Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 06-13-2010, 09:07 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 36,997
Has anyone encountered the National Career Readiness Certificate in the real world?

The local unemployment office is making me jump through some hoops to keep getting their bucks, the most recent hoop being a session where they described many of the services they offer to unemployed folks.

And they were really big on this new thing -- the National Career Readiness Certificate. It is offered by ACT, the college testing company, and is designed to show employers that you have mastered certain skill sets that you need to competently perform many jobs.

The guy told us that "many" large employers were now using it as a screening tool, but the list they put up showed only about 5 or 6 names, only a couple of which I recognized.

And what I'm really wondering is, is this something that ACT has whipped up to attract state money so these agencies can document another program to help their clients, but has no real world meaning? You get this shiny diploma thingy, and you get shinier ones for scoring higher, and is that it? A Google search for it comes up with a bunch of state and federal offices that tout it, but not a single employer, at least among the first couple of pages of results.

So anyway, I decided to do it, 'cause I have lots of free time and it doesn't cost me anything. The state unemployment office has a contract with ACT to run people though the tests. I took a series of practice tests online at home, but to get the certificate I have to go in and spend most of a day taking a proctored exam.
Advertisements
#2
Old 12-03-2012, 11:12 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 8,791
I wanted to bump this poor responseless thread and ask if anyone else has encountered this or a similar qualification. This seems to be a big thing that is often touted by unemployment agencies. My state, Virginia, appears to have a qualification called the "Virginia Career Readiness Certificate" that is similar if not identical to the "National" one. They say it's equivalent and should be cross-recognized.

I looked into these qualifications it and it seems more oriented toward low-wage and or blue collar workers where high literacy and mathematical skills can't always be taken for granted. For example, the "He's a good carpenter on the job and can get the nails in acceptably but if I leave him a parts catalog he can't figure out how to mail order 400 #3 nails and have them at the Decatur warehouse by next Tuesday. He gets confused and sends the order slip to the wrong address, fails to include the check, or doesn't indicate the shipping address and stuff gets messed up." syndrome. Has anyone here taken it? Does it help "get your foot in the door" in any meaningful way? Does this qualification have any more than trivial value for white-collar university graduates? I looked at some sample questions and it seems that you'd pretty much have to have these skills in order to graduate from a university at all. Hiring managers, would you consider having one of these as enough of a plus that you could ever see yourself taking a NCRC certified person over a non-certified person that otherwise looks like a better match?

Last edited by robert_columbia; 12-03-2012 at 11:14 AM.
#3
Old 12-03-2012, 03:13 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 8,791
Nobody?

To extend the question, are you aware of any case where you or someone you know feels that even though they may never have gotten a job, gotten a promotion, or kept a job specifically because a Career Readiness Certificate is on their resume (i.e. having the paper qualification), they nonetheless feel that going through the process of getting one helped them somehow in their career, for example by giving them knowledge or skills that they later used in a job interview or on the job, or by identifying skill or knowledge gaps that they later filled in by reading books or taking classes elsewhere? E.g. John works for CompuGlobalHyperMegaNet which does not use the NCRC for any personnel decisions (i.e. if you put it on a resume they will ignore it), but he nonetheless goes through the program and discovers that he has a deficiency or serious area of growth in reading comprehension. He registers for a class at the local community college and improves his skills, later landing a promotion because his supervisor sees a concrete improvement in on-the-job performance.

I agree with the OP as it relates to search hits. Searching for this turns up links to ACT as well as workforce development/unemployment assistance sites run by various US states, as well as pages run by community colleges who offer career training programs. I don't see many instances of third-party discussions of the merits of at NCRC vs nothing vs another program. I can't remember ever seeing a job description where the hiring manager mentioned an NCRC as either required or desired.
#4
Old 12-03-2012, 03:41 PM
Charter Member
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Beervania
Posts: 52,844
I just Googled for "businesses that accept the National Career Readiness Certificate", and got no hits.
#5
Old 12-03-2012, 03:43 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Obama Northern VA
Posts: 2,336
I never heard of it until today, but I am not an HR person or recuriter. I work in an area where a college degree is considered a minimum requirement, so the certificate as described would not cut the mustard - anothe reason I would not have heard of it, even if it's widely accepted in place of a HS diploma or CLEP or whatever.
#6
Old 12-03-2012, 03:58 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: In front of my PC, y tu?
Posts: 4,044
My deeply cynical nature tells me this is snake oil, an invention of some con artist to siphon taxpayer dollars by appealing to squishy minded lawmakers who want to look like they are doing something BECAUSE JOBS!
#7
Old 12-03-2012, 11:57 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Queen City of the Plains
Posts: 153
My two cents: unless your state has contracted or partnered with companies through economic development activities and incentives hinged on the acceptance of recognizing the credential; this is one of those good ideas that is poorly executed.

