#1
Old 08-29-2011, 12:06 PM
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Skipping jury duty

I live in Missouri. What will happen to me if I blow off jury duty completely?
#2
Old 08-29-2011, 12:27 PM
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If you're in the Kansas City area, then according to this site:

"A person summoned for jury service who willfully fails to appear, is in civil contempt of court. An order may issue directing the person to a hearing where the person may show good cause for failure to appear as summoned. If the individual fails to show good cause for failing to appear, the court may impose a fine for as much as $500 and may order the prospective juror to perform community service for a time no less than would have been spent in jury service."

I suspect it's pretty much like that throughout the state, though I guess it could vary with different judicial circuits.

ETA: Saw you're in St. Louis. According to this site:

"A person who fails to appear or respond may be guilty of criminal contempt, enforceable by an order to show cause for the failure to comply and by a fine up to $250.00."

That seems to be for the state as a whole; it may be that St. Louis has further penalties the way Jackson County does.

Last edited by Gary T; 08-29-2011 at 12:32 PM.
#3
Old 08-29-2011, 12:35 PM
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Worst-case scenario? You're found in contempt of court and a bench warrant is issued for you. The next time you're pulled over for a broken taillight, the nice officer runs your name through the computer and discovers this warrant in the system. You're hauled before a judge and fined and/or sentenced to community service.

So yeah. I wouldn't.
#4
Old 08-29-2011, 12:38 PM
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Well, I'm screwed then! I rec'd the summons at my parents' house and they passed the info along to me; however, I thought the date was for tomorrow, but it was today.

A related question. Say the notice had gotten sent to a previous address of mine and the current residents just tossed it in the trash. I would never have even known about this summons if it hadn't gone to my parents' house. Anyway, what should I do? Make a phone call? or what?
#5
Old 08-29-2011, 12:44 PM
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call the clerk of courts or whoever it says to contact on the summons if you have questions. explain that it was sent to an old address and it caused a problem and you want them to arrange another date for you to show up for jury duty.
#6
Old 08-29-2011, 12:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hazle Weatherfield View Post
Anyway, what should I do? Make a phone call? or what?
Sure, contact them. If it doesn't seem to be resolved by phone, I'd try to go to the courthouse and speak to the judge or his bailiff. I expect they'll be more understanding if you present yourself with your explanation and apology than if they issue a warrant and come after you. With luck, they'll forgo the fine and just reschedule your duty.

ETA: From my second link above: "If you have any questions, contact the jury office of the court that summoned you at the telephone number on the documents you received." They will excuse for cause; I expect if you call and explain they'll work with you (probably reschedule).

Last edited by Gary T; 08-29-2011 at 12:49 PM.
#7
Old 08-29-2011, 01:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hazle Weatherfield View Post
Well, I'm screwed then! I rec'd the summons at my parents' house and they passed the info along to me; however, I thought the date was for tomorrow, but it was today.

A related question. Say the notice had gotten sent to a previous address of mine and the current residents just tossed it in the trash. I would never have even known about this summons if it hadn't gone to my parents' house. Anyway, what should I do? Make a phone call? or what?
My experience has been that jury offices are very relaxed about people not appearing by mistake - they'll just reschedule you. The only time they'll make an issue out of it is if they think you're willfully ignoring a summons.
#8
Old 08-29-2011, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
My experience has been that jury offices are very relaxed about people not appearing by mistake - they'll just reschedule you. The only time they'll make an issue out of it is if they think you're willfully ignoring a summons.
And they can't prove you even got the summons unless they sent it certified mail. Chances are they'll just reschedule you, and that will be that.
#9
Old 08-29-2011, 01:19 PM
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Thanks, all. I just left a message with my reason for not showing up and the recording said that if there was a problem, I would be contacted.
#10
Old 08-29-2011, 01:25 PM
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Always best to e proactive in cases such as this. I'd received a summons years back for service in St. Louis County. I called and said that I had a vacation trip scheduled for that week. They said no problem, we'll slide you down the list a ways. I received another summons about a year later and served then.
#11
Old 08-29-2011, 03:26 PM
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Lest anyone think the judges look the other way if people just skip jury duty without an excuse . . . I remember sitting in a court room the first time I had jury duty, and the judge was quite vocal about the high number of people that didn't show up. He said he would be spending his lunch time that day signing summonses to bring the people in.
#12
Old 08-29-2011, 04:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eva Luna View Post
And they can't prove you even got the summons unless they sent it certified mail.
If a jury summons was sent by regular mail, so there's no proof of receipt, how can a court rule that someone has intentionally ignored a summons? Of course, if a second summons is also ignored, then maybe some case can be built. However, even then, maybe the intended recipient of the summons has moved. So I don't quite understand how a court can effectively enforce what is essentially a voluntary service. A very important, necessary service IMO, but one that must rely on volunteers that are recruited via jury summons.
#13
Old 08-29-2011, 04:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeS View Post
Worst-case scenario? You're found in contempt of court and a bench warrant is issued for you. The next time you're pulled over for a broken taillight, the nice officer runs your name through the computer and discovers this warrant in the system. You're hauled before a judge and fined and/or sentenced to community service.

