Thread Tools
Old 05-31-2009, 07:21 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 926
Why don't Floridian have an accent?

OK, I've only known 3 native Floridians, but based on news I've seen from there, it seems most Floridians don't seem to have a discernable accent (if that's the correct term). To me, they sound like Californians. Yet, the rest of South, be it Texans or Georgians, I can pick up that they're from the South. So, why not Florida?
Old 05-31-2009, 07:57 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 27,077
In the panhandle, they tend to have strong Southern accents.
Old 05-31-2009, 08:04 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Southeast Florida USA
Posts: 20,930
What sort of Floridian? A native from the rural areas sounds very distinctive. It's classic american Southern, only moreso.

If by "native" you means somebody whose parents noved to Florida from out of state shortly before or after their birth and who grew up in one of the big suburban areaa with all the other transplants, well it's not too surprising they sound like they're from nowhere particular.
Old 05-31-2009, 08:57 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Missoula, Montana, USA
Posts: 19,865
Everyone has an accent. You're asking why they don't have a specific accent, or an accent from a specific family, and that's because people from southern Florida (that is, below the panhandle) are culturally distinct from the Deep South. They aren't "away down south in Dixie", they're "away down south of Dixie."

This is due to southern Florida's history as a tourist magnet. Everyone from Cubans to old New Yorkers has moved there and displaced the kind of accents you might expect a region that close to Jawjuh to have.
__________________
"Ridicule is the only weapon that can be used against unintelligible propositions. Ideas must be distinct before reason can act upon them."
If you don't stop to analyze the snot spray, you are missing that which is best in life. - Miller
I'm not sure why this is, but I actually find this idea grosser than cannibalism. - Excalibre, after reading one of my surefire million-seller business plans.
Old 05-31-2009, 09:52 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Orlando(ish)
Posts: 21,305
I was born in Florida, grew up in Florida, live in Florida. I do not have a typical "southern drawl." I will use "ya'll" on occasion.

Florida is not really part of the Deep South, despite their being part of the Confederacy. We're more of a melting pot.
Old 05-31-2009, 01:00 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Pinellobamas Park, FL
Posts: 2,488
Also, we do NOT sound like Californians.
Old 05-31-2009, 01:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: perfidious albion
Posts: 6,422
I'm English and I can totally assure you that my speech is totally without accent .
Unlike everyone else.
Old 05-31-2009, 07:59 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 894
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivylass View Post
I was born in Florida, grew up in Florida, live in Florida. I do not have a typical "southern drawl." I will use "ya'll" on occasion.
Same here, I think I sound pretty close to the standard television news anchor accent (what i consider not accented.)
Central Floridians tend to not have much of an accent, but there are plenty parts of Florida that sound much more Southern. Generally the farther away from a big city the more of an accent there will be.
Of course there are plenty of hispanic accents, haitian accents, etc. as well.
Old 05-31-2009, 08:17 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 114
The further south you go in Florida, the further north you get...
Old 05-31-2009, 08:34 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 9,335
When I lived in Orlando, it seemed like the accents of white residents were strongly linked to class and occupation. Working-class and lower-middle class whites, and middle-class whites in blue-collar fields (usually construction and the trades) usually spoke in a Georgia-like southern drawl, while white-collar middle-class and upper-income whites tended to speak with a generic "Midwestern" accent.

In some parts of town -- the inner eastern, northern and southern suburbs -- Southern/Georgia accents were uncommon. In other areas -- Apopka, Ocoee, Winter Garden, Clermont, Sanford and trailer park colonies like Bithlo -- Southern/Georgia accents were far more common.
Old 05-31-2009, 09:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Florida
Posts: 67,189
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmwood View Post
In some parts of town -- the inner eastern, northern and southern suburbs -- Southern/Georgia accents were uncommon. In other areas -- Apopka, Ocoee, Winter Garden, Clermont, Sanford and trailer park colonies like Bithlo -- Southern/Georgia accents were far more common.
Sanford doesn't really fit into your list, because half of it (Heathrow and the insurance district) is very well-to-do and not-accented.

It's really not that complicated, though; as people said above, we've got lots of newish residents, who tend to sound like people do wherever they came from.... except in the Panhandle, which is unpleasant and doesn't attract new residents.
Old 05-31-2009, 10:16 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 1,206
Along the lines of what Derleth said...

