Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 04-21-2013, 07:27 AM
Suspended
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 18,476
Uncomfortable Auto Seat Headrests-Why?

I mean, some of these things actually tilt your head forward-extremely uncomfortable. Why is this? I remember the SAAB cars of the 1970's had cage-like headrests-they were a good design 9they didn't block your backwards vision. Why were these abandoned?
#2
Old 04-21-2013, 01:45 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 157
New anti-whiplash regulations. If you're having trouble sleeping, read the rule here.

As I understand it, the regulations can be met through active or passive means. The passive ones are like you mention - closer to the head. The active ones use some mechanism (springs, etc) to move closer to the head in the even of a rear collision.
#3
Old 04-21-2013, 08:42 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Eastern Connecticut
Posts: 16,520
My issue with 'ergonomic' car seating is the issue ... my back goes innie when the seat is an outie, and vice verse. The little roller thingy that is supposed to be lumbar support in pretty much every car I have driven simply does not adjust to where it would do me any good. I use a small pink pillow I stole from my Mom's house as lumbar support.
#4
Old 04-21-2013, 11:00 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 290
I've seen these new head rests that look like they'd actually tip your head DOWN if you conformed your head to it. They look incredibly uncomfortable. I'd imagine they'd have opposite the intended effect and people would just straight up remove them.

This is coming from someone who religiously adjusts his headrest to a proper position.
#5
Old 04-21-2013, 11:45 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Tel Aviv
Posts: 23,074
You're not supposed to rest your head on the headrest - that's not what it's there for. At least, that's what I was taught.
#6
Old 04-22-2013, 12:45 AM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alessan View Post
You're not supposed to rest your head on the headrest - that's not what it's there for. At least, that's what I was taught.
I agree with this assertion, but these headrests are so angled that the top edge looks like it would contact your head even in a normal seated position! I personally would go batty leaning forward to avoid that, hence my statement that more people than usual would be inclined to simply remove them.

I'm not sure of the best way to search for an image, but they kind of look like this:
(rear) |_/ (front)
#7
Old 04-22-2013, 01:25 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Houston, Texas, USA
Posts: 840
I agree with the OP, but for a different reason. I'm only 5'0". Short, but not extremely short.
Car seats are designed for taller people so no matter how low I adjust the headrest, it falls in the wrong place. It leaves a huge gap behind my neck and pushes my head forward. There's no way to avoid the headrest, it's always in the way!

I also have a problem with the seatbelt. At its lowest position goes right across my neck, ready to strangle me in an accident.
#8
Old 04-22-2013, 05:04 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: N Texas
Posts: 2,719
Quote:
Originally Posted by nion View Post
I've seen these new head rests that look like they'd actually tip your head DOWN if you conformed your head to it. They look incredibly uncomfortable.
They do force your head forward and down. They are maddeningly uncomfortable. I was shopping for a new vehicle 2 years ago, and the level of discomfort seemed to vary a bit between brands, but none of them would allow me to sit up straight. Ford seemed the worst, Toyota the best.

After getting the new vehicle home, I removed mine and reconfigured them by a combination of reversing the mount, and liberal application of a pipebending tool. I (and my passenger) can now sit comfortably.

Last edited by pullin; 04-22-2013 at 05:05 AM.
#9
Old 04-22-2013, 06:22 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Chicago, Far Northsider
Posts: 7,813
Apparently, I lean the seat back just enough that me sitting straight takes my shoulders and head away from the back of the seat enough for it not to be an issue. Unless my hair is in a clip. Having my hair clip stab me in the back of the head every time I forget not to move my head one inch backwards is indescribably frustrating.
#10
Old 04-22-2013, 06:29 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 28,977
My headrests are height adjustable. While adjusting, I realized that hey were removable. I removed them, but put them back in for state inspections.
#11
Old 04-22-2013, 08:31 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 6,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alessan View Post
You're not supposed to rest your head on the headrest - that's not what it's there for. At least, that's what I was taught.
Same here. It shouldn't be called a headrest. It's a device to help you against getting whiplash in the event of a crash. Mercedes actually have a headrest "airbag" thing that pops out in the event of a crash; otherwise it just kind of stays out of your way.
#12
Old 04-22-2013, 08:34 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,866
The headrest ( at least in my car) are adjustable, up and down, as well as the fore and aft tilt.
Did you have it tilted forward too far?
#13
Old 04-22-2013, 08:45 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Leaky Heart of America
Posts: 2,417
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
My headrests are height adjustable. While adjusting, I realized that hey were removable. I removed them, but put them back in for state inspections.
That deserves a . I think I'd rather take out my seat belts than the head rests. Maybe not, but it's close. In an accident you're hurtled forward and then bounce backwards; the headrest is there so you don't end up staring out the rear window with your neck wrapped over the top of your seatback.