So yeah. I wouldn't.
+1

It never got that far for me, but due to notices being sent to an out of date address, I ended up missing two jury calls and had a bench warrant issued (somehow they got the address right for that). I had to run down to court the next Monday and grovel with the Judge to get it vacated. I still carry around the vacating order in my wallet for fear of just what you describe -- a traffic stop and out of date information on the cop's computer.

Don't ignore it.
#14
Old 08-29-2011, 04:10 PM
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I'll agree with everyone else. Just call the number on the paper and let them know what happened. I doubt they'll be all that worried about it and probably just pick a new date/week.

Also, I know a few people in Milwaukee that said they just threw out their summons and that was the end of it. Never heard another thing about it. I'm not sure what you have to do for yours, but in Milwaukee when you get it you have to call a number and register. My guess is that if you don't register, they probably just assume that you didn't get it (or ignored it) and as long as they don't have a shortage it's probably not worth their time to go after the no-shows.

Last edited by Joey P; 08-29-2011 at 04:11 PM.
#15
Old 08-29-2011, 04:12 PM
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This is one of those things that varies hugely between jurisdictions. There is also a huge variance between what the law says and what actually happens in practice.

I have never blown off jury duty although I have asked to be rescheduled a few times. My town gets a really high rate of people who do show up so I don't think that they spend any resources going after the scofflaws. I have known a couple of people who told me they have been throwing jury duty notices in the garbage for decades without problems.
#16
Old 08-29-2011, 04:19 PM
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Two questions.

Were you instructed to come in yesterday or to call in to see if they needed you to come? I've gotten several notices and have never gotten beyond the call in stage.

Do you still live in the same court jurisdiction? If you now live in a different county, or whatever the boundary is, you may no longer qualify for that jury.
#17
Old 08-29-2011, 04:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hazle Weatherfield View Post
Well, I'm screwed then! I rec'd the summons at my parents' house and they passed the info along to me; however, I thought the date was for tomorrow, but it was today.

A related question. Say the notice had gotten sent to a previous address of mine and the current residents just tossed it in the trash. I would never have even known about this summons if it hadn't gone to my parents' house. Anyway, what should I do? Make a phone call? or what?
I live in MA, but when I went to jury duty the guy in charge said they are generally very accommodating to people who actually try to serve. Its the ones that blow it off completely that won't get consideration. He said if you can't make your date, call to reschedule or at worst show up some other day in the same general time frame and explain your situation. Make an effort, and they will generally be nice. At least that what he said.
I'm willing to bet if you just showed up on the wrong day (off by one) they wouldn't make a big deal out of it at all. They most likely would let you serve on the day you showed up. If you show up willing to serve, you clearly aren't trying to shirk your duties.
#18
Old 08-29-2011, 05:12 PM
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I missed a summons in St. Louis County court (just flat out forgot the date). I called, explained, and they rescheduled for later.
#19
Old 08-29-2011, 05:14 PM
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Can I ask a related question? I've been summoned for jury duty next month and I'm simply wondering whether I'll be asked straight up if there's anything I feel might disqualify me, or if I'll only be asked certain questions and have to stick to that? The reason I'm asking is that I'm friends and family to local police officers and good friends with a forensic psychiatrist who often testifies as an expert in court... it would be awkward, to say the least, to risk being a juror on a case where any of them may show up!
#20
Old 08-29-2011, 05:21 PM
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That's one of the standard questions - in addition to specific people that they know will testify, there are generally "do you know any police officers" (I think the theory is that, in general, the prosecutor would want to keep you and the defense drop you).