North Florida was settled by Southerners.
South Florida was settled by Northerners.
It's that simple.
Old 06-01-2009, 12:01 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Pinellobamas Park, FL
Posts: 2,488
I've made and previously referenced a handy map of the cultures of Florida. We can argue around the borders, but IMO it's pretty close.
Old 06-01-2009, 09:40 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 24,534
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellis Aponte Jr. View Post
Along the lines of what Derleth said...

North Florida was settled by Southerners.
South Florida was settled by Northerners.
It's that simple.
Yeah, but if you get far enough to the south it flips again. Loog at dem peligans fly!
Old 06-01-2009, 10:01 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Southern ontario
Posts: 6,570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bambi Hassenpfeffer View Post
I've made and previously referenced a handy map of the cultures of Florida. We can argue around the borders, but IMO it's pretty close.
I googled 'Cracker Country', but only found a reference to a museum, which didn't explain much about why it has so many counties marked black on the map. Explanation pleasey?
Old 06-01-2009, 10:07 AM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Seminole, FL
Posts: 8,511
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellis Aponte Jr. View Post
Along the lines of what Derleth said...

North Florida was settled by Southerners.
South Florida was settled by Northerners.
It's that simple.
Not that simple any more: You've got to make space for Cuba Del Norte. And you have to make space for French-Canadians, although only because its against the law to keep 'em out.
Old 06-01-2009, 10:12 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Florida
Posts: 67,189
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisk View Post
I googled 'Cracker Country', but only found a reference to a museum, which didn't explain much about why it has so many counties marked black on the map. Explanation pleasey?
It's the bit that's full of crackers.
Old 06-01-2009, 10:23 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Pinellobamas Park, FL
Posts: 2,488
Except it's not derogatory when you mean Florida Cracker.

Last edited by Bambi Hassenpfeffer; 06-01-2009 at 10:23 AM.
Old 06-01-2009, 10:29 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 10,545
Like others have said, Florida is a huge melting pot of people from everywhere. You may find a handful of second genereation Floridians if you look and even less third generation. Major cities like Orlando, Tampa, Miami got huge not because the locals had more kids but because people moved in from elsewhere.
When I lived and worked throughout the state in the late 90s I hired a lot of "kids" (17-20 year-olds) who were born and raised there but anyone in their mid 20s and older came from somewhere else.
Old 06-01-2009, 10:34 AM
Registered User
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,068
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bambi Hassenpfeffer View Post
Also, we do NOT sound like Californians.
Prepare to be horrified, then, because I can't distinguish between you and Canadians!
Old 06-01-2009, 01:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Schlaraffenland
Posts: 20,611
Quote:
Originally Posted by Candyman74 View Post
Prepare to be horrified, then, because I can't distinguish between you and Canadians!
Ask them both to say "Out and about". Then you'll be able to tell.

Some Floridians do have southern accents, but many do not have an accent or if it is there it is much more subtle.
Old 06-01-2009, 01:24 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 9,335
Always thought this map was more accurate.
Old 06-01-2009, 01:27 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,039
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bambi Hassenpfeffer View Post
Except it's not derogatory when you mean Florida Cracker.
I'm still a little confused, how do they differ from the Northern/Southern areas marked in the map? Dialect? Economics? Politics?
Old 06-01-2009, 01:42 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: La Rive Ouest
Posts: 9,307
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShibbOleth View Post
Ask them both to say "Out and about". Then you'll be able to tell.

Some Floridians do have southern accents, but many do not have an accent or if it is there it is much more subtle.
Strictly, all humans speak their language with an accent. How "thick" the accent is will depend largely upon the perception of the listener.

For instance, your textbook "unaccented" Floridian will sound very much "accented" on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, or in a working-class pub in Bimingham, England.
Old 06-01-2009, 02:12 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 1,129
Yep, I'm a third generation Floridia Cracker, born and raised in Tallahassee, and my accent is pretty much purely deep south. Y'all and reckon and yes, ma'am. But once you drop below Gainesville, you tend to head north again.
Old 06-01-2009, 02:57 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Puerto Rico
Posts: 6,786
As an interesting aside, Spanish speakers who have lived in Florida for a reasonable length of time tend to lose their native accents too. I had friends from all possible nationalities and they all spoke what we called "Florida Spanish". It is a more or less neutral but still distinctive accent that sounds like none of the major contributors (Cuban, Mexican, Rican, Venezuela, Colombian).