As for the OP's question, the idea of an uncomfortable headrest doesn't make sense to me. In the cars I've regularly driven my head never comes close to the headrest, so how can it be uncomfortable. What am I missing?
#14
Old 04-22-2013, 09:02 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 28,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baal Houtham View Post
That deserves a . I think I'd rather take out my seat belts than the head rests. Maybe not, but it's close. In an accident you're hurtled forward and then bounce backwards; the headrest is there so you don't end up staring out the rear window with your neck wrapped over the top of your seatback.
I understand your point, but I'm driving 25 mph back-roads and the lack of headrests allows my passenger seat to fold forward fully, as well as making my seat more comfy.
#15
Old 04-22-2013, 09:21 AM
Creature of the Night
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 20,803
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baal Houtham View Post
That deserves a . I think I'd rather take out my seat belts than the head rests. Maybe not, but it's close. In an accident you're hurtled forward and then bounce backwards; the headrest is there so you don't end up staring out the rear window with your neck wrapped over the top of your seatback.


As for the OP's question, the idea of an uncomfortable headrest doesn't make sense to me. In the cars I've regularly driven my head never comes close to the headrest, so how can it be uncomfortable. What am I missing?
I think that the problem with very uncomfortable safety equipment is that the user will try to adjust or remove it. In this process, the user will put him/herself at risk. However, since the user is generally not at a high risk for an accident, the discomfort caused by the safety equipment might very well increase the chances of an accident, if it's left in place.

And count me as another person who is short and can't use the shoulder harness effectively. It hits me in the wrong spot! If I'm in a crash, that thing is going to do more harm than good. The aftermarket adjusters are expensive and ineffective. If I put on my seatbelt at all, I put the shoulder harness behind me, so that I can move around a bit, turn in my seat to look behind me, and generally not get strangled. Things might have changed since I took driver's ed, but I was taught to turn halfway around to look behind me, and not to rely completely on the rear view mirror and side mirrors.
#16
Old 04-22-2013, 10:20 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Betwixt My Ears
Posts: 12,317
Quote:
Originally Posted by pullin View Post
They do force your head forward and down. They are maddeningly uncomfortable. I was shopping for a new vehicle 2 years ago, and the level of discomfort seemed to vary a bit between brands, but none of them would allow me to sit up straight. Ford seemed the worst, Toyota the best.

After getting the new vehicle home, I removed mine and reconfigured them by a combination of reversing the mount, and liberal application of a pipebending tool. I (and my passenger) can now sit comfortably.
Brilliant. Never thought to adjust angle of steel supports. Will do so this week.
__________________
If you want to kiss the sky you'd better learn how to kneel.
#17
Old 04-22-2013, 10:47 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 6,730
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleClogs View Post
...

I also have a problem with the seatbelt. At its lowest position goes right across my neck, ready to strangle me in an accident.
Wow, you really are short!
#18
Old 04-22-2013, 11:03 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Eastern Connecticut
Posts: 16,520
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Bodoni View Post

And count me as another person who is short and can't use the shoulder harness effectively. It hits me in the wrong spot!
Take very heavy duty hair scrunchie, the kind that are about like a small bungee cord. Sit in seat of car, grasp the belt so the strap is lined up and slide doubled scrunchie over the metal tab so that it will hold both layers of the belt together like one of the aftermarket thingies.
Insert metal tab into receiver, slide scrunchie left [in the US] or right [in the UK] as appropriate to make the belt not try and strangle you as you drive. [OK, or sit in a passenger seat.]
#19
Old 04-22-2013, 02:18 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cary, NC
Posts: 5,051
I hate the headrests on my 2012 Honda Odyssey. Especially since I have neck problems, and no human neck should be in the position they require for longer than a few moments. My solution is to use a small cushion behind my mid-back so that my head just barely brushes the headrest. And like SeaDragonTattoo, I can't wear a clip or hair sticks.

