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#1
Old 11-11-2011, 02:10 AM
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I work in a military prison. Ask me anything.

As requested by this thread. I work in the military's only maximum security prison. My responsibilities include conducting an initial mental heath assessment and a risk assessment for new inmates sentenced to the USDB. As per my leadership, there are two types of questions I cannot answer:

1. Specific information about an inmate. (If you ask me is PVT Snuffy inside my prison, I cannot answer that)

2. Details about the facility. (I am not going to tell anyone how high the fences are, or what time is shift change.)

Other than that, ask away. The people that are sentenced to the USDB are all Servicemembers at the time of their confinement. The sentences that I work with are from five years to death sentence inmates. The inmates with less than a five year sentence are confined to a regional facility.

SFC Schwartz
#2
Old 11-11-2011, 02:31 AM
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I see that your facility is a joint services prison. I'm assuming you're an Army Sergeant First Class?
#3
Old 11-11-2011, 02:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
I see that your facility is a joint services prison. I'm assuming you're an Army Sergeant First Class?
That is correct on both counts. We accept inmates from every branch of service. And I am a Sergeant First Class.

SFC Schwartz
#4
Old 11-11-2011, 02:52 AM
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So, you're a mental health specialist by trade, right? Did you just get assigned there at random, or is it one of those things you have to volunteer and be selected for?
#5
Old 11-11-2011, 02:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
So, you're a mental health specialist by trade, right? Did you just get assigned there at random, or is it one of those things you have to volunteer and be selected for?
Most of the mental health specialists I work with sort of got drafted to work at the USDB. I requested the assignment. I have wanted to work with new inmates at a maximum security prison since I can remember. I think Johny Cash or Elwood Blues had something to do with that.

SFC Schwartz
#6
Old 11-11-2011, 03:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSG Schwartz View Post
Other than that, ask away. The people that are sentenced to the USDB are all Servicemembers at the time of their confinement. The sentences that I work with are from five years to death sentence inmates. The inmates with less than a five year sentence are confined to a regional facility.

SFC Schwartz
First, probably more of a history question, but I remember growing up, there were quite a few military prisons. leavenworth being the most famous, but also Portsmouth Naval prison and of course LBJ in Vietnam. Did the corrections facilitys get downsized, with the reduction in forces ?

Second, I imagine that you probably seen the movie, the last castle. How many things were wrong with that film, and did they get anything right.

Declan
#7
Old 11-11-2011, 03:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSG Schwartz View Post
Most of the mental health specialists I work with sort of got drafted to work at the USDB. I requested the assignment. I have wanted to work with new inmates at a maximum security prison since I can remember. I think Johny Cash or Elwood Blues had something to do with that.

SFC Schwartz
Is the medical staff there all Army, or multi-service? Is there a full medical facility (Lab, Radiology, OR, etc), or just a clinic?
#8
Old 11-11-2011, 03:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Declan View Post
First, probably more of a history question, but I remember growing up, there were quite a few military prisons. leavenworth being the most famous, but also Portsmouth Naval prison and of course LBJ in Vietnam. Did the corrections facilitys get downsized, with the reduction in forces ?

Second, I imagine that you probably seen the movie, the last castle. How many things were wrong with that film, and did they get anything right.

Declan
The Castle is right up the street from where the new USDB is. I have not seen the movie, but I have talked to some inmates who swear they were the inspiration for the film. The prison today is much more modern without bars to the cells, but steel doors. If you came in through the front and did not look around until you were inside, you would think you were in a hospital.

There are still a lot of regional confinement facilities. Korea, Germany, Ft. Lewis in Washington State, and Charleston, South Carolina all have facilities for those who are sentenced to less than five years. There is also a confinement facility at Ft Leavenworth. It is new (well opened in the last five years.) The USDB used to house those sentenced to anything from one day to Life without Parole. Someone in Congress figured that was a bad idea and more of the JRCF's (Joint Regional Confinement Facilities) were created, such as the one at Ft Leavenworth, or at Ft Lewis.

