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#1
Old 11-11-2011, 07:45 PM
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What do you think about those "Veteran" baseball caps with the service ribbons?

It's very, very common to see older men in public, like in grocery stores, mall, restaurant, etc, wearing those black Veteran baseball caps with various service ribbons related to the individual's service. Here is a picture of what I'm talking about. Lots more examples here.

When I was younger, I once bought one of those hats for my grandpa as a gift (possibly for Veteran's Day). He said he appreciated the gift, but refused to wear it, on the grounds that it constituted bragging. He was opposed to the idea of wearing his veteran status on his sleeve. (He still keeps the hat on a little shelf in his house, along with a large number of other Korean War related stuff.)

How do you feel about those kind of hats? And sometimes it goes far beyond hats, to shirts, jackets, stickers, and a multitude of other decorations - it's not uncommon for me to see guys (along with their cars/trucks and possibly houses) completely decked out in military logos. The Marines seem to be the most likely to do this, in my experience.
#2
Old 11-11-2011, 08:02 PM
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My DH is a veteran of WWII. He served in the Air Force in Australia and New Guinea. I bought him one of those caps a few years ago, and he wore it proudly today for Veteran's Day.

Twenty years ago he wouldn't have worn it.

I think as the veterans get older they become more proud of their military service. When my DH wears the cap inevitably someone will shake his hand and thank him for his service.
#3
Old 11-11-2011, 08:17 PM
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It seems harmless to me. I don't think anything bad about vets who wear stuff like that.
If they want to brag about their service a little, hey, I think they've earned that right.
I certainly would never want to do half the things that military folks have to put up with.
#4
Old 11-11-2011, 08:55 PM
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I think it's cool. You could go to him, shake his hand, and thank him for his service.
#5
Old 11-11-2011, 09:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ignatz View Post
I think it's cool. You could go to him, shake his hand, and thank him for his service.
I like them. I often look at them and offer thanks. I don't wear one and none of the people my age do, but it allows us to offer up thanks to the older generation of warriors.
#6
Old 11-11-2011, 09:31 PM
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What is a "DH"?
#7
Old 11-11-2011, 10:40 PM
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Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
What is a "DH"?
A designated hitter. I'm not sure how JoThrive's DH could have served in World War II and still be fit for Major League play after the DH became the rule in 1973 however.
#8
Old 11-11-2011, 10:50 PM
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I don't like it, but it doesn't get me worked up. I have no problem with people showing pride in their service. I don't have problems with people tooting their own horn, and the ball caps are a small way to show off that pride. Besides, what else you going to do with those mini ribbons?

SFC Schwartz
#9
Old 11-11-2011, 11:16 PM
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Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
What is a "DH"?
Dear Hubby
__________________
Remember this motto to live by: Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather one should aim to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, glass of Scotch in the other, your body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO! Man, what a ride!"
#10
Old 11-11-2011, 11:19 PM
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Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
What is a "DH"?
I think Dh stands for "Darling Husband" if o remember correctly
#11
Old 11-11-2011, 11:22 PM
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I don't mind. They earned their caps, so to speak.
#12
Old 11-12-2011, 12:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Rick View Post
Dear Hubby
I feared as much.
#13
Old 11-12-2011, 03:40 AM
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I like those hats, but wouldn't wear one. I do, however, own two ballcaps with 82nd Airborne logos...
#14
Old 11-12-2011, 05:12 AM
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When visiting the Soviet Union in the late 80s, one still would see many old men wearing red ribbons, and it was understood these were fellows who fought in defense of the Motherland in the Great Patriotic War. They were given a great deal of deference, offered seats on the subways, and so on.

It strikes me as a tad incongruous as an American practice, though.
#15
Old 11-12-2011, 06:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Koxinga View Post
When visiting the Soviet Union in the late 80s, one still would see many old men wearing red ribbons, and it was understood these were fellows who fought in defense of the Motherland in the Great Patriotic War. They were given a great deal of deference, offered seats on the subways, and so on.