To be frank, I do not know enough to know if there are any states that have done this correctly. But I know Colorado has not. Workforce centers push it, but not many employers embrace it. So, I would go ahead and give into your cynical side of thinking of this as an ACT revenue stream. Please note, though, that I have tangential knowledge and do not work directly with this workforce tool.
#8
Old 12-04-2012, 08:57 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 8,791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Typo Knig View Post
I never heard of it until today, but I am not an HR person or recuriter. I work in an area where a college degree is considered a minimum requirement, so the certificate as described would not cut the mustard - anothe reason I would not have heard of it, even if it's widely accepted in place of a HS diploma or CLEP or whatever.
I'm not saying it's equivalent to a college degree. There is no requirement to write a coherent essay, no requirement to regurgitate basic scientific "facts", nor a requirement to understand the scientific process.
#9
Old 06-11-2013, 05:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Suicide City
Posts: 2,740
I first heard of the NCRC in a want-ad asking for at least a bronze level. I googled it and found out bronze level is the lowest level. It goes up to platinum. Since 2011 my state of Oregon has given out about 23,500. Over half of the certificates they hand out are silver, a little over a third are gold, about ten percent get bronze, and a little over one percent get platinum.

I am signed up to take the tests a week from tomorrow. I have a full-time job, but I am also a college dropout and I'm looking for a better one. I have mostly worked blue collar jobs. It might not give me a boost, but I don't think it can hurt me either.
#10
Old 06-11-2013, 11:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Sunny California
Posts: 14,240
I don't know about any of the specific certificates mentioned above.

At the Fresno Adult School, they have some kind of pre-employment readiness class, that mostly teaches basic job-hunting skills. The certificate says "30 Hour Pre-Employment Preparation Program". It's really just a pre-requisite for any of their other vocational classes where you actually learn some useful job skill beyond how to tie your shoes for the interview.
#11
Old 06-22-2013, 02:17 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Suicide City
Posts: 2,740
I took the test. They award you your certificate based on your lowest score, e.g. have to get at least a six on all three tests to get platinum. I got a five and two sevens. I got a gold. The test I scored the lowest is widely considered the hardest one- locating information. I got a perfect score on applied mathematics. I believe I only missed one hard question on the reading for information, although I wasn't shown which questions I got right or wrong.

They were supposed to email me a user name and password, so I could log in and let potential employers see my results. I haven't got an email yet, two days later. I'm not sure who to contact to get it- the people who make the test or the people that administered it. They have my correct email and meat world addresses.
#12
Old 06-22-2013, 11:34 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 36,997
Amazing I started this three years ago and it's back like the walking dead. I did take the test, and got a gold. And in all those three years since, I have yet to encounter a single employer who asked about it, advertised it, or mentioned it at all.
#13
Old 06-22-2013, 11:42 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 37,037
Never heard of it. Many companies use their own tests to determine the suitability of applicants and aren't likely to accept results from an outside source anyway. Companies don't assume a high school degree means you have any certain level of skills either, they usually don't even have a reason for making it a requirement. Seems like an enormous waste of time. I can see an employment agency using this as a very basic screening tool, but that's about it.
#14
Old 08-08-2013, 12:01 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 28
Certainly worth it

Quote:
Originally Posted by Invisible Chimp View Post
I first heard of the NCRC in a want-ad asking for at least a bronze level. I googled it and found out bronze level is the lowest level. It goes up to platinum. Since 2011 my state of Oregon has given out about 23,500. Over half of the certificates they hand out are silver, a little over a third are gold, about ten percent get bronze, and a little over one percent get platinum.

I am signed up to take the tests a week from tomorrow. I have a full-time job, but I am also a college dropout and I'm looking for a better one. I have mostly worked blue collar jobs. It might not give me a boost, but I don't think it can hurt me either.
This thread is mostly just speculative. It's a real thing, not some gimmick.

Oregon has a list of 300+ employers (at the time of this writing) who use the certificate. There was/is an Excel file on the WorkSource Oregon site that lists them. Oregon was paying for the tests as of this writing, normally around $70 total IIRC. You spend about 6 hours total with breaks and an intro session.

The test questions get progressively harder and you have 55 minutes to complete each section. Some of the information-gathering questions are tricky, so you have to spend as little time as possible on the easy ones. If you don't study for the tests you may not do so well unless you're a good bit brighter than average.