SFC Schwartz
#9
Old 11-11-2011, 03:20 AM
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Is there any kind of segregation between enlisted men/women and officers, and are they segregated? Or is there any reference to rank at all?
#10
Old 11-11-2011, 03:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
Is the medical staff there all Army, or multi-service? Is there a full medical facility (Lab, Radiology, OR, etc), or just a clinic?
We have a few Air Force personnel in the mental health section. We are part of the Directorate of Treatment Program (DTP) which includes the physical health section. We can do lab work as needed and X-rays. There is also a dentist two days a week. If an inmate has a need that cannot be met by the clinic, there is a full service clinic on post. For the most part, the doctor will come from the clinic to the inmate. Sometimes the inmate will be taken to the outside facility. We have even had some inmates go to an area hospital if the need arises.

SFC Schwartz
#11
Old 11-11-2011, 03:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Koxinga View Post
Is there any kind of segregation between enlisted men/women and officers, and are they segregated? Or is there any reference to rank at all?
The female inmates go to San Diego, IIRC. We house only males. Everyone confined in my facility is reduced in rank, generally to E-1, the lowest enlisted rank. However, you do not have rank when you are in confinement. We do have some officers who think they can still wear their rank even though they are confined. (Sort of like Col Hogan in Hogan's Heroes) It doesn't happen. The former Officers are housed the same as the former Enlisted. They are all referred to as "Inmate SoandSo"

SFC Schwartz
#12
Old 11-11-2011, 05:29 AM
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What happens to inmates that get out? Do they still get any retirement benefits, GI Bill access, etc.? Do the inmates seem to still act 'military' (if that makes sense) or they act like inmates at any other prison?
#13
Old 11-11-2011, 06:01 AM
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One, rather morbid question, first; what are the most common reasons for confinement in your prison? I'd guess you've got more towards the five year end of the scale than the death end. Secondly, are there any very general similarities between the inmates (other than their service, obviously), or do you have a psychologically very diverse population?
#14
Old 11-11-2011, 06:18 AM
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Excuse my ignorance, but I guess that is what this thread is for!

If a military person commits a crime, do they go to military prison? What if the crime is a 'civil' crime rather than a 'military' crime, do they still go to military prison or do they go to a state prison?
#15
Old 11-11-2011, 06:24 AM
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Is the plaid car still on post? Who owns it? I often tell the story of it, but I have no idea what make or model it is.
#16
Old 11-11-2011, 06:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandra_nz View Post
Excuse my ignorance, but I guess that is what this thread is for!

If a military person commits a crime, do they go to military prison? What if the crime is a 'civil' crime rather than a 'military' crime, do they still go to military prison or do they go to a state prison?
I'll add to this: when their term of service is up, do they have the chance to transfer to a civilian jail, or do they have to remain in a military jail? I'm guessing the latter if you deal with lifers. If so, has the legality of remaining under military jurisdiction even when 'officially' a civilian ever been challenged?
#17
Old 11-11-2011, 08:09 AM
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Originally Posted by jjimm View Post
I'll add to this: when their term of service is up, do they have the chance to transfer to a civilian jail, or do they have to remain in a military jail? I'm guessing the latter if you deal with lifers. If so, has the legality of remaining under military jurisdiction even when 'officially' a civilian ever been challenged?
Different country, but an anecdote from my brother Ed's military service. It was at the tail end of the Spanish draft: full service time for drafted men was under one year. Draftees were always assigned within their military region, but those are bigger than the civilian ones; Ed was in Saragossa and there were a lot of guys from Barcelona in the same group. Midsummer celebrations are huge in Barcelona but almost nonexistant in Saragossa; the Barcelona guys were surprised they wouldn't get the day off* and wanted to go see the Captain and tell him they were just taking it, ok? The other recruits and a couple of noncoms sat them down and explained, very slowly, that if ten guys go see the Captain and inform him that they're going AWOL, under the Spanish military code that counts as a mutiny and they would have been in for a 9 months' minimum sentence - which was three months more than what was left in their service period.

And yes, they would have had to fulfill it completely, and in a military prison.


* No, they weren't very smart. A couple of them had gotten to Basic without acceptable ID, been sent back home to get it, which of course delayed their in-processing by a couple of days, and thus they'd had to spend their first weekend in military jail for "failure to appear". Note that in Spain you're supposed to have such ID on you at all times or be able to produce it within the time needed to go home/the hotel and grab it.