For the super-petite problem with seat belts, if you're less than 120 pounds, you could try a booster seat! (Actually, I'm sure there are all kinds of disclaimers and warnings about using it in the driver's seat, but they should totally make them for short grownups to use when driving!)
#20
Old 04-22-2013, 03:21 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: 'burbs of Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 14,011
Funny you should mention it. My SIL and I just rented a Ford Focus for our vacation, and we both mentioned how uncomfortable the headrests were. They thrust our heads forward. Too bad it's so hard to find phone books anymore, cause I sure could have used on.
#21
Old 04-22-2013, 05:29 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Under Oveur & over Unger
Posts: 11,353
Quote:
Originally Posted by PunditLisa View Post
Funny you should mention it. My SIL and I just rented a Ford Focus for our vacation, and we both mentioned how uncomfortable the headrests were. They thrust our heads forward. Too bad it's so hard to find phone books anymore, cause I sure could have used on.
they adjust for tilt and were probably tilted all the way forward.

and even the non-power seats have height adjustment.
#22
Old 04-22-2013, 05:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: slightly north of center
Posts: 4,607
The 2013 Honda Accord has horrible headrests. My SO is taller than me, and it fits him ok. Since he is the main driver for that car, I put up with it. As a passenger, I actualyl have to raise the headrest to it's tallest setting, and let my head sit under the cushion. Otherwise the headrest is pushing my head forward, chin into my chest. I would never buy that car for myself, for exactly that reason.
#23
Old 04-22-2013, 06:33 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Houston, Texas, USA
Posts: 840
Quote:
Originally Posted by aruvqan View Post
Take very heavy duty hair scrunchie, the kind that are about like a small bungee cord. Sit in seat of car, grasp the belt so the strap is lined up and slide doubled scrunchie over the metal tab so that it will hold both layers of the belt together like one of the aftermarket thingies.
Insert metal tab into receiver, slide scrunchie left [in the US] or right [in the UK] as appropriate to make the belt not try and strangle you as you drive. [OK, or sit in a passenger seat.]
Good idea! I've been twisting the belt 5 or 6 times before I buckle. But it's probably not as safe that way.

Again on the subject of headrests, I've always thought the airline seats push your head down at an uncomfortable position too. I'd love to see the shape of this person that they use to model these things for! He must look like the Hunchback of Notre Dame.
#24
Old 04-22-2013, 07:48 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Eastern Connecticut
Posts: 16,520
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleClogs View Post
Good idea! I've been twisting the belt 5 or 6 times before I buckle. But it's probably not as safe that way.

Again on the subject of headrests, I've always thought the airline seats push your head down at an uncomfortable position too. I'd love to see the shape of this person that they use to model these things for! He must look like the Hunchback of Notre Dame.
I take the gel seat pad from my wheelchair [I am NOT leaving a fairly important piece of my equipment where it can be lost or stolen out of the cargo areas of an airport.] and shove it behind my back. It props me forward from the back of the seat by a smidge over an inch and brings my upper shoulders and head far enough away from the seat backs to make the flight worlds more comfortable. The little head pillows they provide I surmise could be used in the same manner.
#25
Old 04-22-2013, 11:03 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,188
I chose to buy a 2007 Accord instead of a newer model because the older head rests were so much more comfortable. I'm dreading the next round of car shopping. I tried one of the newer models and ended up with terrible back pain after only a short drive. I don't like driving with my head forced forward and my chin touching my neck....
#26
Old 04-23-2013, 06:59 AM
Suspended
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 18,476
I still don't understand why the headrests cannot be contoured and comfortable-it would seem to me, that having the head in continuous contact with the rest would prevent whiplash.
#27
Old 04-23-2013, 07:40 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 287
I was car shopping recently and remarked on the uncomfortable headrest. The salesman showed me how to remove it and then put it on backwards so that it wasn't angled so far forward. Might be something to try for those of you in misery.
#28
Old 06-10-2013, 04:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 2
I removed the headrests and reversed them so that they lean toward the rear seats. In doing so, I can tilt the seat back to a comfortable position without my head being bend forward and touching the headrest. This works Great!!