Anyone who wants to learn about it can just go to the main ACT site or a local "affiliate." It can't claim to get you automatically hired. It's just something that can help you stand out even if an employer doesn't officially use it.
#15
Old 08-08-2013, 12:16 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Czarcasm View Post
I just Googled for "businesses that accept the National Career Readiness Certificate", and got no hits.
That specific search string is hardly definitive. Try this type of search and you'll get hits:

"list of employers" "National Career Readiness Certificate"

Dig around at local agencies and you'll find more lists. Google can't find everything on local sites, and how you type a search string is critical.

I'm replying to this thread because it's just loose speculation on this topic. I took the test(s) to boost my resume after a layoff. It's much easier and cheaper (free in my case) than going back to school for a 6 month or 1 year certificate in a specialized field which may or may not have jobs available. Many people go back to school as more of a gesture than a real goal.

I see the NCRC as a minor version of the SAT that can help if you find an avenue for it. It at least shows some initiative.
#16
Old 01-14-2014, 02:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1
Well here are some facts.


1. There are no employers that advertise for the "National Career Readiness Certificate"

2. There are no popular employment related websites that mention the "National Career Readiness Certificate"

2. There are no 3rd party statistics for the "National Career Readiness Certificate"

3. Only the corporation "Act, Inc" has data points and statistics.....which are not substantiated. Act, Inc owns the "National Career Readiness Certificate" and it is Act, Inc's product: http://act.org/privacy.html#privacy_contact


4. Over the course of 3+ years, 10 individuals indicate they never heard of it, companies not using it, and pretty much worthless.

5. Over the course of 3+ years one individual signs up with this website to make the only two posts of his/her life defending Act, Inc and the "National Career Readiness Certificate."

6. Act, Inc is a government contractor, contracted with many state unemployment agencies.

7. Various states pay public funds Act, Inc to administer the "National Career Readiness Certificate."

8. While Act, Inc and the "National Career Readiness Certificate" websites have a .org address, the Non-profit IRS declarations are not available. No one knows where they get there money from, nor where it goes, yet their .org address implies they are a non-profit.

9. Act, Inc runs the very popular college standardized test known as the ACT which has run for decades.

10. Demand for the ACT college standardized test is individuals, paid by individuals, in order for admission to a college.

11. Demand for the "National Career Readiness Certificate" is from state government unemployment departments, paid by state funds, in order to assist the unemployed with employment.

12. Act, Inc pays people to conduct research on their products, then quotes the research.

----
So, knowing all that - it is credible that the "National Career Readiness Certificate"-

- was sold to many states, likening it to their popular "ACT test" for college
- Has zero demand and use for employers - but then again if you follow the money the National Career Readiness Certificate is driven by States not employers....
- The National Career Readiness Certificate is profitable for Act, Inc, since it is not tied to market forces, just state government budgeting.
- If no one gets a job from the National Career Readiness Certificate that is fine, since the State is paying the bill, and Act, Inc can pay PhD's to publish research saying it helps people get jobs.
- If no employer uses the National Career Readiness Certificate that is fine, since the State is paying the bill, and Act, Inc can pay PhD's to publish research saying all these employers use it.
- Act, Inc is a very large and powerful corporation, has been for decades. They can pay reputation firms and contractors to counter online negative posts about the National Career Readiness Certificate.

Note: by all means if anyone wants to refute any facts, or opinions, please do so! (But know this: Act, Inc sponsored "research" or data will not be accepted - only 3rd party - if it exists)

Last edited by NCRC analyst; 01-14-2014 at 02:11 PM. Reason: admin
#17
Old 01-15-2014, 10:07 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 19,223
Snake oil or not, I think it's a damn good idea in theory. Anything to separate "career readiness" measurements from "college graduation" measurements is a good thing in my view. It should be that someone who never went to college but scores well on a test like this is known by employers to be "career ready." And it should be that someone who went to college but scores poorly on a test like this is known by employers not to be "career ready." But the way things are often currently done, college graduation is used as a proxy for career readiness. Bad idea. Bad for colleges, and bad for employers and bad for students and employees.
#18
Old 01-15-2014, 10:10 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 19,223
I often have terrorized fantasies about what I would do if I were laid off. In my field, there is very little chance I could find employment elsewhere. I would have to change careers. And unfortunately, having a PhD (especially in the humanities) is more likely to _hurt_ your chances of getting a job under those circumstances.