It strikes me as a tad incongruous as an American practice, though.
I remember reading a guidebook on the USSR for American tourists (the few who went I suppose), and this was specifically mentioned that the Sovs respected their veterans a lot and that the Americans should not find this odd.
#16
Old 11-12-2011, 09:28 AM
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My almost-80 year old step-father was career USN, starting as enlisted and ending as an officer, during Korea and Vietnam. He says some people can't leave their past behind.

StG
#17
Old 11-12-2011, 10:09 AM
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For a data point, my evil half brother has an entire wardrobe of Army Rangers paraphernalia. (He was in the Army for, like, six months. Certainly not the Rangers.) You should see his Bronze Star certificate! He's holding it in his dating site profile.
#18
Old 11-12-2011, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by StGermain View Post
My almost-80 year old step-father was career USN, starting as enlisted and ending as an officer, during Korea and Vietnam. He says some people can't leave their past behind.

StG
I agree with your stepfather. I don't wear anything ever, and in fact have given my uniform, ribbons, etc. to my grandson, who said he'd like to have them, never marched in any parade, or gone to any reunions. I retired in 1990, and since then have completely avoided places that seem to attract former military guys. It was 20 years of my life, but the day after I retired I was doing something else that required my full attention, and didn't feel like reliving the past. At this point, the only thing left from that time are a few photographs, and I'm thinking of tossing most of them out. All I really need to keep is my DD214.

Last edited by Chefguy; 11-12-2011 at 10:29 AM.
#19
Old 11-12-2011, 12:19 PM
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Some veterans don't want to advertise their military connection, others do as a matter of silently honoring their comrades.
#20
Old 11-12-2011, 12:39 PM
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I'm proud of my service in the US Navy. (1968 - 1972) And, as was mentioned above, as you get older the pride seems to increase. I still keep in touch with some of my shipmates and we try to get together once a year or so. I didn't keep my uniform but I did wear the peacoat till it wore out. I don't have one of those Veteran hats but I've been thinking about getting one. I do have a couple stickers on the car (Navy logo and "Proudly Served"). A little late for a tatoo but looking back I wish I did get one way back when.

Not directly related but my license plates are: IX XI MMI and a "Never Forget" decal sits above them.
#21
Old 11-12-2011, 10:34 PM
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I have ball cap with "ARMY" on it that I rarely wear. It's camoflage, and it doesn't have ribbons on it or anything like that.

It's not sweat-stained like the rest of my caps.

If someone wants to wear a cap with their service ribbons--fine. It's just not my style.
#22
Old 11-13-2011, 12:10 AM
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I saw an older man in a wheelchair last year with a ribboned cap that said "WW II Korea Vietnam". I was pretty impressed and gave him my Flag Day pin to put on the hat. He said "Naw, this thing's got enough crap on it." but he took it anyway.

Should I assume that an older man wearing, say, a Marines jacket actually served? I know a younger guy might be using it for some kind of dating advantage, but I'd hope a senior would have gotten past that foolishness.
#23
Old 11-13-2011, 12:31 AM
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I usually assume that older guys are for real. The ridiculous fake-military posing seems to be mostly a phenomenon of the Internet Generation, bunch of bullshitters that they are.
#24
Old 11-13-2011, 05:07 AM
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My SO is a veteran from the Vietnam era, but it was the AF Reserves. He never served in any kind of military engagement, but that was more luck than anything. He feels guilty every Veteran's Day when he gets a thank you from his company for serving.

He could've served. Might've been called up, but never was. Just worked on planes at Ellington Field.

Doesn't hold himself out as what he calls "a REAL veteran".

Some people hold themselves out and some are realistic, I think.
#25
Old 11-13-2011, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrassyPhrase View Post
My SO is a veteran from the Vietnam era, but it was the AF Reserves. He never served in any kind of military engagement, but that was more luck than anything. He feels guilty every Veteran's Day when he gets a thank you from his company for serving.

He could've served. Might've been called up, but never was. Just worked on planes at Ellington Field.

Doesn't hold himself out as what he calls "a REAL veteran".

