Thread Tools
Old 03-06-2009, 12:25 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Outtastate
Posts: 4,486
How to clean the grease off a griddle?

I bought Mr. BEG an electric griddle to make his Pancake Sundays a little easier on him. While cleaning it, I noticed a few sticky, greasy areas on the cooking surface that didn't come off with regular (gentle) cleaning in the soapy water. Without ruining the cooking surface, how do I get the sticky left-over grease off the griddle?
Old 03-06-2009, 01:02 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Farmington, MI
Posts: 3,084
You can try the easy-off stuff that is non-toxic, and not in an aerosol can. In my experience, this stuff gets baked on and it just never comes off. Ever. Without abrasives.

I used Barkeeper's friend on one of my nonstick pans to remove similar stuff recently, and it seemed to work (at that point I figured it wasn't very non-sticky anymore, so I couldn't hurt it much more), but I don't know if I have done any serious damage to the surface.
Old 03-06-2009, 01:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 1999
Posts: 5,629
Does the griddle have a lip? If it does I would put water in the griddle and turn it on let the water come to a boil then try and scrape the stuck on stuff off with something like a wooden spoon (so as not to scratch the surface) while the water was boiling.
Old 03-06-2009, 01:14 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Outtastate
Posts: 4,486
Quote:
Originally Posted by gazpacho View Post
Does the griddle have a lip? If it does I would put water in the griddle and turn it on let the water come to a boil then try and scrape the stuck on stuff off with something like a wooden spoon (so as not to scratch the surface) while the water was boiling.
No, it actually has a drainage ditch around the griddle surface and appears to be sloped slightly. Maybe I'll try the wooden spoon with a hot water spritz while the griddle is on if I can't find a less time intensive solution.
Old 03-06-2009, 01:15 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Outtastate
Posts: 4,486
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyjoe View Post
You can try the easy-off stuff that is non-toxic, and not in an aerosol can. In my experience, this stuff gets baked on and it just never comes off. Ever. Without abrasives.
Ooh, good idea! Spray non-toxic oven cleaner. I'll have to get some and give that a shot. Hopefully it doesn't ruin the non-stick surface. Maybe I'll patch test it first.
Old 03-06-2009, 04:14 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Anderson, IN,USA
Posts: 14,593
You could try mechanic's hand cleaner. It's formulated to cut the worst grease, through chemical means. It's like DawnŽ squared.

Sooner or later, though, you have to grab yourself by the front of the shirt, and Face The Truth. Non-stick surfaces work very well for a limited range of jobs. Treated gently, with medium heat, they'll serve you well. However, with the kind of higher heat needed for pancakes or browning meat, you'll not only be disappointed, you could very well be exposed to toxic fumes. If I'm the first one to tell you this, I'm sorry. I remember the letdown when I first learned it.

If you're cooking hot enough to burn the oil, that's too hot for modern non-stick surfaces, and as you now know, non-stick is no longer non-stick. You need to go back half a century, to the best non-stick surface, cast iron. It's not the iron that makes it non-stick, it's the coating of burned-on oils. It's black, it's ugly, and food doesn't stick to it. It's a rude jolt to realize that great-grandma had better non-stick pans than you do.
__________________
"You know what they say about sleeping dogs; you can't trust 'em." --Oliver Faltz
Old 03-06-2009, 04:23 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: KCMO
Posts: 11,149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl View Post
Ooh, good idea! Spray non-toxic oven cleaner.
If by "spray" you're meaning "aerosol spray," you may want to re-read crazyjoe's post, which recommended (bolding & capitalization mine) "the easy-off stuff that is non-toxic, and NOT in an aerosol can."
Old 03-06-2009, 04:43 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Farmington, MI
Posts: 3,084
Bwuh? Pancakes need high heat? In my experience, high heat and pancakes end me up with pancakes that are burned to shit on the outside and still raw on the inside.

Medium to Med-low heat makes pancakes that are nicely browned, and you almost have enough time to eat one before the next one is done

Full Disclosure: I use a gas range, and tend to cook thicker pancakes, not paper-thin ones.