But if you know someone who specifically be involved in a trial, you won't sit on that jury.
#21
Old 08-29-2011, 05:25 PM
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mnemosyne, I once got as far as being in the court room when potential jurors were being questioned by the defense and prosecuting attorneys. Folks that knew someone who would be involved in the trial got deferred by one lawyer or the other, so there would be no possibility of bias in either direction.
#22
Old 08-29-2011, 05:43 PM
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Besides the standard specific questions, we were asked if there were any reason why we should not serve. I'm pretty sure you'll have an opportunity to raise your issue.
#23
Old 08-29-2011, 05:59 PM
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To add. In my county we get one free postponement, no questions asked. So I agree that calling is going to be fine. Our daughter is living in Germany, so when she got a notice we wrote that on the form and sent it back, with no problems.

Based on how few people do not respond when the roll is called in the jury room, compliance seems to be pretty good. In any case, serving on a jury is an illuminating experience.
I don't know about other places, but around here the judge is not very quick at excusing people. I was in the pool for a capital murder trial, and being against capital punishment did not get an immediate dismissal - or even objections on religious grounds. My sens is that the judge has heard it all, so you need a very good reason to be excused.
#24
Old 08-29-2011, 06:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nivlac View Post
If a jury summons was sent by regular mail, so there's no proof of receipt, how can a court rule that someone has intentionally ignored a summons? Of course, if a second summons is also ignored, then maybe some case can be built. However, even then, maybe the intended recipient of the summons has moved. So I don't quite understand how a court can effectively enforce what is essentially a voluntary service. A very important, necessary service IMO, but one that must rely on volunteers that are recruited via jury summons.
Plenty of scenarios where they could prove you willfully ignored a summons. If you are willing to lie and potentially commit perjury to make your defense it does make it harder to prove but then you've moved into the area of criminal behavior rather then just being negligent.

"Did you receive your summons?" "Yeah I did but I couldn't be bothered to show up or give the court a reason why" In that case they've easily established you intentional ignored a summons.

"Did you receive you summons?" "Nope, Never got it." A month later.. "We were concerned about the reliability of the USPS because of the high percentage of lost summons" "In your particular case we were able to contact your postman, he says you where out in the hard when he was delivering and remembers personally handing it to you." Not only have they established you ignored the summons they've also proved you were lying to the court.

Last edited by boytyperanma; 08-29-2011 at 06:13 PM.
#25
Old 08-29-2011, 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by boytyperanma View Post
Plenty of scenarios where they could prove you willfully ignored a summons. If you are willing to lie and potentially commit perjury to make your defense it does make it harder to prove but then you've moved into the area of criminal behavior rather then just being negligent.

"Did you receive your summons?" "Yeah I did but I couldn't be bothered to show up or give the court a reason why" In that case they've easily established you intentional ignored a summons.