Last edited by wellsgirl; 06-10-2013 at 04:12 PM.
#29
Old 06-10-2013, 04:11 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 2
I removed the headrests and reversed them so that they lean toward the rear seats. In doing so, I can tilt the seat back to a comfortable position without my head being bend forward and touching the headrest. This works great!!
#30
Old 06-10-2013, 07:42 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 28,977
^Driver's & passenger's sides, huh?
#31
Old 06-10-2013, 09:29 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: South Florida
Posts: 5,032
I was thinking she reversed them twice, and they're back to normal.
#32
Old 06-11-2013, 03:43 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Mid Atlantic, USA
Posts: 9,115
This makes me crazy. In the car I usually drive, turning the headrest around moves the contact point about three inches backwards, and that makes it reasonably comfortable, but I drive with my head against it all the time. Note that moving my head away from the rest makes the bent neck WORSE, not better.

In our other car it was practically impossible to lean against the seat back, and so I got curious and measured, and found that the headrest goes six inches forward of the plane of the back of the seat. Six inches! Turning these around also helped.

Somewhere I read that the problem was that car users normally slouch. Well, we don't all do that. And they can't make us start.

Last edited by Napier; 06-11-2013 at 03:43 PM.
#33
Old 06-12-2013, 12:51 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 44
I've noticed the same problem in nearly all of the newer cars that I've driven as rentals. The head restraint will move up and down (about an inch) but any front to back adjustment has been eliminated. I hate them and would end up modifying them if I owned the car.

The seats in my 10 year old SAAB have a mechanism that moves the head restraint closer to your head when needed. Its a simple lever that is activated by your back pressing into the seat. I love SAAB seats - really comfortable and so far safe enough.
#34
Old 06-28-2013, 10:40 AM
Suspended
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 18,476
I just saw a new

Porsch 911-looked like really uncomfortable ones.. (they are integral with the seats)-it looks like your head is pushed a good 6-8" forward. this looks really bad to me..anyone have experience with Porsche seats?
#35
Old 06-28-2013, 11:34 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 1,644
I thought I was the only one who hated this. When I mention it to my friends or family they act like I'm crazy. I am so tired of having to slouch while I drive, it is very tiring. Not only does the seat curve top to bottom along with the unnatural angle of the headrest but it also curves side to side which makes me have to totally round my back.

Who designed these? They certainly didn't do it for humans. Seriously, why are they doing this? It's not for whiplash, that doesn't require your head to be forward, just to not whip back. Why the concave seat backs? I am miserable every time we go on a drive longer than an hour.

OK, I'm wrong. Having the head tilted forward causes fewer whiplash injuries. How many injuries does the forward position cause though?

Last edited by Zulema; 06-28-2013 at 11:38 AM. Reason: because I was wrong
#36
Old 06-28-2013, 11:46 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2011
Location: In the octopus garden
Posts: 521
DH just bought a 2013 Toyota RAV4; I'm the primary driver. The headrests do not adjust fore and aft, just up and down. I'm very petite as well - 4'10" - and yes, it's chin-to-chest time. I'll look into reversing the darned thing. It's driving me crazy!

On the seatbelt front, though, Toyota's made a significant improvement. In my 2002 RAV4, the seatbelt hit me right across the neck too. In the 2013, there's a 'slide and lock' adjustment where you can move the top of the seatbelt down within the frame of the car so that this one actually restrains me across the chest where it's supposed to. I always thought that the old seatbelt was a hazard, but the rest of the RAV4 felt and drove so well, I put up with it. The new RAV4 doesn't fit me nearly as well EXCEPT for the seatbelt. You win some, you lose some, I guess.
#37
Old 06-28-2013, 02:11 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 1
@Zulema: Yes, exactly!!! My husband doesn't mind it, but that's because he slouches and leans the seat back so his upper back and neck and head are no where near the seat!! Many people have suggested to lean the seat back slightly so that your head is not pushed forward. If you do this, then you have to slouch even MORE just to get your back to touch the seat and there is no lumbar/back support this way. I've had whiplash several times, and a fancy headrest doesn't prevent it if you aren't even leaning against the seat! Duh!