Last edited by crazyjoe; 03-06-2009 at 04:43 PM.
Old 03-06-2009, 09:28 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Outtastate
Posts: 4,486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary T View Post
If by "spray" you're meaning "aerosol spray," you may want to re-read crazyjoe's post, which recommended (bolding & capitalization mine) "the easy-off stuff that is non-toxic, and NOT in an aerosol can."
I can't find it. It's all aerosol from what I can see. But I've used the no-fumes one (on an oven, of course) and it works very well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AskNott
Sooner or later, though, you have to grab yourself by the front of the shirt, and Face The Truth. Non-stick surfaces work very well for a limited range of jobs. Treated gently, with medium heat, they'll serve you well. However, with the kind of higher heat needed for pancakes or browning meat, you'll not only be disappointed, you could very well be exposed to toxic fumes. If I'm the first one to tell you this, I'm sorry. I remember the letdown when I first learned it.
Seriously? Yeah, first I've heard of this. I'm not sure that's going to make me throw away all my pans, frankly. From a quick googling, I can't find any indication that any fumes released from non-stick cookware is a significant health risk, unless you're a canary. I smoked cigarettes for over 20 years and sit in traffic several times a week; I would find it incredible if Pancake Sunday killed me (well, somebody would find it incredible, to be sure).

Quote:
If you're cooking hot enough to burn the oil, that's too hot for modern non-stick surfaces, and as you now know, non-stick is no longer non-stick. You need to go back half a century, to the best non-stick surface, cast iron. It's not the iron that makes it non-stick, it's the coating of burned-on oils. It's black, it's ugly, and food doesn't stick to it. It's a rude jolt to realize that great-grandma had better non-stick pans than you do.
I'm pretty sure Mr. BEG is not burning the oil as his flapjacks taste pretty good. Besides, I think he prefers butter, which, ISTR, burns at an even lower temp than oil. You really don't need a hot griddle to fix pancakes. Incidentally, I got the electric griddle because it has a larger surface on which to prepare multiple regular sized pancakes at once as opposed to the smaller pancakes prepared 3-at-a-time in a pan on the stove. The electric griddle also allows him to make bacon and eggs simultaneously with the pancakes should he so desire. Multi-tasking has never had it so good!

As far as I know all the electric griddles have a non-stick cooking surface. Should I replace his brand-spanking new electric griddle with a cast iron pan, I fear Pancake Sunday would come to an abrupt end. I would rather eat Teflon than risk this. It's a thing of beauty for a daddy to get up early on Sunday to make pancakes for his two best girls, you see. Grandma can keep her cast iron pans; Grandpa probably new better than to mess with the cook anyhow.
Old 03-06-2009, 09:34 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Outtastate
Posts: 4,486
I stand corrected. He used Promise, which is essentially an oil, I guess.
Old 03-06-2009, 10:25 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 1,133
I have a rather large stake in learning this answer-

my roommate and/or myself burned quite a bit of oil over a couple of years, and my walls, cabinets, furniture, ceiling fan, ceiling, and nearly all of my kitchen appliances have this supersticky coating that will not come off with any cleaning stuff I have come across.

The ceiling fan has also grabbed dust, which grew and itself became coated, then slowly spraying this superdirt across the walls... The upper layers come off with some scrubbing, but at this point I have been replacing items.

After using the supertoxic foaming aerosol oven cleaner I have been able to get some of it off of certain things, but that stuff takes off paint...

Any other ideas?
Old 03-06-2009, 10:30 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 1,133
Quote:
Originally Posted by AskNott View Post
-snip-
If you're cooking hot enough to burn the oil, that's too hot for modern non-stick surfaces, and as you now know, non-stick is no longer non-stick. You need to go back half a century, to the best non-stick surface, cast iron. It's not the iron that makes it non-stick, it's the coating of burned-on oils. It's black, it's ugly, and food doesn't stick to it. It's a rude jolt to realize that great-grandma had better non-stick pans than you do.
This disagrees- it's still going on...