Last edited by Nava; 11-11-2011 at 08:11 AM.
#18
Old 11-11-2011, 10:43 AM
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What kind of training did you receive to be a mental health specialist? Do the inmates get psychotherapy if they need it?
#19
Old 11-11-2011, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Revenant Threshold View Post
I'd guess you've got more towards the five year end of the scale than the death end.
Death end?
#20
Old 11-11-2011, 11:30 AM
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Are there a lot of inmates? I know this may be crazy, but I wouldn't think there would be a lot of crimes in the military that call for max security. Then again, the day that I was flying out of Turkey, one of the MPs was escorting a soldier who hit his buddy over the head with a bottle of Jack Daniels. So yeah, that kind of stuff happens, I guess.

What's the general demeanor of the inmates? Are they all tough and hard on each other like the sterotypical prison, or do they just kind of sit there all day?

Have you ever seen The Package? One of my favorites from the early 90s, but is very outdated now.

And thanks for serving as well.

Last edited by Intergalactic Gladiator; 11-11-2011 at 11:31 AM.
#21
Old 11-11-2011, 11:32 AM
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Originally Posted by EvilTOJ View Post
What happens to inmates that get out? Do they still get any retirement benefits, GI Bill access, etc.? Do the inmates seem to still act 'military' (if that makes sense) or they act like inmates at any other prison?
Most of the inmates confined have lost all pay and benefits. However, the GI bill is not one of the benefits they lose. The inmate must pay for college up front, but can get reimbursed through the GI Bill. They don't get any retirement benefits, however they can invest a portion of they pay they earn while in prison towards retirement.
Most inmates will do some college while confined, if for no other reason, it looks good to the parole board, and almost everyone will learn a job skill.
Our inmates are different. I have heard from people that have either worked in or been sentenced to a federal prison. The inmates confined at the USDB have a baseline level of intelligence and a level of discipline and respect that you don't find in the federal prison.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Revenant Threshold View Post
One, rather morbid question, first; what are the most common reasons for confinement in your prison? I'd guess you've got more towards the five year end of the scale than the death end. Secondly, are there any very general similarities between the inmates (other than their service, obviously), or do you have a psychologically very diverse population?
The most common offense is child sex offenses. We don't see a lot of short sentences. Of course, we don't get a lot of guys getting death sentences either. I have inprocessed a few with a life sentence for murder, and one who got 12 years for murder. So, the sentence range has a lot of variation. We do have a pretty diverse population. We do have a few with mental disorders, and a few with personality disorders, but for the most part, not a lot, because they would not have been qualified for enlistment anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sandra_nz View Post
Excuse my ignorance, but I guess that is what this thread is for!

If a military person commits a crime, do they go to military prison? What if the crime is a 'civil' crime rather than a 'military' crime, do they still go to military prison or do they go to a state prison?
Generally, if a person is on active duty when he commits his crime, the military will get the first shot at prosecution. There are times where both the military and the civilian side will get charges on a person, which would mean that when they get out of the USDB, they may have a sentence in a state pen. I don't really know how it is decided who get to prosecute for what.

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Originally Posted by Paul in Qatar View Post
Is the plaid car still on post? Who owns it? I often tell the story of it, but I have no idea what make or model it is.
Apparently not. I got no idea what you are talking about.

SFC Schwartz
#22
Old 11-11-2011, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by jjimm View Post
I'll add to this: when their term of service is up, do they have the chance to transfer to a civilian jail, or do they have to remain in a military jail? I'm guessing the latter if you deal with lifers. If so, has the legality of remaining under military jurisdiction even when 'officially' a civilian ever been challenged?
When sentence is passed, most of the inmates are discharged from the military. The few who are not, still owe whatever time is remaining. The time a person is confined does not count toward military service. So, if a person got sentence to ten years, and was not given a discharge at the court martial, he would do the ten years in prison, and then go back to active duty. The inmate is not a civilian until the sentence is served. There have been a few that have been transferred to a federal prison, but I don't think that is what you are asking.

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Originally Posted by Brynda View Post
What kind of training did you receive to be a mental health specialist? Do the inmates get psychotherapy if they need it?
I got my bachelors degree prior to enlisting, but the Army has a job in mental health. The Army provides 20 weeks of training at Ft Sam Houston in Texas for this career. The inmates do get psychotherapy. Most will do some sort of group therapy that is crime specific (AA, NA, sex offender therapy, for example), they will also meet with a mental health worker at least every 90 days. Mental health care is available to the inmates round the clock, and we all take turns going on call for the inmates needs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Intergalactic Gladiator View Post
Are there a lot of inmates? I know this may be crazy, but I wouldn't think there would be a lot of crimes in the military that call for max security. Then again, the day that I was flying out of Turkey, one of the MPs was escorting a soldier who hit his buddy over the head with a bottle of Jack Daniels. So yeah, that kind of stuff happens, I guess.