Last edited by Kitty5623; 06-28-2013 at 02:13 PM.
#38
Old 12-22-2013, 09:51 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleClogs View Post
Good idea! I've been twisting the belt 5 or 6 times before I buckle. But it's probably not as safe that way.

Again on the subject of headrests, I've always thought the airline seats push your head down at an uncomfortable position too. I'd love to see the shape of this person that they use to model these things for! He must look like the Hunchback of Notre Dame.
And movie theater seats as well! As though we need to be concerned about whiplash in a movie theater!!

I'm 5'6 and my husband is 5'11 and airline and auto headrest positions are uncomfortable for both our heights too. So, it really isn't a height issue.
#39
Old 12-22-2013, 08:44 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,260
Hah, I have this problem too with rental cars. I don't recline in a car, ever. I don't even recline on airplanes, you're welcome all the people in back of me. I prefer to sit upright. Who made the brilliant decision that we are all slouchers?

Last edited by sinjin; 12-22-2013 at 08:44 PM.
#40
Old 12-23-2013, 07:39 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: 51.3180N, 0.7300W
Posts: 2,131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baal Houtham View Post
As for the OP's question, the idea of an uncomfortable headrest doesn't make sense to me. In the cars I've regularly driven my head never comes close to the headrest, so how can it be uncomfortable. What am I missing?
This confuses me too. The headrest in my car is about 6 inches forward of the plane of the seat back, but my head never touches it. Probably because at 6'5" I need the seat leaned back a bit for the headroom. Maybe the people with headrest problems have the seat bolt upright?
#41
Old 12-24-2013, 10:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Dayton Ohio USA
Posts: 27,503
Any headrest that points forward and can't be adjusted is a deal breaker for me. I have a broken bone in my neck and any pressure from the back would quickly cause me grief.

It's a head rest. when I sit back in the seat I want my head supported. All it has to to in a crash is keep one's head from going backwards over the top of the seat.
#42
Old 12-25-2013, 08:05 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 12,512
I've never experienced this in any car I've driven or ridden in. I wonder if some of you folks have the seat back... um ... straight up and down?
#43
Old 05-27-2014, 10:10 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1
Seems it harm more to shorter persons

Quote:
Originally Posted by ralph124c View Post
I mean, some of these things actually tilt your head forward-extremely uncomfortable. Why is this? I remember the SAAB cars of the 1970's had cage-like headrests-they were a good design 9they didn't block your backwards vision. Why were these abandoned?

I agree, I can't stand the angle of new car seat headrest but my husband seems ok with it. I hate the position of headrest every time get into the cars. However, I was told not to reverse the direction of the head rest.
#44
Old 05-27-2014, 10:13 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 28,977
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deyang27 View Post
However, I was told not to reverse the direction of the head rest.
Question authority.
#45
Old 05-27-2014, 01:48 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Within
Posts: 11,870
Quote:
Originally Posted by wellsgirl View Post
I removed the headrests and reversed them so that they lean toward the rear seats. In doing so, I can tilt the seat back to a comfortable position without my head being bend forward and touching the headrest. This works Great!!
Thus probably defeating the safety effect that the headrests were designed for.
#46
Old 05-27-2014, 02:08 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Dayton Ohio USA
Posts: 27,503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baal Houtham View Post
That deserves a . I think I'd rather take out my seat belts than the head rests. Maybe not, but it's close. In an accident you're hurtled forward and then bounce backwards; the headrest is there so you don't end up staring out the rear window with your neck wrapped over the top of your seatback.


As for the OP's question, the idea of an uncomfortable headrest doesn't make sense to me. In the cars I've regularly driven my head never comes close to the headrest, so how can it be uncomfortable. What am I missing?
I have a broken neck. Or more precisely, a broken bone floating in my neck. It's not a little uncomfortable it's a major problem if a headrest pushes my head forward. I've chosen cars based on the headrest situation. It looks like I'll have to do what was mentioned above and reverse a newer model or have it bent to a comfortable position.

