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Old 06-10-2010, 08:26 AM
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Why no extension cords?

I've just purchased a second 9000 BTU portable air conditioner for my home. This is the sort on wheels that vents out a window by means of an exhaust hose.

Unfortunately the electrical outlet and window are no where near one another. There are dire warnings in the manual and on the plug itself that state the unit cannot be used with an extension cord. I would buy the highest grade interior extension cord to use - but the warning that using an extension could result in death, fire, or severe shock is a little unnerving, frankly.

I plan on only having the unit plugged in and operating when I'm at home - I don't plan on cooling space that I'm not using.

Of course there is always the option to call an electrician and have a proper wall outlet installed near the window - but that's a lot more expensive than an extension cord.

Are the warnings simply the manufacturer's due diligence, or is there a legitimate concern about using an extension cord?
Old 06-10-2010, 08:30 AM
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You must seek out one made for that special purpose and load. Search for air conditioner extension cord. they do get warm. They are not very long either. Don't expect to find a 15 foot long one.

Last edited by Harmonious Discord; 06-10-2010 at 08:31 AM.
Old 06-10-2010, 08:31 AM
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WAG - the air con unit draws a lot of current, and they want to cover against people using extension cords that come on a reel. If you use those with high-current appliances without unwinding the reel fully, the cable can overheat.

I don't see that there would be any problem with a straightforward extension lead, as long as it was rated to handle the current and was fitted with an appropriate fuse.

Edited to add: the important part of course is the current rating - an air-con unit can draw a lot of current. There should be a label on the unit stating what the power requirement is (in watts). You can then work out what current it will draw.

Last edited by Colophon; 06-10-2010 at 08:36 AM.
Old 06-10-2010, 08:31 AM
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I'm sure electricians will chime in shortly, but personally, I think the concern is about the capacity of the wire. If you get a heavy duty extension cord I think it will be fine.
Old 06-10-2010, 08:37 AM
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I think it'd mostly due diligence. Some people think an extension cord is an extension cord is an extension cord, and would probably have no problem plugging in a 20 ft, 3 prong lamp cord in as an extension cord, and next thing you know, the cord's melted and your house is on fire.

Like Harmonious said, get the highest guage commercial AC cord you can find. Plug it in and run it for an hour or so, and check to see if the cord's getting hot.
Old 06-10-2010, 08:43 AM
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You can't just buy one that says "heavy duty" because there is no formal definition for exactly what "heavy duty" is. Look for one that is rated at 15 amps or is made out of 14 gauge wire.

Make sure it makes a nice solid connection at the air conditioner and also where it plugs into the wall. A loose connection in either place could result in a fire. Also make sure that nothing is near the wall outlet that might push the plug loose (like a piece of furniture).

ETA: By the way, just to be clear, the WAGs above are correct. The main concern is that you'll overload the extension cord and cause it to heat up. If you use too small of a rated extension cord then it gets hot, the plastic melts, the wires touch, and bad things happen.

Last edited by engineer_comp_geek; 06-10-2010 at 08:45 AM.
Old 06-10-2010, 08:53 AM
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Also, many people will not just use "an extension cord plugged into the wall, with the A/C unit plugged into the cord". I've seen pileups of as many as four 1-plug-becomes-3 gizmos, with plug bars then plugged into any of the reachable plugs in that mess. "Don't use extension cords" is clearer and therefore a better defense in a trial than "use only with extension cords rated XYZ Amp or above", much less explanations on the danger of playing "who can plug more things into a single outlet?"
Old 06-10-2010, 08:57 AM
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I should unplug my portable air con...
I have it plugged into a surge protector which is plugged into another surge protector....
Old 06-10-2010, 08:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by engineer_comp_geek View Post
You can't just buy one that says "heavy duty" because there is no formal definition for exactly what "heavy duty" is. Look for one that is rated at 15 amps or is made out of 14 gauge wire.
I'd go with a 12 gauge, 20 Amp cord, especially if it's going to be a longer run.
Old 06-10-2010, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Shark Sandwich View Post
I think it'd mostly due diligence. Some people think an extension cord is an extension cord is an extension cord, and would probably have no problem plugging in a 20 ft, 3 prong lamp cord in as an extension cord, and next thing you know, the cord's melted and your house is on fire.
A 3-prong cord? Hell, most people I know would buy one of those grey ground plug adapters*, and then plug the AC into one of those teeny, tiny white or brown extension cords that have only two prongs, and for some reason never let you actually plug a plug into them all the way...you know the cords I mean.