But if I could go down to the unemployment office and take a test that shows I can score Platinum on a measure of "career readiness," I'd strongly consider putting that on a resume if I thought employers would have any idea what I was talking about. Because it could offset the negative associations of a humanities PhD. It could show that I can actually do shit and learn on the job.
#19
Old 01-15-2014, 01:57 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 36,997
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frylock View Post
I often have terrorized fantasies about what I would do if I were laid off. In my field, there is very little chance I could find employment elsewhere. I would have to change careers. And unfortunately, having a PhD (especially in the humanities) is more likely to _hurt_ your chances of getting a job under those circumstances.

But if I could go down to the unemployment office and take a test that shows I can score Platinum on a measure of "career readiness," I'd strongly consider putting that on a resume if I thought employers would have any idea what I was talking about. Because it could offset the negative associations of a humanities PhD. It could show that I can actually do shit and learn on the job.
Yes, in theory it's a good idea. But in practice it's meaningless unless employers buy into the idea, and after several years, it seems like almost none have. In the meantime, state governments already strapped for cash are blowing unknown big wads of bucks paying ACT to give this test to unemployed people to no perceptible benefit. It's not as bad as forcing them to undergo drug testing, I suppose, but you have to take at least half a day to do it. At least withdfrug testing, you can piss in a cup and be done.
#20
Old 03-03-2014, 12:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 8,791
I searched Monster.com for "Career Readiness Certificate" and found a grand total of six results. Most of these were industrial jobs far away from where I live. Try it yourself.

It seems that the CRC and its WorkKeys exams are supposed to be an effort toward so-called Skills-Based Hiring, where the idea is instead of relying on fuzzy, subjective interviews/reference checks or academic degree programs with tangential relevancy, employers will establish cutoff scores on exams and/or rank candidates by exam score and then hire off the top, and interviews and reference checks will fade into the background and become more of a basic-background check thing (e.g., make sure the candidate isn't a complete boor, pervert, or antisocial lunatic).

It seems that the concept is similar to Competency-Based Education. The idea is that no matter what you've done, if you have somehow gained knowledge, skills, or experience, even in a non-traditional way, you should be able to get that knowledge, etc. assessed and be given appropriate credentials and certifications.

These sort of practices could also be a boon for "overqualified" people. Lost your job as an Software Technical Architect and can't find another, or don't want the stress? Take the Tier 1 Helpdesk Qualification Exam, blow it away with your uber-leet IT skillz, and start your new job. HR doesn't immediately filter you out as "overqualified" because you jump to the top of the stack based on your exam scores.

"Want to be a Floor Manager at BigStore? Get at least a Gold Career Readiness Certificate, a 90 on the Retail Workers Aptitude Test (RWAT), at least an 85 on the Retail Manager Qualification Battery, and a 75 on the Second Edition of the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce's Career Problem Solving Assessment Exam (MCC-CPSAE-2), and you will be ranked based on a weighted average of your scores with the RMQB weighted double, and we will hire off the top pending brief background checks."

Last edited by robert_columbia; 03-03-2014 at 12:12 PM.
#21
Old 03-03-2014, 12:29 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 36,997
Hmmm... I just search Monster for "NCRC" and also got 6 six hits, with a total of 4 employers. Also, they were all either in IL or MN. So I wonder if the certificate is a more regional thing (though still pretty weak as a regional thing), or if Monster itself is bigger in the midwest than elsewhere?
#22
Old 03-04-2014, 12:29 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Jawja
Posts: 8,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by eg8576736 View Post
This thread is mostly just speculative. It's a real thing, not some gimmick.

Oregon has a list of 300+ employers (at the time of this writing) who use the certificate. There was/is an Excel file on the WorkSource Oregon site that lists them.
Out of 92,335 employers (not businesses, employers) in the state as of the latest figures in 2008. That represents 0.325% of Oregon employers. Sounds gimicky to me.

Last edited by Doctor Jackson; 03-04-2014 at 12:30 PM.
#23
Old 11-20-2014, 12:28 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1
Just took it yesterday

Oregon is doing a very big push for this, mostly because they got a grant to get us to cover the cost of taking the test (it isn't free). I just took mine yesterday, also a Gold. Yes, this is real. How effective it will be is yet to be determined as it depends on how many businesses take part (the businesses also get graded by the company, not sure how that works, but it was mentioned yesteday).

Northwest natural Gas and Nabisco both require it for all new hire according to the Oregon employment department. I dont know if that applies to all positions (I doubt it) or only entry level (more likely).