What's the general demeanor of the inmates? Are they all tough and hard on each other like the sterotypical prison, or do they just kind of sit there all day?

Have you ever seen The Package? One of my favorites from the early 90s, but is very outdated now.

And thanks for serving as well.
Thank you. We have over 400 inmates. Not a lot on max security, we have a lot on medium and a few on minimum, there are even a handful of trustees who don't even live in the prison. For the most part, the inmates are well disciplined. You don't see a lot of fights, and rape is almost unheard of. As the inmates say, you can get raped if you ask for it, but it isn't forced on you. The older inmates and the long term inmates try to keep things quiet by teaching the new inmates how things are done. There is still enough of that military mindset where the new inmates want to do the right thing.

SFC Schwartz
#23
Old 11-11-2011, 12:47 PM
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What's the recidivism rate like?

You said that you do risk assessments of new inmates - what risks are you assessing? Likelihood of violence, escape, suicide, other? How do you determine if someone is low or high risk? What might lead you to make a mistake in that process? Small questions, I know.
#24
Old 11-11-2011, 12:56 PM
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Thanks for taking the time to do this! I, like many other Dopers, greatly appreciate the opportunity to learn about interesting professions and environments.

My question: What are some of the more unusual crimes that have landed folks in your prison? With this I am assuming that you learn of the specifics of the crimes during the initial assessment. If that's not true, what do you learn about the inmates?

Edit: Also, thank you for serving the US. Too easily do I forget that the people who make civilized life possible are, in fact, real people.

Last edited by Cryptic C62; 11-11-2011 at 12:57 PM.
#25
Old 11-11-2011, 02:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSG Schwartz View Post
Most of the mental health specialists I work with sort of got drafted to work at the USDB. I requested the assignment. I have wanted to work with new inmates at a maximum security prison since I can remember. I think Johny Cash or Elwood Blues had something to do with that.

SFC Schwartz
You ... were an interesting child.


Is smoking banned?

What do the inmates DO all day? Is there a gym? library? basketball court? TV room? Are they confined to their cells all day? You mentioned classes - do professors come to the facility to teach? What about interenet access?

(This is a fascinating thread - thank you so much for starting it!)
#26
Old 11-11-2011, 02:45 PM
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Wikipedia indicates that commissioned officers are confined at the USDB, while only enlisted personnel with sentences greater than 5 years are confined there. Is this correct? Why not house officers in the other regional facilities?
#27
Old 11-11-2011, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by SSG Schwartz View Post
The most common offense is child sex offenses.
Color me shocked. Is this more about service members having sex with underage girls who are physically mature and just haven't hit their 18th birthday, or is it honest-to-god child rape ala Penn State?

And as others have said, thank you for your service.
#28
Old 11-11-2011, 08:22 PM
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Originally Posted by FlyByNight512 View Post
What's the recidivism rate like?

You said that you do risk assessments of new inmates - what risks are you assessing? Likelihood of violence, escape, suicide, other? How do you determine if someone is low or high risk? What might lead you to make a mistake in that process? Small questions, I know.
I am assessing the inmates risk of harm to self, others, and to the community when they get out of prison. What I do specifically, is use the Hare Psychopathy checklist to determine if the inmate is a psychopath. If so, that makes the inmate ineligible for therapy or treatment groups. Their mental health needs are still taken care of, but they would only learn how to be a better criminal if we put them in treatment groups. The Hare is a semi structured interview, and my assessment is reviewed by a licensed provider, so there is not much of a chance of error.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryptic C62 View Post
Thanks for taking the time to do this! I, like many other Dopers, greatly appreciate the opportunity to learn about interesting professions and environments.

My question: What are some of the more unusual crimes that have landed folks in your prison? With this I am assuming that you learn of the specifics of the crimes during the initial assessment. If that's not true, what do you learn about the inmates?

Edit: Also, thank you for serving the US. Too easily do I forget that the people who make civilized life possible are, in fact, real people.
Thank you.
I learn the specifics of the crime before the inmate arrives. One of the things that I do is review the charges, investigation information, and the result of the trial. One of the ones that I had was almost textbook, word for word, a Chris Hansen type of predator. I had another one who beat his wife to death with a bat, then cleaned her up, and out of love, he says, he had sex with her corpse for the next two days before he turned himself into the police. Not a lot of guys that do fun crimes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
You ... were an interesting child.