*I feel a need to point out that I have neer seen one of those used the proper way. Most people use them as a way to "get rid of" the ground plug so they can plug a 3-prong plug into only a 2-prong outlet, but never take that little ab and screw it into the screw on the outlet faceplate like they shuld...of course, that assumes that it's a metal outlet box that itself is grounded, which IME isn't very likely, either.
Old 06-10-2010, 09:22 AM
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get as short an extension cord as needed, you can find them in 3, 6 or 9 feet.

get an extension cord with number 12 wire (and a ground).

if the receptacle in the wall doesn't take the plug solidly without wiggle then it should be replaced.
Old 06-10-2010, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Heckity View Post
Of course there is always the option to call an electrician and have a proper wall outlet installed near the window - but that's a lot more expensive than an extension cord.
Or have an electrician replace the short cord on the AC with a longer one of the right type.
Old 06-10-2010, 09:46 AM
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It is not just an issue with the cord failing. Extension cords on motor-based devices (and an AC is very definitely one of those) impair the smooth running of the motor. From here:

"Do not operate the unit on an extension cord! The compressor draws a lot of current and can be damaged if insufficient voltage is continually supplied. If you must use one, use only those designed for air conditioners (usually flat) AND only as long as required. NEVER use a lawn mower extension cord."

There is a lot weird stuff that involves motors, phase shifts and voltage drops that's involved. Especially during startup when the load is worse.

It's one thing to fry an extension cord. It's another thing to fry the AC unit.
Old 06-10-2010, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by kferr View Post
Or have an electrician replace the short cord on the AC with a longer one of the right type.
This here gets my vote. Real power tool, heavy gauge extension cords are expensive and it would probably cost about the same. Less connections, less potential for problems.
Old 06-10-2010, 11:15 AM
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You can certainly find even 10 gauge cords, I have a couple I use for compressors. A little extra copper never hurt anyone.

Re-wiring it with a new cord is probably pretty simple, internal connection is quite likely a stress relief and murettes. You can get bulk cable at a hardware store, just use a nice heavy gauge, house supply is done with 8 gauge so that should be plenty. I had to run a 50 ft extension for a construction heater. Talked to my electrician, and made it myself. Fifty feet of 8/4 exterior cable (240v appliance), male and female ends and a couple 240 junctions ran me about $270.
Old 06-10-2010, 11:26 AM
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Threads like this are one of the reasons that not being able to have medical and legal advice threads here are such crap - we can give her advice on how to burn her house down, but not what that mole is. Get an electrician to do a proper job, either on the cord on installing an outlet - you don't burn your $150,000 house down over a $80 electrician charge.
Old 06-10-2010, 11:46 AM
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need to have a country perspective

20A for an air conditioner would be 12AWG.

current standards in the USA would be to have an air conditioner as the only load on a 20A circuit.

flat cord as an extension cord or a replacement cord would be best.

a person could make an extension cord or put in a replacement cord though this has to be done with good electrical practice. replacement cord would likely be done with terminals on a terminal strip in the USA, you would also need the replacement cord fit in the hole provided and have adequate strain relief (this might be custom work to duplicate the factory cord situation).
Old 06-10-2010, 12:19 PM
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I run into this situation all the time in IT.

Forget the extension cords and the possibility of causing a fire. Instead, get yourself a proper power bar with a longer than normal cord. I've picked them up with 9 and 12 foot lengths. Spend some $$ on it, don't go for a cheap one. Don't get one at a dollar either.
Old 06-10-2010, 12:58 PM
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I see two things to worry about, amps and volts.

The longer the cord run, the bigger the voltage drop is going to be, so use the shortest path possible. So you wouldn't want to use a 100' lawn mower extension cord on a spool or something.

The bigger issue is amps. Too many amps through too small of a wire will cause heating and potentially fire. There is really not that much difference between 14awg Romex and 14awg extension cord. You mentioned running romex behind the wall to create a new outlet that the AC would then plug into. Running a similarly sized extension cord is basically the same thing. The ends are not as secure, so special attention would need to be paid to the connection. And you wouldn't want to wind up the cord, or run it under rugs, or run it through an adapter of any sort etc.