Regardless, a permanent certification that you can take with you from state to state that shows your competency (or excellence) in basic areas is not a bad thing, and if you tell prospective employers about it, they get curious. More certifications (real ones) are never bad.
#24
Old 11-20-2014, 01:12 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 25,409
I heard about it when I was unemployed and taking advantage of my state's programs to get the unemployed re-employed.

Back in 2007 when I was first laid off it seemed the entire system was designed around high school drop-outs, the young and inexperienced, and the like, people who needed a GED or childcare or something to get started working, with a few programs targeted specifically at former steel mill workers. They just didn't seem to know what to do with the influx of former white collar workers, most with some sort of college degree and decades of work experience that suddenly no one wanted to hire.

By 2013 the state had adjusted and had several tracks for the unemployed, including one focused on the older worker with degree and experience that needed to change careers or restart a career. Which fit my situation nicely but they still had the GED training and yes, the NCRC. I don't think it was so much so a job-hunter could present a certificate to an employer but rather so the unemployment office could reassure an employer that the person had been tested and had a certain level of literacy/numeracy/skills. Having it be a test was seen as more objective than a job counselor's impression from one-on-one discussion.
#25
Old 11-20-2014, 01:37 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 8,791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnway View Post
Oregon is doing a very big push for this, mostly because they got a grant to get us to cover the cost of taking the test (it isn't free). I just took mine yesterday, also a Gold. Yes, this is real. How effective it will be is yet to be determined as it depends on how many businesses take part (the businesses also get graded by the company, not sure how that works, but it was mentioned yesteday).

Northwest natural Gas and Nabisco both require it for all new hire according to the Oregon employment department. I dont know if that applies to all positions (I doubt it) or only entry level (more likely).

Regardless, a permanent certification that you can take with you from state to state that shows your competency (or excellence) in basic areas is not a bad thing, and if you tell prospective employers about it, they get curious. More certifications (real ones) are never bad.
I got a gold Virginia CRC, which is apparently equivalent as it is based on the same exams. The number of jobs that it has gotten me is exactly zero. I stopped bringing it up as no employer has ever made an offer after I told them about my leet career readiness skillz.
#26
Old 11-20-2014, 01:46 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 8,791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnway View Post
...
Northwest natural Gas and Nabisco both require it for all new hire according to the Oregon employment department. I dont know if that applies to all positions (I doubt it) or only entry level (more likely).
...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
...By 2013 the state had adjusted and had several tracks for the unemployed, including one focused on the older worker with degree and experience that needed to change careers or restart a career. Which fit my situation nicely but they still had the GED training and yes, the NCRC. I don't think it was so much so a job-hunter could present a certificate to an employer but rather so the unemployment office could reassure an employer that the person had been tested and had a certain level of literacy/numeracy/skills. Having it be a test was seen as more objective than a job counselor's impression from one-on-one discussion.
I also am interested if I can use my Gold certificate to "get my foot in the door" into a different and potentially rewarding career, and the answer seems to be yes, theoretically, but there are very few cases where employers are actually on board on this in any formal or semiformal way. All the hiring managers here seem to care about are degrees and years of experience. Don't have 3-5 years of experience in Mopery Aggregation and Fizzbin Management? Don't bother to apply, we don't care about your underlying skills. We don't train either, so go away.

Anyone know of any employers that use an NCRC as a, or the, basic qualifier? E.g. where you can walk in the door, show your NCRC score, and if it's high enough, go through a cursory interview and background check (to make sure you aren't a supervillan or antisocial lunatic, not to identify whether you're the best candidate) and start training for your new job?
#27
Old 11-20-2014, 02:58 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 36,997
I've done numerous searches over the years for this, and while I've found dozens of media stories about it, and hundreds of web pages from city, county and state employment websites encouraging their clients to take the test, I haven't yet found a single site from an actual employer that asks for one as part of a job application, or mentions it in any way as something they would have an interest in.

Damn, that's a run-on sentence. I might fail the test if I took it today.
#28
Old 11-20-2014, 03:13 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 8,791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boyo Jim View Post
I've done numerous searches over the years for this, and while I've found dozens of media stories about it, and hundreds of web pages from city, county and state employment websites encouraging their clients to take the test, I haven't yet found a single site from an actual employer that asks for one as part of a job application, or mentions it in any way as something they would have an interest in.