Some people hold themselves out and some are realistic, I think.
As I mentioned in another thread: it doesn't matter whether you were rear echelon or front line; what's important is that you did your job and served honorably. I'm a little fuzzy on the reserves issue, though. Do you have to be active duty in order to be considered a vet?
#26
Old 11-13-2011, 12:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
As I mentioned in another thread: it doesn't matter whether you were rear echelon or front line; what's important is that you did your job and served honorably. I'm a little fuzzy on the reserves issue, though. Do you have to be active duty in order to be considered a vet?
Yes, but Active Duty includes deployments, not just serving full time.
(Edit)
I believe that is the policy definition, anyway.

Last edited by YoDoc; 11-13-2011 at 12:49 PM.
#27
Old 11-13-2011, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Argent Towers View Post
The ridiculous fake-military posing seems to be mostly a phenomenon of the Internet Generation, bunch of bullshitters that they are.
I don't know about that--I've run across a lot of not-quite-Nam-aged guys who either wildly over-exaggerate their service, or just make it up out of whole cloth. Of course, pretty much all of those claim to have either been Army Rangers or Navy Seals, so that's a helpful sorting mechanism. That, and how much they talk about it--impe, people who did most talk about it least, and vice versa.
#28
Old 11-13-2011, 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by CrazyCatLady View Post
I don't know about that--I've run across a lot of not-quite-Nam-aged guys who either wildly over-exaggerate their service, or just make it up out of whole cloth. Of course, pretty much all of those claim to have either been Army Rangers or Navy Seals, so that's a helpful sorting mechanism. That, and how much they talk about it--impe, people who did most talk about it least, and vice versa.
+1
#29
Old 11-15-2011, 08:43 AM
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These men and women protected and defended my country - many of them with their lives. And they're still doing it today.

My father was a WW2 vet, as was my uncle and maternal grandfather. My great uncle served in WW1.

They can wear any damn thing they like. We show far too little respect to these people as it is. As far as I'm concerned, a reminder of who and what they represent is a very good thing, indeed.
#30
Old 11-15-2011, 09:51 AM
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As long as they're not lying about having served, I could give a toss what other people are wearing. I do not find it boastful in any way.
#31
Old 11-15-2011, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by CrazyCatLady View Post
I don't know about that--I've run across a lot of not-quite-Nam-aged guys who either wildly over-exaggerate their service, or just make it up out of whole cloth. Of course, pretty much all of those claim to have either been Army Rangers or Navy Seals, so that's a helpful sorting mechanism. That, and how much they talk about it--impe, people who did most talk about it least, and vice versa.
I was a Recon Ranger Seal Beret. They're quite rare.
#32
Old 11-15-2011, 11:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyCatLady View Post
I don't know about that--I've run across a lot of not-quite-Nam-aged guys who either wildly over-exaggerate their service, or just make it up out of whole cloth. Of course, pretty much all of those claim to have either been Army Rangers or Navy Seals, so that's a helpful sorting mechanism. That, and how much they talk about it--impe, people who did most talk about it least, and vice versa.
Bolding mine. This is so true. My boyfriend is a former Army Ranger, and he hardly ever talks about what he did. Some of the stuff he did he's still not allowed to talk about even many years after the fact.

Contrast that with the guy my sister dated who claimed he was a Navy Seal. All these ridiculous stories about how he single-handedly saved the day more times than he could count. We later found out he either flunked out or was kicked out of the Navy after only a few months.

But back to the topic, I have no problem with the Veteran hats.

Last edited by Dr. Girlfriend; 11-15-2011 at 11:48 AM.
#33
Old 11-15-2011, 11:56 AM
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No different than me wearing that "Bermuda" hat I got then I went there, except that these guys had a much more intense vacation experience than me. It's not much different from a concert T-shirt - for a really, really huge event.

The military is all about the badges and ribbons. That is what you get rather than good pay and security. So I can't fault an old guy for showing off a tiny bit.
#34
Old 11-15-2011, 11:58 AM
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The veterans I respect and admire most never spoke about their service unless asked. My asshole neighbor OTOH, I've never seen him without a lot of Vietnam paraphernalia.