However, I am not an electrician, and I advise you follow the proper precautions set forth my the manufacturer and the building codes where you live.
Old 06-10-2010, 01:02 PM
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The nature of what you put on that extension is also a concern - I have seen people using extension cords here in the UK to power high-current devices simultaneously - increasing the current drawn through the extension cord to dangerous levels.

If you do extend it (and I seriously advise talking to an electrician if you are at all unsure about any steps or a safe setup) then never connect anything else to that cord. To make doubly sure no one else does either, if the extension has more than one socket cover the other ones over securely with duct tape or fill them with epoxy.

My personal preference for an AC unit in the states would be to have a dedicated circuit put in by an electrician that goes back to the breaker with decent plugs. US-style outlets and plugs scare the crap out of me and I would not trust a semi-permanent fixture drawing that much load based on the domestic outlets I have seen. I grew up with UK outlets though - the nuclear option as far as outlet design goes.
Old 06-10-2010, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Finagle View Post
I'd go with a 12 gauge, 20 Amp cord, especially if it's going to be a longer run.
This.

considering the wall socket is nothing but a 12-3 extension cord from the fuse box. You want to make sure the wall socket is is good shape. by that I mean plugs should insert firmly and not loosely and is rated for the air conditioner. If it's a 20 amp air conditioner it should be a 20 amp socket with the appropriate wire behind it.

Last edited by Magiver; 06-10-2010 at 01:12 PM.
Old 06-10-2010, 01:12 PM
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"Forget the extension cords and the possibility of causing a fire. Instead, get yourself a proper power bar with a longer than normal cord. I've picked them up with 9 and 12 foot lengths."

To me, this seems like very bad advice in light of what has been posted here above.

While it is noted "Forget the extension cords and the possibility of causing a fire.", it seems to me that a power bar with an extra long cord pretty much is simply an extension cord.
Old 06-10-2010, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by johnpost View Post
get an extension cord with number 12 wire (and a ground).
That's maybe a bit of overkill. This thing is going to draw maybe 6 or 7 amps, tops. 14 gauge wire will handle it.

That said, this is one of those cases where bigger is better, and there is certainly nothing wrong with using 12 gauge wire.
Old 06-10-2010, 01:18 PM
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No it's actually very sound advice.

A "proper" power bar that will run you about 20-30$ will offer more than enough protection.

These are deisnged to handle the voltage and amperage that an AC unit will draw.

Again, a brand name, rated power bar, not some POS from a dollar store.
Old 06-10-2010, 01:23 PM
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Voltage drop is a function of the total length of the circuit (from branch circuit breaker all the way out to A/C motor) and gauge (assuming no other loads). If whatever cord is plugged into the wall outlet is at least the gauge of the house's own wiring for that circuit, there's not going to be much voltage drop difference between (a) using an extension cord, (b) making a new long cord for the unit, and (c) extending the existing circuit further through the wall and connecting the unit's standard cord. The total path of the current is about the same each way.

Still, by code, extension cords are never for "permanent use." Even with the right gauge, minimal length, and the maintenance of grounding means (third prong/third conductor) all the way through, you'll still have an additional failure point, plus the cord's vulnerability to physical damage. (Houses have burned because of cords that were nicked or crushed by furniture, for example.)

Of course, if the cord isn't of at-least-equal rating to the house circuit, or if there are any other loads on the circuit, or grounding isn't maintained, the equation gets much worse.

Really, the best way to run an air conditioner is on a dedicated circuit--supplying only that one outlet location by the shortest path from the circuit breaker. If you have an electrician make this installation, you avoid all the above problems, and also keep your existing circuit free for anything else.

(If you were concerned about plugs like JoeH2O, you could have this done with a twist-lock receptacle and plug on the unit cord, but U.S.-style specification-grade devices are just fine, properly installed.)
Old 06-10-2010, 01:26 PM
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All that is moot, however, if your wall wiring is shoddy. I would get that checked, especially the connections to the outlet itself before putting 10 amps through it regularly.

For the cost of an electrician and materials, a dedicated outlet and circuit for it is the safest option in my opinion.
Old 06-10-2010, 01:36 PM
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If you do go with an extension cord, remember to observe fire safety and not cover it with a carpet. Carpet backing is abrasive and repeated traffic can wear through your cord's insulation.