Damn, that's a run-on sentence. I might fail the test if I took it today.
There isn't any writing on the test. It is very heavy on reading comprehension. In essence, the NCRC tests a few things:

1) Basic literacy.
2) Ability to extract meaning from basic documents and follow directions. E.g. here is the company policy on tiddlywinks <three paragraphs of rules and exceptions to those rules>. On Monday, you show up for work and there are three blue tiddlywinks, four red ones, and six green ones. What do you do? A) File a Type 2 Report with your Supervisor. Do not touch the tiddlywinks until you have received an Authorized Work Order. B) Process the tiddlywinks through Grinder A. C) Process the red tiddlywinks through Grinder A and box and ship the other ones to the office in Memphis. D) Process the blue tiddlywinks through Grinder A and file an Out-Of-Spec or Unauthorized Tiddlywink Report with the Corporate Ethics Officer. E) Wash the tiddlywinks in warm water for five minutes and process them through Grinder B.
3) Basic math (+-*/).
4) Combining these skills, e.g. by doing math word problems. So basically those things you did in sixth grade with a train leaving Memphis at 35 MPH at 12:30 PM approaching a train that left Decatur at 9 AM traveling at 55 MPH.

Last edited by robert_columbia; 11-20-2014 at 03:17 PM.
#29
Old 10-26-2015, 08:37 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1
Code Oregon & NCRC

I'm doing the Code Oregon on-line computer training and they claim I need to take this test as part of the sign-up for the Worksource program. Like I already don't have enough on my plate with job hunting and the other hoops the state has me jumping through to qualify for FS while I'm trying to find a job. I really want to have to figure out what I need to do for a test that nobody gives a rats ass about when I could be training for computer programs like excel & office-suite that I know I need.
#30
Old 10-26-2015, 09:58 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 8,791
Quote:
Originally Posted by lindacbug View Post
I'm doing the Code Oregon on-line computer training and they claim I need to take this test as part of the sign-up for the Worksource program. Like I already don't have enough on my plate with job hunting and the other hoops the state has me jumping through to qualify for FS while I'm trying to find a job. I really want to have to figure out what I need to do for a test that nobody gives a rats ass about when I could be training for computer programs like excel & office-suite that I know I need.
The test is mostly reading comprehension, chart and instrument reading (e.g. reading the temperature off a thermometer), and math word problems. The critical thing is to read the question and examine any provided illustrations carefully. In essence, it's proof that you not only have basic reading and math skills, but that you can use them to do basic workplace tasks, like read an incoming shipping manifest and compare it with the employer's written instructions and figure out whether you should put the Widgets on Shelf 1 and the Ding-Dongs on Shelf 2 or whether you should put everything on Shelf 2 and then call your supervisor to report that you are out of shelving.

It's actually a neat test in a way. It's a shame that employers don't seem to be hiring high scorers - it's become more of a basic check to make sure you're not a complete dummy before they send you to shoe-tying school and your government-funded Advanced Preparation for Pre-GED Training.

If you're pretty smart and can follow directions, don't sweat this one. Really. You'll do fine. Just read the directions and don't cut corners.

Last edited by robert_columbia; 10-26-2015 at 10:02 PM.
#31
Old 10-26-2015, 10:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 8,791
Quote:
Originally Posted by robert_columbia View Post
...
It's actually a neat test in a way. It's a shame that employers don't seem to be hiring high scorers - it's become more of a basic check to make sure you're not a complete dummy before they send you to shoe-tying school and your government-funded Advanced Preparation for Pre-GED Training.

If you're pretty smart and can follow directions, don't sweat this one. Really. You'll do fine. Just read the directions and don't cut corners.
I believe they also throw in some multi-step problems, sometimes with unit conversions. They provide a calculator and the conversions you need to know - no real need to memorize if I recall correctly. You might get a problem that says, "You have 10 full five-gallon drums of Diesel fuel. You have a Diesel generator that can power your facility for an hour and a half on one liter of fuel. Do you have enough Diesel fuel to run the facility from 3 PM on March 3 until 7 AM on March 10?" The math isn't hard, but it's multi-step and geared toward the kinds of things that might need to be done on the job. If you fumble your metric and English units like NASA famously did on that Mars probe, no career readiness for you!
#32
Old 12-17-2015, 11:36 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor Jackson View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by eg8576736
This thread is mostly just speculative. It's a real thing, not some gimmick.

Oregon has a list of 300+ employers (at the time of this writing) who use the certificate. There was/is an Excel file on the WorkSource Oregon site that lists them.
Out of 92,335 employers (not businesses, employers) in the state as of the latest figures in 2008. That represents 0.325% of Oregon employers. Sounds gimicky to me.
Oregon Worksource is still promoting this heavily, and I was considering spending the half-day to take the test until I read this depressing thread. What a nice cash cow for ACT, at taxpayers' expense.