Is smoking banned?

What do the inmates DO all day? Is there a gym? library? basketball court? TV room? Are they confined to their cells all day? You mentioned classes - do professors come to the facility to teach? What about interenet access?

(This is a fascinating thread - thank you so much for starting it!)
Smoking and all tobacco products are banned inside the USDB. They banned it about five years ago, without a huge outcry. Most of the inmates have jobs. Some of the jobs available are in the dining facility, laundry, woodworking, and metal shop. So, they get up in the morning, go to work, and then at night they can hang out and watch TV in the common areas if they want to. There is a gym, library, jogging track, and basketball court. There is also a music room where the inmates can learn to play an instrument or sing. So the only way they should be bored is if they really try to do nothing.

The college classes are correspondence courses, as the inmates are not allowed internet access for any reason. They can buy and use a word processor if they make it to minimum security. It makes it challenging for the inmates to get a degree that they want, as they have to find an accredited college that still uses pencil and paper assignments.

SFC Schwartz

Last edited by SSG Schwartz; 11-11-2011 at 08:23 PM.
#29
Old 11-11-2011, 08:32 PM
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Originally Posted by MOIDALIZE View Post
Wikipedia indicates that commissioned officers are confined at the USDB, while only enlisted personnel with sentences greater than 5 years are confined there. Is this correct? Why not house officers in the other regional facilities?
Smart ass response: Because officers are a bigger pain in the ass than other inmates.

Real reason: I don't know. Every officer I have met at the USDB has been sentenced to at least eight years. I will walk across the street on Tuesday to see if they have officers there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedda Rosa View Post
Color me shocked. Is this more about service members having sex with underage girls who are physically mature and just haven't hit their 18th birthday, or is it honest-to-god child rape ala Penn State?

And as others have said, thank you for your service.
As much as I hate to say it, yes, for the most part it is men having sex with children as young as 18 months. I don't know if it makes a difference, but most of the victims are step children. There are some in my facility who got confined for having sex with mature teens, but they usually had some heinous detail. Like the 21 year old who had a 16 year old prostitution ring. He had four girls working for him.

SFC Schwartz
#30
Old 11-11-2011, 09:26 PM
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What is the most heinous, evil crime and or criminal you've come across? Of course, without revealing any details that it would be illegal to disclose etc etc.
#31
Old 11-11-2011, 09:31 PM
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Also, has there ever been any inmates you thought were genuinely innocent?
Do you ever form a sort of "friendship" on a professional or personal level with any inmates? Any that you have more respect for than others? Any you have less respect for or are particularly difficult?
What are the racial demographics of the prison like? Any gangs?
#32
Old 11-11-2011, 09:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSG Schwartz View Post
Smart ass response: Because officers are a bigger pain in the ass than other inmates.

Real reason: I don't know. Every officer I have met at the USDB has been sentenced to at least eight years. I will walk across the street on Tuesday to see if they have officers there.



As much as I hate to say it, yes, for the most part it is men having sex with children as young as 18 months. I don't know if it makes a difference, but most of the victims are step children. There are some in my facility who got confined for having sex with mature teens, but they usually had some heinous detail. Like the 21 year old who had a 16 year old prostitution ring. He had four girls working for him.

SFC Schwartz
Wow. I had no idea.

Are these guys that have seen combat?
#33
Old 11-11-2011, 10:06 PM
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Originally Posted by YourAdHere View Post
What is the most heinous, evil crime and or criminal you've come across? Of course, without revealing any details that it would be illegal to disclose etc etc.
The one that has bothered me the most had multiple sex offenses against children over a period of ten years. The most disturbing part for me was he was having sex with his own son. I know there have been a few others that have caused me to sleep badly the night after I interview the inmate, but I try to forget the details as fast as I can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by YourAdHere View Post
Also, has there ever been any inmates you thought were genuinely innocent?
Do you ever form a sort of "friendship" on a professional or personal level with any inmates? Any that you have more respect for than others? Any you have less respect for or are particularly difficult?
What are the racial demographics of the prison like? Any gangs?
There are one or two, that I think may have had luck in their trial. I don't think that they are innocent. I think that they did something that the jury believed deserved a conviction.