This message brought to you by Chefguy, former electrician whose idiot child set fire to his bedroom.
Old 06-10-2010, 01:37 PM
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You guys are getting a little carried away, IMHO. I personally wouldn't rewire my house for a lousy portable air conditioner. The OP isn't putting in some massive new AC unit that needs some sort of dedicated circuit. It's one of those little floor standing jobs with the vent tube. It's designed to just be plugged into the wall using a normal 15 amp outlet.
Old 06-10-2010, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by engineer_comp_geek View Post
You guys are getting a little carried away, IMHO. I personally wouldn't rewire my house for a lousy portable air conditioner. The OP isn't putting in some massive new AC unit that needs some sort of dedicated circuit. It's one of those little floor standing jobs with the vent tube. It's designed to just be plugged into the wall using a normal 15 amp outlet.
Indeed, however there's no outlet by the window, so he needs to either put one in (so might as well go for the safe option and have a dedicated circuit put in) or an extension. The only way to really do it safely that way is to ensure it is the only thing on that extension and that the connections are solid.

In general, high-load devices in semi-permanent installation on the end of extension cords are a recipe for house fires unless you are careful.
Old 06-10-2010, 01:59 PM
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Get a longer exhaust duct or extend it.
No A/C or power hassles there, and it will probably be less expensive.

I agree with most of the power suggestions here, but there is more than one way to skin the proverbial feline!

later, Tom.
Old 06-10-2010, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Shark Sandwich View Post
I think it'd mostly due diligence. Some people think an extension cord is an extension cord is an extension cord.
I think it's most people, actually.
Old 06-10-2010, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by panman_1960 View Post
Get a longer exhaust duct or extend it.
No A/C or power hassles there, and it will probably be less expensive.

I agree with most of the power suggestions here, but there is more than one way to skin the proverbial feline!

later, Tom.
Depends. What does the manual say about the exhaust duct? If the unit can't draught far enough you may also damage the unit.
As other have stated, extension cords are only to be used temporarily. They are made of copper wire strand as opposed to the solid 14 gauge wire like your household wiring and their connection points are weak. As a result they are prone to excessive heat and line loss over distance. Appliances such as AC units which draw high peak startup currents can cause these cords to fail or ignite.
Their flexibility, their multipurpose, and overuse also contribute to damaging the life of the cord.
That said, if you plan on unplugging it when you're not home and only running the AC seasonally or sporadically, you could get away with a longer cord or extension rated for the unit.
The warning is also a disclaimer for the manufacturer in case some dimwit were to a cheap lamp wire cord and burn his house down.
Old 06-10-2010, 06:22 PM
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Re-wiring it with a new cord is probably pretty simple, internal connection is quite likely a stress relief and murettes.
The US has required window A/C units to be fitted with a GFCI device at the plug for some years now. So you can't just replace the cord with a longer one.

The main issue with extension cords (in general) is that most of the US allows cord sets to have a much lower current rating than the outlet can supply. The only sort-of exception that I know of is New York City, which does not allow "T-prong" 20A receptacles, so cords that don't have the special 20A plug can't be plugged into a 20A outlet. I believe Canada is the same (though it is out of my area of practice). I wouldn't be surprised if Chicago does the same - they have a pretty stringent code out there.

In an attempt to cut down on fraudulently labeled cord sets, UL started requiring ones made in Asia to carry a holographic UL label. Unfortunately, cord sets w/ counterfeit holographic labels showed up in the US before the genuine labels made it to China.

The point of the previous paragraph is that you can't always depend on what the cord label says. Also, just because the wire itself has a particular rating, other components may not. This is particularly true with outlet strips / surge protectors / etc.
Old 06-10-2010, 07:02 PM
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Assuming your house is properly wired in the first place (and if you don't know, why are you living there), you need the rating of the wall outlet you are using in volts and amps, the same rating for the AC, the minimum length of the extension cord you need, and some idea of the length of the wire from the supply panel where you have fuses or breaker, to the outlet. For an estimate, calculate the distance along walls, floors, and ceilings, with lines parallel to the sides of the house, or vertical lines in walls. Then double that number. Don't assume the wires run the shortest route, follow the easiest route to run a wire.
Take all that information to an electrical supply store (not just a hardware store that carries wire and outlets), and give them that information. They will tell you if you would be violating and local codes, or if the house wiring is already too long, or if the AC shouldn't be in that outlet in the first place. If you can use a cord, they might have a standard code to use, or they can sell you the parts to make one. If you don't have the skills and experience to make an extension cord, skip that option.
As mentioned in previous posts, the AC manufacturer wants to avoid lawsuits from the improper use of an extension cord. An electrical supply store will want to avoid the same lawsuits too, so they'll recommend against anything that sounds unsafe.