For English, I guess the fact that most cities in South Florida have a heavy influx of people from other regions contributes to mix up the accents to the point where you can no longer spot any of the contributing accents.
Old 06-01-2009, 05:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Florida
Posts: 67,189
Quote:
Originally Posted by filling_pages View Post
Yep, I'm a third generation Floridia Cracker, born and raised in Tallahassee, and my accent is pretty much purely deep south. Y'all and reckon and yes, ma'am. But once you drop below Gainesville, you tend to head north again.
Indeed, in Gainesville itself you can find both crackers (everything west of the Turnpike) and "regular people" (everything east of the Turnpike - mostly around the university).
Old 06-01-2009, 07:27 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Beffnal Green innit
Posts: 8,091
I have a friend who lives in Gainesville but is originally from a bit further South, and she and her entirely family have a very distinctive Southern accent that even I, a Brit, can differentiate from Texan or Mississipi (though it does sound rather like the accents in Georgia). They were proud Crackers, though - her Dad was a real cowboy! Her cousins still ran a ranch, and not the rich Dallas-type one either! (I was thrilled - it was like walking into a movie). So some Floridians definitely have Florida accents. That is, of course, only one family, but it was a very big one.
Old 06-01-2009, 07:37 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 16,587
Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright View Post
It's really not that complicated, though; as people said above, we've got lots of newish residents, who tend to sound like people do wherever they came from.... except in the Panhandle, which is unpleasant and doesn't attract new residents.

Sshhhhhh...we are trying to keep it a secret up here!
Old 06-01-2009, 10:28 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 894
Quote:
Originally Posted by bordelond View Post
Strictly, all humans speak their language with an accent. How "thick" the accent is will depend largely upon the perception of the listener.
Yeah, we know, but there's no real word I can think of to describe what many in the US would consider unaccented. Basically, the standard news anchor accent. Unless you can think of a word?
Peter Jennings for instance.
Old 06-01-2009, 11:15 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Beffnal Green innit
Posts: 8,091
Quote:
Originally Posted by PetW View Post
Yeah, we know, but there's no real word I can think of to describe what many in the US would consider unaccented. Basically, the standard news anchor accent. Unless you can think of a word?
Peter Jennings for instance.
Midland or Midwestern.
Old 06-02-2009, 01:55 AM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 1,206
Peter Jennings was Canadian. No wonder people are confused.
Old 06-02-2009, 02:12 AM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: N. Hollywood, California
Posts: 3,996
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
In the panhandle, they tend to have strong Southern accents.
Yep, I, as a Californian, noticed that when I went to what I think was called Destin, Florida.
Old 06-02-2009, 12:40 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 894
Quote:
Originally Posted by scifisam2009 View Post
I had no idea, thanks!
Old 06-02-2009, 12:57 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 3,712
Quote:
Originally Posted by PetW View Post
I had no idea, thanks!
It would be more accurate, if perhaps less descriptive, to call it General American. Although it originates in a swath of the Midwest, the Northern Cities Vowel Shift (as in Detroit or Chicago) as well as the noted features of Minnesotan speech militate against using "Midwestern" as a description.

Moreover, "Midland" is now divided into two dialects: northern Midland and southern Midland. Although there appears to be some overlap between the region where General American is thought to have originated and the northern Midland region, when one wishes to identify the dialect that American English speakers would not mark as featuring an accent, "General American" is the term most linguists would use.
Old 04-16-2013, 01:12 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 1
Well, not necessarily. I was raised in Florida since I was three years old, before that I lived in Cuba. I think, no I know, that we have a certain...slur, I guess you could say, to our words. When we speak, and as we're talking to someone else we don't hear it, but if I record myself talking I hear the certain drunken slurring of all my words. I guess it's just a Miami thing, but I sear this is how we sound here in Miami. anyways... I've never heard a southern sounding Floridian, and I've been to like every city in Florida and I drove to Tennessee with my family once so I know how the Northern/Southern Georgia & North/South Carolina accents sound, I've never heard a Floridian that sounds anything like that. But I guess it's cause I live here and I think I'm just used to it...
Old 04-16-2013, 03:12 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: England
Posts: 56,808
nm