"Did you receive you summons?" "Nope, Never got it." A month later.. "We were concerned about the reliability of the USPS because of the high percentage of lost summons" "In your particular case we were able to contact your postman, he says you where out in the hard when he was delivering and remembers personally handing it to you." Not only have they established you ignored the summons they've also proved you were lying to the court.
This last scenario is kind of far-fetched (didn't say impossible, just not very likely). Wouldn't if make more sense for the court to just send a summons via certified mail to establish delivery and receipt of the summons? That would cost the court some money, but why can't the USPS just cut them a break. I bet there would be less people just chucking their summons if they use certified mail. Since they don't use certified mail where I live, I can only conclude that they're happy being dependent on good citizen volunteers to serve. I get a summons every other year and dutifully report to the court. However, I've always been excused from serving. One of these days I may actually get selected!
#26
Old 08-29-2011, 07:56 PM
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A rather long time ago, I served on a jury pool. Not a jury, we just sat there until about 10:30 in the morning, and were told we could go, as everyone had settled or taken a plea bargain. Earlier in the process the judge came in with a list, and called a few names out. (only five or six, with thirty people in the room.) No one answered. The judge said "Ok, I guess those folks like whacking weeds in the sunshine more than sitting in an airconditioned courthouse." Then he walked out. Since the period of jury duty is for two entire weeks, which you seldom actually have to spend even a large fraction of, I imagine the weed whacking could include the entire time period. Unless the weeds cop a plea, that is.

Tris
#27
Old 08-29-2011, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by nivlac View Post
So I don't quite understand how a court can effectively enforce what is essentially a voluntary service. A very important, necessary service IMO, but one that must rely on volunteers that are recruited via jury summons.
I'm sorry, not to jump on you in particular, but this is a pet peeve of mine: jury duty is not "voluntary" any more than paying income taxes is "voluntary." A jury summons is not a recruiting tool; it is a court order.

To the OP: I agree with everyone else who says that you'll be fine. The jury coordinators I've known nave been extremely accommodating for people who make honest mistakes. As long as they take steps to correct them, as you have.
#28
Old 08-29-2011, 08:30 PM
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Originally Posted by nivlac View Post
This last scenario is kind of far-fetched (didn't say impossible, just not very likely). Wouldn't if make more sense for the court to just send a summons via certified mail to establish delivery and receipt of the summons? That would cost the court some money, but why can't the USPS just cut them a break. I bet there would be less people just chucking their summons if they use certified mail. Since they don't use certified mail where I live, I can only conclude that they're happy being dependent on good citizen volunteers to serve. I get a summons every other year and dutifully report to the court. However, I've always been excused from serving. One of these days I may actually get selected!
The Courts haven't had a dire shortage of juries so if the system ain't broke why fix it at a higher cost.

I also kinda feel allowing a system that makes it rather easy for people unwilling to do their civic duty to skip out also helps ensure people that who finally get to the jury box are of a higher caliber and proven they are more willing to do the job prudently.

We could adopt a system that is more forceful in making people serve but overall what would be the benefit? Will punishing the slackers make for a better country? Is forcing people who'd otherwise lie or break the law and skip out serve going to result in better decisions?
#29
Old 08-29-2011, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by boytyperanma View Post
The Courts haven't had a dire shortage of juries so if the system ain't broke why fix it at a higher cost.

I also kinda feel allowing a system that makes it rather easy for people unwilling to do their civic duty to skip out also helps ensure people that who finally get to the jury box are of a higher caliber and proven they are more willing to do the job prudently.
Bolding mine.

Courts arguably have a dire shortage of qualified and representative juries when people selectively duck out because it's not convenient or they can't be bothered.

As to "higher caliber," the way to land on a jury (intentionally or not) is to not have or invoke an excuse that falls into a qualified category (inability to be impartial because of personal/family history, family duties, work duties pretty much sums it up). There's nothiing wrong with retirees, or housewives with child care, or government employees, or the unemployed (all of whom have been heavily represented on juries I've seen/been in the pool for), but neither are these demographics fully representative of the community/possessed of all the myriad collective knowledge/wisdom that a broader sampling brings in from the community. I'm not sure I'd feel like I were getting a "jury of my peers" if eveyone in my demographic (non-minority, working, middle class, who IME are the worst jury scofflaws) opted out because it was just too much of a hassle.
#30
Old 08-29-2011, 11:31 PM
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I missed my date last week...I called they sent another one...dont miss the second one...unless you like trouble.
#31
Old 08-30-2011, 12:08 AM
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Thanks for the answers, everyone! It's more or less what I figured, but thought I'd take the opportunity to ask! I'm looking forward to it...unless it coincides/causes problems with getting a new job. That could be tricky!
#32
Old 08-30-2011, 12:22 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeS View Post
Worst-case scenario? You're found in contempt of court and a bench warrant is issued for you. The next time you're pulled over for a broken taillight, the nice officer runs your name through the computer and discovers this warrant in the system. You're hauled before a judge and fined and/or sentenced to community service.