Last edited by TriPolar; 06-10-2010 at 07:04 PM.
Old 06-10-2010, 07:56 PM
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And if that sounded as complicated to you as it sounds to me, just hire an electrician. There are many home repairs and stuff you can fool around with in your house with little or no knowledge and not do too much damage; your electrical wiring is not one of them.
Old 06-10-2010, 08:05 PM
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Assuming your house is properly wired in the first place (and if you don't know, why are you living there)
The vast majority of people don't know if their house was properly wired in the first place. I'm one of the few exceptions, and only because I know my 15 year-old house wasn't wired correctly in the first place.
Old 06-10-2010, 08:08 PM
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And if that sounded as complicated to you as it sounds to me, just hire an electrician. There are many home repairs and stuff you can fool around with in your house with little or no knowledge and not do too much damage; your electrical wiring is not one of them.
Then I explained it properly. That's the easy way to do it safely, and if anyone can't follow it, they should follow your suggestion.
Old 06-11-2010, 01:00 AM
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Get a good (not cheap) 12/3 cord. They are rated at 15 amps not 20 amps. Most home outlets are also rated at 15 amps. The problem is not the running amps but the surge on starting especally if the AC unit short cycling.
Old 06-11-2010, 01:13 AM
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Assuming your house is properly wired in the first place (and if you don't know, why are you living there)
Well, I think my house was properly wired in the first place -- 102 years ago when it was built. At least, all the knob and tube wiring I replaced in the attic looked just like the illustrations I have seen in electrical history books, and was in quite good shape.

It's the wiring from the second and third and fourth place that I'd be more worried about. The wiring in this house has been modified and extended and replaced several times over the years. But that appears to have been done by qualified electricians, according to the electrical code of the day. But parts of the house wiring are not up to the current code, and if I redid any of them, it would have to be brought up to code.

But everything works fine, with no symptoms to indicate electrical problems. So I live there, because it works fine for me, and the house is paid for.
Old 06-11-2010, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Well, I think my house was properly wired in the first place -- 102 years ago when it was built. At least, all the knob and tube wiring I replaced in the attic looked just like the illustrations I have seen in electrical history books, and was in quite good shape.

It's the wiring from the second and third and fourth place that I'd be more worried about. The wiring in this house has been modified and extended and replaced several times over the years. But that appears to have been done by qualified electricians, according to the electrical code of the day. But parts of the house wiring are not up to the current code, and if I redid any of them, it would have to be brought up to code.

But everything works fine, with no symptoms to indicate electrical problems. So I live there, because it works fine for me, and the house is paid for.
I guess 'in the first place' could be taken as you stated. I have a pretty old house too, but rewired everything. A few things weren't safe, but mostly to get 3 prong outlets everywhere, and more outlets were needed. Since I have friends who are licensed electricians, I can do the work under local codes, and they can check it for me.
If you are satisfied, and meeting the legal requirements, and I don't live in your house, sounds fine with me. But you ought to check your homeowners policy to make sure your heirs can collect.
Old 07-14-2017, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by ookpik View Post
No it's actually very sound advice.

A "proper" power bar that will run you about 20-30$ will offer more than enough protection.

These are deisnged to handle the voltage and amperage that an AC unit will draw.

Again, a brand name, rated power bar, not some POS from a dollar store.
Sound advice would use legitimate electrical terms. Recommending a "proper" power bar, or "the best extension cord you can find" for that matter (as a few others have mentioned), is not great advice.

The only legitimate way to look at this, as a few have mentioned, is in terms of the wire ratings, and what voltage and amperage they are rated to handle.
a 25' cord of 14AWG cable rated for 15 amps would be more than enough. Looking at a few different models of 9,000 BTU A/C units, they draw less than 10 amps - so the 14AWG cord, assuming it's the only load on the circuit, is more than enough to use safely.

If you go with a 12AWG cord you'll have even more extra capacity in the cord. (lower AWG rating = larger diameter of copper = more capacity).
Old 07-14-2017, 11:39 AM
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Hahahahahaha ... just get a longer exhaust pipe ...
Old 07-14-2017, 11:50 AM
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Hahahahahaha ... just get a longer exhaust pipe ...
Really good point. ...everything looks like a nail.
Old 07-14-2017, 11:56 AM
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Originally Posted by watchwolf49 View Post
Hahahahahaha ... just get a longer exhaust pipe ...
Suggested, and cautioned about, seven years ago.