That's just my narrow personal experience talking though. Veterans earned the right to wear whatever the hell they want and on Veterans' Day, at parades & funerals, I expect to see service wear.

I still think my neighbor wears an excessive amount of military garb what with his button & patch-laden vest, the ribbon/pinned ball cap, and the vehicles plastered with stickers. But he's a know-it-all douchebag and if he weren't suck a dick, I probably wouldn't raise an eyebrow.
#35
Old 11-15-2011, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Dr. Girlfriend View Post
Bolding mine. This is so true. My boyfriend is a former Army Ranger, and he hardly ever talks about what he did. Some of the stuff he did he's still not allowed to talk about even many years after the fact.

Contrast that with the guy my sister dated who claimed he was a Navy Seal. All these ridiculous stories about how he single-handedly saved the day more times than he could count. We later found out he either flunked out or was kicked out of the Navy after only a few months.

But back to the topic, I have no problem with the Veteran hats.
Perhaps he failed the Seal training, which is more common than not. I had a friend in the Seabees (yup, me and Ward Cleaver) who had been in Seal training, but they discovered a heart murmur and put him out of the program. No shame in not making the grade, but just being in the program for awhile doesn't make you a Seal.
#36
Old 11-15-2011, 12:45 PM
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It's at least fourteen times less tacky than wearing a Super Bowl ring, and nobody makes fun of those.

They can wear period uniforms and carry their Garands, for all I care. They've earned it.
#37
Old 03-18-2013, 02:29 PM
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Displays of being a Veteran

To all of Y'all that are bad mouthing us Veterans, you need to sit down and shut up! For nearly 20 years after I came home from Viet Nam, I still couldn't talk about it, because most of America was sick of hearing about it. That's what the news media did for us. And that's why they don't let them into the desert storm arena. Anyway, back in the the early 70's, if you even mentioned you had spent time in country, you were a target for those fanatics who wanted to shoot us down. I don't wear any of the stuff that shows that I'm a veteran, except for when I go to VA Hospital or when I'm on a float during the the Veterans Day Parade. It's almost overwhelming that it nearly brings tears to my eyes to see the many thousands of people lining the streets, flags waving, screaming Thank You, cheering us on. Some people even run up to us to shake our hands thanking us for serving our country.
We didn't want to go to Viet Nam, but we were considered cowards or traitors if we didn't go. I spent 375 days in Viet Nam dodging bullets everyday. Now in our great Country, you never know where the bullets are coming from or from whom.
As for the guys who try to shove their veteranship down our throats, I can't really speak for them, only that maybe they didn't really serve. Most of us veterans share our experiences with mostly only other veterans. All in all, the reasons why most of us veterans display our colors, is because we are proud of having served our Great Country and that America should never forget why we are a Great Nation! Thank You, CrazeeDave
#38
Old 03-18-2013, 04:29 PM
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I used to own an ice cream store; if you came in wearing one of those hats, your cone was free.
#39
Old 03-18-2013, 04:50 PM
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Originally Posted by chacoguy View Post
I used to own an ice cream store; if you came in wearing one of those hats, your cone was free.
Free ice cream? Shit, gimme that hat.
#40
Old 03-18-2013, 06:39 PM
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Originally Posted by chacoguy View Post
I used to own an ice cream store; if you came in wearing one of those hats, your cone was free.
Now I imagine a whole group of guys sitting out front, passing around the hat and going in one by one.
#41
Old 03-18-2013, 06:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Love Rhombus View Post
Now I imagine a whole group of guys sitting out front, passing around the hat and going in one by one.
Ah, so you're familiar with the Seabees, then.
#42
Old 03-18-2013, 07:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
As I mentioned in another thread: it doesn't matter whether you were rear echelon or front line; what's important is that you did your job and served honorably. I'm a little fuzzy on the reserves issue, though. Do you have to be active duty in order to be considered a vet?
When this thread popped up, I realized that I never answered your question. Evidently, if you served and you were honorably discharged, you are a veteran. He actually didn't even serve his whole enlistment. As he tells it, at the time, if you were in the reserves and you got sent overseas for your job, your enlistment would be paused. If you had a year left, when you got back you still have a year left.