Last edited by gurujulp; 03-06-2009 at 10:30 PM.
Old 03-07-2009, 12:05 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Bubbaville
Posts: 4,726
Quote:
Originally Posted by AskNott View Post
You could try mechanic's hand cleaner. It's formulated to cut the worst grease, through chemical means. It's like DawnŽ squared.
Not really. Most are lanolin-based and ultimately work by replacing the dirty grease with something that cleaner and better for your skin. Detergents leave your hands dry and cracked, and they still don't get all of the dirt.

It sounds like the greasy spots might be where the Teflon was a little rough, allowing the oil to stick and polymerize. Unless there's enough gunk to affect the taste of future foods, then I doubt that it will be a problem .
Old 03-07-2009, 01:16 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 934
Try this:

Get yourself a box of baking soda. Put a few handfuls of the baking soda into a bowl, and add just enough water to make a paste. Wet the griddle surface with a little water. Rub that baking soda paste onto the griddle surfacewith your fingers. Gently scrub the griddle surface, with your fingers, not with a rag or sponge. Rinse with warm water. You may be pleased with the results. It worked for me, on my griddle and on my George Foreman Grill. (And, it's cheap and non-toxic!)
Old 03-09-2009, 03:11 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Farmington, MI
Posts: 3,084
This is the stuff I used:

http://amazon.com/Carbona-Clean-...6625745&sr=8-6

I suspect that the fume-free oven cleaner is similar. Dawn also made something for a while that was a gel-based grease dissolver for doing dishes, I think it was the same stuff. It took a LONG time to break down the stuff, though.
Old 03-09-2009, 03:29 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Dutch in the Netherlands
Posts: 8,960
Whatever detergent you plan to use, here's a way of letting the thing soak in it for an extra long time. Especially handy of your sink is only big enough to accomodate half the pan, as most sinks will.

Put the pan + cleaning suds in a plastic garbage bag. Close tightly. Lay on horizontal flat surface, with knot of bag on top, so pan is immersed in water. Let it soak for as long as you think makes sense.
Old 03-10-2009, 07:11 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: calgary, alberta
Posts: 174
cleaning walls

Quote:
Originally Posted by gurujulp View Post
I have a rather large stake in learning this answer-
nearly all of my kitchen appliances have this supersticky coating that will not come off with any cleaning stuff I have come across.
YEP. Go to the hardware store and buy TSP. I get it in a blue milk carton. Very cheap and even better it actually works. I do find it somewhat galling to have to admit to my moma that the stuff she used is still the best. Be sure to wear gloves and I always rinse. It evens cleans that stanky range hood fan!
Old 03-10-2009, 07:29 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Outtastate
Posts: 4,486
I feel I should reply and give you all an update although there's really not a whole lot to update. I did the next best thing and mentioned the problem to husband who said he would give it another shot at getting the stickiness off.

He says he stuck it in really hot water and using soap and the soft side of a sponge managed to get most of it off. I guess he's more persistent than I am.

In any case, I forgot to pick up the Easy Off while I was marketing, but I thought I'd give the baking soda a try after the next Pancake Sunday.

Thanks for all your responses.
Old 03-10-2009, 08:28 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Farmington, MI
Posts: 3,084
Just a warning in case you are not aware, baking soda is fairly abrasive. It could damage the non-stick surface of your griddle.
Old 03-10-2009, 08:48 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Outtastate
Posts: 4,486
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyjoe View Post
Just a warning in case you are not aware, baking soda is fairly abrasive. It could damage the non-stick surface of your griddle.
In that case, maybe I'll just let Mr. BEG clean his own damn griddle. He seems to do a much better job at it than I do. If only he'd clean it on Sunday.
Old 03-11-2009, 03:32 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Western PA
Posts: 3,291
You might want to give Dawn Power Dissolver a try. This stuff is incredibly powerful, but rinses as easily and thoroughly as normal dish detergent if you follow directions.
Old 03-11-2009, 12:08 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Outtastate
Posts: 4,486
Quote:
Originally Posted by tumbleddown View Post
You might want to give Dawn Power Dissolver a try. This stuff is incredibly powerful, but rinses as easily and thoroughly as normal dish detergent if you follow directions.
Oooh, thank you. I think that's a product that is designed precisely for my needs. Does anyone have any objections to this one?