If any job-seeker anywhere has ever benefited from the testing, I'd love to hear about it. But Worksource can't even give me a list of employers who are claimed to care about the test: on their job-seekers page, the link under "View the List of Employers in Oregon who Support the NCRC" returns a big 404.

FWIW, here's a bunch of sample test questions in all three categories: (Warning: PDF)
#33
Old 07-13-2016, 09:59 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 2
I took this test after finding out that it was necessary to get a job with the local school system (Greenville county school system in South Carolina). Either that or a degree. I was recently accepted for a bus aide position.

If anyone's curious, I got a Silver certificate (I scored a 4 in locating for information and a 6 in the math and reading ones).

Last edited by MethidMan; 07-13-2016 at 09:59 AM.
#34
Old 07-13-2016, 10:25 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 15,102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frylock View Post
Snake oil or not, I think it's a damn good idea in theory. Anything to separate "career readiness" measurements from "college graduation" measurements is a good thing in my view. It should be that someone who never went to college but scores well on a test like this is known by employers to be "career ready." And it should be that someone who went to college but scores poorly on a test like this is known by employers not to be "career ready." But the way things are often currently done, college graduation is used as a proxy for career readiness. Bad idea. Bad for colleges, and bad for employers and bad for students and employees.
It sure seems to be a bunch of stuff that really should be trivial for a high school graduate to score highly on, never mind a college graduate. Stuff like reading comprehension, basic math dealing with measurements, etc... Hell, even the MCAT math is high school level algebra in large part; I can't imagine this test is anything other than proving you can work with fractions and decimals as used in measurement and money-related problems.

The test seems to be more of a baseline measurement for "Not an Idiot", more than anything else. I mean, even if you get a Platinum score, it doesn't indicate that you're actually qualified to DO anything, but that you're not a total waste of air who can't do stuff that they should have not graduated you from high school for.

I don't think that applying it to college graduates would really accomplish much- it's not really aimed at them in the first place; the presence of a degree is de-facto career readiness proof.

Last edited by bump; 07-13-2016 at 10:26 AM.
#35
Old 06-05-2017, 12:44 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 1
NCRC is valid

I recognize this board is a few years old, but wanted to share some info in case anyone is basing their research on the earlier posts.
The National Career Readiness Certificate is a great tool for employers and job seekers. There are three sections - Applied Math, Reading for Information, and Locating Information. Math and reading go to level 7; Locating info goes to Level 6. Each level gets progressively more difficult and complicated. For example, in Locating information, the lower levels will focus on reading a chart or map and answering a question about it. The higher levels will take multiple graphs or gauges with a complex situation and ask for the student to assess the information and task at hand.
So many people have gone through an educational system that "teaches for the test," and these same people have NO critical thinking skills. These tests incorporate testing the ability to make decisions, infer meanings, and problem solve.
Many employers are now requiring these tests across the nation. If they don't use the CRC, they often have other types of tests that the CRC can help an applicant prepare for.
It looks good on a resume' and shows the applicant has made an effort to go through the process.
Many community colleges (like the one I work for) offer classes for free and will cover the cost of the test. In our school, we provide a "class" where students find they are more disciplined by coming in to do the work, even though it is self-paced. We can then offer support and instruction when they are having difficulty in certain areas.
This is ideal for people who have been out of the job market a while and are now trying to find work. It helps brush up dormant skills and is a good boost to a deflated ego.
It's not a gimmick or snake oil - it's real, it's increasingly needed, and well worth your time to explore.
#36
Old 06-05-2017, 01:13 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 36,997
7 years and hundreds of applications and interviews after posting this thread, I have yet to find one single employer who demanded it or even made reference to it. I find it hard to imagine that the previous poster signed up here just to respond to it.

And, IrisinNC, who are these "many employers across the country?" Where is a list?
#37
Old 06-05-2017, 01:37 PM
Charter Member
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Beervania
Posts: 52,844
10,000 companies accept it according to official website...but they don't seem to provide a list. Neither do any of the other websites I've found so far that claim anything from 1,000 to 15,000 companies.
#38
Old 06-05-2017, 01:52 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Sunny California
Posts: 14,240
This thread has risen from the dead TEN time now by my count! Is that some kind of re-zombification record here?
#39
Old 06-05-2017, 02:14 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 36,997
Well, I started a thread about "Groundhog Day" that came back several times, but I don't think ten times.
#40
Old 06-05-2017, 02:20 PM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: SW Arkansas
Posts: 5,715
New account. One post. That sounds like a PR sound bite.