I think he had like a year and a half left and when he got back, the Vietnam Conflict was beginning to be over. His unit? (I have no idea what things are called in the military.) had been disbanded and b/c his time left was so short no other one would pick him up. So, honorably discharged.

He did the whole boot camp "get your head shaved, run til you puke' stuff.

We have pics of him and his mom at the AFB, so it's not made up.

Sorry it took me two years to get back to you
#43
Old 03-18-2013, 08:46 PM
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I am a five year Army vet, no combat, cold war only. I am grateful for that. I don't mind people wearing them, hell they earned them.

I do have a problem with them wearing them indoors. I was raised that gentalmen don't wear hats indoors. All vets were trained that one does not wear his/her cover indoors unless under arms so they should know better. But I feel this way about all hats on men indoors. No hijack intended.
#44
Old 03-18-2013, 09:24 PM
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Originally Posted by CrazeeDave View Post
To all of Y'all that are bad mouthing us Veterans, you need to sit down and shut up!
Who was badmouthing Veterans? Lighten up, Francis.
#45
Old 03-18-2013, 10:28 PM
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Originally Posted by shiftless View Post
No different than me wearing that "Bermuda" hat I got then I went there, except that these guys had a much more intense vacation experience than me. It's not much different from a concert T-shirt - for a really, really huge event.
From Good Morning, Vietnam
Quote:
Lt. Steven Hauk: Who do we have slated for live entertainment in November?
Phil McPherson: Well, we originally wanted Bob Hope, but it turns out he won't come.
Lt. Steven Hauk: Why not?
Edward Garlick: He doesn't play police actions, just wars. Bob likes a big room, sir.
#46
Old 05-19-2017, 05:01 PM
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I wear the hat now at the age of 66. I was a Dust-Off medic in Cu Chi 1969 -70. For many years I could not say the word "Vietnam". Now I wear the hat hoping to meet someone that was "there". We only wanted to live long enough to make it back to the "world". Alive.
#47
Old 05-20-2017, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Free ice cream? Shit, gimme that hat.
Well now - he didn't say the ice cream IN the cone was free.

When my dad wore his veteran hat, it was in hopes of making a connection w/ another veteran. Much as he dislikes people in general, he has fraternal respect for any and all vets.
#48
Old 05-21-2017, 12:27 PM
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I'm cool with it. I think the hats are ugly but just cause I don't like them doesn't mean I think other vets shouldn't wear them if they want. Hell they earned it.
#49
Old 05-21-2017, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by BrassyPhrase View Post
My SO is a veteran from the Vietnam era, but it was the AF Reserves. He never served in any kind of military engagement, but that was more luck than anything. He feels guilty every Veteran's Day when he gets a thank you from his company for serving.

He could've served. Might've been called up, but never was. Just worked on planes at Ellington Field.

Doesn't hold himself out as what he calls "a REAL veteran".

Some people hold themselves out and some are realistic, I think.
My uncle worked on C-119's at Ellington during that period--so he had to belong to the Reserves. He'd done his own active duty during the Korean War--fixing jets in Japan. On the way back from the yearly service, the plane crashed; the mechanics riding in the cargo bay bailed out but the flight crew died. My uncle found another job since he didn't want to fly any more. Even the "safest" duty can have risks.

The only vets I see in real life (as apposed to assholes on the internet) wearing those caps tend to be old guys in wheelchairs in the Medical Center. Good for them
#50
Old 05-21-2017, 06:00 PM
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Re those who wear them all the time and not just on holidays I think it's a last gasp way for old guys to say "I mattered" instead of just being a shuffling old nobody. I would never do that even if I served but I understand the motivation. People want to be acknowledged.

Last edited by astro; 05-21-2017 at 06:01 PM.
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