If not, I'll be looking for that. It's usually worth giving a new product of an established company a try. If it doesn't work, I won't be throwing good money after bad.
Old 03-11-2009, 01:00 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Anderson, IN,USA
Posts: 14,593
A couple of you have disagreed with my saying that pancakes need fairly high heat. I don't doubt that pancakes can be cooked at a lower heat, but hotter is the way I learned it. When I was in Junior High School (early 1960s,) both boys and girls were required to take Home Economics and Shop classes.

The lady from the Gas Company who came in to teach us how to make Squirrel Pancakes* (and extol the glory of cooking on a gas stove) showed us how to tell if the pan was hot enough to cook pancakes. If you drip a little water on the surface, she said, and the drops dance on their own steam, it's hot enough. By the way, she used a smooth metal griddle laid across two burners.

*"Squirrel pancakes" means with chopped nuts in them.
Old 03-11-2009, 01:23 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 4,752
Quote:
Originally Posted by AskNott View Post
*"Squirrel pancakes" means with chopped nuts in them.
You could have said this to start with. What the hell am I supposed to do with all these squirrels now?
Old 03-11-2009, 04:47 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Outtastate
Posts: 4,486
Quote:
Originally Posted by AskNott View Post
The lady from the Gas Company who came in to teach us how to make Squirrel Pancakes* (and extol the glory of cooking on a gas stove) showed us how to tell if the pan was hot enough to cook pancakes. If you drip a little water on the surface, she said, and the drops dance on their own steam, it's hot enough. By the way, she used a smooth metal griddle laid across two burners.
Well, of course! She was from the gas company. The higher the heat, the more gas you're using.

Seriously, I learned the water dancing bit as well but it was relative to stir frying which requires a much higher heat than pancakes. Actually, I don't think it was water, but oil. The water dancing was for eggs.

What I know about pancakes is that if the pancake bubbles around the edges it's cooking properly, but if it's bubbling in the center soon after you pour the pancake on the griddle, the heat is too high and the outside will darken before the inside has a chance to cook, making for a soggy pancake and spottiness on the skin of the pancake as opposed to a cakey pancake with uniform skin color.
Old 03-11-2009, 05:31 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Somers Point, NJ
Posts: 5,797
Here's what works well for me:

As soon as your done cooking, pour off the excess oil into a cup for cooking again later...or brewing up some biodiesel or whatever...and immediately pour some dish detergent on the hot pan (I use Joy or Palmolive, but any liquid soap will work). The soap will immediately boil/foam up, and you add some tap water to continue the scouring action of boiling soapy water. Swish the boiling foam around the entire pan until the pan cools enough to cease boiling/foaming. Let sit to loosen up hard baked-on deposits. Wipe up with a pot scrubbie and rinse.
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:37 PM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: italian mistress famous xylophone songs ancient persian beard mlb.tv condensed games ugly casting overdose lsd frigid woman definition deep cuts hydroxyquinoline sulfate uti forums clay skateboard wheels does alcohol disinfect error pining uti forums delayed pain response drano down toilet nicknames for minivans lobster crusher claw sex with ape 4 track tape rear coil spring bake on paint baked shark renting vending machines chipndale strippers flower company names christian theocracies 60 interstate corian countertops polishing next saturday date dumb as a why do cats like being patted on the bum melt plastic in oven does best buy install car stereos for free why are outlets installed upside down no federal income tax withheld on w2 dos santos coffee liqueur what does wedo mean in spanish 2 broke girls sucks why do cats sit in a loaf shipping off to boston song angel and devil cartoon will lowes cut wood to size can you return open items to amazon foods that start with the letter q rid x septic tank treatment reviews why is europe a continent quit smoking tired all the time picking up trash community service ben franklin variety store expression soup to nuts how to tell if a bathtub is fiberglass or acrylic price of viagra at walmart what sickness did jenny from forrest gump have are all eye exam charts the same is there an e sharp glen and les charles how to identify an unknown substance chemistry how many miles do you run in a basketball game why don't i have wisdom teeth cinderella step sisters names poisonous snakes new hampshire miss world vs miss universe difference