View Poll Results: What do you call a unit of bacon?
Piece 54 16.27%
Slice 71 21.39%
Strip 158 47.59%
Rasher 47 14.16%
Something I've missed 2 0.60%
Voters: 332. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-08-2013, 01:06 PM
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What do you call an individual unit of bacon?

Ha ha, "A whole pig!" While I certainly agree (I have eight pieces in the oven right now ), I want to know what you call one unit of bacon. Where you're from might be interesting, too.
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Old 02-08-2013, 01:09 PM
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A single piece of bacon is a slice, or a strip. A rasher is a SERVING of bacon, consisting of several slices.

Unless, of course, you are someone like my husband with a voracious bacon appetite. Then a serving would be an entire side of bacon, fried up crisply.


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Old 02-08-2013, 01:12 PM
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Probably strip or rasher. All of those are possibilities, though; I'm not sure I have a clear favourite.
Old 02-08-2013, 01:13 PM
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"Side of bacon" sounds right to me. And a piece of bacon is a strip or a slice.
Old 02-08-2013, 01:14 PM
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Rasher is rarely heard on this side of the pond. Slice, slices, serving.

Anyone else use a Zik-Zak Electric Bacon Straightener? It lets you be rasher with your rasher.
Old 02-08-2013, 01:15 PM
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The smallest unit of bacon is a strip. A serving of bacon is properly referred to as 'all of it'.

ETA: A 'bacon straightener'? Please tell me you're making that up, or that it's something less stupid than I think.

Last edited by Regallag_The_Axe; 02-08-2013 at 01:16 PM.
Old 02-08-2013, 01:25 PM
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Of course, they don't have proper bacon in America anyway.
Old 02-08-2013, 01:27 PM
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Slice. Or possibly strip. I have never heard "rasher" outside of UK usage.
Old 02-08-2013, 01:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Regallag_The_Axe View Post
ETA: A 'bacon straightener'? Please tell me you're making that up, or that it's something less stupid than I think.
I am not making it up. I saw an ad for it with a very well-known spokesman.
Old 02-08-2013, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by njtt View Post
Of course, they don't have proper bacon in America anyway.
"Unsmoked bacon"? Um... I'll just let that stand on its own.
Old 02-08-2013, 01:30 PM
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Usually a piece of bacon, tho I have used slice & strip before too.
Old 02-08-2013, 01:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VOW View Post
A single piece of bacon is a slice, or a strip. A rasher is a SERVING of bacon, consisting of several slices.

Unless, of course, you are someone like my husband with a voracious bacon appetite. Then a serving would be an entire side of bacon, fried up crisply.


~VOW
No, the primary definition of rasher is "a thin slice of bacon".
Old 02-08-2013, 02:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NitroPress View Post
Rasher is rarely heard on this side of the pond. Slice, slices, serving.

Anyone else use a Zik-Zak Electric Bacon Straightener? It lets you be rasher with your rasher.
Cook your strips, slices, and/or rashers in the oven and they will always come out straight.
Old 02-08-2013, 02:17 PM
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Why is straight bacon desirable? I don't mind the curls. In fact, I kind of like them
Old 02-08-2013, 02:18 PM
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What do you call an individual unit of bacon?

"Not enough."


edit: In my brain I answered "strip" but when I thought about conversations in my real life I usually say "piece." I'm in Florida.

Last edited by Johnny Bravo; 02-08-2013 at 02:19 PM.
Old 02-08-2013, 02:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VOW View Post
A single piece of bacon is a slice, or a strip. A rasher is a SERVING of bacon, consisting of several slices.
Hmm... I'll admit to being unsure, but this was not my understanding when I posted the poll. Prior to a few years ago (I'm 39), I thought a "rasher" was the whole package from the store, generally a pound. I've been corrected several times since then, and now I wonder if I was corrected incorrectly.

Edit : I see that I was corrected correctly:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug K. View Post
No, the primary definition of rasher is "a thin slice of bacon".

Last edited by Yorikke; 02-08-2013 at 02:41 PM.
Old 02-08-2013, 02:42 PM
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Rasher: Australia
Old 02-08-2013, 02:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukeinva View Post
Cook your strips, slices, and/or rashers in the oven and they will always come out straight.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Why is straight bacon desirable? I don't mind the curls. In fact, I kind of like them
Straight bacon strips, like straight lines, are pre-pre-preferred by s-some.
Old 02-08-2013, 02:52 PM
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Originally Posted by NitroPress View Post
Straight bacon strips, like straight lines, are pre-pre-preferred by s-some.
Does not compute. The wrinkles/curls are part of what defines it as bacon. Otherwise it's just thin pork.
Old 02-08-2013, 02:54 PM
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Strip.