I don't make friends with the inmates. There is nothing they can offer in terms of friendship. I'm not rude, and generally the inmates like me, but they do know that there is a line of professionalism that is not crossed. The first time I warn them, the second time I recommend disciplinary action. The inmates know what the limits are. As they are all former military, it is the same level of professionalism they would show their leadership.

I do have respect for all the inmates. I give them the same respect I give all human beings. There are a few that I give a bit more courtesy to. Those are the ones that have been in for a few years and have stayed out of trouble, or they will take one of the new guys who is slipping up and make sure he is set in the right direction.

There are no gangs. Gang members are disqualified from enlisting. Generally, after people enlist in the Military, gangs don't want them anymore. There are racial lines. Mostly because it is the easiest way to divide up the groups. The inmates self segregate into black, white, and hispanic (other). So Native Americans and Asians are usually in the Hispanic group. There are three TV's in each housing pod, as an example, and there is no reason why a white guy can't watch the black TV, and some do. But a white inmate will never hold the remote for the black TV, even if there are no black guys watching it.

The racial divisions also make it easier to make sure that the inmates have a check and balance system if someone gets out of line. If a Hispanic inmate has been stealing, for example, the leader of the Hispanic group will usually talk to the leader of the white and black group before anything is done to the thief. Not that it has to be done, just to make sure all the race leaders know what is happening and can make recommendations.

Thanks for all the questions so far. I am having fun with this.

SFC Schwartz
#34
Old 11-11-2011, 10:08 PM
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Originally Posted by not what you'd expect View Post
Wow. I had no idea.

Are these guys that have seen combat?
About the same percentage as the military that is not in prison. Some have, some haven't, and some were not in long enough to have the opportunity to deploy.

SFC Schwartz
#35
Old 11-11-2011, 10:10 PM
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Did you ever run across people you suspect may have been railroaded in order to cover up the greater crimes of their superiors or to obfuscate the reality of an ugly war, la Fields of Glory or Breaker Morant?
#36
Old 11-11-2011, 10:18 PM
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Originally Posted by SSG Schwartz View Post
There are no gangs. Gang members are disqualified from enlisting. Generally, after people enlist in the Military, gangs don't want them anymore.
Not intending to argue, and I know you see what you see, but you know there are reports this isn't the case. According to some of the less mainstream media sites I've read, some gangs even encourage enlistment by members in order to take advantage of the weapons and tactics training received. Just saying . . .
#37
Old 11-11-2011, 10:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSG Schwartz View Post
There are three TV's in each housing pod, as an example, and there is no reason why a white guy can't watch the black TV, and some do. But a white inmate will never hold the remote for the black TV, even if there are no black guys watching it.
How does this work? He just sits there by himself wishing he could change the channel but he won't pick up the remote? Wht am I missing?
#38
Old 11-11-2011, 10:30 PM
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So is my neighbor still there - the squid who killed off his wife in Norfolk VA and stashed her body in the bath tub, and kept borrowing other peoples bathrooms because 'his bathroom was screwed up' for a month back in the 80s?
#39
Old 11-11-2011, 10:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Koxinga View Post
Did you ever run across people you suspect may have been railroaded in order to cover up the greater crimes of their superiors or to obfuscate the reality of an ugly war, la Fields of Glory or Breaker Morant?
That sounds good in movies, and there is an inmate who killed an Iraqi detainee. He tried to pass the blame on to his subordinate. Didn't get away with it. I don't think any Soldier could come up with a good enough conspiracy and get away with it. The main reason people end up as my guest is because the weren't smart enough to stay out of prison. Put a bunch of these guys together and you get more evidence to convict.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koxinga View Post
Not intending to argue, and I know you see what you see, but you know there are reports this isn't the case. According to some of the less mainstream media sites I've read, some gangs even encourage enlistment by members in order to take advantage of the weapons and tactics training received. Just saying . . .
They told me the same thing when I was out in recruiting. It made it a pain in the ass to put in anyone with a tattoo. I am sure some gangsters have tried to join, and there maybe a couple of gangsters in the military. I don't think there are enough to make a difference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zoid View Post
How does this work? He just sits there by himself wishing he could change the channel but he won't pick up the remote? Wht am I missing?
Take a scene where a white guy is sitting in the black section watching Real Housewives of Atlanta (for some reason, the black inmates love that show). The black inmate with the remote gets up to take a shower. He would take the remote and put it in his cell. Another black inmate could go get the remote, but the white inmate would not be able to change the channel. Even if the remote was left out. The white inmate would not change it. It would be one of those rule violations that would get you at least talked to. If he wants to watch something different, he has to see what the other sections are watching.