Can anyone say, "shill"?
#41
Old 06-05-2017, 02:38 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Riding my handcycle
Posts: 31,430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Senegoid View Post
This thread has risen from the dead TEN time now by my count! Is that some kind of re-zombification record here?
The "How to protect and clean your computer from malware" thread is a spam magnet.
#42
Old 06-05-2017, 02:41 PM
Charter Member
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Beervania
Posts: 52,844
Quote:
Originally Posted by running coach View Post
The "How to protect and clean your computer from malware" thread is a spam magnet.
[Homer Simpson]Mmmmmm-Spam magnet![/HS]
#43
Old 09-16-2017, 01:05 AM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 1
Maaany years ago when I was unemployed (probably around the time this thread was started,) someone at the employment department (Oregon) suggested I take the NCRC test because it would improve my hirability. So I did, got Gold, and I've been listing it on my resume ever since. Not once has an employer or even a temp agency said anything about it. I did have an interview go from a Job Interview to a formality/BS session when I mentioned I'd written an SOP and trained a few people on it. Even recently when I became unemployed, the people at the employment department saw that it was on my resume and were super-impressed that I got Gold.

As has been mentioned earlier, I think the NCRC is bascially a product sold by ACT to employment departments who can then say "See, we've had X number of people take the test, and Y number of people have gotten jobs," when there's really no real correlation between the two.

My take: If you're unemployed and your employment department is offering the test for free, you might as well take it. Off chance that the thing catches on, it might prove to be useful.

Finally, I swear I was doing a job search one time and one of the employers listed "NCRC Preferred" or something to that effect, but I can't remember now.
#44
Old 09-16-2017, 06:27 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2011
Location: boise idaho
Posts: 1,420
Quote:
Originally Posted by Senegoid View Post
This thread has risen from the dead TEN time now by my count! Is that some kind of re-zombification record here?
somehow, we keep forgetting that the only way to kill the undead (works for vampires too I hear) is central nervous system disconnect. Sever the cervical spinal column (total decapitation not required but more satisfying).

would this count as 11 resurrections?



exits stage left
__________________
"The ability to destroy a planet is insignificant next to the power of the Chocolate" Darth Desserticola

Last edited by guestchaz; 09-16-2017 at 06:28 PM.
#45
Old 09-26-2017, 01:28 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Missoula, Montana, USA
Posts: 19,713
The lack of information from multiple sources and perspectives online is a great sign it's a scam: Real things, that people actually care about, have information from multiple perspectives on the Internet, no matter how obscure the thing is to most people. The Internet is great at allowing people to find the most obscure information imaginable, and then argue about it. The arguments mean it's real and people actually care.

Therefore, if the only information available is sanitized corporate happytalk from the approved perspective, it's a complete loser of an idea and not worth much consideration.
__________________
"Ridicule is the only weapon that can be used against unintelligible propositions. Ideas must be distinct before reason can act upon them."
If you don't stop to analyze the snot spray, you are missing that which is best in life. - Miller
I'm not sure why this is, but I actually find this idea grosser than cannibalism. - Excalibre, after reading one of my surefire million-seller business plans.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:32 PM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: pantomimes lying one's or ones stalemate ww1 california joe bullshit martial arts funny logging jokes scared mouse menstruating lesbians boyish face bilbo farewell speech crossdressing laws tamiflu in pregnancy shirts laundered domo arigato song humanity sucks sametime gifs lemon squize prozac od chalk body outline bullet proof engine speakeasy synonym sourcewatch org define gimp horn swallow microfibre glasses suicide attempt scars pamela reed imdb hentai that skinny car coons age origin rat trap walmart longmire native american topolino italian tukes hats black & decker pest repeller what does white pepper taste like james taylor sweet baby james lyrics why does starbucks coffee taste burnt ammonia and chlorine reaction read x men comics online how to make yourself pass out how much does an average house weigh keep birds out of dog food how tall is patrick schwarzenegger can benadryl kill you the rats in the walls hp lovecraft mix flour and water what happens if you eat egg shells how to make money with cows chevy colorado 5 cylinder mecuricome where to buy what happens if you eat an ant digital olive software oregonian how many tylenol pills does it take to overdose what causes bad gas mileage saving private ryan juden how to cut through thick metal can i add my girlfriend to my blue cross health insurance bag balm for eye wrinkles rainbow vacuum pyramid scheme how to fix odometer do i have to pay sales tax on out of state purchases does aleve work for toothache signs of a dog dying of heart failure do cats automatically use the litter box he thrusts his fists against the posts figure 8 clavicle brace