And my reaction to the poll was "Hey, so that's what a rasher is!" I'd never come across the term except in fiction set in Britain. Those little British/American linguistic differences leave me wondering what the heck people are eating over there sometimes.
Old 02-08-2013, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Doug K. View Post
No, the primary definition of rasher is "a thin slice of bacon".
Pardon. I was going by wikipedia.

In the "Bacon" entry, I learned more than I could ever possibly want to know about what constitutes bacon in every municipality across the globe.

And now I want a bite of it ALL.


~VOW
Old 02-08-2013, 02:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Doug K. View Post
Does not compute.
That's as straight as it gets.
Old 02-08-2013, 03:03 PM
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i went with slice, strip a close second. I assumed by unit it would be the smallest piece normally seen. Certainly 1 slice or strip is not a serving.
Old 02-08-2013, 03:07 PM
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If I'm not mistaken, pieces of so-called "streaky" bacon such as you're served in the US are referred to as strips (which accurately describes their form). They can be either thick or thin.

The bacon you get in GB and, I believe Ireland, are fairly round in shape, with more pink meat in proportion to fat (as if they were cut from pork chops). These are what I would call rashers, and the ones I've had are about as thick as a thin slice of streaky bacon.

Also, if I'm not mistaken, they come from different cuts of pork: streaky bacon is basically cured pork belly, while British rashers are from a more meaty (and less fatty) section of the pig.

So-called Canadian bacon is, in my experience, very similar to rounds of ham, while Canada's "back bacon" is very close to British rashers (though they insist on coating it on the outside with corn meal for some reason).
Old 02-08-2013, 03:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Regallag_The_Axe View Post
ETA: A 'bacon straightener'? Please tell me you're making that up, or that it's something less stupid than I think.
When I was in Cub Scouts we used to send the newbs to neghboring campsites to borrow a left-handed bacon stretcher. Sometimes they'd actually come back with some gaget or other. That's when we'd chew them out for not knowing the difference between a left-handed and a right-handed bacon stretcher. Yeah, webelo is just another word for dick.
Old 02-08-2013, 03:08 PM
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I think piece is the word I would most commonly use, but I might say strip as well. Slice is a never, for me. Never even heard of the word rasher.
Old 02-08-2013, 03:09 PM
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A "bacon straightener" is, I believe, nothing more than a weight you apply to a piece of streaky bacon to keep it from shriveling as it fries. Some diners do the same thing to hamburgers to make sure they fry uniformly, even though it presses out a lot of the beef juices.
Old 02-08-2013, 03:19 PM
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The term I am used to is "piece." "Slice" only works when it's not cooked. It's not in a sliced shape, and can't be sliced off in its cooked form. "Strip" is technically more accurate, but the specificity is unnecessary except when it is added to other foods, as "piece" can also refer to smaller sections that have been cut off, or even real bacon bits. (It can't refer to that fake stuff. It's good, but it's not bacon.)
Old 02-08-2013, 03:20 PM
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Originally Posted by terentii View Post
A "bacon straightener" is, I believe, nothing more than a weight you apply to a piece of streaky bacon to keep it from shriveling as it fries. Some diners do the same thing to hamburgers to make sure they fry uniformly, even though it presses out a lot of the beef juices.
Not an automatic bacon straightener!
Old 02-08-2013, 03:20 PM
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a bacion.
Old 02-08-2013, 03:23 PM
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Breakfast.
Old 02-08-2013, 03:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Slice. Or possibly strip. I have never heard "rasher" outside of UK usage.
It used to be used in the US, though. The only reason I know what a rasher of bacon is is because I wanted to look up what 49ers were being charged over a dollar for in a historical document I'd read.

But now, it's a piece.
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Old 02-08-2013, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by terentii View Post
Also, if I'm not mistaken, they come from different cuts of pork: streaky bacon is basically cured pork belly, while British rashers are from a more meaty (and less fatty) section of the pig.
Yes, American bacon is almost always made from pork belly that is cured and smoked. (Although you can also find jowl bacon, for instance, but that's more a specific Southern US thing.) Being made from belly, it has a high proportion of fat. I believe British styles of bacon are usually back bacon made from a cut that has more loin to it. "Canadian bacon" in the US is usually just cured and smoked pork loin, which is a bit different than what is sold as bacon in Canada.

If you live near a European butcher in the US, you can often find a whole assortment of bacons, from streaky bacon to lean back bacons. Generically, though, "bacon" in the US is made from pork belly.

Last edited by pulykamell; 02-08-2013 at 03:31 PM.
Old 02-08-2013, 03:36 PM
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I feel like I use "piece" for cooked bacon, and "slice" for uncooked.

I voted "piece."
Old 02-08-2013, 04:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Der Trihs View Post
Strip.

And my reaction to the poll was "Hey, so that's what a rasher is!" I'd never come across the term except in fiction set in Britain. Those little British/American linguistic differences leave me wondering what the heck people are eating over there sometimes.
With the horsemeat burgers and lasanga revelations over the past couple of weeks a lot of Brits are probably wondering what the heck we're eating...