Last edited by Mangetout; 04-16-2013 at 03:13 AM.
Old 04-16-2013, 05:00 AM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 725
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lust4Life View Post
I'm English and I can totally assure you that my speech is totally without accent .
Unlike everyone else.
Specifically which English accent don't you have?
Old 04-16-2013, 09:02 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 2,713
My cousins are from Jacksonville. They have an obvious accent as does my aunt.
Old 04-16-2013, 09:08 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Florida
Posts: 67,189
Quote:
Originally Posted by _claudia_4189 View Post
Well, not necessarily. I was raised in Florida since I was three years old, before that I lived in Cuba. I think, no I know, that we have a certain...slur, I guess you could say, to our words. When we speak, and as we're talking to someone else we don't hear it, but if I record myself talking I hear the certain drunken slurring of all my words. I guess it's just a Miami thing, but I sear this is how we sound here in Miami. anyways... I've never heard a southern sounding Floridian, and I've been to like every city in Florida and I drove to Tennessee with my family once so I know how the Northern/Southern Georgia & North/South Carolina accents sound, I've never heard a Floridian that sounds anything like that. But I guess it's cause I live here and I think I'm just used to it...
You've been to Jacksonville and never heard anyone who sounds like they're from Georgia? Try Clay County.
Old 04-16-2013, 09:27 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 278
I went to high school in Orlando in the late fifties, and the native Floridians definitely had a particular southern accent, a little bit like a Georgian accent, but distinctive in its own way and very pleasing to hear...at least I thought so.

Orlando was a dinky little town back then. Not like today at all. There were a few kids like me who came from out of state, but most were native Floridians.

Never hear that accent when visiting Orlando today. I do miss it.
Old 04-16-2013, 01:21 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Orlando!
Posts: 2,929
Born in Stuart, FL (about 2 hours north of Miami) and lived in FL my entire life. I do not have any accent relative to general american speach. My father is from Detroit and my mother from Stuart (I think) and the only thing between them that sounds weird is my mother's pronounciation of the word "water" as "war-ter".
Old 04-16-2013, 01:23 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 319
Quote:
It would be more accurate, if perhaps less descriptive, to call it General American.
And often colloquially referred to as "Newscaster Voice."

I grew up in Tampa and traveled all over the US East coast. There's a fascinating variety of dialects, especially when you wander into Louisiana.

The panhandle is very rural, like "Deep South" rural. Central Florida is rather metro. South Florida is not guaranteed to speak English... heh.
Old 04-16-2013, 04:15 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Tacoma, WA; USA
Posts: 1,343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lust4Life View Post
I'm English and I can totally assure you that my speech is totally without accent .
Unlike everyone else.
Of course you do. EVERYBODY has an accent, even folks who use speech synthesizers (like Stephen Hawking). Language changes in different ways at different locations. Travel to an area where the langugage changed differently from where you live and your accent becomes apparent. Heck, even different generations growing up in the same area will have different accents.

I know you're you're just joking, but it's an old/bad joke and encourages misunderstanding of what an accent really is.
Old 04-16-2013, 06:04 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 36,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bambi Hassenpfeffer View Post
I've made and previously referenced a handy map of the cultures of Florida. We can argue around the borders, but IMO it's pretty close.
You forgot to make Key West fluorescent pink.
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:26 AM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: illegal boxing moves dragon skin vests french butler fridge refrigerator d guys camping trip agent koutris wednesday song title goat cheese flavor masturbating while drunk homicidal thoughts weird al ricky meaning of disembowelment home depot 2x6x16 rifleman's rifle sharpie on metal store bought mushrooms amazon cannibals lars guinard jello and pudding magic gathering deckmaster gallbladder ultrasound fasting mst3k quotes voting is useless freud scientific change gif speed loitering illegal che guevara pronounce autobiographies titles initials in spanish lucifers hammer movie andrea gail location learnings synonym steep highway grades a government that can give you everything no return address on letter how to put a permanent crease in pants myspace music won't play when is the best time to take protonix tonic water mixed drinks george montgomery and dinah shore home depot lumber cutting service sirius outlaw country playlist what gives you diarrhea fast nfl playoff pool rules sabot round hitting tank when in danger or in doubt how long does it take food to leave stomach cat claw covers do they work what does aw snap mean fuck her gently video how to fix cracked radiator why do bananas split open how to crack si joint puff the magic dragon tattoo john bevan people who are too nice are annoying ultra mega chicken he is legend how to knock someone out safely old el paso mexican rice recipe chewing on a piece of grass 2004 mazda 3 aux cord where do split peas come from can a bad alternator ruin a battery how to make 14k gold lorne armstrong to catch a predator why did executioners wear masks why was y2k a big deal what kind of doctor performs vasectomies