So yeah. I wouldn't.
Even worst case. It's after hours and you get to spend the night as a guest at the county B&B.
#33
Old 08-30-2011, 03:23 AM
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Originally Posted by mnemosyne View Post
Thanks for the answers, everyone! It's more or less what I figured, but thought I'd take the opportunity to ask! I'm looking forward to it...unless it coincides/causes problems with getting a new job. That could be tricky!
By the way, mnemosyne, jury selection in Canada is not as lengthy a process as it is in the US - there's the general questions that the jduge addresses to the entire jury pool, and then there may be some specific challenges for cause or peremptory challenges, but you won't be grilled as much as is shown on US tv shows.

Also, since you're in Quebec, you've been summoned for a criminal case, as Quebec doesn't use the jury in civil matters.

Curious to hear how it all turns out! (Barring a change in the law, I'll never get to serve on a jury, so I'm always interested to hear other peoples' experience.)

Last edited by Northern Piper; 08-30-2011 at 03:23 AM.
#34
Old 08-30-2011, 08:19 AM
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I exchanged messages with a lady from the jury office. They had my name AND address wrong. They'll only call me back if there's a problem.
#35
Old 08-30-2011, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Hazle Weatherfield View Post
I exchanged messages with a lady from the jury office. They had my name AND address wrong. They'll only call me back if there's a problem.
Hazle, if your parents live in a different jurisdiction than you (typically, county level), you have a valid disqualification. Generally, you are required to respond before your date.

You did handle it properly, BTW.
#36
Old 08-30-2011, 10:17 AM
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I've lived outside the US for several years and from time to time have wondered if I might be setting myself up for trouble when I return, if I did happen to get any jury duty notices while I've been gone. I haven't always kept my forwarding addresses up to date.
#37
Old 08-30-2011, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Northern Piper View Post
By the way, mnemosyne, jury selection in Canada is not as lengthy a process as it is in the US - there's the general questions that the jduge addresses to the entire jury pool, and then there may be some specific challenges for cause or peremptory challenges, but you won't be grilled as much as is shown on US tv shows.

Also, since you're in Quebec, you've been summoned for a criminal case, as Quebec doesn't use the jury in civil matters.

Curious to hear how it all turns out! (Barring a change in the law, I'll never get to serve on a jury, so I'm always interested to hear other peoples' experience.)
I'm actually kind of looking forward to it, unless it prevents me from having job interviews or some other such inconvenience. I knew it would be a criminal case, which could be interesting, but also likely to be kind of long, no? My brother was dismissed from serving a year or two ago, and he later found out that that case went on for something like 4 months!

I was somewhat pleasantly surprised to see how prospective jurors are paid; cost of transit and/or $0.45 per km and parking fees are covered. Something in the range of $9 for breakfast, $14 for lunch and $30(IIRC) for supper. If retained for jury duty, jurors are paid $90 a day and up to $130 for hotel/accomodations. I always thought it was much less than that. Since I am, at present, unemployed, it doesn't seem like such a bad deal, though it is admittedly less than I expect to make when I start working!
#38
Old 08-30-2011, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Hazle Weatherfield View Post
Well, I'm screwed then! I rec'd the summons at my parents' house and they passed the info along to me; however, I thought the date was for tomorrow, but it was today.

A related question. Say the notice had gotten sent to a previous address of mine and the current residents just tossed it in the trash. I would never have even known about this summons if it hadn't gone to my parents' house. Anyway, what should I do? Make a phone call? or what?
Yeah - contact them. They're not really out to GET people who've missed jury duty, they're probably quite willing to reschedule you. It's the people who miss, and do NOT check in, who get them mad. So I've heard, anyway.
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