As to the bureaucratic jackasses who came up with the new regulations they can rot in hell. I've been in a whiplash accident. If anybody would have problems with a normal headrest it would be me. I walked away with a sore neck that lasted a day.

If your head never touches a newer model headrest it's because you have
your seat tilted so far back you have to arch your head forward to see.
#47
Old 05-27-2014, 02:13 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Dayton Ohio USA
Posts: 27,503
Quote:
Originally Posted by enipla View Post
I've never experienced this in any car I've driven or ridden in. I wonder if some of you folks have the seat back... um ... straight up and down?
If you have the seat tilted back then you're asking for back problems because of the slouching it creates. It should be relatively straight. The headrest should not project into the line formed by the seat.
#48
Old 05-27-2014, 02:57 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Manor Farm
Posts: 17,895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magiver View Post
If you have the seat tilted back then you're asking for back problems because of the slouching it creates. It should be relatively straight. The headrest should not project into the line formed by the seat.
This is absolutely incorrect. You aren't sitting at the dinner table with a static 1 g down load. The supposed "slouch" permits the seat to more fully support the back as well as providing some degree of bolstering (in bucket seats, at least) against the lateral motion which is the largest contributor to stress on the back, especially the lower back. A properly designed seat (e.g. Recaro seats) are designed specifically to a degree of recline.

As others have already noted, the notion that the adjustable upper part of the seat is designed as a "head rest" is incorrect; it is properly speaking a head restraint and is intended to only contact the head in the case of impact. As such, it should be positioned to contact at or above the basilal occipital (starting at the "bump" at the back of the skull just above where the trapezius attaches to the skull. This prevents reward hyperflexion of the neck and the strain associated with subsequent rapid forward advserse movement of the head. (While it is commonly thought that the rearward travel causes the damage, it is actually the movement of the head forward and down while the sternohyoid muscles are in high tension that causes the resulting strain or dislocation in the ligaments of the atlantoaxial and atlantoocciptial joints as well as the anterior longitudinal ligament.) The head should be 2-3" inches away from the restraint.

Stranger
#49
Old 05-27-2014, 10:39 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Dayton Ohio USA
Posts: 27,503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger On A Train View Post
This is absolutely incorrect. You aren't sitting at the dinner table with a static 1 g down load.
take it up with the physical therapist who fixed my back by simply examining how I sit in various chairs. Once I changed the way I sat in the car my back problems went away. YMMV.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger On A Train View Post
As others have already noted, the notion that the adjustable upper part of the seat is designed as a "head rest" is incorrect; it is properly speaking a head restraint and is intended to only contact the head in the case of impact.
And as others have already noted it causes pain. If it's pressing against your head while you sit it's going to cause problems. This isn't up for debate.

I've been in 65 mph crashes and a standard headrest aligned with the rest of the seat did just fine.
#50
Old 06-05-2014, 03:07 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1
Reversing the Headrest

Reversing the headrest is the first thing I do when either buying or renting a car. Otherwise, the forward-tilted headrest puts way too much strain and tension on my neck and upper spine (my upper spine is straight instead of slightly S-curved).
I then place a neck roll for comfort. The back of my head still touches the headrest, but it's not pushing my head forward anymore and therefore is now very comfortable.
The seat position is at a ca. 100 degree angle, which gives me great back support.
(I also use a special memory foam pillow with neck support to sleep, so I'm used to that added support.)
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:54 AM.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: [email protected]

Send comments about this website to:

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: bonemeal bread huge ass holes merovingian matrix david blaine fake bass boat paint omfug meaning ass dimple gamma ray gun absentia movie explanation sheinhardt wig how long is pasta sauce good for in the fridge cork stuck in bottle get your filthy hands off me average cost of cat dental cleaning driving chicago to new orleans drivers ed car two steering wheels unsolicited letter to buy house songs that start with the letter q jelly left out overnight what does ion mean on a fan how fast do antibiotics work how to clean featherbed can i buy prevident toothpaste