SFC Schwartz
#40
Old 11-11-2011, 10:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSG Schwartz View Post
We have a few Air Force personnel in the mental health section.
No doubt, but I think he was asking about staff.

OK, I'll go back to reading the thread quietly now.
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#41
Old 11-11-2011, 10:49 PM
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You mentioned that there are a handful of trustees who aren't actually physically confined to the prison any longer, but they are still technically prisoners.

Do they have to check in every few days?

I assume these are non-violent criminals who are at the end of their time anyway and so have no incentive to go on the lam?
#42
Old 11-11-2011, 11:07 PM
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Originally Posted by aruvqan View Post
So is my neighbor still there - the squid who killed off his wife in Norfolk VA and stashed her body in the bath tub, and kept borrowing other peoples bathrooms because 'his bathroom was screwed up' for a month back in the 80s?
I really can't answer that.

SFC Schwartz
#43
Old 11-11-2011, 11:11 PM
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You talk about the racial divisions. Are there any by branch or arm of service?
#44
Old 11-11-2011, 11:14 PM
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Originally Posted by MPB in Salt Lake View Post
You mentioned that there are a handful of trustees who aren't actually physically confined to the prison any longer, but they are still technically prisoners.

Do they have to check in every few days?

I assume these are non-violent criminals who are at the end of their time anyway and so have no incentive to go on the lam?
They have housing, sort of like barracks, on Ft Leavenworth. They have to get up and go to work everyday. There is a van that arrives to take the inmates to work. If the inmate does not show up for work, the pass list is checked to see if the trustee has a valid pass for the day. If not, someone will be sent out to the housing unit to see if the inmate is sick or overslept. So, the inmates are accounted for everyday they have to work.

You are also correct in your assumption that they have too much to lose. If they attempt to escape, they go from trustee to max security. While on trustee status, they can go home for a week every year. Try telling your wife that you won't be coming home this year or any in the forseeable future because you had a good plan to escape. It won't happen often.

SFC Schwartz
#45
Old 11-11-2011, 11:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AK84 View Post
You talk about the racial divisions. Are there any by branch or arm of service?
Not so much by branch of service. Everyone has a certain amount of "cred." Cred gets you slightly larger portions in the dining facility. Cred gets you control of the TV remote. Cred gets your suggestions taken seriously when there are problems. The Marines usually get more cred than anyone else when they first arrive. Rangers, Special Forces and Snipers get automatic cred when they arrive. The next thing to sort status would be the type of offense. Murder gets you cred. Sex offenses not so much. You can earn it, but you don't start with it.

SFC Schwartz
#46
Old 11-11-2011, 11:39 PM
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What is a squid?
#47
Old 11-11-2011, 11:43 PM
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A member of the Navy.

SFC Schwartz
#48
Old 11-11-2011, 11:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Koxinga View Post
According to some of the less mainstream media sites I've read, some gangs even encourage enlistment by members in order to take advantage of the weapons and tactics training received. Just saying . . .
That seems unlikely. Gangs are trying to do things like sell drugs not start a civil war. The skills they'd need for their business you can pick up in a few days at a firing range. Military skills like calling in airstrikes, firing artillery, driving tanks, clearing minefields, all-terrain recon, launching a surface-to-air missile, and close order marching aren't going to be used in gang fighting.

Heck, a gang leader would probably be better off sending his people to community college to take some business management courses.

Last edited by Little Nemo; 11-11-2011 at 11:49 PM.
#49
Old 11-11-2011, 11:52 PM
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My dad was at Leavenworth (civilian) when I was a kid. He said something about being able to work, but this got me thinking...

I know your site is a different building, but do you get 'work releases' too so that inmates can 'be productive' anywhere? Or are the conditions harsher?

edit: You answered this. Sorry.

Last edited by Farmer Jane; 11-11-2011 at 11:53 PM.
#50
Old 11-11-2011, 11:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSG Schwartz View Post
A member of the Navy.

SFC Schwartz
Thank you, Sir.
This is a term of contempt used by the Marines?
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