Quote:
Originally Posted by panman_1960 View Post
Get a longer exhaust duct or extend it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky812 View Post
If the unit can't draught far enough you may also damage the unit.
Old 07-14-2017, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Snnipe 70E View Post
Get a good (not cheap) 12/3 cord. They are rated at 15 amps not 20 amps. Most home outlets are also rated at 15 amps.
A standard "heavy duty, 120 VAC, 15 A" extension cord will be comprised of the following:

12 AWG wires --- 20 A rating
NEMA 5-15P plug --- 15 A rating
NEMA 5-15R receptacle --- 15 A rating

Because each of the two connectors is rated for 15 A, the entire extension cord is rated for 15 A.

They're a bit hard to find, but you can buy a "120 VAC, 20 A" extension cord. This extension cord is comprised of the following:

12 AWG wires --- 20 A rating
NEMA 5-20P plug --- 20 A rating
NEMA 5-20R receptacle --- 20 A rating

Because the wires and each connector are rated for 20 A, the entire extension cord is rated for 20 A. Of course, this extension cord will only be of benefit if your device has a NEMA 5-20P plug. If it has a NEMA 5-15P plug, you may as well use the cheaper and more common "120 VAC, 15 A" extension cord.
Old 07-14-2017, 12:20 PM
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@markoP: Thanks for joining us.

FYI, the person you're fussing at wrote those words 7 years ago and hasn't been seen around here in the last two years.

We have plenty of current (heh ) conversations you might enjoy participating in. Some are even about electricity if that's your bag.


@The rest of us old hands: Smelling a bit musty in here it is.

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Old 07-14-2017, 12:22 PM
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Location: State of Jefferson
Posts: 7,662
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary T View Post
Suggested, and cautioned about, seven years ago.
Thanx ... I missed that scanning through the thread ...

This is because of boundary layer friction ... just use a bigger pipe ... the alternative is undervolting the A/C unit and so there's balance point somewhere ... my concern is that if the undersized piping causes a problem, your A/C dies ... if your undersized extension cord causes a problem, your house burns down (no smoke alarm, you might be dead) ...

The label says to not use an extension cord ... there must be a reason ...
Old 07-14-2017, 08:57 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 3,783
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finagle View Post
I'd go with a 12 gauge, 20 Amp cord, especially if it's going to be a longer run.
Go with a 12 gage cord it will be rated for 15 amps 1800 watts. Do not use a 14 gage cord.
Old 07-14-2017, 11:04 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Appalachia
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer View Post
Threads like this are one of the reasons that not being able to have medical and legal advice threads here are such crap - we can give her advice on how to burn her house down, but not what that mole is. Get an electrician to do a proper job, either on the cord on installing an outlet - you don't burn your $150,000 house down over a $80 electrician charge.
Hallelujah, and Amen!

I thought perhaps I was the only person that felt as you do... Often I've felt I should start a thread related to such, but deferred because of what has become the accepted norm here. Apparently electrical work doesn't maintain the same cachet as medical or legal situations among the elders of SDMB... Even though misunderstood electrical advice, or outright faulty opinion may cause great financial harm and/or loss of life... For some convoluted reason, it's considered OK in GQ.

Last edited by gogogophers; 07-14-2017 at 11:09 PM.
Old 07-15-2017, 02:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 7,411
FWIW:

I bought two of the HiSense 9000 units - one each for two adjacent rooms.

This being a built-to-code-but-barely cookie-cutter house, the two rooms share a single 15 amp circuit. Two units turns out to be 1 unit too many for the circuit.
I have an old, heavy-duty (14 or 16 ga.) exterior-rated cord - yellow, about 1/2" in diameter.

Surprise! it came from Home Depot several years ago when they till has a few decent items amidst the crap.

It is 25' long.
One of the A/C units is plugged into it - the other end goes out a window and into a window in the kitchen - where it is plugged into a 20 amp circuit.
The unit runs continuously for over two weeks and the cord has never gotten so much as warm.

The thing is in my bedroom. I trust the install.

Last edited by usedtobe; 07-15-2017 at 02:50 PM.
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