Over here i've always known it as a 'rasher'.
Old 02-08-2013, 05:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Lendervedder View Post
I feel like I use "piece" for cooked bacon, and "slice" for uncooked.

I voted "piece."
This is most correct, and therefore, my vote as well.

Thin-sliced, curly bacon is an abomination unto the Lord; The standard for proper bacon preparation is thick-sliced, cooked on a flat griddle with a press on top, done crisply, but not burnt. No curls, no curves, just 3/8" of crunchy, extruded early death. So sayeth the Psalm[/Rev. Roy]

My dear wife began her wily attempt to kill me slowly on New Years Day, waking me to a bacon tower of crispy thick bacon on a plate and a dozen hot Krispy Kreme donuts for breakfast. I have gone along with her plan, so as not to arouse suspicion, but was unable to eat two of the donuts. There have been similar episodes since, which I have documented but not exposed just yet...

To follow the True Path of Bacon, be sure to watch the Historical Documents entitled "The United States of Bacon" on the Discovery channel.
Old 02-08-2013, 05:13 PM
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Uncurly bacon? I weep for our future.
Old 02-08-2013, 05:34 PM
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I'm American. I usually call them strips, but I don't bat an eye at piece or slice.

I'd heard the term rasher in reference to bacon, but wasn't sure whether it referred to a single strip or a group of them. From the linked definitions, it appears that it can mean either. (Enlightenment quickly dissolves back into confusion.... )
Old 02-08-2013, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
"Canadian bacon" in the US is usually just cured and smoked pork loin, which is a bit different than what is sold as bacon in Canada.
Having lived in Canada for some time now, I can assure you that asking for "bacon" at the supermarket will get you strips of cured and smoked pork belly, just like in the US.

Asking for "back bacon" will get you cured pork loin, probably coated in the aforementioned corn meal.

Asking for "Canadian bacon" will get you the same stuff that's put on Egg McMuffins and so-called Hawaiian pizzas; again, to me it's just like eating little rounds of ham.
Old 02-08-2013, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by terentii View Post
Having lived in Canada for some time now, I can assure you that asking for "bacon" at the supermarket will get you strips of cured and smoked pork belly, just like in the US.
Oh, that's good to hear. I was mixing it up with peameal bacon, thinking that was the default, but regular ol' streaky/side/belly bacon is the norm.
Old 02-08-2013, 05:41 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Oh, that's good to hear. I was mixing it up with peameal bacon, thinking that was the default, but regular ol' streaky/side/belly bacon is the norm.
Is peameal made from actual peas, or is it just another name for cornmeal, because that's what I've always thought it was.
Old 02-08-2013, 05:57 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Uncurly bacon? I weep for our future.
I think you're over reacting mate...

Bacon in a pan...

Bacon in the oven...

Both equally good!
Old 02-08-2013, 06:03 PM
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Originally Posted by terentii View Post
Is peameal made from actual peas, or is it just another name for cornmeal, because that's what I've always thought it was.
Used to be yellow peas, but now it's rolled in coarse cornmeal.

I love it.

Last edited by Labrador Deceiver; 02-08-2013 at 06:04 PM.
Old 02-08-2013, 06:04 PM
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"Strip" for American-style bacon, "slice" for back bacon, pancetta, or slab bacon.
Old 02-08-2013, 06:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Lukeinva View Post
I think you're over reacting mate...

Bacon in a pan...

Bacon in the oven...

Both equally good!
I know how to make flat bacon. I just don't get it.
Old 02-08-2013, 06:26 PM
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"Strip" is my choice. I've only ever seen "rasher" on restaurant menus, generally with the size of the order indicated, as Rasher of bacon (3 strips).

Grew up in Ohio, now live in Indiana, so basically lifelong Midwesterner.
Old 02-08-2013, 06:42 PM
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I voted slice, but strip would be OK. Rasher? I'll try to use that term next time we have bacon.

ETA: Bacon in the oven is awesome. Instead of five seconds of perfectly done bacon, between limp and burnt, you've got a couple minutes. And who cares if the bacon is flat. Seriously? That's a disadvantage? That even matters?

Last edited by ZenBeam; 02-08-2013 at 06:46 PM.
Old 02-08-2013, 06:46 PM
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In the UK. The answer here is rasher, which refers to a single slice, of either back or streaky bacon. I didn't realise it meant something else in the colonies...
Old 02-08-2013, 07:59 PM
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What do you call an individual unit of bacon?

A good start.
Old 02-08-2013, 08:12 PM
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I'm in the UK, so I voted for "rasher", but it really depends on what cut I'm buying.

If it's slices of back or streaky bacon (or middle, or Ayreshire Roll), they're rashers, but otherwise it may be medallions, or chops, or a joint. Sometimes I'll buy a half pound of off-cuts to make into soup or a pie, in which case each unit would probably be a "piece" or a "bit".
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