add eggs and milk!' - which is another way of saying 'sucker! - you just bought a very expensive little bag of flour!'
Oh yes, that's exactly it. Though for some reason mine asks for egg and water (it's got milk powder in it I think).

I'm fully cognizant of the fact that I've just bought a very expensive box of flour. But I'm a creature of minimum effort, and the box is great in that all of the proportions are just right.

Besides, hubby likes 'em so I'm doing something right

And they were absolutely gorgeous last night!
#42
Old 09-04-2007, 09:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chowder
'ecky thump lad, tha's reet tha' knows, Lancashire through and through
Ahem.
Quote:
Originally Posted by From the rules
The common language of all the moderators of this message board is English. For that reason we ask that all posts on this message board be made in English.

Thanks for all the information. Bread made with meat drippings sounds like the perfect companion for roast beef. I'll probably substitute mashed potatoes for roasted ones because that's the way I was raised. I think I'd serve too just because you can't have too many starches in a meal.

PS. What does the quoted portion mean in 'Mercan?
#43
Old 09-05-2007, 02:30 AM
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Ahem, for the benefit of KRM a translation is:

" I say my good fellow, you are perfectly correct, I was indeed born in Lancashire"

Sithee?
#44
Old 09-05-2007, 07:35 AM
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In addition to the excellent advice in this thread, avoid the temptation to overwork the batter before letting it rest. You don't want too much air in it.

I use olive oil - it gets hot but does not burn at roasting temps.

We love yorkies - I hve to resist the temptation to make then whenever I roast some meat.

Si
#45
Old 09-05-2007, 08:34 AM
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Hey, is a muffin tin an acceptable substitute for a popover pan for Yorkshire Pudding purposes? I know they're not as deep.
#46
Old 09-05-2007, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhyNot
Hey, is a muffin tin an acceptable substitute for a popover pan for Yorkshire Pudding purposes? I know they're not as deep.
I use large muffin tins

Si
#47
Old 09-05-2007, 04:01 PM
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I use "Texas" muffin tins to make my Yorkies. I have made a big Yorkie in a cake tin, but that was a hassle. Muffin tins make Yorkies that are just the right size for 2 or so per person.
#48
Old 09-05-2007, 05:17 PM
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One large one can be made in a glass oven dish, too. Works quite well, actually, because once pre-heated, the dish retains a lot of heat when the batter is added.
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